Search Results

Search found 1503 results on 61 pages for 'timestamp'.

Page 1/61 | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  | Next Page >

  • Converting local timestamp to UTC timestamp in Java.

    - by fiXedd
    I have a milliseconds-since-local-epoch timestamp that I'd like to convert into a milliseconds-since-UTC-epoch timestamp. From a quick glance through the docs it looks like something like this would work: int offset = TimeZone.getDefault().getRawOffset(); long newTime = oldTime - offset; Is there a better way to do this?

    Read the article

  • TimeStamp and mini-ETL (extract, transform, load)

    - by Tomaz.tsql
    Short example how to use Timestamp for a mini ETL process of your data. example below is following: Table_1 is production table on server1 Table_2 is datawarehouse table on server2 where datawarehouse is located Every day data are extracted, transformed and loaded to dataware house for further off-line usage and data analysis and business decision support. 1. Creating the environment if object_id ('table_1') is not null drop table table_1; go if object_id ('table_2') is not null drop...(read more)

    Read the article

  • "Error encountered while BER decoding" in Adobe Acrobat Pro X when applying timestamp

    - by djechelon
    I have a tedious problem with Acrobat Pro X 10.1.3.23: when I want to apply a timestamp to a document I always get that error. I have configured VeriSign TSA server http://timestamp.verisign.com/scripts/timstamp.dll and it returns that error. I have tried Comodo CA http://timestamp.comodoca.com/authenticode and Aruba https://servizi.arubapec.it/tsa/ngrequest.php but all three returned the same exact error. My PDFs are now signed without a certified timestamp and this is a problem for me. I'm obliged to sign documents and apply a certified timestamp at the same time. This seems to be a common error in Acrobat, but I found no solution to it. Can somebody help me?

    Read the article

  • SQL Server: Clutering by timestamp; pros/cons

    - by Ian Boyd
    i have a table in SQL Server, where i want inserts to be added to the end of the table (as opposed to a clustering key that would cause them to be inserted in the middle). This means i want the table clustered by some column that will constantly increase. This could be achieved by clustering on a datetime column: CREATE TABLE Things ( ... CreatedDate datetime DEFAULT getdate(), [timestamp] timestamp, CONSTRAINT [IX_Things] UNIQUE CLUSTERED (CreatedDate) ) But i can't guaranteed that two Things won't have the same time. So my requirements can't really be achieved by a datetime column. i could add a dummy identity int column, and cluster on that: CREATE TABLE Things ( ... RowID int IDENTITY(1,1), [timestamp] timestamp, CONSTRAINT [IX_Things] UNIQUE CLUSTERED (RowID) ) But you'll notice that my table already constains a timestamp column; a column which is guaranteed to be a monotonically increasing. This is exactly the characteristic i want for a candidate cluster key. So i cluster the table on the rowversion (aka timestamp) column: CREATE TABLE Things ( ... [timestamp] timestamp, CONSTRAINT [IX_Things] UNIQUE CLUSTERED (timestamp) ) Rather than adding a dummy identity int column (RowID) to ensure an order, i use what i already have. What i'm looking for are thoughts of why this is a bad idea; and what other ideas are better. Note: Community wiki, since the answers are subjective.

    Read the article

  • SQL Server: Clustering by timestamp; pros/cons

    - by Ian Boyd
    I have a table in SQL Server, where i want inserts to be added to the end of the table (as opposed to a clustering key that would cause them to be inserted in the middle). This means I want the table clustered by some column that will constantly increase. This could be achieved by clustering on a datetime column: CREATE TABLE Things ( ... CreatedDate datetime DEFAULT getdate(), [timestamp] timestamp, CONSTRAINT [IX_Things] UNIQUE CLUSTERED (CreatedDate) ) But I can't guaranteed that two Things won't have the same time. So my requirements can't really be achieved by a datetime column. I could add a dummy identity int column, and cluster on that: CREATE TABLE Things ( ... RowID int IDENTITY(1,1), [timestamp] timestamp, CONSTRAINT [IX_Things] UNIQUE CLUSTERED (RowID) ) But you'll notice that my table already constains a timestamp column; a column which is guaranteed to be a monotonically increasing. This is exactly the characteristic I want for a candidate cluster key. So I cluster the table on the rowversion (aka timestamp) column: CREATE TABLE Things ( ... [timestamp] timestamp, CONSTRAINT [IX_Things] UNIQUE CLUSTERED (timestamp) ) Rather than adding a dummy identity int column (RowID) to ensure an order, I use what I already have. What I'm looking for are thoughts of why this is a bad idea; and what other ideas are better. Note: Community wiki, since the answers are subjective.

    Read the article

  • SQL SERVER – Asynchronous Update and Timestamp – Check if Row Values are Changed Since Last Retrieve

    - by pinaldave
    Here is the question received just this morning. “Pinal, Our application is much different than other application you might have come across. In simple words, I would like to call it Asynchronous Updated Application. We need your quick opinion about one of the situation which we are facing. From business side: We have bidding system (similar to eBay but not exactly) and where multiple parties bid on one item, during the last few minutes of bidding many parties try to bid at the same time with the same price. When they hit submit, we would like to check if the original data which they retrieved is changed or not. If the original data which they have retrieved is the same, we will accept their new proposed price. If original data are changed, they will have to resubmit the data with new price. From technical side: We have a row which we retrieve in our application. Multiple users are retrieving the same row. Some of the users will update the value of the row and submit. However, only the very first user should be allowed to update the row and remaining all the users will have to re-fetch the row and updated it once again. We do not want to lock any record as that will create other problems. Do you have any solution for this kind of situation?” Fantastic Question. I believe there is good chance that we can use timestamp datatype in this kind of application. Before we continue let us see following simple example. USE tempdb GO CREATE TABLE SampleTable (ID INT, Col1 VARCHAR(100), TimeStampCol TIMESTAMP) GO INSERT INTO SampleTable (ID, Col1) VALUES (1, 'FirstVal') GO SELECT ID, Col1, TimeStampCol FROM SampleTable st GO UPDATE SampleTable SET Col1 = 'NextValue' GO SELECT ID, Col1, TimeStampCol FROM SampleTable st GO DROP TABLE SampleTable GO Now let us see the resultset. Here is the simple explanation of the scenario. We created a table with simple column with TIMESTAMP datatype. When we inserted a very first value the timestamp was generated. When we updated any value in that row, the timestamp was updated with the new value. Every single time when we update any value in the row, it will generate new timestamp value. Now let us apply this in an original question’s scenario. In that case multiple users are retrieving the same row. Everybody will have the same now same TimeStamp with them. Before any user update any value they should once again retrieve the timestamp from the table and compare with the timestamp they have with them. If both of the timestamp have the same value – the original row has not been updated and we can safely update the row with the new value. After initial update, now the row will contain a new timestamp. Any subsequent update to the same row should also go to the same process of checking the value of the timestamp they have in their memory. In this case, the timestamp from memory will be different from the timestamp in the row. This indicates that row in the table has changed and new updates should not be allowed. I believe timestamp can be very very useful in this kind of scenario. Is there any better alternative? Please leave a comment with the suggestion and I will post on the blog with due credit. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

    Read the article

  • How to disable windows server 2008 timestamp response

    - by Cal
    Posted this question on stackoverflow but then got instructed to post it here: I was using Rapid7's Nexpose to scan one of our web servers (windows server 2008), and got a vulnerability for timestamp response. According to Rapid7, timestamp response shall be disabled: http://www.rapid7.com/db/vulnerabilities/generic-tcp-timestamp So far I have tried several things: Edit the registry, add a "Tcp1323Opts" key to HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters, and set it to 0. http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc938205.aspx Use this command: netsh int tcp set global timestamps=disabled Tried powershell command: Set-netTCPsetting -SettingName InternetCustom -Timestamps disabled (got error: Set-netTCPsetting : The term 'Set-netTCPsetting' is not recognized as the name of a cmdlet, function, script file, or operable program. Check the spelling of the name, or if a path was included, verify that the path is correct and try again.) None of above attempts was successful, after re-scan we still got the same alert. Rapid7 suggested using a firewall that's capable of blocking it, but we want to know if there is a setting on windows to achieve it. Is it through a specific port? If yes, what is the port number? If not, could you suggest a 3rd party firewall that is capable of blocking it? Thank you very much.

    Read the article

  • MySQL: Ignore the timestamp attribute

    - by Nique
    I have a timestamp column in my database, and i use it for almost every field, but now, i just want to update the hit counter.. and i do not want to update the timestamp column with it. I use the timestamp field to see the last 'content' update. Not for every hit. Is it possible to let mysql stop updating the timestamp column for just one query?

    Read the article

  • linux/shell: change a file's modify timestamp relatively?

    - by index
    My Canon camera produces files like IMG_1234.JPG and MVI_1234.AVI. It also timestamps those files. Unfortunately during a trip to another timezone several cameras were used, one of which did not have the correct time zone set - meta data mess.. Now I would like to correct this (not EXIF, the file's "modify" timestamp on disk). Proposed algorithm: 1 read file's modify date 2 add delta, i.e. hhmmss (preferred: change timezone) 3 write new timestamp Unless someone knows a tool or a combination of tools that do the trick directly, maybe one could simplify the calculation using epoch time (seconds since ..) and whip up a shell script. Any help appreciated!

    Read the article

  • C# Getting Just Date From Timestamp

    - by Soo
    If I have a timestamp in the form: yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss:mmm How can I just extract the date from the timestamp? For instance, if a timestamp reads: "2010-05-18 08:36:52:236" what is the best way to just get 2010-05-18 from it. What I'm trying to do is isolate the date portion of the timestamp, define a custom time for it to create a new time stamp. Is there a more efficient way to define the time of the timestamp without first taking out the date, and then adding a new time?

    Read the article

  • Why does the minus operator give different result than the TIMESTAMPDIFF() function in mysql?

    - by f3r3nc
    Since TIMESTAMP in mysql is stored as a 32bit value representing the time interval from 1970-jan-1 0:00:00 in seconds, I assumed that using minus (-) operator on TIMESTAMP values would give the difference of these values in seconds. Actually not: +---------------------------------------------------------------------+ | TIMESTAMP("2010-04-02 10:30:00") - TIMESTAMP("2010-04-02 10:29:59") | +---------------------------------------------------------------------+ | 41.000000 | +---------------------------------------------------------------------+ 1 row in set (0.05 sec) mysql> select timestampdiff(SECOND,TIMESTAMP("2010-04-02 10:30:00"),TIMESTAMP("2010-04-02 10:29:59")); +-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ | timestampdiff(SECOND,TIMESTAMP("2010-04-02 10:30:00"),TIMESTAMP("2010-04-02 10:29:59")) | +-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ | -1 | +-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ mysql> select TIMESTAMP("2010-04-02 10:30:00") - TIMESTAMP("2010-04-02 10:30:01") ; +---------------------------------------------------------------------+ | TIMESTAMP("2010-04-02 10:30:00") - TIMESTAMP("2010-04-02 10:30:01") | +---------------------------------------------------------------------+ | -1.000000 | +---------------------------------------------------------------------+ +---------------------------------------------------------------------+ | TIMESTAMP("2010-04-02 10:30:00") - TIMESTAMP("2010-04-02 10:31:00") | +---------------------------------------------------------------------+ | -100.000000 | +---------------------------------------------------------------------+ It seems like one minute difference is 100 instead of 60. Why is this?

    Read the article

  • Bad value for type timestamp on production server

    - by Juan Javaloyes
    I'm working with: seam 2.2.2 + hibernate + richfaces + jboss 5.1 + postgres I have an module which needs to load some data from the database. Easy. The problem is, on development it works fine, 100%, but when I deploy on my production server and try to get the data, an error rise: could not read column value from result set: fechahor9_504_; Bad value for type timestamp : [[email protected] SQL Error: 0, SQLState: 22007 Bad value for type timestamp : [[email protected] javax.persistence.PersistenceException: org.hibernate.exception.DataException: could not execute query [more errors] Caused by: org.postgresql.util.PSQLException: Bad value for type timestamp : [[email protected] at org.postgresql.jdbc2.TimestampUtils.loadCalendar(TimestampUtils.java:232) [more errors] Caused by: java.lang.NumberFormatException: Trailing junk on timestamp: '' at org.postgresql.jdbc2.TimestampUtils.loadCalendar(TimestampUtils.java:226) I can't understand why it works on my machine (development) and why not on production. Any clues? Anyone gone through the same problem? Is exactly the same compilation

    Read the article

  • Timestamp as part of composite primary key?

    - by Curtis White
    I get this error when using linq-to-sql with timestamp as part of a composite primary key: "The primary key column of type 'Timestamp' cannot be generated by the server." I'm guessing this may be due to the fact timestamp is just a row version thus perhaps it must be created after the insert? Or...

    Read the article

  • Python datetime to Unix timestamp

    - by Off Rhoden
    I have to create an "Expires" value 5 minutes in the future, but I have to supply it in UNIX Timestamp format. I have this so far, but it seems like a hack. def expires(): '''return a UNIX style timestamp representing 5 minutes from now''' epoch = datetime.datetime(1970, 1, 1) seconds_in_a_day = 60 * 60 * 24 five_minutes = datetime.timedelta(seconds=5*60) five_minutes_from_now = datetime.datetime.now() + five_minutes since_epoch = five_minutes_from_now - epoch return since_epoch.days * seconds_in_a_day + since_epoch.seconds Is there a module or function that does the timestamp conversion for me?

    Read the article

  • DB2 timestamp PHP DateTime

    - by Dolfa
    After upgrade to PHP 5.3 my application is returning DB2 columns with Timestamp type as "2010-12-15-10.23.22.716000". This is causing problem for PHP DateTime function, as it fails with Failed to parse time string (2010-12-15-10.23.22.716000) at position 25 (0): Unexpected character It seems its having a problem with too much accuracy in DB2 timestamp. Can I somehow force connection to change timestamp format with it is fetching data into?

    Read the article

  • SQlite: Column format for unix timestamp; Integer types

    - by SF.
    Original problem: What is the right column format for a unix timestamp? The net is full of confusion: some posts claim SQLite has no unsigned types - either whatsoever, or with exception of the 64bit int type (but there are (counter-)examples that invoke UNSIGNED INTEGER). The data types page mentions it only in a bigint example. It also claims there is a 6-byte integer but doesn't give a name for it. Of course standard INTEGER being 4-byte signed signed stores unix timestamps as negative numbers. I've heard that some systems return 64-bit timestamps too. OTOH I'm not too fond of wasting 4 bytes to store 1 extra bit (top bit of timestamp), and even if I have to pick a bigger data format, I'd rather go for the 6-byte one. I've even seen a post that claims SQLite unix timestamp is of type REAL... Complete problem: Could someone please clarify that mess?

    Read the article

  • HQL(hibernate) timestamp range match

    - by Saky
    I need to write a query to get an object between a range of time, currently the query looks like this: Timestamp from = ... Timestamp to = ... getHibernateTemplate().find("from " + Person.class.getName() + " ml where ml.lastModifiedOn>="+from.toString()+" and m1.lastModifiedOn<=" + to.toString()); However, this doesnot work for obvious reasons. How can I format the timestamp to be acceptable by the query. org.springframework.orm.hibernate3.HibernateQueryException: unexpected token: 16 near line 1, column 123 [from Person ml where ml.lastModifiedOn=2010-02-12 16:00:21.292 and m1.lastModifiedOn

    Read the article

  • Pulling a timestamp from an XML feed with PHP but seem to be to many digits

    - by Craig Ward
    I am pulling a timestamp from a feed and it gives 12 digits (1269088723811). When I convert it, it comes out as 1901-12-13 20:45:52, but if I put the timestamp into http://www.epochconverter.com/ it comes out as Sat, 20 Mar 2010 12:38:43 GMT, which is the correct time. epochconverter.com mentions that it maybe in milliseconds so I have amended the script to take care of it using $mil = $timestamp; $seconds = $mil / 1000; $date = date('Y-m-d H:i:s', date($seconds)); but it still converts the date wrong, 1970-01-25 20:31:23. What am I doing wrong?

    Read the article

  • UNIX timestamp always in GMT?

    - by bn
    UNIX timestamp always in GMT? I tried to run php function time() and when I tried to convert the unix timestamp from the time() function, the output is not similar to the computer time. Thank You

    Read the article

  • How to read date from the form and calculate a timestamp

    - by Vafello
    I would like to calculate a timestamp based on the input date. I would like to calculate it from the user input (something like 12/12/2011) I guess I need a function that changes the format to something readable for php and then calculate timestamp for this date. Maybe I should use strtotime() function? Any ideas will be appreciated. $date = $_POST['date']; <input type="text" name="date" value="">

    Read the article

  • php mysql timestamp

    - by user342391
    I need to track the date and time a user was created in my mysql database. I have column called 'created' and the data type as TIMESTAMP. The problem is that when a user changes their password or other information the TIMESTAMP value changes. How can I set this to not change????

    Read the article

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  | Next Page >