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  • ASP.NET Podcast Show #148 - ASP.NET WebForms to build a Mobile Web Application

    - by Wallym
    Check the podcast site for the original url. This is the video and source code for an ASP.NET WebForms app that I wrote that is optimized for the iPhone and mobile environments.  Subscribe to everything. Subscribe to WMV. Subscribe to M4V for iPhone/iPad. Subscribe to MP3. Download WMV. Download M4V for iPhone/iPad. Download MP3. Link to iWebKit. Source Code: <%@ Page Title="MapSplore" Language="C#" MasterPageFile="iPhoneMaster.master" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeFile="Default.aspx.cs" Inherits="AT_iPhone_Default" %> <asp:Content ID="Content1" ContentPlaceHolderID="head" Runat="Server"></asp:Content><asp:Content ID="Content2" ContentPlaceHolderID="Content" Runat="Server" ClientIDMode="Static">    <asp:ScriptManager ID="sm" runat="server"         EnablePartialRendering="true" EnableHistory="false" EnableCdn="true" />    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://maps.google.com/maps/api/js?sensor=true"></script>    <script  language="javascript"  type="text/javascript">    <!--    Sys.WebForms.PageRequestManager.getInstance().add_endRequest(endRequestHandle);    function endRequestHandle(sender, Args) {        setupMapDiv();        setupPlaceIveBeen();    }    function setupPlaceIveBeen() {        var mapPlaceIveBeen = document.getElementById('divPlaceIveBeen');        if (mapPlaceIveBeen != null) {            var PlaceLat = document.getElementById('<%=hdPlaceIveBeenLatitude.ClientID %>').value;            var PlaceLon = document.getElementById('<%=hdPlaceIveBeenLongitude.ClientID %>').value;            var PlaceTitle = document.getElementById('<%=lblPlaceIveBeenName.ClientID %>').innerHTML;            var latlng = new google.maps.LatLng(PlaceLat, PlaceLon);            var myOptions = {                zoom: 14,                center: latlng,                mapTypeId: google.maps.MapTypeId.ROADMAP            };            var map = new google.maps.Map(mapPlaceIveBeen, myOptions);            var marker = new google.maps.Marker({                position: new google.maps.LatLng(PlaceLat, PlaceLon),                map: map,                title: PlaceTitle,                clickable: false            });        }    }    function setupMapDiv() {        var mapdiv = document.getElementById('divImHere');        if (mapdiv != null) {            var PlaceLat = document.getElementById('<%=hdPlaceLat.ClientID %>').value;            var PlaceLon = document.getElementById('<%=hdPlaceLon.ClientID %>').value;            var PlaceTitle = document.getElementById('<%=hdPlaceTitle.ClientID %>').value;            var latlng = new google.maps.LatLng(PlaceLat, PlaceLon);            var myOptions = {                zoom: 14,                center: latlng,                mapTypeId: google.maps.MapTypeId.ROADMAP            };            var map = new google.maps.Map(mapdiv, myOptions);            var marker = new google.maps.Marker({                position: new google.maps.LatLng(PlaceLat, PlaceLon),                map: map,                title: PlaceTitle,                clickable: false            });        }     }    -->    </script>    <asp:HiddenField ID="Latitude" runat="server" />    <asp:HiddenField ID="Longitude" runat="server" />    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1/jquery.min.js%22%3E%3C/script>    <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">        $(document).ready(function () {            GetLocation();            setupMapDiv();            setupPlaceIveBeen();        });        function GetLocation() {            if (navigator.geolocation != null) {                navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition(getData);            }            else {                var mess = document.getElementById('<%=Message.ClientID %>');                mess.innerHTML = "Sorry, your browser does not support geolocation. " +                    "Try the latest version of Safari on the iPhone, Android browser, or the latest version of FireFox.";            }        }        function UpdateLocation_Click() {            GetLocation();        }        function getData(position) {            var latitude = position.coords.latitude;            var longitude = position.coords.longitude;            var hdLat = document.getElementById('<%=Latitude.ClientID %>');            var hdLon = document.getElementById('<%=Longitude.ClientID %>');            hdLat.value = latitude;            hdLon.value = longitude;        }    </script>    <asp:Label ID="Message" runat="server" />    <asp:UpdatePanel ID="upl" runat="server">        <ContentTemplate>    <asp:Panel ID="pnlStart" runat="server" Visible="true">    <div id="topbar">        <div id="title">MapSplore</div>    </div>    <div id="content">        <ul class="pageitem">            <li class="menu">                <asp:LinkButton ID="lbLocalDeals" runat="server" onclick="lbLocalDeals_Click">                <asp:Image ID="imLocalDeals" runat="server" ImageUrl="~/Images/ArtFavor_Money_Bag_Icon.png" Height="30" />                <span class="name">Local Deals.</span>                <span class="arrow"></span>                </asp:LinkButton>                </li>            <li class="menu">                <asp:LinkButton ID="lbLocalPlaces" runat="server" onclick="lbLocalPlaces_Click">                <asp:Image ID="imLocalPlaces" runat="server" ImageUrl="~/Images/Andy_Houses_on_the_horizon_-_Starburst_remix.png" Height="30" />                <span class="name">Local Places.</span>                <span class="arrow"></span>                </asp:LinkButton>                </li>            <li class="menu">                <asp:LinkButton ID="lbWhereIveBeen" runat="server" onclick="lbWhereIveBeen_Click">                <asp:Image ID="imImHere" runat="server" ImageUrl="~/Images/ryanlerch_flagpole.png" Height="30" />                <span class="name">I've been here.</span>                <span class="arrow"></span>                </asp:LinkButton>                </li>            <li class="menu">                <asp:LinkButton ID="lbMyStats" runat="server">                <asp:Image ID="imMyStats" runat="server" ImageUrl="~/Images/Anonymous_Spreadsheet.png" Height="30" />                <span class="name">My Stats.</span>                <span class="arrow"></span>                </asp:LinkButton>                </li>            <li class="menu">                <asp:LinkButton ID="lbAddAPlace" runat="server" onclick="lbAddAPlace_Click">                <asp:Image ID="imAddAPlace" runat="server" ImageUrl="~/Images/jean_victor_balin_add.png" Height="30" />                <span class="name">Add a Place.</span>                <span class="arrow"></span>                </asp:LinkButton>                </li>            <li class="button">                <input type="button" value="Update Your Current Location" onclick="UpdateLocation_Click()">                </li>        </ul>    </div>    </asp:Panel>    <div>    <asp:Panel ID="pnlCoupons" runat="server" Visible="false">        <div id="topbar">        <div id="title">MapSplore</div>        <div id="leftbutton">            <asp:LinkButton runat="server" Text="Return"                 ID="ReturnFromDeals" OnClick="ReturnFromDeals_Click" /></div></div>    <div class="content">    <asp:ListView ID="lvCoupons" runat="server">        <LayoutTemplate>            <ul class="pageitem" runat="server">                <asp:PlaceHolder ID="itemPlaceholder" runat="server" />            </ul>        </LayoutTemplate>        <ItemTemplate>            <li class="menu">                <asp:LinkButton ID="lbBusiness" runat="server" Text='<%#Eval("Place.Name") %>' OnClick="lbBusiness_Click">                    <span class="comment">                    <asp:Label ID="lblAddress" runat="server" Text='<%#Eval("Place.Address1") %>' />                    <asp:Label ID="lblDis" runat="server" Text='<%# Convert.ToString(Convert.ToInt32(Eval("Place.Distance"))) + " meters" %>' CssClass="smallText" />                    <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceId" runat="server" Value='<%#Eval("PlaceId") %>' />                    <asp:HiddenField ID="hdGeoPromotionId" runat="server" Value='<%#Eval("GeoPromotionId") %>' />                    </span>                    <span class="arrow"></span>                </asp:LinkButton></li></ItemTemplate></asp:ListView><asp:GridView ID="gvCoupons" runat="server" AutoGenerateColumns="false">            <HeaderStyle BackColor="Silver" />            <AlternatingRowStyle BackColor="Wheat" />            <Columns>                <asp:TemplateField AccessibleHeaderText="Business" HeaderText="Business">                    <ItemTemplate>                        <asp:Image ID="imPlaceType" runat="server" Text='<%#Eval("Type") %>' ImageUrl='<%#Eval("Image") %>' />                        <asp:LinkButton ID="lbBusiness" runat="server" Text='<%#Eval("Name") %>' OnClick="lbBusiness_Click" />                        <asp:LinkButton ID="lblAddress" runat="server" Text='<%#Eval("Address1") %>' CssClass="smallText" />                        <asp:Label ID="lblDis" runat="server" Text='<%# Convert.ToString(Convert.ToInt32(Eval("Distance"))) + " meters" %>' CssClass="smallText" />                        <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceId" runat="server" Value='<%#Eval("PlaceId") %>' />                        <asp:HiddenField ID="hdGeoPromotionId" runat="server" Value='<%#Eval("GeoPromotionId") %>' />                        <asp:Label ID="lblInfo" runat="server" Visible="false" />                    </ItemTemplate>                </asp:TemplateField>            </Columns>        </asp:GridView>    </div>    </asp:Panel>    <asp:Panel ID="pnlPlaces" runat="server" Visible="false">    <div id="topbar">        <div id="title">            MapSplore</div><div id="leftbutton">            <asp:LinkButton runat="server" Text="Return"                 ID="ReturnFromPlaces" OnClick="ReturnFromPlaces_Click" /></div></div>        <div id="content">        <asp:ListView ID="lvPlaces" runat="server">            <LayoutTemplate>                <ul id="ulPlaces" class="pageitem" runat="server">                    <asp:PlaceHolder ID="itemPlaceholder" runat="server" />                    <li class="menu">                        <asp:LinkButton ID="lbNotListed" runat="server" CssClass="name"                            OnClick="lbNotListed_Click">                            Place not listed                            <span class="arrow"></span>                            </asp:LinkButton>                    </li>                </ul>            </LayoutTemplate>            <ItemTemplate>            <li class="menu">                <asp:LinkButton ID="lbImHere" runat="server" CssClass="name"                     OnClick="lbImHere_Click">                <%#DisplayName(Eval("Name")) %>&nbsp;                <%# Convert.ToString(Convert.ToInt32(Eval("Distance"))) + " meters" %>                <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceId" runat="server" Value='<%#Eval("PlaceId") %>' />                <span class="arrow"></span>                </asp:LinkButton></li></ItemTemplate></asp:ListView>    </div>    </asp:Panel>    <asp:Panel ID="pnlImHereNow" runat="server" Visible="false">        <div id="topbar">        <div id="title">            MapSplore</div><div id="leftbutton">            <asp:LinkButton runat="server" Text="Places"                 ID="lbImHereNowReturn" OnClick="lbImHereNowReturn_Click" /></div></div>            <div id="rightbutton">            <asp:LinkButton runat="server" Text="Beginning"                ID="lbBackToBeginning" OnClick="lbBackToBeginning_Click" />            </div>        <div id="content">        <ul class="pageitem">        <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceId" runat="server" />        <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceLat" runat="server" />        <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceLon" runat="server" />        <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceTitle" runat="server" />        <asp:Button ID="btnImHereNow" runat="server"             Text="I'm here" OnClick="btnImHereNow_Click" />             <asp:Label ID="lblPlaceTitle" runat="server" /><br />        <asp:TextBox ID="txtWhatsHappening" runat="server" TextMode="MultiLine" Rows="2" style="width:300px" /><br />        <div id="divImHere" style="width:300px; height:300px"></div>        </div>        </ul>    </asp:Panel>    <asp:Panel runat="server" ID="pnlIveBeenHere" Visible="false">        <div id="topbar">        <div id="title">            Where I've been</div><div id="leftbutton">            <asp:LinkButton ID="lbIveBeenHereBack" runat="server" Text="Back" OnClick="lbIveBeenHereBack_Click" /></div></div>        <div id="content">        <asp:ListView ID="lvWhereIveBeen" runat="server">            <LayoutTemplate>                <ul id="ulWhereIveBeen" class="pageitem" runat="server">                    <asp:PlaceHolder ID="itemPlaceholder" runat="server" />                </ul>            </LayoutTemplate>            <ItemTemplate>            <li class="menu" runat="server">                <asp:LinkButton ID="lbPlaceIveBeen" runat="server" OnClick="lbPlaceIveBeen_Click" CssClass="name">                    <asp:Label ID="lblPlace" runat="server" Text='<%#Eval("PlaceName") %>' /> at                    <asp:Label ID="lblTime" runat="server" Text='<%#Eval("ATTime") %>' CssClass="content" />                    <asp:HiddenField ID="hdATID" runat="server" Value='<%#Eval("ATID") %>' />                    <span class="arrow"></span>                </asp:LinkButton>            </li>            </ItemTemplate>        </asp:ListView>        </div>        </asp:Panel>    <asp:Panel runat="server" ID="pnlPlaceIveBeen" Visible="false">        <div id="topbar">        <div id="title">            I've been here        </div>        <div id="leftbutton">            <asp:LinkButton ID="lbPlaceIveBeenBack" runat="server" Text="Back" OnClick="lbPlaceIveBeenBack_Click" />        </div>        <div id="rightbutton">            <asp:LinkButton ID="lbPlaceIveBeenBeginning" runat="server" Text="Beginning" OnClick="lbPlaceIveBeenBeginning_Click" />        </div>        </div>        <div id="content">            <ul class="pageitem">            <li>            <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceIveBeenPlaceId" runat="server" />            <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceIveBeenLatitude" runat="server" />            <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceIveBeenLongitude" runat="server" />            <asp:Label ID="lblPlaceIveBeenName" runat="server" /><br />            <asp:Label ID="lblPlaceIveBeenAddress" runat="server" /><br />            <asp:Label ID="lblPlaceIveBeenCity" runat="server" />,             <asp:Label ID="lblPlaceIveBeenState" runat="server" />            <asp:Label ID="lblPlaceIveBeenZipCode" runat="server" /><br />            <asp:Label ID="lblPlaceIveBeenCountry" runat="server" /><br />            <div id="divPlaceIveBeen" style="width:300px; height:300px"></div>            </li>            </ul>        </div>                </asp:Panel>         <asp:Panel ID="pnlAddPlace" runat="server" Visible="false">                <div id="topbar"><div id="title">MapSplore</div><div id="leftbutton"><asp:LinkButton ID="lbAddPlaceReturn" runat="server" Text="Back" OnClick="lbAddPlaceReturn_Click" /></div><div id="rightnav"></div></div><div id="content">    <ul class="pageitem">        <li id="liPlaceAddMessage" runat="server" visible="false">        <asp:Label ID="PlaceAddMessage" runat="server" />        </li>        <li class="bigfield">        <asp:TextBox ID="txtPlaceName" runat="server" placeholder="Name of Establishment" />        </li>        <li class="bigfield">        <asp:TextBox ID="txtAddress1" runat="server" placeholder="Address 1" />        </li>        <li class="bigfield">        <asp:TextBox ID="txtCity" runat="server" placeholder="City" />        </li>        <li class="select">        <asp:DropDownList ID="ddlProvince" runat="server" placeholder="Select State" />          <span class="arrow"></span>              </li>        <li class="bigfield">        <asp:TextBox ID="txtZipCode" runat="server" placeholder="Zip Code" />        </li>        <li class="select">        <asp:DropDownList ID="ddlCountry" runat="server"             onselectedindexchanged="ddlCountry_SelectedIndexChanged" />        <span class="arrow"></span>        </li>        <li class="bigfield">        <asp:TextBox ID="txtPhoneNumber" runat="server" placeholder="Phone Number" />        </li>        <li class="checkbox">            <span class="name">You Here Now:</span> <asp:CheckBox ID="cbYouHereNow" runat="server" Checked="true" />        </li>        <li class="button">        <asp:Button ID="btnAdd" runat="server" Text="Add Place"             onclick="btnAdd_Click" />        </li>    </ul></div>        </asp:Panel>        <asp:Panel ID="pnlImHere" runat="server" Visible="false">            <asp:TextBox ID="txtImHere" runat="server"                 TextMode="MultiLine" Rows="3" Columns="40" /><br />            <asp:DropDownList ID="ddlPlace" runat="server" /><br />            <asp:Button ID="btnHere" runat="server" Text="Tell Everyone I'm Here"                 onclick="btnHere_Click" /><br />        </asp:Panel>     </div>    </ContentTemplate>    </asp:UpdatePanel> </asp:Content> Code Behind .cs file: using System;using System.Collections.Generic;using System.Linq;using System.Web;using System.Web.Security;using System.Web.UI;using System.Web.UI.HtmlControls;using System.Web.UI.WebControls;using LocationDataModel; public partial class AT_iPhone_Default : ViewStatePage{    private iPhoneDevice ipd;     protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        LocationDataEntities lde = new LocationDataEntities();        if (!Page.IsPostBack)        {            var Countries = from c in lde.Countries select c;            foreach (Country co in Countries)            {                ddlCountry.Items.Add(new ListItem(co.Name, co.CountryId.ToString()));            }            ddlCountry_SelectedIndexChanged(ddlCountry, null);            if (AppleIPhone.IsIPad())                ipd = iPhoneDevice.iPad;            if (AppleIPhone.IsIPhone())                ipd = iPhoneDevice.iPhone;            if (AppleIPhone.IsIPodTouch())                ipd = iPhoneDevice.iPodTouch;        }    }    protected void btnPlaces_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {    }    protected void btnAdd_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        bool blImHere = cbYouHereNow.Checked;        string Place = txtPlaceName.Text,            Address1 = txtAddress1.Text,            City = txtCity.Text,            ZipCode = txtZipCode.Text,            PhoneNumber = txtPhoneNumber.Text,            ProvinceId = ddlProvince.SelectedItem.Value,            CountryId = ddlCountry.SelectedItem.Value;        int iProvinceId, iCountryId;        double dLatitude, dLongitude;        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        if ((!String.IsNullOrEmpty(ProvinceId)) &&            (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(CountryId)))        {            iProvinceId = Convert.ToInt32(ProvinceId);            iCountryId = Convert.ToInt32(CountryId);            if (blImHere)            {                dLatitude = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value);                dLongitude = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);                da.StorePlace(Place, Address1, String.Empty, City,                    iProvinceId, ZipCode, iCountryId, PhoneNumber,                    dLatitude, dLongitude);            }            else            {                da.StorePlace(Place, Address1, String.Empty, City,                    iProvinceId, ZipCode, iCountryId, PhoneNumber);            }            liPlaceAddMessage.Visible = true;            PlaceAddMessage.Text = "Awesome, your place has been added. Add Another!";            txtPlaceName.Text = String.Empty;            txtAddress1.Text = String.Empty;            txtCity.Text = String.Empty;            ddlProvince.SelectedIndex = -1;            txtZipCode.Text = String.Empty;            txtPhoneNumber.Text = String.Empty;        }        else        {            liPlaceAddMessage.Visible = true;            PlaceAddMessage.Text = "Please select a State and a Country.";        }    }    protected void ddlCountry_SelectedIndexChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        string CountryId = ddlCountry.SelectedItem.Value;        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(CountryId))        {            int iCountryId = Convert.ToInt32(CountryId);            LocationDataModel.LocationDataEntities lde = new LocationDataModel.LocationDataEntities();            var prov = from p in lde.Provinces where p.CountryId == iCountryId                        orderby p.ProvinceName select p;                        ddlProvince.Items.Add(String.Empty);            foreach (Province pr in prov)            {                ddlProvince.Items.Add(new ListItem(pr.ProvinceName, pr.ProvinceId.ToString()));            }        }        else        {            ddlProvince.Items.Clear();        }    }    protected void btnImHere_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        int i = 0;        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        double Lat = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value),            Lon = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);        List<Place> lp = da.NearByLocations(Lat, Lon);        foreach (Place p in lp)        {            ListItem li = new ListItem(p.Name, p.PlaceId.ToString());            if (i == 0)            {                li.Selected = true;            }            ddlPlace.Items.Add(li);            i++;        }        pnlAddPlace.Visible = false;        pnlImHere.Visible = true;    }    protected void lbImHere_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        string UserName = Membership.GetUser().UserName;        ListViewItem lvi = (ListViewItem)(((LinkButton)sender).Parent);        HiddenField hd = (HiddenField)lvi.FindControl("hdPlaceId");        long PlaceId = Convert.ToInt64(hd.Value);        double dLatitude = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value);        double dLongitude = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        Place pl = da.GetPlace(PlaceId);        pnlImHereNow.Visible = true;        pnlPlaces.Visible = false;        hdPlaceId.Value = PlaceId.ToString();        hdPlaceLat.Value = pl.Latitude.ToString();        hdPlaceLon.Value = pl.Longitude.ToString();        hdPlaceTitle.Value = pl.Name;        lblPlaceTitle.Text = pl.Name;    }    protected void btnHere_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        string UserName = Membership.GetUser().UserName;        string WhatsH = txtImHere.Text;        long PlaceId = Convert.ToInt64(ddlPlace.SelectedValue);        double dLatitude = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value);        double dLongitude = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        da.StoreUserAT(UserName, PlaceId, WhatsH,            dLatitude, dLongitude);    }    protected void btnLocalCoupons_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        double dLatitude = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value);        double dLongitude = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();     }    protected void lbBusiness_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        string UserName = Membership.GetUser().UserName;        GridViewRow gvr = (GridViewRow)(((LinkButton)sender).Parent.Parent);        HiddenField hd = (HiddenField)gvr.FindControl("hdPlaceId");        string sPlaceId = hd.Value;        Int64 PlaceId;        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(sPlaceId))        {            PlaceId = Convert.ToInt64(sPlaceId);        }    }    protected void lbLocalDeals_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        double dLatitude = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value);        double dLongitude = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        pnlCoupons.Visible = true;        pnlStart.Visible = false;        List<GeoPromotion> lgp = da.NearByDeals(dLatitude, dLongitude);        lvCoupons.DataSource = lgp;        lvCoupons.DataBind();    }    protected void lbLocalPlaces_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        double Lat = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value);        double Lon = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);        List<LocationDataModel.Place> places = da.NearByLocations(Lat, Lon);        lvPlaces.DataSource = places;        lvPlaces.SelectedIndex = -1;        lvPlaces.DataBind();        pnlPlaces.Visible = true;        pnlStart.Visible = false;    }    protected void ReturnFromPlaces_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        pnlPlaces.Visible = false;        pnlStart.Visible = true;    }    protected void ReturnFromDeals_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        pnlCoupons.Visible = false;        pnlStart.Visible = true;    }    protected void btnImHereNow_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        long PlaceId = Convert.ToInt32(hdPlaceId.Value);        string UserName = Membership.GetUser().UserName;        string WhatsHappening = txtWhatsHappening.Text;        double UserLat = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value);        double UserLon = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        da.StoreUserAT(UserName, PlaceId, WhatsHappening,             UserLat, UserLon);    }    protected void lbImHereNowReturn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        pnlImHereNow.Visible = false;        pnlPlaces.Visible = true;    }    protected void lbBackToBeginning_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        pnlStart.Visible = true;        pnlImHereNow.Visible = false;    }    protected void lbWhereIveBeen_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        string UserName = Membership.GetUser().UserName;        pnlStart.Visible = false;        pnlIveBeenHere.Visible = true;        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        lvWhereIveBeen.DataSource = da.UserATs(UserName, 0, 15);        lvWhereIveBeen.DataBind();    }    protected void lbIveBeenHereBack_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        pnlIveBeenHere.Visible = false;        pnlStart.Visible = true;    }     protected void lbPlaceIveBeen_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        LinkButton lb = (LinkButton)sender;        ListViewItem lvi = (ListViewItem)lb.Parent.Parent;        HiddenField hdATID = (HiddenField)lvi.FindControl("hdATID");        Int64 ATID = Convert.ToInt64(hdATID.Value);        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        pnlIveBeenHere.Visible = false;        pnlPlaceIveBeen.Visible = true;        var plac = da.GetPlaceViaATID(ATID);        hdPlaceIveBeenPlaceId.Value = plac.PlaceId.ToString();        hdPlaceIveBeenLatitude.Value = plac.Latitude.ToString();        hdPlaceIveBeenLongitude.Value = plac.Longitude.ToString();        lblPlaceIveBeenName.Text = plac.Name;        lblPlaceIveBeenAddress.Text = plac.Address1;        lblPlaceIveBeenCity.Text = plac.City;        lblPlaceIveBeenState.Text = plac.Province.ProvinceName;        lblPlaceIveBeenZipCode.Text = plac.ZipCode;        lblPlaceIveBeenCountry.Text = plac.Country.Name;    }     protected void lbNotListed_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        SetupAddPoint();        pnlPlaces.Visible = false;    }     protected void lbAddAPlace_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        SetupAddPoint();    }     private void SetupAddPoint()    {        double lat = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value);        double lon = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        var zip = da.WhereAmIAt(lat, lon);        if (zip.Count > 0)        {            var z0 = zip[0];            txtCity.Text = z0.City;            txtZipCode.Text = z0.ZipCode;            ddlProvince.ClearSelection();            if (z0.ProvinceId.HasValue == true)            {                foreach (ListItem li in ddlProvince.Items)                {                    if (li.Value == z0.ProvinceId.Value.ToString())                    {                        li.Selected = true;                        break;                    }                }            }        }        pnlAddPlace.Visible = true;        pnlStart.Visible = false;    }    protected void lbAddPlaceReturn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        pnlAddPlace.Visible = false;        pnlStart.Visible = true;        liPlaceAddMessage.Visible = false;        PlaceAddMessage.Text = String.Empty;    }    protected void lbPlaceIveBeenBack_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        pnlIveBeenHere.Visible = true;        pnlPlaceIveBeen.Visible = false;            }    protected void lbPlaceIveBeenBeginning_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        pnlPlaceIveBeen.Visible = false;        pnlStart.Visible = true;    }    protected string DisplayName(object val)    {        string strVal = Convert.ToString(val);         if (AppleIPhone.IsIPad())        {            ipd = iPhoneDevice.iPad;        }        if (AppleIPhone.IsIPhone())        {            ipd = iPhoneDevice.iPhone;        }        if (AppleIPhone.IsIPodTouch())        {            ipd = iPhoneDevice.iPodTouch;        }        return (iPhoneHelper.DisplayContentOnMenu(strVal, ipd));    }} iPhoneHelper.cs file: using System;using System.Collections.Generic;using System.Linq;using System.Web; public enum iPhoneDevice{    iPhone, iPodTouch, iPad}/// <summary>/// Summary description for iPhoneHelper/// </summary>/// public class iPhoneHelper{ public iPhoneHelper() {  //  // TODO: Add constructor logic here  // } // This code is stupid in retrospect. Use css to solve this problem      public static string DisplayContentOnMenu(string val, iPhoneDevice ipd)    {        string Return = val;        string Elipsis = "...";        int iPadMaxLength = 30;        int iPhoneMaxLength = 15;        if (ipd == iPhoneDevice.iPad)        {            if (Return.Length > iPadMaxLength)            {                Return = Return.Substring(0, iPadMaxLength - Elipsis.Length) + Elipsis;            }        }        else        {            if (Return.Length > iPhoneMaxLength)            {                Return = Return.Substring(0, iPhoneMaxLength - Elipsis.Length) + Elipsis;            }        }        return (Return);    }}  Source code for the ViewStatePage: using System;using System.Data;using System.Data.SqlClient;using System.Configuration;using System.Web;using System.Web.Security;using System.Web.UI;using System.Web.UI.WebControls;using System.Web.UI.WebControls.WebParts;using System.Web.UI.HtmlControls; /// <summary>/// Summary description for BasePage/// </summary>#region Base class for a page.public class ViewStatePage : System.Web.UI.Page{     PageStatePersisterToDatabase myPageStatePersister;        public ViewStatePage()        : base()    {        myPageStatePersister = new PageStatePersisterToDatabase(this);    }     protected override PageStatePersister PageStatePersister    {        get        {            return myPageStatePersister;        }    } }#endregion #region This class will override the page persistence to store page state in a database.public class PageStatePersisterToDatabase : PageStatePersister{    private string ViewStateKeyField = "__VIEWSTATE_KEY";    private string _exNoConnectionStringFound = "No Database Configuration information is in the web.config.";     public PageStatePersisterToDatabase(Page page)        : base(page)    {    }     public override void Load()    {         // Get the cache key from the web form data        System.Int64 key = Convert.ToInt64(Page.Request.Params[ViewStateKeyField]);         Pair state = this.LoadState(key);         // Abort if cache object is not of type Pair        if (state == null)            throw new ApplicationException("Missing valid " + ViewStateKeyField);         // Set view state and control state        ViewState = state.First;        ControlState = state.Second;    }     public override void Save()    {         // No processing needed if no states available        if (ViewState == null && ControlState != null)            return;         System.Int64 key;        IStateFormatter formatter = this.StateFormatter;        Pair statePair = new Pair(ViewState, ControlState);         // Serialize the statePair object to a string.        string serializedState = formatter.Serialize(statePair);         // Save the ViewState and get a unique identifier back.        key = SaveState(serializedState);         // Register hidden field to store cache key in        // Page.ClientScript does not work properly with Atlas.        //Page.ClientScript.RegisterHiddenField(ViewStateKeyField, key.ToString());        ScriptManager.RegisterHiddenField(this.Page, ViewStateKeyField, key.ToString());    }     private System.Int64 SaveState(string PageState)    {        System.Int64 i64Key = 0;        string strConn = String.Empty,            strProvider = String.Empty;         string strSql = "insert into tblPageState ( SerializedState ) values ( '" + SqlEscape(PageState) + "');select scope_identity();";        SqlConnection sqlCn;        SqlCommand sqlCm;        try        {            GetDBConnectionString(ref strConn, ref strProvider);            sqlCn = new SqlConnection(strConn);            sqlCm = new SqlCommand(strSql, sqlCn);            sqlCn.Open();            i64Key = Convert.ToInt64(sqlCm.ExecuteScalar());            if (sqlCn.State != ConnectionState.Closed)            {                sqlCn.Close();            }            sqlCn.Dispose();            sqlCm.Dispose();        }        finally        {            sqlCn = null;            sqlCm = null;        }        return i64Key;    }     private Pair LoadState(System.Int64 iKey)    {        string strConn = String.Empty,            strProvider = String.Empty,            SerializedState = String.Empty,            strMinutesInPast = GetMinutesInPastToDelete();        Pair PageState;        string strSql = "select SerializedState from tblPageState where tblPageStateID=" + iKey.ToString() + ";" +            "delete from tblPageState where DateUpdated<DateAdd(mi, " + strMinutesInPast + ", getdate());";        SqlConnection sqlCn;        SqlCommand sqlCm;        try        {            GetDBConnectionString(ref strConn, ref strProvider);            sqlCn = new SqlConnection(strConn);            sqlCm = new SqlCommand(strSql, sqlCn);             sqlCn.Open();            SerializedState = Convert.ToString(sqlCm.ExecuteScalar());            IStateFormatter formatter = this.StateFormatter;             if ((null == SerializedState) ||                (String.Empty == SerializedState))            {                throw (new ApplicationException("No ViewState records were returned."));            }             // Deserilize returns the Pair object that is serialized in            // the Save method.            PageState = (Pair)formatter.Deserialize(SerializedState);             if (sqlCn.State != ConnectionState.Closed)            {                sqlCn.Close();            }            sqlCn.Dispose();            sqlCm.Dispose();        }        finally        {            sqlCn = null;            sqlCm = null;        }        return PageState;    }     private string SqlEscape(string Val)    {        string ReturnVal = String.Empty;        if (null != Val)        {            ReturnVal = Val.Replace("'", "''");        }        return (ReturnVal);    }    private void GetDBConnectionString(ref string ConnectionStringValue, ref string ProviderNameValue)    {        if (System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings.Count > 0)        {            ConnectionStringValue = System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["ApplicationServices"].ConnectionString;            ProviderNameValue = System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["ApplicationServices"].ProviderName;        }        else        {            throw new ConfigurationErrorsException(_exNoConnectionStringFound);        }    }    private string GetMinutesInPastToDelete()    {        string strReturn = "-60";        if (null != System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["MinutesInPastToDeletePageState"])        {            strReturn = System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["MinutesInPastToDeletePageState"].ToString();        }        return (strReturn);    }}#endregion AppleiPhone.cs file: using System;using System.Collections.Generic;using System.Linq;using System.Web; /// <summary>/// Summary description for AppleIPhone/// </summary>public class AppleIPhone{ public AppleIPhone() {  //  // TODO: Add constructor logic here  // }     static public bool IsIPhoneOS()    {        return (IsIPad() || IsIPhone() || IsIPodTouch());    }     static public bool IsIPhone()    {        return IsTest("iPhone");    }     static public bool IsIPodTouch()    {        return IsTest("iPod");    }     static public bool IsIPad()    {        return IsTest("iPad");    }     static private bool IsTest(string Agent)    {        bool bl = false;        string ua = HttpContext.Current.Request.UserAgent.ToLower();        try        {            bl = ua.Contains(Agent.ToLower());        }        catch { }        return (bl);        }} Master page .cs: using System;using System.Collections.Generic;using System.Linq;using System.Web;using System.Web.UI;using System.Web.UI.HtmlControls;using System.Web.UI.WebControls; public partial class MasterPages_iPhoneMaster : System.Web.UI.MasterPage{    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)    {            HtmlHead head = Page.Header;            HtmlMeta meta = new HtmlMeta();            if (AppleIPhone.IsIPad() == true)            {                meta.Content = "width=400,user-scalable=no";                head.Controls.Add(meta);             }            else            {                meta.Content = "width=device-width, user-scalable=no";                meta.Attributes.Add("name", "viewport");            }            meta.Attributes.Add("name", "viewport");            head.Controls.Add(meta);            HtmlLink cssLink = new HtmlLink();            HtmlGenericControl script = new HtmlGenericControl("script");            script.Attributes.Add("type", "text/javascript");            script.Attributes.Add("src", ResolveUrl("~/Scripts/iWebKit/javascript/functions.js"));            head.Controls.Add(script);            cssLink.Attributes.Add("rel", "stylesheet");            cssLink.Attributes.Add("href", ResolveUrl("~/Scripts/iWebKit/css/style.css") );            cssLink.Attributes.Add("type", "text/css");            head.Controls.Add(cssLink);            HtmlGenericControl jsLink = new HtmlGenericControl("script");            //jsLink.Attributes.Add("type", "text/javascript");            //jsLink.Attributes.Add("src", ResolveUrl("~/Scripts/jquery-1.4.1.min.js") );            //head.Controls.Add(jsLink);            HtmlLink appleIcon = new HtmlLink();            appleIcon.Attributes.Add("rel", "apple-touch-icon");            appleIcon.Attributes.Add("href", ResolveUrl("~/apple-touch-icon.png"));            HtmlMeta appleMobileWebAppStatusBarStyle = new HtmlMeta();            appleMobileWebAppStatusBarStyle.Attributes.Add("name", "apple-mobile-web-app-status-bar-style");            appleMobileWebAppStatusBarStyle.Attributes.Add("content", "black");            head.Controls.Add(appleMobileWebAppStatusBarStyle);    }     internal string FindPath(string Location)    {        string Url = Server.MapPath(Location);        return (Url);    }}

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  • Application running in the iPad Simulator

    - by Wallym
    I've got some code running in the iPad Simulator.  One thing I discovered is that an application has to be compiled against a specific version of the SDK.  When I created a new iPad application, the updated iPad window for the Interface Builder became availble.  Very nice indeed.  Everything was the same as before, so that was good.  I fired up the iPad Simulator, and I got this below:   The next step was getting my app on there, which was easy.  Then I got my app running on the simulator, and I saw this: Basically, everything is filled with goodness and seems to be running correctly.  **fingers crossed**

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  • Develop an iPad app with MonoTouch, C#, and .NET.

    - by Wallym
    Article url: http://www.devproconnections.com/article/mobile-development/ipad-ios-app-monotouch-143636 Since its release in March 2010, the iPad has taken the world by storm. Each new iPad release has launched the device further and further into our lives. Here are some interesting facts that we have seen over the past few years along with some market share analysis:The school that my teenagers attend here in Knoxville, Tennessee, was the first school in the United States to integrate the iPad into its teaching program and its curriculum. Many schools have since followed suit.There are a healthy number of applications in a variety of market segments. In fact, there is a market for iPad point-of-sale systems.The iPad is a popular device and growing more so each day. comScore states that one in four smartphone owners also owns a tablet. We also know that the iPad comprises 68 percent of the tablet market.eMarketer recently issued a report stating that the number of iPad users is expected to grow by 90 percent in the US in 2012.No matter how you slice the data, tablet usage is growing, and the iPad is currently leading the pack. The question for .NET developers is "How can I get me some of that?" Xamarin's MonoTouch offers help, by providing the means for .NET developers to leverage their C# and .NET coding skills to develop iPad applications. MonoTouch has supported the iPad since the initial release of the iOS 3.2 beta SDK all the way up to the most recent iOS SDK, which supports the iPad. In this article, we'll look at targeting the iPad and how we can take advantage of iPad-specific features in our iOS applications written with MonoTouch.I hope you enjoy the article and you find it helpful.

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  • MonoDroid Article in Visual Studio Magazine

    - by Wallym
    The February edition of Visual Studio magazine is now online.  In it, my article regarding MonoDroid, the implementation of C# and .NET for Android devices, is online.  I can't thank Michael Desmond enough for the opportunity.  Its fitting now that Android is the most popular smartphone platform.  This article is available online at: Intro to MonoDroid Part 1. Intro to MonoDroid Part 2. Along with the article, check out this short video that I did regarding MonoDroid on the Mac. The article(s) were written based on MonoDroid Preview 9.1, so there are a few updates necessary, but I think this gets the basics out.  I hope you enjoy the article(s). And yes, we're still working on our book on MonoDroid.  I've got a great author group and am excited about the book. If you get a chance, come to AnDevCon in San Francisco in March.  I'll be presenting on MonoDroid there.

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  • What's new in Xamarin and iOS7 - webinar

    - by Wallym
    I recently did an online webinar regarding the new iOS7 and Xamarin.  In it, I covered the basics of what is new in iOS7 along with what is new in Xamarin's developer platform.  Please take some time and view this webinar.  The items that were covered include:What's new in iOS7.The XCode Design Surface.An example showing new iOS7 View Animations.What's new with Xamarin and async, await, and HttpClient.A demo of Razor Templating.The Xamarin.iOS Plugin for Visual Studio.  ** The video only works in Windows.  I don't control the content, so I have to go with what I am given. :-( **

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  • eLearning event on HTML5 for Mobile with jQuery Mobile

    - by Wallym
    I'll be doing an eLearning event on HTML5 for Mobile with jQuery Mobile. There will also be a few items sprinkled in on ASP.NET Razor. Mobile development is a hot item. Customers are buying iPhones, iPads, Android devices, and many other mobile computing devices at an ever increasing record pace. Devices based on iOS and Android are nearly 80 percent of the marketplace. RIM continues to be dominant in the business area across the world. Nokia's growth with Windows Phone will grow on a worldwide basis. At the same time, clearly web development is a tremendous driver of applications, both on the public Internet and on private networks. How can developers target these various mobile platforms with web technologies? Developers can write web applications that take advantage of each mobile platform, but that is a lot of work. Into this space, the jQuery Mobile framework was developed. This eLearning series will provide an overview of mobile web development with jQuery Mobile, a detailed look at what the jQuery Mobile framework provides for us, how we can customize jQuery Mobile, and how we can use jQuery Mobile inside of ASP.NET.Link: http://elearning.left-brain.com/event/mobile-web-development

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  • Bytes by MSDN - Let's talk Cloud

    - by Wallym
    While I was at DevConnections in Las Vegas, I was honored to be interviewed by Tim Huckaby for "Bytes by MSDN" on Cloud Computing. Here's a short intro from the talk:Do you believe in the Cloud? Wallace McClure, Founder and Architect of Scalable Development, Inc., does. His customers are extremely interested in the value and economies of scale that Cloud Computing, and more specifically, Windows Azure can bring. Building out an infrastructure that supports your web service or application can be expensive, complicated and time consuming. Or you could look to the Microsoft cloud. The Windows Azure platform is a flexible cloud–computing platform that lets you focus on solving business problems and addressing customer needs. Wally talks about all this, and more, in this interview with Tim Huckaby, and in his Windows Azure podcasts.

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  • ASP.NET Podcast Show #144 - Windows Azure Part II - Worker Roles

    - by Wallym
    Original Url: http://aspnetpodcast.com/CS11/blogs/asp.net_podcast/archive/2010/10/28/asp-net-podcast-show-144-windows-azure-part-ii-worker-roles.aspx This show is on Web & Worker Roles in Azure, Blob Storage, and the Visual Studio 2010 Azure tools. Subscribe to everything. Subscribe to WMV. Subscribe to M4V for iPhone/iPad. Subscribe to MP3. Download WMV. Download MOV. Download M4V for iPhone/iPad. Download MP3.

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  • Mono for Android Book has been Released!!!!!

    - by Wallym
    If I understand things correctly, and I make no guarantees that I do, our Mono for Android book has been RELEASED!  I'm not quite sure what this means, but my guess is that that it has been printed and is being shipped to various book sellers.So, if you have pre-ordered a copy, its now up to Amazon to send it to you.  Its fully out of my control, Wrox, Wiley, as well as everyone but Amazon.If you haven't bought a copy already, why?  Seriously, go order 8-10 copies for the ones you love.  They'll make great romantic gifts for the ones you love.  Just think at the look on the other person's face when you give them a copy of our book. Here's a little about the book:The wait is over! For the millions of .NET/C# developers who have been eagerly awaiting the book that will guide them through the white-hot field of Android application programming, this is the book. As the first guide to focus on Mono for Android, this must-have resource dives into writing applications against Mono with C# and compiling executables that run on the Android family of devices.Putting the proven Wrox Professional format into practice, the authors provide you with the knowledge you need to become a successful Android application developer without having to learn another programming language. You'll explore screen controls, UI development, tables and layouts, and MonoDevelop as you become adept at developing Android applications with Mono for Android.Develop Android apps using tools you already know—C# and .NETAimed at providing readers with a thorough, reliable resource that guides them through the field of Android application programming, this must-have book shows how to write applications using Mono with C# that run on the Android family of devices. A team of authors provides you with the knowledge you need to become a successful Android application developer without having to learn another programming language. You'll explore screen controls, UI development, tables and layouts, and MonoDevelop as you become adept at planning, building, and developing Android applications with Mono for Android.Professional Android Programming with Mono for Android and .NET/C#:Shows you how to use your existing C# and .NET skills to build Android appsDetails optimal ways to work with data and bind data to controlsExplains how to program with Android device hardwareDives into working with the file system and application preferencesDiscusses how to share code between Mono for Android, MonoTouch, and Windows® Phone 7Reveals tips for globalizing your apps with internationalization and localization supportCovers development of tablet apps with Android 4Wrox Professional guides are planned and written by working programmers to meet the real-world needs of programmers, developers, and IT professionals. Focused and relevant, they address the issues technology professionals face every day. They provide examples, practical solutions, and expert education in new technologies, all designed to help programmers do a better job.Now, go buy a bunch of copies!!!!!If you are interested in iPhone and Android and would like to get a little more knowledgeable in the area of development, you can purchase the 3 pack of books from Wrox on Mobile Development with Mono.  This will cover MonoTouch, Mono for Android, and cross platform methods for using both tools.  A great package in and of itself.  The name of that package is: Wrox Cross Platform Android and iOS Mobile Development Three-Pack 

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  • Async & Await in C# with Xamarin

    - by Wallym
     One of the great things about the .NET Framework is that Microsoft has worked long and hard to improve many features. Since the initial release of .NET 1.0, there has been support for threading via .NET threads as well as an application-level threadpool. This provided a great starting point when compared to Visual Basic 6 and classic ASP programming. The release of.NET 4 brought significant improvements in the area of threading, asynchronous operations and parallel operations. While the improvements made working with asynchronous operations easier, new problems were introduced, since many of these operations work based on callbacks. For example: How should a developer handle error checking? The program flow tends to be non-linear. Fixing bugs can be problematic. It is hard for a developer to get an understanding of what is happening within an application. The release of .NET 4.5 (and C# 5.0), in the fall of 2012, was a blockbuster update with regards to asynchronous operations and threads. Microsoft has added C# language keywords to take this non-linear callback-based program flow and turn it into a much more linear flow. Recently, Xamarin has updated Xamarin.Android and Xamarin.iOS to support async. This article will look at how Xamarin has implemented the .NET 4.5/C# 5 support into their Xamarin.iOS and Xamarin.Android productions. There are three general areas that I'll focus on: A general look at the asynchronous support in Xamarin's mobile products. This includes async, await, and the implications that this has for cross-platform code. The new HttpClient class that is provided in .NET 4.5/Mono 3.2. Xamarin's extensions for asynchronous operations for Android and iOS. FYI: Be aware that sometimes the OpenWeatherMap API breaks, for no reason.  I found this out after I shipped the article in.

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  • How did I get here? My route to Android, iPhone, Windows Phone 7, and interest in Mobile Devices

    - by Wallym
    I get asked all the time how/why I got interested in mobile and jumped on this fairly early.  I tend to give half answers because it wasn't just one thing that took me to mobile, but a whole host of separate ivents culminating in a specific event where I wasdoing market research in May/June 2008.  Let me throw out the events and the facts about me: I tend to like new, different, cool stuff.  I jumped on .NET early on.  I jumped on Ajax early on.  I don't jump on every new technology that comes down the road, I'm probably the only person on the planet that doesn't "get" MVC, though I acknowledge that a lot of people do and it solves a number of problems in the default settings of ASP.NET WebForms. I remember buying an early Windows CE device. It was interesting, but dang, this stylus thing sucks. After I lost my third stylus, i just gave up.  I got my first mobile phone in early 1999.  Reception was crappy, but I could see the value in being mobile. In 1999, I worked on a manufacturing systems project.  One piece of the projects was a set of handheld devices on the shop floor.  While the UI was a crappy DOS based, yes I said DOS as in Disk Operating System Version 6.22, I could see that the wireless world was a direction I wanted to be in. In 2000, Microsoft released the first public alpha of .NET.  Very cool stuff indeed.  One piece of the puzzle was a set of mobile controls for ASP.NET.  I build numerous test apps as well as mobile version using these mobile controls.  Now, the mobile UIs of the time were based on WML, which was crap. I could real all the analysis of mobile and read all about growth rates.  Now, you have to realize that growth rates can be impressive when dealing with small numbers, but I knew it was a comer. In our first book, I got talked out of mobile because of the line from the publisher "Wally, mobile doesn't sell." Blackberry was the dominant device of the mid 2000s.  Its users were referred to as "Crackberry addicts."  Unfortunately, the mobile development experience for native apps was crap and the web experience was fairly rough as well, but if they could get the ecosystem started, other phones and better blackberryies would come out.  I finally jumped into using a blackberry. Sometime around 2006, I heard "Wally, mobile doesn't sell" again.  Now, anyone that knows me knows that someone saying something like this to me means I'll keep trying it. The phones of the mid 2000s were moving to be more graphical, but there were too many that had this idea that they had to use a stylus.  Stylus suck.  They get lost too easily. I worked on a project in 2007 and 2008 for a startup trying to answer the question of "What is there to do where I am at?"  For some reason, they wanted to be tied to PCs.  As it became obvious that they were having problems, their investor asked us to do some market research and to figure out what the marketplace did want.  One of the important things that I figured out was the we lived in a mobile world and if you had a mobile app, it need to be on a mobile device, not tied to a desktop/laptop/netbook device.  If there was any single event, this was it - I was doing some market research and sat and talked to people in a bar/restaurant in Atlanta called "The Grove" on Lavista.  The consensus of the people that I talked to was that they wanted their data where ever they were at, laptop, pc, mobile, whereever. In 2007, Apple released the iPhone.  Wow, what an impressive device, even with all the problems of a 1st generation device.  I bought an iPod Touch 1st generation to understand touch better, one of the best decisions I ever made. I decided in late 2008, to make a move into cloud, for a number of reasons.  I was working on an example app.  In April, 2009, one of my friends at Microsoft said "don't mention my name with this, but you need an iPhone front end for this app."  How do you get on the iPhone.  Well, there are a number of ways including: ObjectiveC.  Its hard to teach an old dog new tricks, and this dog knows .NET, not ObjectiveC. HTML, web, javascript optimized interface.  yeah, this is possible. PhoneGap.  Now, this is interesting, take an html interface and get it to run on the iPhone, Android, Blackberry, and other platforms.  I thought that this way made the most sense for me until......... MonoTouch.  In May/June 2009, Novell announced a way for .NET/c# developers to write apps for the iPhone.  This is the way that made the most sense to me. Titanium by Appcelerator.  This is similar in concept to PhoneGap.  I haven't played with this much but do want to learn more about it. In July, 2009, I emailed one of my contacts at Wrox to see if they would be interested in a short MonoTouch ebook in their Wrox Blox format.  I fully expected another  response along the lines of "Wally, mobile doesn't sell."  The response I got was "Wally, iPhone is H O T, get started immediately, can you have this to me before Labor Day."  Not quite the response I expected.  Thankfully, we didn't make the Labor Day, first draft date. I kept pushing back because I had a feeling that things were not going to be quite as polished and feature rich as necessary.  After all, Novell doesn't have the resouces of Microsoft's developer division. The ebook shipped on November 30, 2009. On about December, 15, 2009, my editor emailed and said "Your ebook is selling really well, lets do a full book and it by March 1 so get started."  Thankfully, guys like Craig Dunn and Chris Hardy were interested along with Martin and Ror joinged us later on. I bought my wife an iPhone 3Gs in early 2010 to go along with all my iPod Touch devices. I tried to pretend in 2010 that I wasn't that interested in mobile and still had interest in the desktop technologies.  I love the technologies and continue to use them today, but that isn't where my interest is right now.  I'm just about all mobile all the time with my energies.  Our book shipped in the beginning of July, 2010 right in the middle of the Apple FUD.I've been looking at Mobile Web as a way around the AppStores and Apple FUD problems of 2010. With all the Apple self FUD, we became interested in Android.I went up to Dino Esposito at DevConnections in Las Vegas at introduced myself. I've always tried to keep up with what Dino has been doing. I was shocked, he wanted to meet me.  We must have talked for 1.5 hours. It was way more time than I deserved. If you get a chance, go and introduce yourself to Dino. He's a great guy. Microsoft released Windows Phone 7 in the Fall of 2010.  I'm not doing development on that platform at this time.  I think they have a very interesting user interface.  The devices are being positively reviewed.  For my purposes, the devices are limited at this point in time.  We'll see what 2011 brings as far as updates to the operating system.  I need multitasking/background processing and html5 in the browser. Add that as well as acceptance in the marketplace and I'll be more interested in the device. Obviosuly, I'm now working on a MonoDroid book . I own Android and iPhone/iOS devices.  I am currently working on some startup ideas and am exploring as much in that area as I can. For 2011, I'm planning on speaking at Android Developer's Conference (AnDevCon) and Mobile Connections.  I'm really excited about this. I have a couple of magazine articles coming out in 2011 on Android and iPhone development with the Mono technologies.is Mono "The Answer"? What's "The Question?" I think it will work for me.  It might work for you, it might not.  it depends on your situation.  Its the current horse that I am riding. I might find a better horse tomorrow. So, that's how I got here.  I'm in love with mobile.  Mobile native apps on the device as well as mobile web.  I'm into all this cool stuff.  Where are you at?

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  • Article - Create a MapView in Google Maps for iOS

    - by Wallym
    With the introduction of iOS 6 in September 2012, Apple Inc. removed the map system based on Google Maps and introduced its own map system for iPhone and iPad users. The introduction of Apple Maps, like any new technology, came with its own problems. In December 2012, Google released its Google Maps SDK for iOS. (Check the Google Maps SDK for iOS page for additional documentation as new features are deployed to the product.) Google Maps for iOS has a long, solid track record, given the use of its data in Android and many years of usage. The introduction of Google Maps for iOS has resulted in a measurable increase in the number of users who have updated their existing iPhones from iOS version 5 to iOS version 6. This article will look at using Google Maps for iOS using Xamarin.iOS.Article url: http://visualstudiomagazine.com/articles/2013/06/01/how-to-use-google-maps-for-ios.asp

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  • ASP.NET Podcast Show #149 - MonoDroid Development on the Apple Macintosh OSX

    - by Wallym
    Given that I have a cast on my arm, I installed the MonoDroid Development Framework for Apple Macs today.  I walked through it and found that things are pretty much the same as with the MonoDroid plugin for Visual Studio 2010.  This post shows the video displaying this.  This video is based on MonoDroid Preview 11.1. Subscribe to everything. Subscribe to WMV. Subscribe to M4V for iPhone/iPad. Subscribe to MP3. Download WMV. Download M4V. Download MP4. Download MP3.

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  • Review - Professional Android Programming with Mono for Android and .NET/C#

    - by Wallym
    Mike Riley of Dev Pro Connections Magazine has a review of our Mono for Android book.  You can read the full review on their siteMono for Android has been available for more than a year. The documentation for the product is adequate and has been improving over time, but until recently, finding a good book about the technology was difficult. Such a constraint has been lifted thanks to Wiley's Professional Android Programming with Mono for Android and .NET/C#. Written under the Wrox imprint by several contributors (Wallace B. McClure, Nathan Blevins, John J. Croft, Jonathan Dick, and Chris Hardy), the book is one of the most comprehensive and helpful Mono for Android titles currently on the market. Please buy 8-10 copies of our book for the ones you love, they make great romantic gifts.

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  • Mobile: Wrox Cross Platform Mobile Development - iPhone, iPad, Android, and everything with .NET & C#

    - by Wallym
    Wrox has produced a bundle of their 3 best selling mobile development books and it is available as of Today (March 16). A bundle of 3 best-selling and respected mobile development e-books from Wrox form a complete library on the key tools and techniques for developing apps across the hottest platforms including Android and iOS. This collection includes the full content of these three books, at a special price: Professional Android Programming with Mono for Android and .NET/C#, ISBN: 9781118026434, by Wallace B. McClure, Nathan Blevins, John J. Croft, IV, Jonathan Dick, and Chris Hardy Professional iPhone Programming with MonoTouch and .NET/C#, ISBN: 9780470637821, by Wallace B. McClure, Rory Blyth, Craig Dunn, Chris Hardy, and Martin Bowling Professional Cross-Platform Mobile Development in C#, ISBN: 9781118157701, by Scott Olson, John Hunter, Ben Horgen, and Kenny Goers Remember, go buy 8-10 copies of the 3 book set for the ones you love. They will make great and romantic gifts!!

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  • Cross Platform Data Access with Xamarin & C# For iPhone, iPad, and Android - Local, Web Services, & Sql Server

    - by Wallym
    The following is a link to cross platform data access training with Xamarin & C#.   It is intended for use on iPhone, iPad, and Android devices.  The course covers local data in Sqlite, calling Web Services via REST and JSON, and calling Sql Server. Url: http://www.learnnowonline.com/course/cpx2/xamarin-cross-platform-data-access/  Course Data  Applications live on data. These applications can vary from an online social network service, to a company’s internal database, to simple data, and all points in between. This Course will focus on how to easily access data on the device, communicate back and forth with a web service, and then finally to a SQL server database. Outline Local Data (27:36) Introduction (00:36) Problem (01:57) Solution (02:01) LINQ (02:03) LINQ Status (00:48) SQLite (02:18) SQLite - .Net Developers (00:50) SQLite-net (01:07) SQLite-net Attributes (02:10) Getting Started (01:09) CRUD (01:05) SQLite Platforms (01:17) Demo: SQLite – Android (04:53) Demo: SQLite – iOS (04:56) Summary (00:20) Web Services Data (32:43) Introduction (00:19) Async Commands (03:15) HttpClient (01:26) HTTP Verbs (01:29) Notes (00:58) GET Operation (01:37) JSON.NET (01:50) Images (01:16) Other Http Verbs (01:27) Post (03:18) Demo: Http – iOS prt1 (05:26) Demo: Http – iOS prt2 (05:28) Demo: Http – Android (04:20) Summary (00:27) Direct Data (12:33) Introduction (00:23) Remote Data - Direct (02:47) Sql Server (01:15) Demo: Sql Server – iOS (04:15) Demo: Sql Server – Android (01:49) "codepage 1252 not supported" (01:03) Other Resources (00:43) Summary (00:15) Note: Thanks to Frank Kreuger for his data access library Sqlite-Net.  It is very helpful and I have used it in some other projects beyond just this training session.

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  • Xamarin Designer for Android Webinar - Recording

    - by Wallym
    Here is some info on the recording of the webinar that I did last week for AppDev regarding the Xamarin Designer for Android.Basic Info: Android user interfaces can be created declaratively by using XML files, or programmatically in code. The Xamarin Android Designer allows developers to create and modify declarative layouts visually, without having to deal with the tedium of hand-editing XML files. The designer also provides real-time feedback, which lets the developer validate changes without having to redeploy the application in order to test a design. This can speed up UI development in Android tremendously. In this webinar, we'll take a look at UI Design in Mono for Android, the basics of the Xamarin Android Designer, and build a simple application with the designer.Here is the link:http://media.appdev.com/EDGE/LL/livelearn05232012.wmvI think it will only play in Internet Explorer.  Enjoy!

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  • Calling a REST Based JSON Endpoint with HTTP POST and WCF

    - by Wallym
    Note: I always forget this stuff, so I'm putting it my blog to help me remember it.Calling a JSON REST based service with some params isn't that hard.  I have an endpoint that has this interface:        [WebInvoke(UriTemplate = "/Login",             Method="POST",             BodyStyle = WebMessageBodyStyle.Wrapped,            RequestFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json,            ResponseFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json )]        [OperationContract]        bool Login(LoginData ld); The LoginData class is defined like this:    [DataContract]    public class LoginData    {        [DataMember]        public string UserName { get; set; }        [DataMember]        public string PassWord { get; set; }        [DataMember]        public string AppKey { get; set; }    } Now that you see my method to call to login as well as the class that is passed for the login, the body of the login request looks like this:{ "ld" : {  "UserName":"testuser", "PassWord":"ackkkk", "AppKey":"blah" } } The header (in Fiddler), looks like this:User-Agent: FiddlerHost: hostnameContent-Length: 76Content-Type: application/json And finally, my url to POST against is:http://www.something.com/...../someservice.svc/LoginAnd there you have it, calling a WCF JSON Endpoint thru REST (and HTTP POST)

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  • Location, Orientation, and Writing a Custom Control with Mono for Android, .NET, and C#

    - by Wallym
    Like real estate, mobile is about location, location, location. That means that direction is an important item. And just as important is how this information is presented to the user. In Nov. 2011, we talked about building a user interface in Mono For Android. In this article, I'll expand a little bit on that by creating a compass that displays north. We'll use Android's built-in sensor support to determine the orientation of the device, then use a custom control to display North. The output will look like

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  • Xamarin Designer for Android Article

    - by Wallym
    The latest version of Mono for Android includes a long-awaited design surface. Learn how it works.It's interesting to look at the needs of various segments of developers. When I first start looking at an environment, the first thing I need to understand is the UI. I'm not magically born with some knowledge about the environment and don't learn well by just reading, so I need some help in getting started. I found this was true when I started Windows based development in the early 1990s, Dynamic Web in the late 1990s, ASP.NET in 2000, Silverlight/WPF, iPhone and Android. I find that getting up to speed with a UI is the single biggest deterrent for someone learning a platform. I find that as a beginner I need the features provided by a design surface. It's only as I grow and become comfortable with a platform that I find that building a UI by hand is more productive. Even as I get more advanced, I still can learn from a designer, so it has value as I grow into a platform.I hope that this article helps you as you dive into Android Development.

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  • Writing to the UI with MonoDroid using RunOnUIThread

    - by Wallym
    I've been pulling my hair out over the past day or so trying to update the UI in my test app.  I was having problem after problem.  I finally got down to my base problem.  I could not write out to my TextView.  WTF could be causing that?  I can write to my UI in other parts of my app.  This is pure craziness.  I thought long and hard and nothing was coming to me.  Wait, the light bulb went on.  I am in the wrong thread.  Great, how do I write in the correct thread?  MonoDroid supports the entire AsyncTask set of objects, but this seemed like overkill.  I was reading and came across RunOnUIThread().......Bing..........The lightbulb has been invented...BlueStar Airlines (oh wait, wrong context). Anyway, here is what I needed:this.RunOnUiThread(() => TextViewControl.Text = "Hello World"); Enjoy!!!!!!!  Remember kiddies, running on the main ui for off device operations is bad, not as bad as crossing the streams bad, but bad as in trying to drive on a flat tire bad. It won't kill you, but it does keep you from getting anywhere.

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  • Mobile Connections in Las Vegas April 17-21

    - by Wallym
    I'll be speaking at Mobile Connections in Las Vegas.  The event is April 17-21.  The event is a cross platform mobile event.  There will be sessions on iOS, Android, WP7, Blackberry, and cross platform tools.  The sessions I am speaking on are:Introduction to Android via MonoDroid:This session will introduce writing native applications geared for the Android Platform based on .NET/C#/Mono. We’ll examine the overall architecture of MonoDroid, discuss how it integrates with Visual Studio, debug with MonoDroid, and look at a couple of example apps written with MonoDroid. This session is targeted to the .NET developer who wants to move to the Android mobile platform. While the session will be introductory for the Android platform, it will be intermediate/expert for those on the .NET platform.Web Development with HTML5 to target Android, iOS, iPadThis session will examine the features of the mobile browser, and how developers can leverage it to build applications that target mobile devices. This session is for developers looking to target Android, iPhone, WebKit based devices, and other devices through the mobile web with the same application code, development managers looking to Android, iPhone, WebKit based devices, and other devices through the mobile web with the same application code, and developers and development managers looking to build mobile web apps for devices that look like native apps. Attendees will be able to immediately begin building web applications that target the Android and iPhone platforms. The benefits of this approach are: Easy cross platform development No requirement to learn Objective-C/Xcode or Java/Eclipse Applications are immediately upgradeable. There is no requirement to go through the Marketplace or Appstore of either platform. Web developers are easier to find than Objective-C, Blackberry, WebOS, or Java programmerYou can register for the event and get $100 off via this link.

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  • MSDN article on jQuery Mobile

    - by Wallym
    My article on jQuery Mobile has been published.  Please check it out.There’s no doubt about it. Wherever developers look and whoever they talk to, mobile is at the top of the list. Talk to a C-level executive, and the conversation turns to mobile, and the question “How do I get me some of that?” comes up. Talk to other developers, and they tell you they’re targeting mobile devices. Mobile has become a big deal as smartphones have taken hold in the consumer marketplace.In the years leading up to the current focus on mobile applications and devices, Web developers have been adding more and more client-side functionality to their applications. You can see this in the use of client-side JavaScript libraries like jQuery.With the growth of the market for mobile devices, the ability to create applications that run across platforms is very important for developers and for businesses that are trying to keep their expenses in check. There are a set of applications, mostly in the area of content consumption (think Amazon.com), that run well in a mobile Web browser. Unfortunately, there are differences between Web browsers on various mobile devices. The goal of the recently introduced jQuery Mobile (jQM) library is to provide cross-browser support to allow developers to build applications that can run across the various mobile Web browsers and provide the same—or at least a very similar—user interface.The jQuery Mobile library was introduced in an alpha release in the fall of 2010 and released to manufacturing in November 2011. At the time of this writing, the current version of jQuery Mobile is 1.1.1. By the time you read this, jQuery Mobile will almost certainly have reached version 1.2.0. The library has been embraced by Microsoft, Adobe and other companies for mobile Web development. In August 2011, jQM had 32 percent market share compared with other mobile JavaScript frameworks such as iWebKit and jQTouch. This market share is impressive given that it started from zero little more than 12 months ago, and the 1.0 release is the first officially supported release.

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  • Cross-Platform Mobile Development With Mono for Android and MonoTouch

    - by Wallym
    Many years ago, in fact pre-Java, I remember a hallway discussion about the desire to write a single application that could easily run across various platforms. At the time, we were only worried about writing applications on Windows 3.1 and Mac OS 7.x. There were many discussions about windows, user interface concepts, and specifically a rather long discussion as to whether Mac users would accept a Mac application that didn't have balloon help. Thankfully, the marketplace answered this question for us with the Windows API winning the battle.A similar set of questions is currently going on in the mobile world. Unfortunately, at this point in time, there is currently no winning API and none currently in sight. What's a developer to do? Here are some questions that developers have (and there are many more):How can mobile developers target Android and the iPhone with the same code?How can .NET developers share their code across Android, iPhone and other platforms?How can developers give applications the look and feel of the specific platform and still allow as much code as possible to be shared?Mobile devices share many common features, such as cameras, accelerometers, and address books. How can we take advantage of them in a platform independent way and still give the users the look of every other application running on their platform?In this article, we'll look at some solutions to these cross-platform and code-sharing questions between Mono for Android, MonoTouch and the .NET Framework available to developers. 

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  • Passing values between Activities using MonoDroid

    - by Wallym
    Been doing some work in MonoDroid and found that I needed to pass a user entered value from on Activity to another Activity in MonoDroid.  Here's how I did it. In my sending Activity, I need to take some user user entered data and send it to my second activity.  Here is the code:             string UserId = Convert.ToString(et.Text);            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(UserId))            {                Intent i = new Intent();                i.SetClass(this, typeof(CustomList));                i.AddFlags(ActivityFlags.NewTask);                i.PutExtra("TwitterId", UserId);                StartActivity(i);            }  In this code, I have called .PutExtra and  passed it with a key.  In this case, I am passing a Twitter id.  In the code that is receiving the data, the code to retrieve the Twitter id is: string twitterId = Intent.GetStringExtra("TwitterId"); The call to GetStringExtra() returns the value passed on the key.

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