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  • compare a string in two files

    - by Tarun
    I am trying to get the name of the user from one file and their corresponding details from my other file. I use the command awk -F : '{ print $1 }' user-name it gives me the list of all the user's. So now how can I match these names with the other file and get a output like: user-name id contact-details The format of the two files is like follows: 1.user-name Tarun:143 Rahul:148 Neeraj:149 2.user-details Tarun:[email protected] Neeraj:[email protected] Rahul:[email protected] what I'm trying to get is like: Neeraj:149:[email protected] Rahul:148:[email protected] Tarun:143:[email protected]

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  • Script to email files content

    - by Tarun
    I have created a shell script that takes backups everyday and emails its execution as successfull or unsuccessfull. Now I want that it send the contents of log file it creates with the mail as well. I have seen how to send file as attachement but I want to send the contents of the file as email message and not the file. Please Help. Its code is like #Email Settings Message_Success="Database Backup generated successfully" Message_Failure="Problem occured while generating Database Backup please verify" Subject="Database Backup Status Mail" Recipients="[email protected]" #Verify Backup Created if [ -f "$Path_Mysql_Dump" ]; then echo "Database Backup Created" >> $Path_Log_File echo "$Message_Success" | mail -s "$Subject" "$Recipients" else echo "Database Backup not created please verify the process will terminate" >> $Path_Log_File echo "$Message_Failure" | mail -s "$Subject" "$Recipients" exit -1 fi

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  • Geeks with Blogs acquired by Watson Technology Group

    - by Tarun Arora
    Just received the following email… It’s now official! Hello bloggers, you are receiving this email to let you know that Geeks with Blogs (http://geekswithblogs.net) has been acquired by my company, Watson Technology Group. Jeff Julian started the site in 2003 and since then him and John Alexander (AJI Software) have done a great job with the community. I am a long time friend of theirs and I was actually one of the first bloggers on the site in 2003. I am excited to take over the reins and I have a lot of plans to improve the blog platform and community. My goal is to make the site the #1 blogging site for all IT professionals. The site currently has over 3,000 bloggers and has received 75,000,000 website visitors over the last 5 years. Some of the planned improvements in the coming months: Overall look and feel upgrades to the site Improve editor for blog postings including support for code formatting and uploading images Mobile support and more responsive design templates Improve community side of the site to drive more traffic between blogs Highlight top articles and bloggers by redesigning the home page ... and lots of other things. One of the delicate balances I want to ensure is that each blogger can maintain their own identity and blog personality but at the same time be part of the community of bloggers. The community helps everyone receive more blog traffic and visibility. The blog templates need to be somewhere between Facebook and Myspace if you know what I mean. Since this website is designed to be a community, I would love to have your feedback and hear your ideas. Please submit idea via UserVoice at http://geekswithblogs.uservoice.com or email [email protected] at anytime. For those who are interested to know more about me, here is a link to my LinkedIn profile and you can follow me on Twitter @mattwatson81. LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/mattwatsonkc Thanks, Matt Watson Geeks with Blogs Member of Geeks with Blogs Unsubscribe tarun[email protected] from this list. Our mailing address is: GeeksWithBlogs,LLC 9201 Ward Parkway Suite 302 Kansas City, MO 64114

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  • Database Replication check script not running

    - by Tarun
    I'm trying to create a Database Replication checking script but I'm getting error while executing it. Here is the script #!/bin/bash PATH=/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin export PATH #Server Name Server="Test Server" #My Sql Username and Password User=root Password="a" #Maximum Slave Time Delay Delay="60" #File Path to store error and email the same Log_File=/tmp/replicationcheck.txt #Email Settings Subject="$Server Replication Error" Sender_Name=TestServer Recipients="[email protected]" #Mail Alert Function mailalert(){ sendmail -F $Sender_Name -it <<END_MESSAGE To: $Recipients Subject: $Subject $Message_Replication_Error `/bin/cat $Log_File` END_MESSAGE } #Show Slave Status Show_Slave_Status=`echo "show slave status \G;" | mysql -u $User -p$Password 2>&1` #Getting list of queries in mysql $Show_Slave_Status | grep "Last_" > $Log_File #Check if slave running $Show_Slave_Status | grep "Slave_IO_Running: No" if [ "$?" -eq "0" ]; then Message_Replication_Error="$Server Replication error please check. The Slave_IO_Running state is No." mailalert exit 1 else $Show_Slave_Status | grep "Slave_IO_Running: Connecting" if [ "$?" -eq "0" ]; then Message_Replication_Error="$Server Replication error please check. The Slave_IO_Running state is Connecting." mailalert exit 1 fi fi #Check if replication delayed Seconds_Behind_Master=$Show_Slave_Status | grep "Seconds_Behind_Master" | awk -F": " {' print $2 '} if [ "$Seconds_Behind_Master" -ge "$Delay" ]; then Message_Replication_Error="Replication Delayed by $Seconds_Behind_Master." mailalert else if [ "$Seconds_Behind_Master" = "NULL" ]; then Message_Replication_Error="$Server Replication error please check. The Seconds_Behind_Master state is NULL." mailalert fi fi

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  • Set up a TFS Server/Service demo environment in less than 1 minute now!

    - by Tarun Arora
    Release Notes – http://tfsdemosetup.codeplex.com/  | Download | Source Code | Report a Bug | Ideas To Demonstrate the capabilities of TFS 2012 Server/Service Task board you would need to set up TFS with some teams, a few team members, some sample stories, tasks, etc. That’s too many steps if you as me! Hi! My name is Tarun Arora, I am a Microsoft MVP in Visual Studio ALM & a Visual Studio ALM Ranger, as a consultant I have had to demo TFS Preview to potential customers several times a day. I usually create the team project during the demo to show off how quick and efficient it is, but setting up teams, team members, tasks usually takes longer I don’t prefer carrying out these steps during the demo. I have developed a .net based console application which uses the TFS API to create a standard demo environment saving me from all these manual steps. The console application reads the set up information from an XML file, leaving the setup process highly customizable. Figure 1 – Demo Dictionary, change values here for unique setup The console application today sets up, 1. Create a new Team 2. Set the team as the default team 3. Configure team settings      a. Set Backlog Iteration path      b. Set Team Iterations and start & finish dates      c. Set Team Area path 4. Add Team Members 5. Add Product Backlog Items & linked Tasks. Image 2 – The team website before (on the left) and after (on the right) running the console app Image 3 – Team configuration before (on left) and after (on right) with new team Demo and 2 members Image 4 – Iteration configuration before (on left) and after (on right) with new backlog iteration path & sprint dates set Image 5 – Area configuration (on left) and after (on right) with area path configured for the team   Image 6 – A demo ready Task Board and Task Board for Team Members Credits, - Mattias Sköld [Visual Studio ALM Ranger] – I have used TfsTeamTools to perform team creation & add members - Ivan Popek – TFS 2012 API blog posts had some fantastic reusable samples.  - Shai Raiten [Microsoft ALM MVP] – Great collection of posts on TFS API. Enjoy!

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  • New features in TFS Demo Setup 1.0.0.2

    - by Tarun Arora
    Release Notes – http://tfsdemosetup.codeplex.com/ | Download | Source Code | Report a Bug | Ideas Just pushed out the 2nd release of the TFS Demo setup on CodePlex, below a quick look at some of the new features/improvements in the tool… Details of the existing features can be found here. Feature 1 – Set up Work Items Queries as Team Favorites The task board looks cooler when the team favourite work item queries show up on the task board. The demo setup console application now has the ability to set up the work item queries as team favorites for you. If you want to see how you can add Team Favorites programmatically, refer to this blogpost here. Image 1 – Task board without Team Favorites Let’s see how the TFS Demo Setup application sets-up team favorites as part of the run… Open up the DemoDictionary.xml and you should be able to see the new node <TeamFavorites> this accepts multiple <TeamFavorite>. You simply need to specify the <Type> as Query and in the <Name> specify the name of the work item query that you would like added as a favorite. Image 2 – Highlighting the TeamFavorites block in DemoDictionary.xml So, when the demo set up application is run with the above config, work item queries “Blocked Tasks” and “Open Impediments” are added as team favorites. They then show up on the task board, as highlighted in the screen shot below. Image 3 – Team Favorites setup during the TFS demo setup app execution Feature 2 – Choose what you want to setup and exclude the rest I had a great feature request come in requesting the ability to exclude parts of the setup at the sole discretion of the executioner. To accommodate this, I have added an attribute with each block, the attribute “Run” accepts “true” or “false”. If you set the flag to true then at the time of execution that block would be considered for setup and if you set the flag to false, the block will be ignored during the setup. So, lets look at an example below… The attribute "Run” is set to true for TeamSettings, Team Favorites, TeamMembers and WorkItems. So, all of these would be setup as part of the demo setup application execution. Image 4 – New Attribute Run added to all blocks in DemoDictionary.xml If I did not want to recreate the team and did not want to add new work items but only wanted to add favorites and team members to the existing team “AgileChamps1” then I could simple run the application with below DemoDictionary.xml. Note – TeamSettings Run=”false” and WorkItems Run=”false”. Image 5 – TeamFavorites and TeamMembers set as true and others set to false Feature 3 – Usability Improvement If you try and assign a work item to a team member that does not exist then the application throws a nasty exception. This behaviour has now been changed, upon adding such a work item, the work items will be created and not assigned to any user. The work item id will be printed to the console making it simple for you to assign the work item manually. As you can see in the screen shot below, I am trying to assign the work item to a user “Tarun” and a user “v2” both are *not valid users in my team project collection* so the tool creates the work items and provides me the work item id and lets me know that since the user is invalid the work item could not be assigned to the user. Better user experience ae Image 6 – Behaviour if work item assigned to users are in valid users in team project That’s about it for the current release. I have some new features planned for the next release. Mean while if you have any ideas/comments please feel free to leave a comment. Stay tuned for more… Enjoy! Other posts on TFS Demo Setup can be found here.

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  • Upgrading VSIX extensions from VS2012 to VS2013

    - by Tarun Arora [Microsoft MVP]
    Originally posted on: http://geekswithblogs.net/TarunArora/archive/2013/06/27/upgrading-vsix-extensions-from-vs2012-to-vs2013.aspx  As consumers of your Visual Studio extensions start to move over to VS 2013, you will have to upgrade the Visual Studio extensions you build for Visual Studio 2012 to Visual Studio 2013 and republish to the Visual Studio extension gallery. Failing which, it will not be possible for your consumers to install and use your extensions on Visual Studio 2013.   Objective In this blog post, I’ll show you how simple it is to upgrade your Visual Studio 2012 extension to Visual Studio 2013. There aren’t any reported breaking changes between VS 2012 SDK and VS 2013 SDK, the upgrade usually involves, rebuilding the extension against VS 2013 SDK and updating the vsix manifest file.              Walkthrough Download the Visual Studio 2013 SDK - You will need to download the Visual Studio 2013 SDK in order to open up the Visual Studio extension project in Visual Studio 2013. The SDK can be downloaded from here. Install the SDK before you proceed.                2. Once the VS 2013 SDK has been installed, open up your package project. For the purposes of this blog post, I’ll open up the Avanade Extension – Software Inventory in Visual Studio 2013. You will notice that Visual Studio doesn’t load the project but let’s you know that the project needs to be Migrated.                  3. Right click the project and choose the option ‘Reload Project’ from the Context Menu.                  4. Choosing the Reload Project option brings up an upgrade window, telling you that the upgrade is a one way only upgrade i.e. the project will be changed to work with Visual Studio 2013 and you will not be able to open the project up in Visual Studio 2012. My recommendation would be to create a Visual Studio 2013 branch and upgrading the project in that branch only, so if you need to go back to Visual Studio 2012 project at some point, you have a handy reference in a separate branch.             5. Upon clicking Ok, the project is updated. See below, the following changes are made at the time of upgrade,           - The runtime version is updated in the Resources.Designer.cs file                      - The Minimum version of Visual Studio in the package project file is changed from 11.0 to 12.0                    6. Reference VS 2013 dll’s rather than VS 2012 dll’s. So reference Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Client.dll and Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Controls.dll from C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 12.0\Common7\IDE\ReferenceAssemblies\v2.0 and C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 12.0\Common7\IDE\ReferenceAssemblies\v4.5. If you have any other API references, then change the references to point to VS 2013 instead of VS 2012.                          7. Rebuild your solution to ensure there are no breaking changes. Success!                8. Update VSIX Manifest file (the file source.extnsion.vsixmanifest contains the meta data for your VSIX).          - Update the Install Targets from 11.0 to 12.0. This basically enforces that the extension can be installed on Visual Studio 2013 version of Visual Studio.                         - Update the Dependencies from Visual Studio MPF 11.0 to Visual Studio MPF 12.0              9. Rebuild the solution and open up the bin folder for the Package project and look for the file *.vsix file [Microsoft Visual Studio Extension].         - This is basically the installer for your extension.                 - Double click the installer to launch the installer wizard. Viola! You can see the package installation wizard opens up and gives you the option to install the extension for Visual Studio 2013.                    - Click Install to Continue                    - Note – If you run into the exception “23/06/2013 10:42:18 - Install Error : Microsoft.VisualStudio.ExtensionManager.InstallByMsiException: The InstalledByMSI element in extension Avanade Extensions cannot be 'true' when installing an extension through the Extensions and Updates Installer.  The element can only be 'true' when an MSI lays down the extension manifest file.” Ensure you have the option “This VSIX is installed by Windows Installer” unchecked in the Install Targets tab.        10. Verifying that the extension has installed correctly.           - Open Extension Manager and verify that the installed extension shows up in the extension manager “list of installed VSIX”.                      11. First Look at the updated Extension                         - The links have now been moved to the context menu, so to see the navigation links, you’ll have to right click on the icon and select the option from the context menu.                                        Note – The Avanade Extension being used in the demo has been developed by Utkarsh and Tarun. The Software Inventory Extension for Visual Studio 2012…  allows you to see the list of Software installed on the hosted build server right from with in Visual Studio,  the extension also allows you to export this list to excel. More details on how this has been implemented can be found here.   I hope you found this useful. In case you have any questions or feedback, feel free to reach out on Visual Studio extensibility MSDN forums or via Microsoft Visual Studio feedback forum. Thank you for taking the time out and reading this blog post. If you enjoyed the post, remember to subscribe to http://feeds.feedburner.com/TarunArora. Stay tuned!

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  • SOA Suite 11g Database Growth Management

    - by JuergenKress
    This whitepaper “Oracle SOA Suite 11g Database Growth Management”  has been written to highlight the need to implement an appropriate strategy to manage the growth the of SOA 11g database. The advice presented should facilitate better dialog between SOA and Database administrators when planning database and host requirements Whitepaper Oracle SOA Suite 11g Database Growth Management Advisor Webcast “Oracle SOA Suite 11g Database Growth Management” April 11th 2012 Author: Michael Bousamra Contributing Authors: Deepak Arora Sai Sudarsan Pogaru SOA Partner Community For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA Partner Community for registration please visit  www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center. Blog Twitter LinkedIn Mix Forum Technorati Tags: SOA Community Forum,SOA Specialization,purging,Michael Bousamra Contributing Authors: Deepak Arora Sai Sudarsan Pogaru,SOA Suite 11g Database Growth Management

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  • How to uncompress the NSData in Php which is compressed using zlib in Iphone

    - by Gaurav Arora
    Hello Everyone, I am quite new to Iphone development , so please bear me if I ask some some common questions. In my application I have to transfer data from my Iphone app to a PHP server and for this I have to compress the NSdata in my Iphone app and then pass it on to the PHP server and then Uncompress it in PHP and process the data sent by Iphone in PHP. For compressing the data in Iphone I have used zlib library.Now on PHP side I want to uncompress this data , but I am unable to do so. Can anyone help me in uncompressing this data in PHP. Thanks in Advance. Gaurav Arora

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  • How do I uncompress data in PHP which was originally compressed using zlib?

    - by Gaurav Arora
    Hello Everyone, I am quite new to Iphone development , so please bear me if I ask some some common questions. In my application I have to transfer data from my Iphone app to a PHP server and for this I have to compress the NSdata in my Iphone app and then pass it on to the PHP server and then Uncompress it in PHP and process the data sent by Iphone in PHP. For compressing the data in Iphone I have used zlib library.Now on PHP side I want to uncompress this data , but I am unable to do so. Can anyone help me in uncompressing this data in PHP. Thanks in Advance. Gaurav Arora

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  • TFS 2010 SDK: Connecting to TFS 2010 Programmatically&ndash;Part 1

    - by Tarun Arora
    Technorati Tags: Team Foundation Server 2010,TFS 2010 SDK,TFS API,TFS Programming,TFS ALM   Download Working Demo Great! You have reached that point where you would like to extend TFS 2010. The first step is to connect to TFS programmatically. 1. Download TFS 2010 SDK => http://visualstudiogallery.msdn.microsoft.com/25622469-19d8-4959-8e5c-4025d1c9183d?SRC=VSIDE 2. Alternatively you can also download this from the visual studio extension manager 3. Create a new Windows Forms Application project and add reference to TFS Common and client dlls Note - If Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Client and Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Common do not appear on the .NET tab of the References dialog box, use the Browse tab to add the assemblies. You can find them at %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\Common7\IDE\ReferenceAssemblies\v2.0. using Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Client; using Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Framework.Client; using Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Framework.Common;   4. There are several ways to connect to TFS, the two classes of interest are, Option 1 – Class – TfsTeamProjectCollectionClass namespace Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Client { public class TfsTeamProjectCollection : TfsConnection { public TfsTeamProjectCollection(RegisteredProjectCollection projectCollection); public TfsTeamProjectCollection(Uri uri); public TfsTeamProjectCollection(RegisteredProjectCollection projectCollection, IdentityDescriptor identityToImpersonate); public TfsTeamProjectCollection(Uri uri, ICredentials credentials); public TfsTeamProjectCollection(Uri uri, ICredentialsProvider credentialsProvider); public TfsTeamProjectCollection(Uri uri, IdentityDescriptor identityToImpersonate); public TfsTeamProjectCollection(RegisteredProjectCollection projectCollection, ICredentials credentials, ICredentialsProvider credentialsProvider); public TfsTeamProjectCollection(Uri uri, ICredentials credentials, ICredentialsProvider credentialsProvider); public TfsTeamProjectCollection(RegisteredProjectCollection projectCollection, ICredentials credentials, ICredentialsProvider credentialsProvider, IdentityDescriptor identityToImpersonate); public TfsTeamProjectCollection(Uri uri, ICredentials credentials, ICredentialsProvider credentialsProvider, IdentityDescriptor identityToImpersonate); public override CatalogNode CatalogNode { get; } public TfsConfigurationServer ConfigurationServer { get; internal set; } public override string Name { get; } public static Uri GetFullyQualifiedUriForName(string name); protected override object GetServiceInstance(Type serviceType, object serviceInstance); protected override object InitializeTeamFoundationObject(string fullName, object instance); } } Option 2 – Class – TfsConfigurationServer namespace Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Client { public class TfsConfigurationServer : TfsConnection { public TfsConfigurationServer(RegisteredConfigurationServer application); public TfsConfigurationServer(Uri uri); public TfsConfigurationServer(RegisteredConfigurationServer application, IdentityDescriptor identityToImpersonate); public TfsConfigurationServer(Uri uri, ICredentials credentials); public TfsConfigurationServer(Uri uri, ICredentialsProvider credentialsProvider); public TfsConfigurationServer(Uri uri, IdentityDescriptor identityToImpersonate); public TfsConfigurationServer(RegisteredConfigurationServer application, ICredentials credentials, ICredentialsProvider credentialsProvider); public TfsConfigurationServer(Uri uri, ICredentials credentials, ICredentialsProvider credentialsProvider); public TfsConfigurationServer(RegisteredConfigurationServer application, ICredentials credentials, ICredentialsProvider credentialsProvider, IdentityDescriptor identityToImpersonate); public TfsConfigurationServer(Uri uri, ICredentials credentials, ICredentialsProvider credentialsProvider, IdentityDescriptor identityToImpersonate); public override CatalogNode CatalogNode { get; } public override string Name { get; } protected override object GetServiceInstance(Type serviceType, object serviceInstance); public TfsTeamProjectCollection GetTeamProjectCollection(Guid collectionId); protected override object InitializeTeamFoundationObject(string fullName, object instance); } }   Note – The TeamFoundationServer class is obsolete. Use the TfsTeamProjectCollection or TfsConfigurationServer classes to talk to a 2010 Team Foundation Server. In order to talk to a 2005 or 2008 Team Foundation Server use the TfsTeamProjectCollection class. 5. Sample code for programmatically connecting to TFS 2010 using the TFS 2010 API How do i know what the URI of my TFS server is, Note – You need to be have Team Project Collection view details permission in order to connect, expect to receive an authorization failure message if you do not have sufficient permissions. Case 1: Connect by Uri string _myUri = @"https://tfs.codeplex.com:443/tfs/tfs30"; TfsConfigurationServer configurationServer = TfsConfigurationServerFactory.GetConfigurationServer(new Uri(_myUri)); Case 2: Connect by Uri, prompt for credentials string _myUri = @"https://tfs.codeplex.com:443/tfs/tfs30"; TfsConfigurationServer configurationServer = TfsConfigurationServerFactory.GetConfigurationServer(new Uri(_myUri), new UICredentialsProvider()); configurationServer.EnsureAuthenticated(); Case 3: Connect by Uri, custom credentials In order to use this method of connectivity you need to implement the interface ICredentailsProvider public class ConnectByImplementingCredentialsProvider : ICredentialsProvider { public ICredentials GetCredentials(Uri uri, ICredentials iCredentials) { return new NetworkCredential("UserName", "Password", "Domain"); } public void NotifyCredentialsAuthenticated(Uri uri) { throw new ApplicationException("Unable to authenticate"); } } And now consume the implementation of the interface, string _myUri = @"https://tfs.codeplex.com:443/tfs/tfs30"; ConnectByImplementingCredentialsProvider connect = new ConnectByImplementingCredentialsProvider(); ICredentials iCred = new NetworkCredential("UserName", "Password", "Domain"); connect.GetCredentials(new Uri(_myUri), iCred); TfsConfigurationServer configurationServer = TfsConfigurationServerFactory.GetConfigurationServer(new Uri(_myUri), connect); configurationServer.EnsureAuthenticated();   6. Programmatically query TFS 2010 using the TFS SDK for all Team Project Collections and retrieve all Team Projects and output the display name and description of each team project. CatalogNode catalogNode = configurationServer.CatalogNode; ReadOnlyCollection<CatalogNode> tpcNodes = catalogNode.QueryChildren( new Guid[] { CatalogResourceTypes.ProjectCollection }, false, CatalogQueryOptions.None); // tpc = Team Project Collection foreach (CatalogNode tpcNode in tpcNodes) { Guid tpcId = new Guid(tpcNode.Resource.Properties["InstanceId"]); TfsTeamProjectCollection tpc = configurationServer.GetTeamProjectCollection(tpcId); // Get catalog of tp = 'Team Projects' for the tpc = 'Team Project Collection' var tpNodes = tpcNode.QueryChildren( new Guid[] { CatalogResourceTypes.TeamProject }, false, CatalogQueryOptions.None); foreach (var p in tpNodes) { Debug.Write(Environment.NewLine + " Team Project : " + p.Resource.DisplayName + " - " + p.Resource.Description + Environment.NewLine); } }   Output   You can download a working demo that uses TFS SDK 2010 to programmatically connect to TFS 2010. Screen Shots of the attached demo application, Share this post :

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  • Install Quartz.Net as a windows service and Test installation

    - by Tarun Arora
    In this blog post I’ll be covering, 01: Where to download Quartz.net from 02: How to install Quartz.net as a Windows service 03: Test the Quartz.net Installation If you are new to Quartz.net I would recommend reading the blog post on a brief introduction to Quartz.net. 01 – Where to download Quartz.net? http://sourceforge.net/projects/quartznet/files/quartznet/       Currently version  Quartz.Net 2.0.1 is the recommended download version. 02 – How to install Quartz.net as a Windows service         Go to the download location and unzip the Quartz.net package Navigate to the folder Quartz.Net \ Server \ bin – This is where you will find different .net version installers of the quartz.net packages. For example in the screen shot above, you can see the Quartz.net .net 3.5 and .net 4 packages. Open up the Quartz.net .net 4.0 folder, this folder contains the files you need to install Quartz.net as a windows service Copy the contents of the folder Downloads\Quartz.NET-2.0.1\server\bin\4.0 to the folder %program files%\Quartz.net   5. Open up a new CMD as an administrator and run the below command to install Quartz.net as a windows service /> Quartz.Server.exe install 6. How do I know that Quartz.Net service has installed as a Windows service? Go to run prompt and type ‘services.msc’ you should now see all the windows services installed on your machine. Navigate down to look for Quartz.Net. The service installs itself as an automatic startup Type and log on as ‘Local System’. You can easily change this to your prefer account that you would like to run the service as. If you wanted to name the Quartz service something else then that’s also possible… Can I change the default display name of the quartz.net windows service? Yes, you can! Navigate to C:\Program Files (x86)\Quartz.Net\ and open up the config file ‘quartz.config’ - You can change the instance name - You can change the default thread count of 10 - The port that the service listens to (by default this is port 555) A blog post on more configuration details can be found here. 03 – Test Quartz.Net windows service installation So, I have installed Quartz.Net as a windows service, how do I test whether my installation has been successful. Open up cmd as an administrator and run the below command, C:\Program Files (x86)\Quartz.Net> Quartz.Server.exe –i Since by default the Quartz.net windows service writes INFO level diagnostics (this can be changed from Quartz.Server.exe.config) you should see the service information show up on the console. For instance in the example above I can see that the service is running in a NON CLUSTERED mode, its currently not started and is currently in standby mode with 0 number of jobs executed so far… This was second in the series of posts on enterprise scheduling using Quartz.net, in the next post I’ll be covering how to run your first scheduled task using Quartz.net windows service. Thank you for taking the time out and reading this blog post. If you enjoyed the post, remember to subscribe to http://feeds.feedburner.com/TarunArora. Stay tuned!

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  • Quartz.Net Writing your first Hello World Job

    - by Tarun Arora
    In this blog post I’ll be covering, 01: A few things to consider before you should schedule a Job using Quartz.Net 02: Setting up your solution to use Quartz.Net API 03: Quartz.Net configuration 04: Writing & scheduling a hello world job with Quartz.Net If you are new to Quartz.Net I would recommend going through, A brief introduction to Quartz.net Walkthrough of Installing & Testing Quartz.Net as a Windows Service A few things to consider before you should schedule a Job using Quartz.Net - An instance of the scheduler service - A trigger - And last but not the least a job For example, if I wanted to schedule a script to run on the server, I should be jotting down answers to the below questions, a. Considering there are multiple machines set up with Quartz.Net windows service, how can I choose the instance of Quartz.Net where I want my script to be run b. What will trigger the execution of the job c. How often do I want the job to run d. Do I want the job to run right away or start after a delay or may be have the job start at a specific time e. What will happen to my job if Quartz.Net windows service is reset f. Do I want multiple instances of this job to run concurrently g. Can I pass parameters to the job being executed by Quartz.Net windows service Setting up your solution to use Quartz.Net API 1. Create a new C# Console Application project and call it “HelloWorldQuartzDotNet” and add a reference to Quartz.Net.dll. I use the NuGet Package Manager to add the reference. This can be done by right clicking references and choosing Manage NuGet packages, from the Nuget Package Manager choose Online from the left panel and in the search box on the right search for Quartz.Net. Click Install on the package “Quartz” (Screen shot below). 2. Right click the project and choose Add New Item. Add a new Interface and call it ‘IScheduledJob.cs’. Mark the Interface public and add the signature for Run. Your interface should look like below. namespace HelloWorldQuartzDotNet { public interface IScheduledJob { void Run(); } }   3. Right click the project and choose Add new Item. Add a class and call it ‘Scheduled Job’. Use this class to implement the interface ‘IscheduledJob.cs’. Look at the pseudo code in the implementation of the Run method. using System; namespace HelloWorldQuartzDotNet { class ScheduledJob : IScheduledJob { public void Run() { // Get an instance of the Quartz.Net scheduler // Define the Job to be scheduled // Associate a trigger with the Job // Assign the Job to the scheduler throw new NotImplementedException(); } } }   I’ll get into the implementation in more detail, but let’s look at the minimal configuration a sample configuration file for Quartz.Net service to work. Quartz.Net configuration In the App.Config file copy the below configuration <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?> <configuration> <configSections> <section name="quartz" type="System.Configuration.NameValueSectionHandler, System, Version=1.0.5000.0,Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089" /> </configSections> <quartz> <add key="quartz.scheduler.instanceName" value="ServerScheduler" /> <add key="quartz.threadPool.type" value="Quartz.Simpl.SimpleThreadPool, Quartz" /> <add key="quartz.threadPool.threadCount" value="10" /> <add key="quartz.threadPool.threadPriority" value="2" /> <add key="quartz.jobStore.misfireThreshold" value="60000" /> <add key="quartz.jobStore.type" value="Quartz.Simpl.RAMJobStore, Quartz" /> </quartz> </configuration>   As you can see in the configuration above, I have included the instance name of the quartz scheduler, the thread pool type, count and priority, the job store type has been defined as RAM. You have the option of configuring that to ADO.NET JOB store. More details here. Writing & scheduling a hello world job with Quartz.Net Once fully implemented the ScheduleJob.cs class should look like below. I’ll walk you through the details of the implementation… - GetScheduler() uses the name of the quartz.net and listens on localhost port 555 to try and connect to the quartz.net windows service. - Run() an attempt is made to start the scheduler in case it is in standby mode - I have defined a job “WriteHelloToConsole” (that’s the name of the job), this job belongs to the group “IT”. Think of group as a logical grouping feature. It helps you bucket jobs into groups. Quartz.Net gives you the ability to pause or delete all jobs in a group (We’ll look at that in some of the future posts). I have requested for recovery of this job in case the quartz.net service fails over to the other node in the cluster. The jobType is “HelloWorldJob”. This is the class that would be called to execute the job. More details on this below… - I have defined a trigger for my job. I have called the trigger “WriteHelloToConsole”. The Trigger works on the cron schedule “0 0/1 * 1/1 * ? *” which means fire the job once every minute. I would recommend that you look at www.cronmaker.com a free and great website to build and parse cron expressions. The trigger has a priority 1. So, if two jobs are run at the same time, this trigger will have high priority and will be run first. - Use the Job and Trigger to schedule the job. This method returns a datetime offeset. It is possible to see the next fire time for the job from this variable. using System.Collections.Specialized; using System.Configuration; using Quartz; using System; using Quartz.Impl; namespace HelloWorldQuartzDotNet { class ScheduledJob : IScheduledJob { public void Run() { // Get an instance of the Quartz.Net scheduler var schd = GetScheduler(); // Start the scheduler if its in standby if (!schd.IsStarted) schd.Start(); // Define the Job to be scheduled var job = JobBuilder.Create<HelloWorldJob>() .WithIdentity("WriteHelloToConsole", "IT") .RequestRecovery() .Build(); // Associate a trigger with the Job var trigger = (ICronTrigger)TriggerBuilder.Create() .WithIdentity("WriteHelloToConsole", "IT") .WithCronSchedule("0 0/1 * 1/1 * ? *") // visit http://www.cronmaker.com/ Queues the job every minute .WithPriority(1) .Build(); // Assign the Job to the scheduler var schedule = schd.ScheduleJob(job, trigger); Console.WriteLine("Job '{0}' scheduled for '{1}'", "", schedule.ToString("r")); } // Get an instance of the Quartz.Net scheduler private static IScheduler GetScheduler() { try { var properties = new NameValueCollection(); properties["quartz.scheduler.instanceName"] = "ServerScheduler"; // set remoting expoter properties["quartz.scheduler.proxy"] = "true"; properties["quartz.scheduler.proxy.address"] = string.Format("tcp://{0}:{1}/{2}", "localhost", "555", "QuartzScheduler"); // Get a reference to the scheduler var sf = new StdSchedulerFactory(properties); return sf.GetScheduler(); } catch (Exception ex) { Console.WriteLine("Scheduler not available: '{0}'", ex.Message); throw; } } } }   The above highlighted values have been taken from the Quartz.config file, this file is available in the Quartz.net server installation directory. Implementation of my HelloWorldJob Class below. The HelloWorldJob class gets called to execute the job “WriteHelloToConsole” using the once every minute trigger set up for this job. The HelloWorldJob is a class that implements the interface IJob. I’ll walk you through the details of the implementation… - context is passed to the method execute by the quartz.net scheduler service. This has everything you need to pull out the job, trigger specific information. - for example. I have pulled out the value of the jobKey name, the fire time and next fire time. using Quartz; using System; namespace HelloWorldQuartzDotNet { class HelloWorldJob : IJob { public void Execute(IJobExecutionContext context) { try { Console.WriteLine("Job {0} fired @ {1} next scheduled for {2}", context.JobDetail.Key, context.FireTimeUtc.Value.ToString("r"), context.NextFireTimeUtc.Value.ToString("r")); Console.WriteLine("Hello World!"); } catch (Exception ex) { Console.WriteLine("Failed: {0}", ex.Message); } } } }   I’ll add a call to call the scheduler in the Main method in Program.cs using System; using System.Threading; namespace HelloWorldQuartzDotNet { class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { try { var sj = new ScheduledJob(); sj.Run(); Thread.Sleep(10000 * 10000); } catch (Exception ex) { Console.WriteLine("Failed: {0}", ex.Message); } } } }   This was third in the series of posts on enterprise scheduling using Quartz.net, in the next post I’ll be covering how to pass parameters to the scheduled task scheduled on Quartz.net windows service. Thank you for taking the time out and reading this blog post. If you enjoyed the post, remember to subscribe to http://feeds.feedburner.com/TarunArora. Stay tuned!

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  • How to Troubleshoot TFS Build Server Failure?

    - by Tarun Arora
    Ever found your self in this helpless situation where you think you have tried every possible suggestion on the internet to bring the build server back but it just won’t work. Well some times before hunting around for a solution it is important to understand what the problem is, if the error messages in the build logs don’t seem to help you can always enable tracing on the build server to get more information on what could possibly be the root cause of failure. In this blog post today I’ll be showing you how to enable tracing on, - TFS 2010/11 Server - Build Server - Client Enable Tracing on Team Foundation Server 2010/2011 On the Team Foundation Server navigate to C:\Program Files\Microsoft Team Foundation Server 2010\Application Tier\Web Services, right click web.config and from the context menu select edit.          Search for the <appSettings> node in the config file and set the value of the key ‘traceWriter’ to true.          In the <System.diagnostics> tag set the value of switches from 0 to 4 to set the trace level to maximum to write diagnostics level trace information.          Restart the TFS Application pool to force this change to take effect. The application pool restart will impact any one using the TFS server at present. Note - It is recommended that you do not make any changes to the TFS production application server, this can have serious consequences and can even jeopardize the installation of your server.          Download the Debug view tool from http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896647.aspx and set it to capture “Global Events”. Perform any actions in the Team Explorer on the client machine, you should be able to see a series of trace data in the debug view tool now.         Enable Tracing on Build Controller/Agents Log on to the Build Controller/Agent and Navigate to the directory C:\Program Files\Microsoft Team Foundation Server 2010\Tools         Look for the configuration file ‘TFSBuildServiceHost.exe.config’ if it is not already there create a new text file and rename it to ‘TFSBuildServiceHost.exe.config’         To Enable tracing uncomment the <system.diagnostics> and paste the snippet below if it is not already there. <configuration> <system.diagnostics> <switches> <add name="BuildServiceTraceLevel" value="4"/> </switches> <trace autoflush="true" indentsize="4"> <listeners> <add name="myListener" type="Microsoft.TeamFoundation.TeamFoundationTextWriterTraceListener, Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Common, Version=10.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a" initializeData="c:\logs\TFSBuildServiceHost.exe.log" /> <remove name="Default" /> </listeners> </trace> </system.diagnostics> </configuration> The highlighted path above is where the Log file will be created. If the folder is not already there then create the folder, also, make sure that the account running the build service has access to write to this folder.         Restart the build Controller/Agent service from the administration console (or net stop tfsbuildservicehost & net start tfsbuildservicehost) in order for the new setting to be picked up.         Enable TFS Tracing on the Client Machine On the client machine, shut down Visual Studio, navigate to C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\Common 7\IDE          Search for devenv.exe.config, make a backup copy of the config file and right click the file and from the context menu select edit. If its not already there create this file.          Edit devenv.exe.config by adding the below code snippet before the last </configuration> tag <system.diagnostics> <switches> <add name="TeamFoundationSoapProxy" value="4" /> <add name="VersionControl" value="4" /> </switches> <trace autoflush="true" indentsize="3"> <listeners> <add name="myListener" type="Microsoft.TeamFoundation.TeamFoundationTextWriterTraceListener,Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Common, Version=10.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a" initializeData="c:\tf.log" /> <add name="perfListener" type="Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Client.PerfTraceListener, Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Client, Version=10.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a"/> </listeners> </trace> </system.diagnostics> The highlighted path above is where the Log file will be created. If the folder is not already there then create the folder. Start Visual Studio and after a bit of activity you should be able to see the new log file being created on the folder specified in the config file. Other Resources Below are some Key resource you might like to review. I would highly recommend the documentation, walkthroughs and videos available on MSDN.   Thank you for taking the time out and reading this blog post. If you enjoyed the post, remember to subscribe to http://feeds.feedburner.com/TarunArora. Have you come across an interesting one to one with the build server, please share your experience here. Questions/Feedback/Suggestions, etc please leave a comment. Thank You! Share this post : CodeProject

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  • Are you cashing in on the MVP complimentary subscriptions ?

    - by Tarun Arora
    The two most asked questions in the Microsoft technology communities around the Microsoft MVP program are, 1. How do I become a Microsoft MVP? 2. What benefits do I get as an MVP? The answer to the first question has been well answered here. In this blog post, I’ll try and answer the second question.           Please find a comprehensive list of Not for Resale personal subscriptions of various products that Microsoft MVP’s are eligible for Product Description Details JetBrains Resharper, dotTrace, dotCover & WebStorm  https://www.jetbrains.com/resharper/buy/mvp.html RedGate Sql server development, database administration, .net development, azure development (merged with Cerebrata), mySQL development, Oracle development http://www.red-gate.com/community/mvp-program Pluralsight Pluralsight on demand training http://blog.pluralsight.com/2011/02/28/pluralsight-for-mvp/ Cerebrata Cloud storage studio and Azure Diagnostic Manager (part of redgate now) https://www.cerebrata.com/Offers/mvp.aspx Telerik Telerik Ultimate collection & Telerik TeamPulse http://blogs.telerik.com/blogs/posts/11-03-01/telerik-gift-for-microsoft-mvps.aspx Developer Express DevEx controls http://www.devexpress.com/Home/Community/mvp.xml InnerWorking 600 hours of .net training catalogue http://www.innerworkings.com/mvp Typemock Typemock Isolator, Typemock Isolator for Sharepoint developers, Typemock Isolator for web developers, TestDriven.NET http://www.typemock.com/mvp SpeakFlow A suite of tools for creating, managing, and delivering non-linear presentations http://www.speakflow.com/ TechSmith Camtasia Studio, SnagIt, screen cast http://www.techsmith.com/camtasia.html Altova Altova XML spy http://www.altova.com/xml-editor/ Visual SVN VisualSVN Subversion integration plug-in for Visual Studio http://www.visualsvn.com/visualsvn/purchase/mvp/ PreEmptive Solution Professional PreEmptive Analytics, Dotfuscator http://www.preemptive.com/landing/mvp Armadillo Armadillo Adaptive Bug Prevention http://www.armadilloverdrive.com/ IS Decisions NFR license to Userlock, RemoteExec, FileAudit & WinReporter http://www.isdecisions.com/download/mvp-mct-program.htm Idera SQL tools http://www.idera.com/Content/Home.aspx West Wind Help Builder Help builder solution http://www.west-wind.com/weblog/posts/2005/Mar/09/Are-you-a-Microsoft-MVP-Get-a-FREE-copy-of-West-Wind-Html-Help-Builder Bamboo Sharepoint tools http://community.bamboosolutions.com/blogs/partner-advantage-program/archive/2008/08/01/partner-advantage-program-mvp.aspx Nitriq Nitriq code analysis http://blog.nitriq.com/FreeLicensesForMicrosoftMVPs.aspx ByteScout Components, Libraries and Developer Tools http://bytescout.com/buy/purchase_nfr_for_mvp.html YourKit Java and .net Profiler http://yourkit.com/.net/profiler/index.jsp Aspose .NET components http://www.aspose.com/corporate/community/2012_05_08_nfr-licenses-for-community-leaders.aspx Apart from google bing fu; stackoverflow and breathtech were a great help in compiling the above list. If you know of any other benefits, offers or complimentary subscriptions on offer for MVPs not cover in the list above, please add to the comment thread and I’ll have it updated in the list. Enjoy

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  • Load and Web Performance Testing using Visual Studio Ultimate 2010-Part 3

    - by Tarun Arora
    Welcome back once again, in Part 1 of Load and Web Performance Testing using Visual Studio 2010 I talked about why Performance Testing the application is important, the test tools available in Visual Studio Ultimate 2010 and various test rig topologies, in Part 2 of Load and Web Performance Testing using Visual Studio 2010 I discussed the details of web performance & load tests as well as why it’s important to follow a goal based pattern while performance testing your application. In part 3 I’ll be discussing Test Result Analysis, Test Result Drill through, Test Report Generation, Test Run Comparison, Asp.net Profiler and some closing thoughts. Test Results – I see some creepy worms! In Part 2 we put together a web performance test and a load test, lets run the test to see load test to see how the Web site responds to the load simulation. While the load test is running you will be able to see close to real time analysis in the Load Test Analyser window. You can use the Load Test Analyser to conduct load test analysis in three ways: Monitor a running load test - A condensed set of the performance counter data is maintained in memory. To prevent the results memory requirements from growing unbounded, up to 200 samples for each performance counter are maintained. This includes 100 evenly spaced samples that span the current elapsed time of the run and the most recent 100 samples.         After the load test run is completed - The test controller spools all collected performance counter data to a database while the test is running. Additional data, such as timing details and error details, is loaded into the database when the test completes. The performance data for a completed test is loaded from the database and analysed by the Load Test Analyser. Below you can see a screen shot of the summary view, this provides key results in a format that is compact and easy to read. You can also print the load test summary, this is generated after the test has completed or been stopped.         Analyse the load test results of a previously run load test – We’ll see this in the section where i discuss comparison between two test runs. The performance counters can be plotted on the graphs. You also have the option to highlight a selected part of the test and view details, drill down to the user activity chart where you can hover over to see more details of the test run.   Generate Report => Test Run Comparisons The level of reports you can generate using the Load Test Analyser is astonishing. You have the option to create excel reports and conduct side by side analysis of two test results or to track trend analysis. The tools also allows you to export the graph data either to MS Excel or to a CSV file. You can view the ASP.NET profiler report to conduct further analysis as well. View Data and Diagnostic Attachments opens the Choose Diagnostic Data Adapter Attachment dialog box to select an adapter to analyse the result type. For example, you can select an IntelliTrace adapter, click OK and open the IntelliTrace summary for the test agent that was used in the load test.   Compare results This creates a set of reports that compares the data from two load test results using tables and bar charts. I have taken these screen shots from the MSDN documentation, I would highly recommend exploring the wealth of knowledge available on MSDN. Leaving Thoughts While load testing the application with an excessive load for a longer duration of time, i managed to bring the IIS to its knees by piling up a huge queue of requests waiting to be processed. This clearly means that the IIS had run out of threads as all the threads were busy processing existing request, one easy way of fixing this is by increasing the default number of allocated threads, but this might escalate the problem. The better suggestion is to try and drill down to the actual root cause of the problem. When ever the garbage collection runs it stops processing any pages so all requests that come in during that period are queued up, but realistically the garbage collection completes in fraction of a a second. To understand this better lets look at the .net heap, it is divided into large heap and small heap, anything greater than 85kB in size will be allocated to the Large object heap, the Large object heap is non compacting and remember large objects are expensive to move around, so if you are allocating something in the large object heap, make sure that you really need it! The small object heap on the other hand is divided into generations, so all objects that are supposed to be short-lived are suppose to live in Gen-0 and the long living objects eventually move to Gen-2 as garbage collection goes through.  As you can see in the picture below all < 85 KB size objects are first assigned to Gen-0, when Gen-0 fills up and a new object comes in and finds Gen-0 full, the garbage collection process is started, the process checks for all the dead objects and assigns them as the valid candidate for deletion to free up memory and promotes all the remaining objects in Gen-0 to Gen-1. So in the future when ever you clean up Gen-1 you have to clean up Gen-0 as well. When you fill up Gen – 0 again, all of Gen – 1 dead objects are drenched and rest are moved to Gen-2 and Gen-0 objects are moved to Gen-1 to free up Gen-0, but by this time your Garbage collection process has started to take much more time than it usually takes. Now as I mentioned earlier when garbage collection is being run all page requests that come in during that period are queued up. Does this explain why possibly page requests are getting queued up, apart from this it could also be the case that you are waiting for a long running database process to complete.      Lets explore the heap a bit more… What is really a case of crisis is when the objects are living long enough to make it to Gen-2 and then dying, this is definitely a high cost operation. But sometimes you need objects in memory, for example when you cache data you hold on to the objects because you need to use them right across the user session, which is acceptable. But if you wanted to see what extreme caching can do to your server then write a simple application that chucks in a lot of data in cache, run a load test over it for about 10-15 minutes, forcing a lot of data in memory causing the heap to run out of memory. If you get to such a state where you start running out of memory the IIS as a mode of recovery restarts the worker process. It is great way to free up all your memory in the heap but this would clear the cache. The problem with this is if the customer had 10 items in their shopping basket and that data was stored in the application cache, the user basket will now be empty forcing them either to get frustrated and go to a competitor website or if the customer is really patient, give it another try! How can you address this, well two ways of addressing this; 1. Workaround – A x86 bit processor only allows a maximum of 4GB of RAM, this means the machine effectively has around 3.4 GB of RAM available, the OS needs about 1.5 GB of RAM to run efficiently, the IIS and .net framework also need their share of memory, leaving you a heap of around 800 MB to play with. Because Team builds by default build your application in ‘Compile as any mode’ it means the application is build such that it will run in x86 bit mode if run on a x86 bit processor and run in a x64 bit mode if run on a x64 but processor. The problem with this is not all applications are really x64 bit compatible specially if you are using com objects or external libraries. So, as a quick win if you compiled your application in x86 bit mode by changing the compile as any selection to compile as x86 in the team build, you will be able to run your application on a x64 bit machine in x86 bit mode (WOW – By running Windows on Windows) and what that means is, you could use 8GB+ worth of RAM, if you take away everything else your application will roughly get a heap size of at least 4 GB to play with, which is immense. If you need a heap size of more than 4 GB you have either build a software for NASA or there is something fundamentally wrong in your application. 2. Solution – Now that you have put a workaround in place the IIS will not restart the worker process that regularly, which means you can take a breather and start working to get to the root cause of this memory leak. But this begs a question “How do I Identify possible memory leaks in my application?” Well i won’t say that there is one single tool that can tell you where the memory leak is, but trust me, ‘Performance Profiling’ is a great start point, it definitely gets you started in the right direction, let’s have a look at how. Performance Wizard - Start the Performance Wizard and select Instrumentation, this lets you measure function call counts and timings. Before running the performance session right click the performance session settings and chose properties from the context menu to bring up the Performance session properties page and as shown in the screen shot below, check the check boxes in the group ‘.NET memory profiling collection’ namely ‘Collect .NET object allocation information’ and ‘Also collect the .NET Object lifetime information’.    Now if you fire off the profiling session on your pages you will notice that the results allows you to view ‘Object Lifetime’ which shows you the number of objects that made it to Gen-0, Gen-1, Gen-2, Large heap, etc. Another great feature about the profile is that if your application has > 5% cases where objects die right after making to the Gen-2 storage a threshold alert is generated to alert you. Since you have the option to also view the most expensive methods and by capturing the IntelliTrace data you can drill in to narrow down to the line of code that is the root cause of the problem. Well now that we have seen how crucial memory management is and how easy Visual Studio Ultimate 2010 makes it for us to identify and reproduce the problem with the best of breed tools in the product. Caching One of the main ways to improve performance is Caching. Which basically means you tell the web server that instead of going to the database for each request you keep the data in the webserver and when the user asks for it you serve it from the webserver itself. BUT that can have consequences! Let’s look at some code, trust me caching code is not very intuitive, I define a cache key for almost all searches made through the common search page and cache the results. The approach works fine, first time i get the data from the database and second time data is served from the cache, significant performance improvement, EXCEPT when two users try to do the same operation and run into each other. But it is easy to handle this by adding the lock as you can see in the snippet below. So, as long as a user comes in and finds that the cache is empty, the user locks and starts to get the cache no more concurrency issues. But lets say you are processing 10 requests per second, by the time i have locked the operation to get the results from the database, 9 other users came in and found that the cache key is null so after i have come out and populated the cache they will still go in to get the results again. The application will still be faster because the next set of 10 users and so on would continue to get data from the cache. BUT if we added another null check after locking to build the cache and before actual call to the db then the 9 users who follow me would not make the extra trip to the database at all and that would really increase the performance, but didn’t i say that the code won’t be very intuitive, may be you should leave a comment you don’t want another developer to come in and think what a fresher why is he checking for the cache key null twice !!! The downside of caching is, you are storing the data outside of the database and the data could be wrong because the updates applied to the database would make the data cached at the web server out of sync. So, how do you invalidate the cache? Well if you only had one way of updating the data lets say only one entry point to the data update you can write some logic to say that every time new data is entered set the cache object to null. But this approach will not work as soon as you have several ways of feeding data to the system or your system is scaled out across a farm of web servers. The perfect solution to this is Micro Caching which means you cache the query for a set time duration and invalidate the cache after that set duration. The advantage is every time the user queries for that data with in the time span for which you have cached the results there are no calls made to the database and the data is served right from the server which makes the response immensely quick. Now figuring out the appropriate time span for which you micro cache the query results really depends on the application. Lets say your website gets 10 requests per second, if you retain the cache results for even 1 minute you will have immense performance gains. You would reduce 90% hits to the database for searching. Ever wondered why when you go to e-bookers.com or xpedia.com or yatra.com to book a flight and you click on the book button because the fare seems too exciting and you get an error message telling you that the fare is not valid any more. Yes, exactly => That is a cache failure! These travel sites or price compare engines are not going to hit the database every time you hit the compare button instead the results will be served from the cache, because the query results are micro cached, its a perfect trade-off, by micro caching the results the site gains 100% performance benefits but every once in a while annoys a customer because the fare has expired. But the trade off works in the favour of these sites as they are still able to process up to 30+ page requests per second which means cater to the site traffic by may be losing 1 customer every once in a while to a competitor who is also using a similar caching technique what are the odds that the user will not come back to their site sooner or later? Recap   Resources Below are some Key resource you might like to review. I would highly recommend the documentation, walkthroughs and videos available on MSDN. You can always make use of Fiddler to debug Web Performance Tests. Some community test extensions and plug ins available on Codeplex might also be of interest to you. The Road Ahead Thank you for taking the time out and reading this blog post, you may also want to read Part I and Part II if you haven’t so far. If you enjoyed the post, remember to subscribe to http://feeds.feedburner.com/TarunArora. Questions/Feedback/Suggestions, etc please leave a comment. Next ‘Load Testing in the cloud’, I’ll be working on exploring the possibilities of running Test controller/Agents in the Cloud. See you on the other side! Thank You!   Share this post : CodeProject

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  • UAT Testing for SOA 10G Clusters

    - by [email protected]
    A lot of customers ask how to verify their SOA clusters and make them production ready. Here is a list that I recommend using for 10G SOA Clusters. v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} .shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);} Normal 0 false false false EN-CA X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} Test cases for each component - Oracle Application Server 10G General Application Server test cases This section is going to cover very General test cases to make sure that the Application Server cluster has been set up correctly and if you can start and stop all the components in the server via opmnct and AS Console. Test Case 1 Check if you can see AS instances in the console Implementation 1. Log on to the AS Console --> check to see if you can see all the nodes in your AS cluster. You should be able to see all the Oracle AS instances that are part of the cluster. This means that the OPMN clustering worked and the AS instances successfully joined the AS cluster. Result You should be able to see if all the instances in the AS cluster are listed in the EM console. If the instances are not listed here are the files to check to see if OPMN joined the cluster properly: $ORACLE_HOME\opmn\logs{*}opmn.log*$ORACLE_HOME\opmn\logs{*}opmn.dbg* If OPMN did not join the cluster properly, please check the opmn.xml file to make sure the discovery multicast address and port are correct (see this link  for opmn documentation). Restart the whole instance using opmnctl stopall followed by opmnctl startall. Log on to AS console to see if instance is listed as part of the cluster. Test Case 2 Check to see if you can start/stop each component Implementation Check each OC4J component on each AS instanceStart each and every component through the AS console to see if they will start and stop.Do that for each and every instance. Result Each component should start and stop through the AS console. You can also verify if the component started by checking opmnctl status by logging onto each box associated with the cluster Test Case 3 Add/modify a datasource entry through AS console on a remote AS instance (not on the instance where EM is physically running) Implementation Pick an OC4J instanceCreate a new data-source through the AS consoleModify an existing data-source or connection pool (optional) Result Open $ORACLE_HOME\j2ee\<oc4j_name>\config\data-sources.xml to see if the new (and or the modified) connection details and data-source exist. If they do then the AS console has successfully updated a remote file and MBeans are communicating correctly. Test Case 4 Start and stop AS instances using opmnctl @cluster command Implementation 1. Go to $ORACLE_HOME\opmn\bin and use the opmnctl @cluster to start and stop the AS instances Result Use opmnctl @cluster status to check for start and stop statuses.  HTTP server test cases This section will deal with use cases to test HTTP server failover scenarios. In these examples the HTTP server will be talking to the BPEL console (or any other web application that the client wants), so the URL will be _http://hostname:port\BPELConsole Test Case 1  Shut down one of the HTTP servers while accessing the BPEL console and see the requested routed to the second HTTP server in the cluster Implementation Access the BPELConsoleCheck $ORACLE_HOME\Apache\Apache\logs\access_log --> check for the timestamp and the URL that was accessed by the user. Timestamp and URL would look like this 1xx.2x.2xx.xxx [24/Mar/2009:16:04:38 -0500] "GET /BPELConsole=System HTTP/1.1" 200 15 After you have figured out which HTTP server this is running on, shut down this HTTP server by using opmnctl stopproc --> this is a graceful shutdown.Access the BPELConsole again (please note that you should have a LoadBalancer in front of the HTTP server and configured the Apache Virtual Host, see EDG for steps)Check $ORACLE_HOME\Apache\Apache\logs\access_log --> check for the timestamp and the URL that was accessed by the user. Timestamp and URL would look like above Result Even though you are shutting down the HTTP server the request is routed to the surviving HTTP server, which is then able to route the request to the BPEL Console and you are able to access the console. By checking the access log file you can confirm that the request is being picked up by the surviving node. Test Case 2 Repeat the same test as above but instead of calling opmnctl stopproc, pull the network cord of one of the HTTP servers, so that the LBR routes the request to the surviving HTTP node --> this is simulating a network failure. Test Case 3 In test case 1 we have simulated a graceful shutdown, in this case we will simulate an Apache crash Implementation Use opmnctl status -l to get the PID of the HTTP server that you would like forcefully bring downOn Linux use kill -9 <PID> to kill the HTTP serverAccess the BPEL console Result As you shut down the HTTP server, OPMN will restart the HTTP server. The restart may be so quick that the LBR may still route the request to the same server. One way to check if the HTTP server restared is to check the new PID and the timestamp in the access log for the BPEL console. BPEL test cases This section is going to cover scenarios dealing with BPEL clustering using jGroups, BPEL deployment and testing related to BPEL failover. Test Case 1 Verify that jGroups has initialized correctly. There is no real testing in this use case just a visual verification by looking at log files that jGroups has initialized correctly. Check the opmn log for the BPEL container for all nodes at $ORACLE_HOME/opmn/logs/<group name><container name><group name>~1.log. This logfile will contain jGroups related information during startup and steady-state operation. Soon after startup you should find log entries for UDP or TCP.Example jGroups Log Entries for UDPApr 3, 2008 6:30:37 PM org.collaxa.thirdparty.jgroups.protocols.UDP createSockets ·         INFO: sockets will use interface 144.25.142.172·          ·         Apr 3, 2008 6:30:37 PM org.collaxa.thirdparty.jgroups.protocols.UDP createSockets·          ·         INFO: socket information:·          ·         local_addr=144.25.142.172:1127, mcast_addr=228.8.15.75:45788, bind_addr=/144.25.142.172, ttl=32·         sock: bound to 144.25.142.172:1127, receive buffer size=64000, send buffer size=32000·         mcast_recv_sock: bound to 144.25.142.172:45788, send buffer size=32000, receive buffer size=64000·         mcast_send_sock: bound to 144.25.142.172:1128, send buffer size=32000, receive buffer size=64000·         Apr 3, 2008 6:30:37 PM org.collaxa.thirdparty.jgroups.protocols.TP$DiagnosticsHandler bindToInterfaces·          ·         -------------------------------------------------------·          ·         GMS: address is 144.25.142.172:1127·          ------------------------------------------------------- Example jGroups Log Entries for TCPApr 3, 2008 6:23:39 PM org.collaxa.thirdparty.jgroups.blocks.ConnectionTable start ·         INFO: server socket created on 144.25.142.172:7900·          ·         Apr 3, 2008 6:23:39 PM org.collaxa.thirdparty.jgroups.protocols.TP$DiagnosticsHandler bindToInterfaces·          ·         -------------------------------------------------------·         GMS: address is 144.25.142.172:7900------------------------------------------------------- In the log below the "socket created on" indicates that the TCP socket is established on the own node at that IP address and port the "created socket to" shows that the second node has connected to the first node, matching the logfile above with the IP address and port.Apr 3, 2008 6:25:40 PM org.collaxa.thirdparty.jgroups.blocks.ConnectionTable start ·         INFO: server socket created on 144.25.142.173:7901·          ·         Apr 3, 2008 6:25:40 PM org.collaxa.thirdparty.jgroups.protocols.TP$DiagnosticsHandler bindToInterfaces·          ·         ------------------------------------------------------·         GMS: address is 144.25.142.173:7901·         -------------------------------------------------------·         Apr 3, 2008 6:25:41 PM org.collaxa.thirdparty.jgroups.blocks.ConnectionTable getConnectionINFO: created socket to 144.25.142.172:7900  Result By reviewing the log files, you can confirm if BPEL clustering at the jGroups level is working and that the jGroup channel is communicating. Test Case 2  Test connectivity between BPEL Nodes Implementation Test connections between different cluster nodes using ping, telnet, and traceroute. The presence of firewalls and number of hops between cluster nodes can affect performance as they have a tendency to take down connections after some time or simply block them.Also reference Metalink Note 413783.1: "How to Test Whether Multicast is Enabled on the Network." Result Using the above tools you can confirm if Multicast is working  and whether BPEL nodes are commnunicating. Test Case3 Test deployment of BPEL suitcase to one BPEL node.  Implementation Deploy a HelloWorrld BPEL suitcase (or any other client specific BPEL suitcase) to only one BPEL instance using ant, or JDeveloper or via the BPEL consoleLog on to the second BPEL console to check if the BPEL suitcase has been deployed Result If jGroups has been configured and communicating correctly, BPEL clustering will allow you to deploy a suitcase to a single node, and jGroups will notify the second instance of the deployment. The second BPEL instance will go to the DB and pick up the new deployment after receiving notification. The result is that the new deployment will be "deployed" to each node, by only deploying to a single BPEL instance in the BPEL cluster. Test Case 4  Test to see if the BPEL server failsover and if all asynch processes are picked up by the secondary BPEL instance Implementation Deploy a 2 Asynch process: A ParentAsynch Process which calls a ChildAsynchProcess with a variable telling it how many times to loop or how many seconds to sleepA ChildAsynchProcess that loops or sleeps or has an onAlarmMake sure that the processes are deployed to both serversShut down one BPEL serverOn the active BPEL server call ParentAsynch a few times (use the load generation page)When you have enough ParentAsynch instances shut down this BPEL instance and start the other one. Please wait till this BPEL instance shuts down fully before starting up the second one.Log on to the BPEL console and see that the instance were picked up by the second BPEL node and completed Result The BPEL instance will failover to the secondary node and complete the flow ESB test cases This section covers the use cases involved with testing an ESB cluster. For this section please Normal 0 false false false EN-CA X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} follow Metalink Note 470267.1 which covers the basic tests to verify your ESB cluster.

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  • Bad Screen Flicker from video recording of recordmydesktop

    - by Tarun
    I have ubuntu 11.10 and I installed recordmydesktop. Video recording from recordmydesktop always result in screen flicker. In recording I see half of the screen moving forward while half would be stuck. I checked the settings and "Frame per Second" is set to 15 One such recording is available here - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QafF44m2Ttk&feature=youtu.be I am quite new to Ubuntu and not sure what is wrong.

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  • List of all states from COMPOSITE_INSTANCE, CUBE_INSTANCE, DLV_MESSAGE tables

    - by Deepak Arora
    In many of my engagements I get asked repeatedly about the states of the composites in 11g and how to decipher them, especially when we are troubleshooting issues around purging. I have compiled a list of all the states from the COMPOSITE_INSTANCE, CUBE_INSTANCE, DLV_MESSAGE and MEDIATOR_INSTANCE tables. These are the primary tables that are used when using BPEL composites and how they are used with the ECID.  Composite State Values COMPOSITE_INSTANCE States State Description 0 Running 1 Completed 2 Running with faults 3 Completed with faults 4 Running with recovery required 5 Completed with recovery required 6 Running with faults and recovery required 7 Completed with faults and recovery required 8 Running with suspended 9 Completed with suspended 10 Running with faults and suspended 11 Completed with faults and suspended 12 Running with recovery required and suspended 13 Completed with recovery required and suspended 14 Running with faults, recovery required, and suspended 15 Completed with faults, recovery required, and suspended 16 Running with terminated 17 Completed with terminated 18 Running with faults and terminated 19 Completed with faults and terminated 20 Running with recovery required and terminated 21 Completed with recovery required and terminated 22 Running with faults, recovery required, and terminated 23 Completed with faults, recovery required, and terminated 24 Running with suspended and terminated 25 Completed with suspended and terminated 26 Running with faulted, suspended, and terminated 27 Completed with faulted, suspended, and terminated 28 Running with recovery required, suspended, and terminated 29 Completed with recovery required, suspended, and terminated 30 Running with faulted, recovery required, suspended, and terminated 31 Completed with faulted, recovery required, suspended, and terminated 32 Unknown 64 - Normal 0 false false false EN-CA X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Any value in the range of 32 to 63 indicates that the composite instance state has not been enabled, but the instance state is updated for faults, aborts, etc. CUBE_INSTANCE States State Description 0 STATE_INITIATED 1 STATE_OPEN_RUNNING 2 STATE_OPEN_SUSPENDED 3 STATE_OPEN_FAULTED 4 STATE_CLOSED_PENDING_CANCEL 5 STATE_CLOSED_COMPLETED 6 STATE_CLOSED_FAULTED 7 STATE_CLOSED_CANCELLED 8 STATE_CLOSED_ABORTED 9 STATE_CLOSED_STALE 10 STATE_CLOSED_ROLLED_BACK DLV_MESSAGE States State Description 0 STATE_UNRESOLVED 1 STATE_RESOLVED 2 STATE_HANDLED 3 STATE_CANCELLED 4 STATE_MAX_RECOVERED Since now in 11g the Invoke_Messages table is not there so to distinguish between a new message (Invoke) and callback (DLV) and there is DLV_TYPE column that defines the type of message: DLV_TYPE States State Description 1 Invoke Message 2 DLV Message MEDIATOR_INSTANCE STATE Description  0  No faults but there still might be running instances  1  At least one case is aborted by user  2  At least one case is faulted (non-recoverable)  3  At least one case is faulted and one case is aborted  4  At least one case is in recovery required state  5 At least one case is in recovery required state and at least one is aborted  6 At least one case is in recovery required state and at least one is faulted  7 At least one case is in recovery required state, one faulted and one aborted  >=8 and < 16  Running >= 16   Stale In my next blog posting I will walk through the lifecycle of a BPEL process using the above states for the following use cases: - New BPEL process - initial Receive activity - Callback BPEL process - mid-level Receive activity As always comments and questions welcome! Deepak

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  • List of all states from COMPOSITE_INSTANCE, CUBE_INSTANCE, DLV_MESSAGE tables

    - by Deepak Arora
    In many of my engagements I get asked repeatedly about the states of the composites in 11g and how to decipher them, especially when we are troubleshooting issues around purging. I have compiled a list of all the states from the COMPOSITE_INSTANCE, CUBE_INSTANCE, and DLV_MESSAGE tables. These are the primary tables that are used when using BPEL composites and how they are used with the ECID.  Composite State Values COMPOSITE_INSTANCE States State Description 0 Running 1 Completed 2 Running with faults 3 Completed with faults 4 Running with recovery required 5 Completed with recovery required 6 Running with faults and recovery required 7 Completed with faults and recovery required 8 Running with suspended 9 Completed with suspended 10 Running with faults and suspended 11 Completed with faults and suspended 12 Running with recovery required and suspended 13 Completed with recovery required and suspended 14 Running with faults, recovery required, and suspended 15 Completed with faults, recovery required, and suspended 16 Running with terminated 17 Completed with terminated 18 Running with faults and terminated 19 Completed with faults and terminated 20 Running with recovery required and terminated 21 Completed with recovery required and terminated 22 Running with faults, recovery required, and terminated 23 Completed with faults, recovery required, and terminated 24 Running with suspended and terminated 25 Completed with suspended and terminated 26 Running with faulted, suspended, and terminated 27 Completed with faulted, suspended, and terminated 28 Running with recovery required, suspended, and terminated 29 Completed with recovery required, suspended, and terminated 30 Running with faulted, recovery required, suspended, and terminated 31 Completed with faulted, recovery required, suspended, and terminated 32 Unknown 64 - CUBE_INSTANCE States State Description 0 STATE_INITIATED 1 STATE_OPEN_RUNNING 2 STATE_OPEN_SUSPENDED 3 STATE_OPEN_FAULTED 4 STATE_CLOSED_PENDING_CANCEL 5 STATE_CLOSED_COMPLETED 6 STATE_CLOSED_FAULTED 7 STATE_CLOSED_CANCELLED 8 STATE_CLOSED_ABORTED 9 STATE_CLOSED_STALE 10 STATE_CLOSED_ROLLED_BACK DLV_MESSAGE States State Description 0 STATE_UNRESOLVED 1 STATE_RESOLVED 2 STATE_HANDLED 3 STATE_CANCELLED 4 STATE_MAX_RECOVERED Since now in 11g the Invoke_Messages table is not there so to distinguish between a new message (Invoke) and callback (DLV) and there is DLV_TYPE column that defines the type of message: DLV_TYPE States State Description 1 Invoke Message 2 DLV Message MEDIATOR_INSTANCE STATE Description  0  No faults but there still might be running instances  1  At least one case is aborted by user  2  At least one case is faulted (non-recoverable)  3  At least one case is faulted and one case is aborted  4  At least one case is in recovery required state  5 At least one case is in recovery required state and at least one is aborted  6 At least one case is in recovery required state and at least one is faulted  7 At least one case is in recovery required state, one faulted and one aborted  >=8 and < 16  Running >= 16   Stale In my next blog posting I will walk through the lifecycle of a BPEL process using the above states for the following use cases: - New BPEL process - initial Receive activity - Callback BPEL process - mid-level Receive activity As always comments and questions welcome! Deepak

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  • TFS API-Process Template currently applied to the Team Project

    - by Tarun Arora
    Download Demo Solution - here In this blog post I’ll show you how to use the TFS API to get the name of the Process Template that is currently applied to the Team Project. You can also download the demo solution attached, I’ve tested this solution against TFS 2010 and TFS 2011.    1. Connecting to TFS Programmatically I have a blog post that shows you from where to download the VS 2010 SP1 SDK and how to connect to TFS programmatically. private TfsTeamProjectCollection _tfs; private string _selectedTeamProject;   TeamProjectPicker tfsPP = new TeamProjectPicker(TeamProjectPickerMode.SingleProject, false); tfsPP.ShowDialog(); this._tfs = tfsPP.SelectedTeamProjectCollection; this._selectedTeamProject = tfsPP.SelectedProjects[0].Name; 2. Programmatically get the Process Template details of the selected Team Project I’ll be making use of the VersionControlServer service to get the Team Project details and the ICommonStructureService to get the Project Properties. private ProjectProperty[] GetProcessTemplateDetailsForTheSelectedProject() { var vcs = _tfs.GetService<VersionControlServer>(); var ics = _tfs.GetService<ICommonStructureService>(); ProjectProperty[] ProjectProperties = null; var p = vcs.GetTeamProject(_selectedTeamProject); string ProjectName = string.Empty; string ProjectState = String.Empty; int templateId = 0; ProjectProperties = null; ics.GetProjectProperties(p.ArtifactUri.AbsoluteUri, out ProjectName, out ProjectState, out templateId, out ProjectProperties); return ProjectProperties; } 3. What’s the catch? The ProjectProperties will contain a property “Process Template” which as a value has the name of the process template. So, you will be able to use the below line of code to get the name of the process template. var processTemplateName = processTemplateDetails.Where(pt => pt.Name == "Process Template").Select(pt => pt.Value).FirstOrDefault();   However, if the process template does not contain the property “Process Template” then you will need to add it. So, the question becomes how do i add the Name property to the Process Template. Download the Process Template from the Process Template Manager on your local        Once you have downloaded the Process Template to your local machine, navigate to the Classification folder with in the template       From the classification folder open Classification.xml        Add a new property <property name=”Process Template” value=”MSF for CMMI Process Improvement v5.0” />           4. Putting it all together… using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.ComponentModel; using System.Data; using System.Drawing; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using System.Windows.Forms; using Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Client; using Microsoft.TeamFoundation.VersionControl.Client; using Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Server; using System.Diagnostics; using Microsoft.TeamFoundation.WorkItemTracking.Client; namespace TfsAPIDemoProcessTemplate { public partial class Form1 : Form { public Form1() { InitializeComponent(); } private TfsTeamProjectCollection _tfs; private string _selectedTeamProject; private void btnConnect_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) { TeamProjectPicker tfsPP = new TeamProjectPicker(TeamProjectPickerMode.SingleProject, false); tfsPP.ShowDialog(); this._tfs = tfsPP.SelectedTeamProjectCollection; this._selectedTeamProject = tfsPP.SelectedProjects[0].Name; var processTemplateDetails = GetProcessTemplateDetailsForTheSelectedProject(); listBox1.Items.Clear(); listBox1.Items.Add(String.Format("Team Project Selected => '{0}'", _selectedTeamProject)); listBox1.Items.Add(Environment.NewLine); var processTemplateName = processTemplateDetails.Where(pt => pt.Name == "Process Template") .Select(pt => pt.Value).FirstOrDefault(); if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(processTemplateName)) { listBox1.Items.Add(Environment.NewLine); listBox1.Items.Add(String.Format("Process Template Name: {0}", processTemplateName)); } else { listBox1.Items.Add(String.Format("The Process Template does not have the 'Name' property set up")); listBox1.Items.Add(String.Format("***TIP: Download the Process Template and in Classification.xml add a new property Name, update the template then you will be able to see the Process Template Name***")); listBox1.Items.Add(String.Format(" - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -")); } } private ProjectProperty[] GetProcessTemplateDetailsForTheSelectedProject() { var vcs = _tfs.GetService<VersionControlServer>(); var ics = _tfs.GetService<ICommonStructureService>(); ProjectProperty[] ProjectProperties = null; var p = vcs.GetTeamProject(_selectedTeamProject); string ProjectName = string.Empty; string ProjectState = String.Empty; int templateId = 0; ProjectProperties = null; ics.GetProjectProperties(p.ArtifactUri.AbsoluteUri, out ProjectName, out ProjectState, out templateId, out ProjectProperties); return ProjectProperties; } } } Thank you for taking the time out and reading this blog post. If you enjoyed the post, remember to subscribe to http://feeds.feedburner.com/TarunArora. Have you come across a better way of doing this, please share your experience here. Questions/Feedback/Suggestions, etc please leave a comment. Thank You! Share this post : CodeProject

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  • Cloud Based Load Testing Using TF Service &amp; VS 2013

    - by Tarun Arora [Microsoft MVP]
    Originally posted on: http://geekswithblogs.net/TarunArora/archive/2013/06/30/cloud-based-load-testing-using-tf-service-amp-vs-2013.aspx One of the new features announced as part of the Visual Studio 2013 Ultimate Preview is ‘Cloud Based Load Testing’. In this blog post I’ll walk you through, What is Cloud Based Load Testing? How have I been using this feature? – Success story! Where can you find more resources on this feature? What is Cloud Based Load Testing? It goes without saying that performance testing your application not only gives you the confidence that the application will work under heavy levels of stress but also gives you the ability to test how scalable the architecture of your application is. It is important to know how much is too much for your application! Working with various clients in the industry I have realized that the biggest barriers in Load Testing & Performance Testing adoption are, High infrastructure and administration cost that comes with this phase of testing Time taken to procure & set up the test infrastructure Finding use for this infrastructure investment after completion of testing Is cloud the answer? 100% Visual Studio Compatible Scalable and Realistic Start testing in < 2 minutes Intuitive Pay only for what you need Use existing on premise tests on cloud There are a lot of vendors out there offering Cloud Based Load Testing, to name a few, Load Storm Soasta Blaze Meter Blitz And others… The question you may want to ask is, why should you go with Microsoft’s Cloud based Load Test offering. If you are a Microsoft shop or already have investments in Microsoft technologies, you’ll see great benefit in the natural integration this offers with existing Microsoft products such as Visual Studio and Windows Azure. For example, your existing Web tests authored in Visual Studio 2010 or Visual Studio 2012 will run on the cloud without requiring any modifications what so ever. Microsoft’s cloud test rig also supports API based testing, for example, if you are building a WPF application which consumes WCF services, you can write unit tests to invoke the WCF service, these tests can be run on the cloud test rig and loaded with ‘N’ concurrent users for performance testing. If you have your assets already hosted in the Azure and possibly in the same data centre as the Cloud test rig, your Azure app will not incur a usage cost because of the generated traffic since the traffic is coming from the same data centre. The licensing or pricing information on Microsoft’s cloud based Load test service is yet to be announced, but I would expect this to be priced attractively to match the market competition.   The only additional configuration required for running load tests on Microsoft Cloud based Load Tests service is to select the Test run location as Run tests using Visual Studio Team Foundation Service, How have I been using Microsoft’s Cloud based Load Test Service? I have been part of the Microsoft Cloud Based Load Test Service advisory council for the last 7 months. This gave the opportunity to see the product shape up from concept to working solution. I was also the first person outside of Microsoft to try this offering out. This gave me the opportunity to test real world application at various clients using the Microsoft Load Test Service and provide real world feedback to the Microsoft product team. One of the most recent systems I tested using the Load Test Service has been an insurance quote generation engine. This insurance quote generation engine is,   hosted in Windows Azure expected to get quote requests from across the globe expected to handle 5 Million quote requests in a day (not clear how this load will be distributed across the day) There was no way, I could simulate such kind of load from on premise without standing up additional hardware. But Microsoft’s Cloud based Load Test service allowed me to test my key performance testing scenarios, i.e. Simulate expected Load, Endurance Testing, Threshold Testing and Testing for Latency. Simulating expected load: approach to devising a load pattern My approach to devising a load test pattern has been to run the test scenario with 1 user to figure out the response time. Then work out how many users are required to reach the target load. So, for example, to invoke 1 quote from the quote engine software takes 0.5 seconds. Now if you do the math,   1 quote request by 1 user = 0.5 seconds   quotes generated by 1 user in 24 hour = 1 * (((2 * 60) * 60) * 24) = 172,800   quotes generated by 30 users in 24 hours = 172,800 * 30 =  5,184,000 This was a very simple example, if your application requires more concurrent users to test scenario’s such as caching, etc then you can devise your own load pattern, some examples of load test patterns can be found here.  Endurance Testing To test for endurance, I loaded the quote generation engine with an expected fixed user load and ran the test for very long duration such as over 48 hours and observed the affect of the long running test on the Azure infrastructure. Currently Microsoft Load Test service does not support metrics from the machine under test. I used Azure diagnostics to begin with, but later started using Cerebrata Azure Diagnostics Manager to capture the metrics of the machine under test. Threshold Testing To figure out how much user load the application could cope with before falling on its belly, I opted to step load the quote generation engine by incrementing user load with different variations of incremental user load per minute till the application crashed out and forced an IIS reset. Testing for Latency Currently the Microsoft Load Test service does not support generating geographically distributed load, I however, deployed the insurance quote generation engine in different Azure data centres and ran the same set of performance tests to measure for latency. Because I could compare load test results from different runs by exporting the results to excel (this feature is provided out of the box right from Visual Studio 2010) I could see the different in response times. More resources on Microsoft Cloud based Load Test Service A few important links to get you started, Download Visual Studio Ultimate 2013 Preview Getting started guide for load testing using Team Foundation Service Troubleshooting guide for FAQs and known issues Team Foundation Service forum for questions and support Detailed demo and presentation (link to Tech-Ed session recording) Detailed demo and presentation (link to Build session recording) There a few limits on the usage of Microsoft Cloud based Load Test service that you can read about here. If you have any feedback on Microsoft Cloud based Load Test service, feel free to share it with the product team via the Visual Studio User Voice forum. I hope you found this useful. Thank you for taking the time out and reading this blog post. If you enjoyed the post, remember to subscribe to http://feeds.feedburner.com/TarunArora. Stay tuned!

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  • Part 2&ndash;Load Testing In The Cloud

    - by Tarun Arora
    Welcome to Part 2, In Part 1 we discussed the advantages of creating a Test Rig in the cloud, the Azure edge and the Test Rig Topology we want to get to. In Part 2, Let’s start by understanding the components of Azure we’ll be making use of followed by manually putting them together to create the test rig, so… let’s get down dirty start setting up the Test Rig.  What Components of Azure will I be using for building the Test Rig in the Cloud? To run the Test Agents we’ll make use of Windows Azure Compute and to enable communication between Test Controller and Test Agents we’ll make use of Windows Azure Connect.  Azure Connect The Test Controller is on premise and the Test Agents are in the cloud (How will they talk?). To enable communication between the two, we’ll make use of Windows Azure Connect. With Windows Azure Connect, you can use a simple user interface to configure IPsec protected connections between computers or virtual machines (VMs) in your organization’s network, and roles running in Windows Azure. With this you can now join Windows Azure role instances to your domain, so that you can use your existing methods for domain authentication, name resolution, or other domain-wide maintenance actions. For more details refer to an overview of Windows Azure connect. A very useful video explaining everything you wanted to know about Windows Azure connect.  Azure Compute Windows Azure compute provides developers a platform to host and manage applications in Microsoft’s data centres across the globe. A Windows Azure application is built from one or more components called ‘roles.’ Roles come in three different types: Web role, Worker role, and Virtual Machine (VM) role, we’ll be using the Worker role to set up the Test Agents. A very nice blog post discussing the difference between the 3 role types. Developers are free to use the .NET framework or other software that runs on Windows with the Worker role or Web role. Developers can also create applications using languages such as PHP and Java. More on Windows Azure Compute. Each Windows Azure compute instance represents a virtual server... Virtual Machine Size CPU Cores Memory Cost Per Hour Extra Small Shared 768 MB $0.04 Small 1 1.75 GB $0.12 Medium 2 3.50 GB $0.24 Large 4 7.00 GB $0.48 Extra Large 8 14.00 GB $0.96   You might want to review the Windows Azure Pricing FAQ. Let’s Get Started building the Test Rig… Configuration Machine Role Comments VM – 1 Domain Controller for Playpit.com On Premise VM – 2 TFS, Test Controller On Premise VM – 3 Test Agent Cloud   In this blog post I would assume that you have the domain, Team Foundation Server and Test Controller Installed and set up already. If not, please refer to the TFS 2010 Installation Guide and this walkthrough on MSDN to set up your Test Controller. You can also download a preconfigured TFS 2010 VM from Brian Keller's blog, Brian also has some great hands on Labs on TFS 2010 that you may want to explore. I. Lets start building VM – 3: The Test Agent Download the Windows Azure SDK and Tools Open Visual Studio and create a new Windows Azure Project using the Cloud Template                   Choose the Worker Role for reasons explained in the earlier post         The WorkerRole.cs implements the Run() and OnStart() methods, no code changes required. You should be able to compile the project and run it in the compute emulator (The compute emulator should have been installed as part of the Windows Azure Toolkit) on your local machine.                   We will only be making changes to WindowsAzureProject, open ServiceDefinition.csdef. Ensure that the vmsize is small (remember the cost chart above). Import the “Connect” module. I am importing the Connect module because I need to join the Worker role VM to the Playpit domain. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <ServiceDefinition name="WindowsAzureProject2" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/ServiceHosting/2008/10/ServiceDefinition"> <WorkerRole name="WorkerRole1" vmsize="Small"> <Imports> <Import moduleName="Diagnostics" /> <Import moduleName="Connect"/> </Imports> </WorkerRole> </ServiceDefinition> Go to the ServiceConfiguration.Cloud.cscfg and note that settings with key ‘Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.%%%%’ have been added to the configuration file. This is because you decided to import the connect module. See the config below. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <ServiceConfiguration serviceName="WindowsAzureProject2" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/ServiceHosting/2008/10/ServiceConfiguration" osFamily="1" osVersion="*"> <Role name="WorkerRole1"> <Instances count="1" /> <ConfigurationSettings> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Diagnostics.ConnectionString" value="UseDevelopmentStorage=true" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.ActivationToken" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.Refresh" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.WaitForConnectivity" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.Upgrade" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.EnableDomainJoin" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainFQDN" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainControllerFQDN" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainAccountName" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainPassword" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainOU" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.Administrators" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainSiteName" value="" /> </ConfigurationSettings> </Role> </ServiceConfiguration>             Let’s go step by step and understand all the highlighted parameters and where you can find the values for them.       osFamily – By default this is set to 1 (Windows Server 2008 SP2). Change this to 2 if you want the Windows Server 2008 R2 operating system. The Advantage of using osFamily = “2” is that you get Powershell 2.0 rather than Powershell 1.0. In Powershell 2.0 you could simply use “powershell -ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted ./myscript.ps1” and it will work while in Powershell 1.0 you will have to change the registry key by including the following in your command file “reg add HKLM\Software\Microsoft\PowerShell\1\ShellIds\Microsoft.PowerShell /v ExecutionPolicy /d Unrestricted /f” before you can execute any power shell. The other reason you might want to move to os2 is if you wanted IIS 7.5.       Activation Token – To enable communication between the on premise machine and the Windows Azure Worker role VM both need to have the same token. Log on to Windows Azure Management Portal, click on Connect, click on Get Activation Token, this should give you the activation token, copy the activation token to the clipboard and paste it in the configuration file. Note – Later in the blog I’ll be showing you how to install connect on the on premise machine.                       EnableDomainJoin – Set the value to true, ofcourse we want to join the on windows azure worker role VM to the domain.       DomainFQDN, DomainControllerFQDN, DomainAccountName, DomainPassword, DomainOU, Administrators – This information is specific to your domain. I have extracted this information from the ‘service manager’ and ‘Active Directory Users and Computers’. Also, i created a new Domain-OU namely ‘CloudInstances’ so all my cloud instances joined to my domain show up here, this is optional. You can encrypt the DomainPassword – refer to the instructions here. Or hold fire, I’ll be covering that when i come to certificates and encryption in the coming section.       Now once you have filled all this information up, the configuration file should look something like below, <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <ServiceConfiguration serviceName="WindowsAzureProject2" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/ServiceHosting/2008/10/ServiceConfiguration" osFamily="2" osVersion="*"> <Role name="WorkerRole1"> <Instances count="1" /> <ConfigurationSettings> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Diagnostics.ConnectionString" value="UseDevelopmentStorage=true" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.ActivationToken" value="45f55fea-f194-4fbc-b36e-25604faac784" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.Refresh" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.WaitForConnectivity" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.Upgrade" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.EnableDomainJoin" value="true" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainFQDN" value="play.pit.com" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainControllerFQDN" value="WIN-KUDQMQFGQOL.play.pit.com" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainAccountName" value="playpit\Administrator" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainPassword" value="************************" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainOU" value="OU=CloudInstances, DC=Play, DC=Pit, DC=com" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.Administrators" value="Playpit\Administrator" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainSiteName" value="" /> </ConfigurationSettings> </Role> </ServiceConfiguration> Next we will be enabling the Remote Desktop module in to the ServiceDefinition.csdef, we could make changes manually or allow a beautiful wizard to help us make changes. I prefer the second option. So right click on the Windows Azure project and choose Publish       Now once you get the publish wizard, if you haven’t already you would be asked to import your Windows Azure subscription, this is simply the Msdn subscription activation key xml. Once you have done click Next to go to the Settings page and check ‘Enable Remote Desktop for all roles’.       As soon as you do that you get another pop up asking you the details for the user that you would be logging in with (make sure you enter a reasonable expiry date, you do not want the user account to expire today). Notice the more information tag at the bottom, click that to get access to the certificate section. See screen shot below.       From the drop down select the option to create a new certificate        In the pop up window enter the friendly name for your certificate. In my case I entered ‘WAC – Test Rig’ and click ok. This will create a new certificate for you. Click on the view button to see the certificate details. Do you see the Thumbprint, this is the value that will go in the config file (very important). Now click on the Copy to File button to copy the certificate, we will need to import the certificate to the windows Azure Management portal later. So, make sure you save it a safe location.                                Click Finish and enter details of the user you would like to create with permissions for remote desktop access, once you have entered the details on the ‘Remote desktop configuration’ screen click on Ok. From the Publish Windows Azure Wizard screen press Cancel. Cancel because we don’t want to publish the role just yet and Yes because we want to save all the changes in the config file.       Now if you go to the ServiceDefinition.csdef file you will see that the RemoteAccess and RemoteForwarder roles have been imported for you. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <ServiceDefinition name="WindowsAzureProject2" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/ServiceHosting/2008/10/ServiceDefinition"> <WorkerRole name="WorkerRole1" vmsize="Small"> <Imports> <Import moduleName="Diagnostics" /> <Import moduleName="Connect" /> <Import moduleName="RemoteAccess" /> <Import moduleName="RemoteForwarder" /> </Imports> </WorkerRole> </ServiceDefinition> Now go to the ServiceConfiguration.Cloud.cscfg file and you see a whole bunch for setting “Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.RemoteAccess.%%%” values added for you. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <ServiceConfiguration serviceName="WindowsAzureProject2" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/ServiceHosting/2008/10/ServiceConfiguration" osFamily="2" osVersion="*"> <Role name="WorkerRole1"> <Instances count="1" /> <ConfigurationSettings> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Diagnostics.ConnectionString" value="UseDevelopmentStorage=true" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.ActivationToken" value="45f55fea-f194-4fbc-b36e-25604faac784" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.Refresh" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.WaitForConnectivity" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.Upgrade" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.EnableDomainJoin" value="true" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainFQDN" value="play.pit.com" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainControllerFQDN" value="WIN-KUDQMQFGQOL.play.pit.com" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainAccountName" value="playpit\Administrator" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainPassword" value="************************" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainOU" value="OU=CloudInstances, DC=Play, DC=Pit, DC=com" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.Administrators" value="Playpit\Administrator" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.Connect.DomainSiteName" value="" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.RemoteAccess.Enabled" value="true" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.RemoteAccess.AccountUsername" value="Administrator" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.RemoteAccess.AccountEncryptedPassword" value="MIIBnQYJKoZIhvcNAQcDoIIBjjCCAYoCAQAxggFOMIIBSgIBADAyMB4xHDAaBgNVBAMME1dpbmRvd 3MgQXp1cmUgVG9vbHMCEGa+B46voeO5T305N7TSG9QwDQYJKoZIhvcNAQEBBQAEggEABg4ol5Xol66Ip6QKLbAPWdmD4ae ADZ7aKj6fg4D+ATr0DXBllZHG5Umwf+84Sj2nsPeCyrg3ZDQuxrfhSbdnJwuChKV6ukXdGjX0hlowJu/4dfH4jTJC7sBWS AKaEFU7CxvqYEAL1Hf9VPL5fW6HZVmq1z+qmm4ecGKSTOJ20Fptb463wcXgR8CWGa+1w9xqJ7UmmfGeGeCHQ4QGW0IDSBU6ccg vzF2ug8/FY60K1vrWaCYOhKkxD3YBs8U9X/kOB0yQm2Git0d5tFlIPCBT2AC57bgsAYncXfHvPesI0qs7VZyghk8LVa9g5IqaM Cp6cQ7rmY/dLsKBMkDcdBHuCTAzBgkqhkiG9w0BBwEwFAYIKoZIhvcNAwcECDRVifSXbA43gBApNrp40L1VTVZ1iGag+3O1" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.RemoteAccess.AccountExpiration" value="2012-11-27T23:59:59.0000000+00:00" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.RemoteForwarder.Enabled" value="true" /> </ConfigurationSettings> <Certificates> <Certificate name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.RemoteAccess.PasswordEncryption" thumbprint="AA23016CF0BDFC344400B5B82706B608B92E4217" thumbprintAlgorithm="sha1" /> </Certificates> </Role> </ServiceConfiguration>          Okay let’s look at them one at a time,       Enabled - Yes, we would like to enable Remote Access.       AccountUserName – This is the user name you entered while you were on the publish windows azure role screen, as detailed above.       AccountEncrytedPassword – Try and decode that, the certificate is used to encrypt the password you specified for the user account. Remember earlier i said, either use the instructions or wait and i’ll be showing you encryption, now the user account i am using for rdp has the same password as my domain password, so i can simply copy the value of the AccountEncryptedPassword to the DomainPassword as well.       AccountExpiration – This is the expiration as you specified in the wizard earlier, make sure your account does not expire today.       Remote Forwarder – Check out the documentation, below is how I understand it, -- One role in an application that implements a remote desktop connection must import the RemoteForwarder module. The two modules work together to enable the remote desktop connections to role instances. -- If you have multiple roles defined in the service model, it does not matter which role you add the RemoteForwarder module to, but you must add it to only one of the role definitions.       Certificate – Remember the certificate thumbprint from the wizard, the on premise machine and windows azure role machine that need to speak to each other must have the same thumbprint. More on that when we install Windows Azure connect Endpoints on the on premise machine. As i said earlier, in this blog post, I’ll be showing you the manual process so i won’t be scripting any star up tasks to install the test agent or register the test agent with the TFS Server. I’ll be showing you all this cool stuff in the next blog post, that’s because it’s important to understand the manual side of it, it becomes easier for you to troubleshoot in case something fails. Having said that, the changes we have made are sufficient to spin up the Windows Azure Worker Role aka Test Agent VM, have it connected with the play.pit.com domain and have remote access enabled on it. Before we deploy the Test Agent VM we need to set up Windows Azure Connect on the TFS Server. II. Windows Azure Connect: Setting up Connect on VM – 2 i.e. TFS & Test Controller Glad you made it so far, now to enable communication between the on premise TFS/Test Controller and Azure-ed Test Agent we need to enable communication. We have set up the Azure connect module in the Test Agent configuration, now the connect end points need to be enabled on the on premise machines, let’s have a look at how we can do this. Log on to VM – 2 running the TFS Server and Test Controller Log on to the Windows Azure Management Portal and click on Virtual Network Click on Virtual Network, if you already have a subscription you should see the below screen shot, if not, you would be asked to complete the subscription first        Click on Install Local Endpoints from the top left on the panel and you get a url appended with a token id in it, remember the token i showed you earlier, in theory the token you get here should match the token you added to the Test Agent config file.        Copy the url to the clip board and paste it in IE explorer (important, the installation at present only works out of IE and you need to have cookies enabled in order to complete the installation). As stated in the pop up, you can NOT download and run the software later, you need to run it as is, since it contains a token. Once the installation completes you should see the Windows Azure connect icon in the system tray.                         Right click the Azure Connect icon, choose Diagnostics and refer to this link for diagnostic detail terminology. NOTE – Unfortunately I could not see the Windows Azure connect icon in the system tray, a bit of binging with Google revealed that the azure connect icon is only shown when the ‘Windows Azure Connect Endpoint’ Service is started. So go to services.msc and make sure that the service is started, if not start it, unfortunately again, the service did not start for me on a manual start and i realised that one of the dependant services was disabled, you can look at the service dependencies and start them and then start windows azure connect. Bottom line, you need to start Windows Azure connect service before you can proceed. Please refer here on MSDN for more on Troubleshooting Windows Azure connect. (Follow the next step as well)   Now go back to the Windows Azure Management Portal and from Groups and Roles create a new group, lets call it ‘Test Rig’. Make sure you add the VM – 2 (the TFS Server VM where you just installed the endpoint).       Now if you go back to the Azure Connect icon in the system tray and click ‘Refresh Policy’ you will notice that the disconnected status of the icon should change to ready for connection. III. Importing Certificate in to Windows Azure Management Portal But before that you need to import the certificate you created in Step I in to the Windows Azure Management Portal. Log on to the Windows Azure Management Portal and click on ‘Hosted Services, Storage Accounts & CDN’ and then ‘Management Certificates’ followed by Add Certificates as shown in the screen shot below        Browse to the location where you saved the certificate earlier, remember… Refer to Step I in case you forgot.        Now you should be able to see the imported certificate here, make sure the thumbprint of the certificate matches the one you inserted in the config files        IV. Publish Windows Azure Worker Role aka Test Agent Having completed I, II and III, you are ready to publish the Test Agent VM – 3 to the cloud. Go to Visual Studio and right click the Windows Azure project and select Publish. Verify the infomration in the wizard, from the advanced settings tab, you can also enabled capture of intellitrace or profiling information.         Click Next and Click Publish! From the view menu bar select the Windows Azure Activity Log window.       Now you should be able to see the deployment progress in real time.             In the Windows Azure Management Portal, you should also be able to see the progress of creation of a new Worker Role.       Once the deployment is complete you should be able to RDP (go to run prompt type mstsc and in the pop up the machine name) in to the Test Agent Worker Role VM from the Playpit network using the domain admin user account. In case you are unable to log in to the Test Agent using the domain admin user account it means the process of joining the Test Agent to the domain has failed! But the good news is, because you imported the connect module, you can connect to the Test Agent machine using Windows Azure Management Portal and troubleshoot the reason for failure, you will be able to log in with the user name and password you specified in the config file for the keys ‘RemoteAccess.AccountUsername, RemoteAccess.EncryptedPassword (just that enter the password unencrypted)’, fix it or manually join the machine to the domain. Once you have managed to Join the Test Agent VM to the Domain move to the next step.      So, log in to the Test Agent Worker Role VM with the Playpit Domain Administrator and verify that you can log in, the machine is connected to the domain and the connect service is successfully running. If yes, give your self a pat on the back, you are 80% mission accomplished!         Go to the Windows Azure Management Portal and click on Virtual Network, click on Groups and Roles and click on Test Rig, click Edit Group, the edit the Test Rig group you created earlier. In the Connect to section, click on Add to select the worker role you have just deployed. Also, check the ‘Allow connections between endpoints in the group’ with this you will enable to communication between test controller and test agents and test agents/test agents. Click Save.      Now, you are ready to deploy the Test Agent software on the Worker Role Test Agent VM and configure it to work with the Test Controller. V. Configuring VM – 3: Installing Test Agent and Associating Test Agent to Controller Log in to the Worker Role Test Agent VM that you have just successfully deployed, make sure you log in with the domain administrator account. Download the All Agents software from MSDN, ‘en_visual_studio_agents_2010_x86_x64_dvd_509679.iso’, extract the iso and navigate to where you have extracted the iso. In my case, i have extracted the iso to “C:\Resources\Temp\VsAgentSetup”. Open the Test Agent folder and double click on setup.exe. Once you have installed the Test Agent you should reach the configuration window. If you face any issues installing TFS Test Agent on the VM, refer to the walkthrough on MSDN.       Once you have successfully installed the Test Agent software you will need to configure the test agent. Right click the test agent configuration tool and run as a different user. i.e. an Administrator. This is really to run the configuration wizard with elevated privileges (you might have UAC block something's otherwise).        In the run options, you can select ‘service’ you do not need to run the agent as interactive un less you are running coded UI tests. I have specified the domain administrator to connect to the TFS Test Controller. In real life, i would never do that, i would create a separate test user service account for this purpose. But for the blog post, we are using the most powerful user so that any policies or restrictions don’t block you.        Click the Apply Settings button and you should be all green! If not, the summary usually gives helpful error messages that you can resolve and proceed. As per my experience, you may run in to either a permission or a firewall blocking communication issue.        And now the moment of truth! Go to VM –2 open up Visual Studio and from the Test Menu select Manage Test Controller       Mission Accomplished! You should be able to see the Test Agent that you have just configured here,         VI. Creating and Running Load Tests on your brand new Azure-ed Test Rig I have various blog posts on Performance Testing with Visual Studio Ultimate, you can follow the links and videos below, Blog Posts: - Part 1 – Performance Testing using Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate - Part 2 – Performance Testing using Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate - Part 3 – Performance Testing using Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate Videos: - Test Tools Configuration & Settings in Visual Studio - Why & How to Record Web Performance Tests in Visual Studio Ultimate - Goal Driven Load Testing using Visual Studio Ultimate Now that you have created your load tests, there is one last change you need to make before you can run the tests on your Azure Test Rig, create a new Test settings file, and change the Test Execution method to ‘Remote Execution’ and select the test controller you have configured the Worker Role Test Agent against in our case VM – 2 So, go on, fire off a test run and see the results of the test being executed on the Azur-ed Test Rig. Review and What’s next? A quick recap of the benefits of running the Test Rig in the cloud and what i will be covering in the next blog post AND I would love to hear your feedback! Advantages Utilizing the power of Azure compute to run a heavy virtual user load. Benefiting from the Azure flexibility, destroy Test Agents when not in use, takes < 25 minutes to spin up a new Test Agent. Most important test Network Latency, (network latency and speed of connection are two different things – usually network latency is very hard to test), by placing the Test Agents in Microsoft Data centres around the globe, one can actually test the lag in transferring the bytes not because of a slow connection but because the page has been requested from the other side of the globe. Next Steps The process of spinning up the Test Agents in windows Azure is not 100% automated. I am working on the Worker process and power shell scripts to make the role deployment, unattended install of test agent software and registration of the test agent to the test controller automated. In the next blog post I will show you how to make the complete process unattended and automated. Remember to subscribe to http://feeds.feedburner.com/TarunArora. Hope you enjoyed this post, I would love to hear your feedback! If you have any recommendations on things that I should consider or any questions or feedback, feel free to leave a comment. See you in Part III.   Share this post : CodeProject

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  • VS 2012 Code Review &ndash; Before Check In OR After Check In?

    - by Tarun Arora
    “Is Code Review Important and Effective?” There is a consensus across the industry that code review is an effective and practical way to collar code inconsistency and possible defects early in the software development life cycle. Among others some of the advantages of code reviews are, Bugs are found faster Forces developers to write readable code (code that can be read without explanation or introduction!) Optimization methods/tricks/productive programs spread faster Programmers as specialists "evolve" faster It's fun “Code review is systematic examination (often known as peer review) of computer source code. It is intended to find and fix mistakes overlooked in the initial development phase, improving both the overall quality of software and the developers' skills. Reviews are done in various forms such as pair programming, informal walkthroughs, and formal inspections.” Wikipedia No where does the definition mention whether its better to review code before the code has been committed to version control or after the commit has been performed. No matter which side you favour, Visual Studio 2012 allows you to request for a code review both before check in and also request for a review after check in. Let’s weigh the pros and cons of the approaches independently. Code Review Before Check In or Code Review After Check In? Approach 1 – Code Review before Check in Developer completes the code and feels the code quality is appropriate for check in to TFS. The developer raises a code review request to have a second pair of eyes validate if the code abides to the recommended best practices, will not result in any defects due to common coding mistakes and whether any optimizations can be made to improve the code quality.                                             Image 1 – code review before check in Pros Everything that gets committed to source control is reviewed. Minimizes the chances of smelly code making its way into the code base. Decreases the cost of fixing bugs, remember, the earlier you find them, the lesser the pain in fixing them. Cons Development Code Freeze – Since the changes aren’t in the source control yet. Further development can only be done off-line. The changes have not been through a CI build, hard to say whether the code abides to all build quality standards. Inconsistent! Cumbersome to track the actual code review process.  Not every change to the code base is worth reviewing, a lot of effort is invested for very little gain. Approach 2 – Code Review after Check in Developer checks in, random code reviews are performed on the checked in code.                                                      Image 2 – Code review after check in Pros The code has already passed the CI build and run through any code analysis plug ins you may have running on the build server. Instruct the developer to ensure ZERO fx cop, style cop and static code analysis before check in. Code is cleaner and smell free even before the code review. No Offline development, developers can continue to develop against the source control. Cons Bad code can easily make its way into the code base. Since the review take place much later in the cycle, the cost of fixing issues can prove to be much higher. Approach 3 – Hybrid Approach The community advocates a more hybrid approach, a blend of tooling and human accountability quotient.                                                               Image 3 – Hybrid Approach 1. Code review high impact check ins. It is not possible to review everything, by setting up code review check in policies you can end up slowing your team. More over, the code that you are reviewing before check in hasn't even been through a green CI build either. 2. Tooling. Let the tooling work for you. By running static analysis, fx cop, style cop and other plug ins on the build agent, you can identify the real issues that in my opinion can't possibly be identified using human reviews. Configure the tooling to report back top 10 issues every day. Mandate the manual code review of individuals who keep making it to this list of shame more often. 3. During Merge. I would prefer eliminating some of the other code issues during merge from Main branch to the release branch. In a scrum project this is still easier because cheery picking the merges is a possibility and the size of code being reviewed is still limited. Let the tooling work for you, if some one breaks the CI build often, put them on a gated check in build course until you see improvement. If some one appears on the top 10 list of shame generated via the build then ensure that all their code is reviewed till you see improvement. At the end of the day, the goal is to ensure that the code being delivered is top quality. By enforcing a code review before any check in, you force the developer to work offline or stay put till the review is complete. What do the experts say? So I asked a few expects what they thought of “Code Review quality gate before Checking in code?" Terje Sandstrom | Microsoft ALM MVP You mean a review quality gate BEFORE checking in code????? That would mean a lot of code staying either local or in shelvesets, and not even been through a CI build, and a green CI build being the main criteria for going further, f.e. to the review state. I would not like code laying around with no checkin’s. Having a requirement that code is checked in small pieces, 4-8 hours work max, and AT LEAST daily checkins, a manual code review comes second down the lane. I would expect review quality gates to happen before merging back to main, or before merging to release.  But that would all be on checked-in code.  Branching is absolutely one way to ease the pain.   Another way we are using is automatic quality builds, running metrics, coverage, static code analysis.  Unfortunately it takes some time, would be great to be on CI’s – but…., so it’s done scheduled every night. Based on this we get, among other stuff,  top 10 lists of suspicious code, which is then subjected to reviews.  If a person seems to be very popular on these top 10 lists, we subject every check in from that person to a review for a period. That normally helps.   None of the clients I have can afford to have every checkin reviewed, so we need to find ways around it. I don’t disagree with the nicety of having all the code reviewed, but I find it hard to find those resources in today’s enterprises. David V. Corbin | Visual Studio ALM Ranger I tend to agree with both sides. I hate having code that is not checked in, but at the same time hate having “bad” code in the repository. I have found that branching is one approach to solving this dilemma. Code is checked into the private/feature branch before the review, but is not merged over to the “official” branch until after the review. I advocate both, depending on circumstance (especially team dynamics)   - The “pre-checkin” is usually for elements that may impact the project as a whole. Think of it as another “gate” along with passing unit tests. - The “post-checkin” may very well not be at the changeset level, but correlates to a review at the “user story” level.   Again, this depends on team dynamics in play…. Robert MacLean | Microsoft ALM MVP I do not think there is no right answer for the industry as a whole. In short the question is why do you do reviews? Your question implies risk mitigation, so in low risk areas you can get away with it after check in while in high risk you need to do it before check in. An example is those new to a team or juniors need it much earlier (maybe that is before checkin, maybe that is soon after) than seniors who have shipped twenty sprints on the team. Abhimanyu Singhal | Visual Studio ALM Ranger Depends on per scenario basis. We recommend post check-in reviews when: 1. We don't want to block other checks and processes on manual code reviews. Manual reviews take time, and some pieces may not require manual reviews at all. 2. We need to trace all changes and track history. 3. We have a code promotion strategy/process in place. For risk mitigation, post checkin code can be promoted to Accepted branches. Or can be rejected. Pre Checkin Reviews are used when 1. There is a high risk factor associated 2. Reviewers are generally (most of times) have immediate availability. 3. Team does not have strict tracking needs. Simply speaking, no single process fits all scenarios. You need to select what works best for your team/project. Thomas Schissler | Visual Studio ALM Ranger This is an interesting discussion, I’m right now discussing details about executing code reviews with my teams. I see and understand the aspects you brought in, but there is another side as well, I’d like to point out. 1.) If you do reviews per check in this is not very practical as a hard rule because this will disturb the flow of the team very often or it will lead to reduce the checkin frequency of the devs which I would not accept. 2.) If you do later reviews, for example if you review PBIs, it is not easy to find out which code you should review. Either you review all changesets associate with the PBI, but then you might review code which has been changed with a later checkin and the dev maybe has already fixed the issue. Or you review the diff of the latest changeset of the PBI with the first but then you might also review changes of other PBIs. Jakob Leander | Sr. Director, Avanade In my experience, manual code review: 1. Does not get done and at the very least does not get redone after changes (regardless of intentions at start of project) 2. When a project actually do it, they often do not do it right away = errors pile up 3. Requires a lot of time discussing/defining the standard and for the team to learn it However code review is very important since e.g. even small memory leaks in a high volume web solution have big consequences In the last years I have advocated following approach for code review - Architects up front do “at least one best practice example” of each type of component and tell the team. Copy from this one. This should include error handling, logging, security etc. - Dev lead on project continuously browse code to validate that the best practices are used. Especially that patterns etc. are not broken. You can do this formally after each sprint/iteration if you want. Once this is validated it is unlikely to “go bad” even during later code changes Agree with customer to rely on static code analysis from Visual Studio as the one and only coding standard. This has HUUGE benefits - You can easily tweak to reach the level you desire together with customer - It is easy to measure for both developers/management - It is 100% consistent across code base - It gets validated all the time so you never end up getting hammered by a customer review in the end - It is easy to tell the developer that you do not want code back unless it has zero errors = minimize communication You need to track this at least during nightly builds and make sure team sees total # issues. Do not allow #issues it to grow uncontrolled. On the project I run I require code analysis to have run on code before checkin (checkin rule). This means -  You have to have clean compile (or CA wont run) so this is extra benefit = very few broken builds - You can change a few of the rules to compile as errors instead of warnings. I often do this for “missing dispose” issues which you REALLY do not want in your app Tip: Place your custom CA rules files as part of solution. That  way it works when you do branching etc. (path to CA file is relative in VS) Some may argue that CA is not as good as manual inspection. But since manual inspection in reality suffers from the 3 issues in start it is IMO a MUCH better (and much cheaper) approach from helicopter perspective Tirthankar Dutta | Director, Avanade I think code review should be run both before and after check ins. There are some code metrics that are meant to be run on the entire codebase … Also, especially on multi-site projects, one should strive to architect in a way that lets men manage the framework while boys write the repetitive code… scales very well with the need to review less by containment and imposing architectural restrictions to emphasise the design. Bruno Capuano | Microsoft ALM MVP For code reviews (means peer reviews) in distributed team I use http://www.vsanywhere.com/default.aspx  David Jobling | Global Sr. Director, Avanade Peer review is the only way to scale and its a great practice for all in the team to learn to perform and accept. In my experience you soon learn who's code to watch more than others and tune the attention. Mikkel Toudal Kristiansen | Manager, Avanade If you have several branches in your code base, you will need to merge often. This requires manual merging, when a file has been changed in both branches. It offers a good opportunity to actually review to changed code. So my advice is: Merging between branches should be done as often as possible, it should be done by a senior developer, and he/she should perform a full code review of the code being merged. As for detecting architectural smells and code smells creeping into the code base, one really good third party tools exist: Ndepend (http://www.ndepend.com/, for static code analysis of the current state of the code base). You could also consider adding StyleCop to the solution. Jesse Houwing | Visual Studio ALM Ranger I gave a presentation on this subject on the TechDays conference in NL last year. See my presentation and slides here (talk in Dutch, but English presentation): http://blog.jessehouwing.nl/2012/03/did-you-miss-my-techdaysnl-talk-on-code.html  I’d like to add a few more points: - Before/After checking is mostly a trust issue. If you have a team that does diligent peer reviews and regularly talk/sit together or peer review, there’s no need to enforce a before-checkin policy. The peer peer-programming and regular feedback during development can take care of most of the review requirements as long as the team isn’t under stress. - Under stress, enforce pre-checkin reviews, it might sound strange, if you’re already under time or budgetary constraints, but it is under such conditions most real issues start to be created or pile up. - Use tools to catch most common errors, Code Analysis/FxCop was already mentioned. HP Fortify, Resharper, Coderush etc can help you there. There are also a lot of 3rd party rules you can add to Code Analysis. I’ve written a few myself (http://fccopcontrib.codeplex.com) and various teams from Microsoft have added their own rules (MSOCAF for SharePoint, WSSF for WCF). For common errors that keep cropping up, see if you can define a rule. It’s much easier. But more importantly make sure you have a good help page explaining *WHY* it's wrong. If you have small feature or developer branches/shelvesets, you might want to review pre-merge. It’s still better to do peer reviews and peer programming, but the most important thing is that bad quality code doesn’t make it into the important branch. So my philosophy: - Use tooling as much as possible. - Make sure the team understands the tooling and the importance of the things it flags. It’s too easy to just click suppress all to ignore the warnings. - Under stress, tighten process, it’s under stress that the problems of late reviews will really surface - Most importantly if you do reviews do them as early as possible, but never later than needed. In other words, pre-checkin/post checking doesn’t really matter, as long as the review is done before the code is released. It’ll just be much more expensive to fix any review outcomes the later you find them. --- I would love to hear what you think!

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  • TFS 2010 SDK: Smart Merge - Programmatically Create your own Merge Tool

    - by Tarun Arora
    Technorati Tags: Team Foundation Server 2010,TFS SDK,TFS API,TFS Merge Programmatically,TFS Work Items Programmatically,TFS Administration Console,ALM   The information available in the Merge window in Team Foundation Server 2010 is very important in the decision making during the merging process. However, at present the merge window shows very limited information, more that often you are interested to know the work item, files modified, code reviewer notes, policies overridden, etc associated with the change set. Our friends at Microsoft are working hard to change the game again with vNext, but because at present the merge window is a model window you have to cancel the merge process and go back one after the other to check the additional information you need. If you can relate to what i am saying, you will enjoy this blog post! I will show you how to programmatically create your own merging window using the TFS 2010 API. A few screen shots of the WPF TFS 2010 API – Custom Merging Application that we will be creating programmatically, Excited??? Let’s start coding… 1. Get All Team Project Collections for the TFS Server You can read more on connecting to TFS programmatically on my blog post => How to connect to TFS Programmatically 1: public static ReadOnlyCollection<CatalogNode> GetAllTeamProjectCollections() 2: { 3: TfsConfigurationServer configurationServer = 4: TfsConfigurationServerFactory. 5: GetConfigurationServer(new Uri("http://xxx:8080/tfs/")); 6: 7: CatalogNode catalogNode = configurationServer.CatalogNode; 8: return catalogNode.QueryChildren(new Guid[] 9: { CatalogResourceTypes.ProjectCollection }, 10: false, CatalogQueryOptions.None); 11: } 2. Get All Team Projects for the selected Team Project Collection You can read more on connecting to TFS programmatically on my blog post => How to connect to TFS Programmatically 1: public static ReadOnlyCollection<CatalogNode> GetTeamProjects(string instanceId) 2: { 3: ReadOnlyCollection<CatalogNode> teamProjects = null; 4: 5: TfsConfigurationServer configurationServer = 6: TfsConfigurationServerFactory.GetConfigurationServer(new Uri("http://xxx:8080/tfs/")); 7: 8: CatalogNode catalogNode = configurationServer.CatalogNode; 9: var teamProjectCollections = catalogNode.QueryChildren(new Guid[] {CatalogResourceTypes.ProjectCollection }, 10: false, CatalogQueryOptions.None); 11: 12: foreach (var teamProjectCollection in teamProjectCollections) 13: { 14: if (string.Compare(teamProjectCollection.Resource.Properties["InstanceId"], instanceId, true) == 0) 15: { 16: teamProjects = teamProjectCollection.QueryChildren(new Guid[] { CatalogResourceTypes.TeamProject }, false, 17: CatalogQueryOptions.None); 18: } 19: } 20: 21: return teamProjects; 22: } 3. Get All Branches with in a Team Project programmatically I will be passing the name of the Team Project for which i want to retrieve all the branches. When consuming the ‘Version Control Service’ you have the method QueryRootBranchObjects, you need to pass the recursion type => none, one, full. Full implies you are interested in all branches under that root branch. 1: public static List<BranchObject> GetParentBranch(string projectName) 2: { 3: var branches = new List<BranchObject>(); 4: 5: var tfs = TfsTeamProjectCollectionFactory.GetTeamProjectCollection(new Uri("http://<ServerName>:8080/tfs/<teamProjectName>")); 6: var versionControl = tfs.GetService<VersionControlServer>(); 7: 8: var allBranches = versionControl.QueryRootBranchObjects(RecursionType.Full); 9: 10: foreach (var branchObject in allBranches) 11: { 12: if (branchObject.Properties.RootItem.Item.ToUpper().Contains(projectName.ToUpper())) 13: { 14: branches.Add(branchObject); 15: } 16: } 17: 18: return branches; 19: } 4. Get All Branches associated to the Parent Branch Programmatically Now that we have the parent branch, it is important to retrieve all child branches of that parent branch. Lets see how we can achieve this using the TFS API. 1: public static List<ItemIdentifier> GetChildBranch(string parentBranch) 2: { 3: var branches = new List<ItemIdentifier>(); 4: 5: var tfs = TfsTeamProjectCollectionFactory.GetTeamProjectCollection(new Uri("http://<ServerName>:8080/tfs/<CollectionName>")); 6: var versionControl = tfs.GetService<VersionControlServer>(); 7: 8: var i = new ItemIdentifier(parentBranch); 9: var allBranches = 10: versionControl.QueryBranchObjects(i, RecursionType.None); 11: 12: foreach (var branchObject in allBranches) 13: { 14: foreach (var childBranche in branchObject.ChildBranches) 15: { 16: branches.Add(childBranche); 17: } 18: } 19: 20: return branches; 21: } 5. Get Merge candidates between two branches Programmatically Now that we have the parent and the child branch that we are interested to perform a merge between we will use the method ‘GetMergeCandidates’ in the namespace ‘Microsoft.TeamFoundation.VersionControl.Client’ => http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb138934(v=VS.100).aspx 1: public static MergeCandidate[] GetMergeCandidates(string fromBranch, string toBranch) 2: { 3: var tfs = TfsTeamProjectCollectionFactory.GetTeamProjectCollection(new Uri("http://<ServerName>:8080/tfs/<CollectionName>")); 4: var versionControl = tfs.GetService<VersionControlServer>(); 5: 6: return versionControl.GetMergeCandidates(fromBranch, toBranch, RecursionType.Full); 7: } 6. Get changeset details Programatically Now that we have the changeset id that we are interested in, we can get details of the changeset. The Changeset object contains the properties => http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/microsoft.teamfoundation.versioncontrol.client.changeset.aspx - Changes: Gets or sets an array of Change objects that comprise this changeset. - CheckinNote: Gets or sets the check-in note of the changeset. - Comment: Gets or sets the comment of the changeset. - PolicyOverride: Gets or sets the policy override information of this changeset. - WorkItems: Gets an array of work items that are associated with this changeset. 1: public static Changeset GetChangeSetDetails(int changeSetId) 2: { 3: var tfs = TfsTeamProjectCollectionFactory.GetTeamProjectCollection(new Uri("http://<ServerName>:8080/tfs/<CollectionName>")); 4: var versionControl = tfs.GetService<VersionControlServer>(); 5: 6: return versionControl.GetChangeset(changeSetId); 7: } 7. Possibilities In future posts i will try and extend this idea to explore further possibilities, but few features that i am sure will further help during the merge decision making process would be, - View changed files - Compare modified file with current/previous version - Merge Preview - Last Merge date Any other features that you can think of?

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