Search Results

Search found 628 results on 26 pages for 'vi'.

Page 1/26 | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  | Next Page >

  • Problem with text deletion in vi editor

    - by user184256
    When I am writing C code on the vi editor, I am not able to use the backspace keys or my arrow keys to delete or navigate through lines. Some unexpected special characters occur on the screen that is on middle of my code and I am not able to delete them also. If I use my delete key, the whole code gets deleted. I have tried both insert mode using 'i' and 'a'. I am able to manage this situation for C programming by using the text editors but when I am creating LeX and yacc programs, I find this awkward. Can you please help me with this?

    Read the article

  • I get the following error when i open any progaram in vi please help me

    - by Adithya Chakilam
    E325: ATTENTION Found a swap file by the name ".ptr.c.swp" owned by: honey dated: Sat Oct 26 12:49:38 2013 file name: ~honey/ptr.c modified: YES user name: honey host name: honey-desktop process ID: 2542 While opening file "ptr.c" dated: Sun Nov 3 09:05:49 2013 NEWER than swap file! (1) Another program may be editing the same file. If this is the case, be careful not to end up with two different instances of the same file when making changes. Quit, or continue with caution. (2) An edit session for this file crashed. If this is the case, use ":recover" or "vim -r ptr.c" to recover the changes (see ":help recovery"). If you did this already, delete the swap file ".ptr.c.swp" to avoid this message. "ptr.c" 9L, 136C Press ENTER or type command to continue

    Read the article

  • Vi on Linux: show ^M line endings for DOS-format files

    - by sss
    On Solaris, if you open a file in vi that has Windows line endings, this shows up as ^M at the end of every line. On Linux, vi is cleverer and understands the Windows file format, and does not display ^M. Is there a setting to make Linux vi behave the same as Solaris in this respect? A common problem for us is copying a shell script off a (Windows) dev box and forgetting to dos2unix it, and then being confused when it doesn't work properly. On Solaris the problem is obvious as soon as you vi the file, but not on Linux. Thanks.

    Read the article

  • How to deal with job that stop and cannot continue unless made foreground?

    - by Vi
    Recent example: mountlo (using UML): [email protected]:~/b$ mountlo -m 16 -d /dev/uba1 /home/vi/mnt/usb -t vfat -o iocharset=utf8,allow_other& [1] 32561 [email protected]:~/b$ Checking that ptrace can change system call numbers...OK Checking syscall emulation patch for ptrace...OK Checking advanced syscall emulation patch for ptrace...OK Checking PROT_EXEC mmap in /tmp...OK Checking for the skas3 patch in the host: - /proc/mm...not found - PTRACE_FAULTINFO...not found - PTRACE_LDT...not found UML running in SKAS0 mode [1]+ Stopped mountlo -m 16 -d /dev/uba1 /home/vi/mnt/usb -t vfat -o iocharset=utf8,allow_other [email protected]:~/b$ bg [1]+ mountlo -m 16 -d /dev/uba1 /home/vi/mnt/usb -t vfat -o iocharset=utf8,allow_other & [1]+ Stopped mountlo -m 16 -d /dev/uba1 /home/vi/mnt/usb -t vfat -o iocharset=utf8,allow_other [email protected]:~/b$ bg [1]+ mountlo -m 16 -d /dev/uba1 /home/vi/mnt/usb -t vfat -o iocharset=utf8,allow_other & [1]+ Stopped mountlo -m 16 -d /dev/uba1 /home/vi/mnt/usb -t vfat -o iocharset=utf8,allow_other [email protected]:~/b$ bg [1]+ mountlo -m 16 -d /dev/uba1 /home/vi/mnt/usb -t vfat -o iocharset=utf8,allow_other & [1]+ Stopped mountlo -m 16 -d /dev/uba1 /home/vi/mnt/usb -t vfat -o iocharset=utf8,allow_other [email protected]:~/b$ fg mountlo -m 16 -d /dev/uba1 /home/vi/mnt/usb -t vfat -o iocharset=utf8,allow_other Linux version 2.6.15 ([email protected]) (gcc version 3.3.5 (Debian 1:3.3.5-13)) #1 Mon Feb 27 13:27:52 CET 2006 (normal output) ... [email protected]:~/b$ socat - exec:'mountlo -m 16 -d /dev/uba1 /home/vi/mnt/usb -t vfat -o iocharset=utf8\,allow_other',pty,ctty fusermount: waitpid: No child processes [email protected]:~/b$ Also happens with Gimp (when it does run it's plug-ins). Parts of Gimp started by `gimp q.jpg&' freeze and cannot continue unless "killall -CONT" or made foreground. Is it a bug? How to reliably start things in a background?

    Read the article

  • Escape not idempotent in zsh's vi emulation?

    - by user1063042
    I have zsh configured to use vi keybindings. I've noticed some unexpected behavior with "escape". In vim (I haven't tested vanilla vi) if I hit escape twice, I can hit 'i' once to return to insert mode. In zsh if I happen to hit escape twice, hitting 'i' won't return me to insert mode, I have to hit it twice. Another example of this comes up in navigation. If I hit escape once, I can use '^' and '$' as expected. But if I've accidentally hit escape twice (or more) they fail to work until I return to insert mode and escape again. Do I somehow have zsh configured incorrectly, or is this just a known difference in zsh's vi emulation?

    Read the article

  • How to set up "vi" shell environment as default

    - by Ency
    It could by silly question, but I can not find answer anywhere. So, I'd like to use vi (you know set -o vi can do the trick) as default in my shell instead of emacs, but I do not want to put it into bash startup scripts. Why? Because I work as verification engineer and I am using several user accounts, which are also quite often reinstalled. Changing of default profile is not answer too, because some of software creates its own home directory (independent on default profile).

    Read the article

  • Editing Multiple files in vi with Wildcards

    - by Alan Storm
    When using the programmers text editor vi, I'll often using a wildcard search to be lazy about the file I want to edit vi ThisIsAReallLongFi*.txt When this matches a single file it works great. However, if it matches multiple files vi does something weird. First, it opens the first file for editing Second, when I :wq out of the file, I get a message the bottom of the terminal that looks like this E173: 4 more files to edit Hit ENTER or type command to continue When I hit enter, it returns me to edit mode in the file I was just in. The behavior I'd expect here would be that vi would move on to the next file to edit. So, What's the logic behind vi's behavior here Is there a way to move on and edit the next file that's been matched? And yes, I know about tab completion, this question is based on curiosity and wanting to understand the shell better.

    Read the article

  • For what to use VI?

    - by Zikko
    I recently started picking up VI, going through some tutorials and trying to get used to it. But I still have some questions about it. It seems to be nice for small one file changes, but as soon as I start to try doing bigger things it seems to be lacking. For example I'm used to have code formatting, import organizing, simple overview over all packages and other things that an IDE gives me. I saw some tutorials on how to use VI as an IDE, but it felt awkward at best. Now I'm just wondering, what are the typical use cases for VI? Is it typically used to edit small files, or can it be used for larger projects? And if you use it in larger projects, how do you make it work? Or would it be a lot easier to use an IDE with VI keybindings?

    Read the article

  • vi visual mode doesn't work

    - by BobMarley
    I'm running vim (7.0.237) after sshing to a remote CentOS box, and it just won't enter visual mode. When I press 'v', it just beeps and does nothing. I'm running Ubuntu with GNOME Terminal, and the local copy of vi works fine, so I don't see how this could be a problem with the terminal. I have the same .vimrc file on the local and remote machines, and the only settings are: set nocompatible; set tabstop=4. I'm at a total loss here, any ideas?

    Read the article

  • undo continually vi

    - by wowrt
    Hi, I am using vi(not Vim) and I would like to continually undo the changes made. u works for a single command undo and Ufor a single line undo. But Is there a way to undo continuously like vim(I recall a command in vim can even undo changes by time!) in vi? Thanks in Advance.

    Read the article

  • Why should I learn vi/vim/emacs? [on hold]

    - by Tom Busby
    I hear all the flame wars about vi/vim and emacs and which is better etc but honestly, I just use sublime. When I have to edit from the CLI I use nano (it's simpler to use). I'm wondering if I'm missing something. Should I put the time/effort into learning one of those text-editors thoroughly, and if so... why? What is it about these two editors that evokes so much adoration and devotion? Why would I want to use any of them over my nice, multi-caret, GUI text editor?

    Read the article

  • Emacs/Vim/Vi - do they have a place in modern software development ecosystem? [closed]

    - by Anton Gogolev
    Watching all those screencasts (and listening all those podcasts) with more-or-less famous hackers/programmers I hear that many of those use emacs/vi(m) for their daily work. Now, I myself tried using both emacs and vim, and I honestly cannot understand why would anybody use these for any kind of serious development. The most advertised feature is something along the lines of "you'll be able to work with text (meaning cutting, pasting, duplicating, moving, etc) up to ten times faster than with conventional IDEs", but I don't buy that. When has the success of a software project been defined by how fast a programmer can juggle lines in a text editor or by saving a couple of keystrokes here and there? Plugins and extensions? I bet nothing comes close to R# or IDEA in terms of refactoring support ("Rename" refactoring implemented by means of "Search and Replace" is not a refactoring IMO); others are trivial. Ubiquitous and available everywhere? So what? How often do you find yourself editing files over a 300 baud connection on an esoteric *nix installation without a VCS? So here goes: do said editors have a justified place in a modern software development ecosystem?

    Read the article

  • Become a Vi Master by Learning These 30+ Key Bindings

    - by Chris Hoffman
    Vi is a powerful text editor included on most Linux systems. Many people swear by vi and find it faster than any other editor once they’ve learned its key bindings. You can even use vi key bindings in Bash. We’ve already covered getting started with vi for beginners. If you haven’t used vi in a while, you might want to give that post a look to get a refresher on the basics. How To Customize Your Wallpaper with Google Image Searches, RSS Feeds, and More 47 Keyboard Shortcuts That Work in All Web Browsers How To Hide Passwords in an Encrypted Drive Even the FBI Can’t Get Into

    Read the article

  • Navigating multiples files vi editor

    - by learner135
    According to http://www.lagmonster.org/docs/vi2.html the command :p would make vi go to the previous file. Unfortunately, this isn't working for me. However :n works and goes to the next page. What should I use to go to the previous file? For :p I get the message, Hit Return to continue and it stays in the same page. Thanks. Edit: I am sshing to an AIX box and using the vi in Ksh if that helps.

    Read the article

  • Auto-Completion in Unix VI editor

    - by IllustratedInsomnia
    Hey guys, after using graphical IDE's like Visual Studio, I'm used to pressing CTRL+Space to auto-complete a variable or function name. Now, I know such a thing isn't completely possible in VI, but I heard there was a list of commands that could be mapped that allowed automatic completion of variables and functions in the current file opened. Does anyone know what this sequence is? Thanks in advance.

    Read the article

  • Why are Vi and Emacs popular ?

    - by Teifion
    I've never learned to use Vi or Emacs yet people do use them still, despite there being other editors out there that are free and useful. What is it about these two and any others like them that means they hold appeal in the face of the newer editors?

    Read the article

  • Why do people still use Vi and Emacs?

    - by mawg
    This is not a subjective question. I am genuinely looking for techinccal reasons to do so. I will risk offending some folks (not intended as an offence – maybe as a goad) by saying that I have been coding for 30+ years and used to be religously attched to each of them, but as soone as I saw editor-cum-IDE which seemed to offer more, I moved on. Is there any compelling reason, in this day and age, to choose Vi / Emacs over – say- Eclipse for code editing? Even Notepad++ for win-doze users seems to offer more. Just sayin'

    Read the article

  • is there a way to switch bash or zsh from emacs mode to vi mode with a keystroke

    - by Brandon
    I'd like to be able to switch temporarily from emacs mode to vi mode, since vi mode is sometimes better, but I'm usually half-way through typing something before I realize I want I don't want to switch permanently to vi mode, because I normally prefer emacs mode on the command line, mostly because it's what I'm used to, and over the years many of the keystrokes have become second nature. (As an editor I generally use emacs in viper mode, so that I can use both vi and emacs keystrokes, since I found myself accidentally using them in vi all the time, and screwing things up, and because in some cases I find vi keystrokes more memorable and handy, and in other cases emacs.)

    Read the article

  • vi issue in SSH TTYs to Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS

    - by Steve Campbell
    After upgrading my server to Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS, I can no longer use the vi editor to edit anything in an SSH terminal (I access the server by launching ssh sessions from Cygwin running on Windows). The empty portions of the vi window fill with garbage. The workaround is to launch an xterm from the server back to my Cygwin/X display. Using vi from within the xterm works fine. Setting my TERM to vt100/vt220/xterm does not help.

    Read the article

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  | Next Page >