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  • Java Spotlight Episode 99: Daniel Blaukopf on JavaFX for Embedded Systems

    - by Roger Brinkley
    Interview with  Daniel Blaukopf on JavaFX for Embedded Systems Right-click or Control-click to download this MP3 file. You can also subscribe to the Java Spotlight Podcast Feed to get the latest podcast automatically. If you use iTunes you can open iTunes and subscribe with this link:  Java Spotlight Podcast in iTunes. Show Notes News Top 5 Reasons to go to JavaOne 5. Chance to see the future of Java Technical Keynotes and sessions The pavillion The new [email protected] conference 4. The meetings outside the scope of the conference Top 10 Reasons to Attend the Oracle Appreciation Event GlassFish Community Event at JavaOne 2012 Sundays User Group Forum 3. It’s like drinking from firehose Less keynotes more sessions - 20% more 60% of the talks are external to HOLs Tutorials OracleJava University classes on Sunday - Top Five Reasons You Should Attend Java University at JavaOne 2. Students are free 1. It’s not what you see it’s who you will meet Events Sep 10-15, IMTS 2012 Conference,  Chicago Sep 12,  The Coming M2M Revolution: Critical Issues for End-to-End Software and Systems Development,  Webinar Sep 30-Oct 4, JavaONE, San Francisco Oct 3-4, Java Embedded @ JavaONE, San Francisco Oct 15-17, JAX London Oct 30-Nov 1, Arm TechCon, Santa Clara Oct 22-23, Freescale Technology Forum - Japan, Tokyo Oct 31, JFall, Netherlands Nov 2-3, JMagreb, Morocco Nov 13-17, Devoxx, Belgium Feature InterviewDaniel Blaukopf is the Embedded Java Client Architect at Oracle, working on JavaFX. Daniel's focus in his 14 years in the Java organization has been mobile and embedded devices, including working with device manufacturers to port and tune all levels of the Java stack to their hardware and software environments. Daniel's particular interests are: graphics, performance optimization and functional programming.

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  • Le C en 20 heures d'Eric Berthomier et Daniel Schang

    Nous avons le plaisir de vous présenter le livre "Le C en 20 heures" d'Eric Berthomier et Daniel Schang à consulter ou à télécharger gratuitement. Citation: L'ouvrage que vous tenez dans les mains ou que vous consultez sur votre écran a pour objectif de vous faire découvrir, par la pratique, la programmation en langage C. Il a été testé par de nombreux étudiants qui n'avaient aucune connaissance préalable de ce langage. En 20 à 30 heures de ...

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  • Critical Patch Update For Oracle Fusion Middleware – CPU October 2012 by Daniel Mortimer

    - by JuergenKress
    The latest Critical Patch Update (CPU) has been released for Oracle products. Start your reading here. Patch Set Update and Critical Patch Update October 2012 Availability Document [ID 1477727.1] Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g Release 2 11.1.2.0 Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g Release 1 11.1.1.4 (Portal,Forms,Reports and Discoverer) 11.1.1.5 11.1.1.6 Oracle Application Server 10g Release 3 10.1.3.5 Read the full article here. WebLogic Partner Community For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center. BlogTwitterLinkedInMixForumWiki Technorati Tags: patch ofm,critical patch,WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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  • How do I fix "bzr: ERROR: Unable to determine your name. "?

    - by Daniel
    I am trying to quickly create my first app and am getting gtk errors when I try to run or create an application. Here is a copy of what I executed and what results I got: [email protected]:~/PyDevelopment$ quickly create ubuntu-application app001 Creating project directory app001 Creating bzr repository and committing Launching your newly created project! /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/gi/overrides/Gtk.py:391: Warning: g_object_set_property: construct property "type" for object `Window' can't be set after construction Gtk.Window.__init__(self, type=type, **kwds) /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/gi/overrides/Gtk.py:391: Warning: g_object_set_property: construct property "type" for object `App001Window' can't be set after construction Gtk.Window.__init__(self, type=type, **kwds) Congrats, your new project is setup! cd /home/daniel/PyDevelopment/app001/ to start hacking. [email protected]:~/PyDevelopment$ cd app001 [email protected]:~/PyDevelopment/app001$ quickly design [email protected]:~/PyDevelopment/app001$ quickly rub ERROR: No rub command found in template ubuntu-application. Candidate commands are: add, commands, configure, create, debug, design, edit, getstarted, help, license, package, quickly, release, run, save, share, submitubuntu, test, tutorial, upgrade [email protected]:~/PyDevelopment/app001$ quickly run /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/gi/overrides/Gtk.py:391: Warning: g_object_set_property: construct property "type" for object `Window' can't be set after construction Gtk.Window.__init__(self, type=type, **kwds) /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/gi/overrides/Gtk.py:391: Warning: g_object_set_property: construct property "type" for object `App001Window' can't be set after construction Gtk.Window.__init__(self, type=type, **kwds) [email protected]:~/PyDevelopment/app001$ quickly package .......Ubuntu packaging created in debian/ ....... ---------------------------------- Command returned some ERRORS: ---------------------------------- bzr: ERROR: Unable to determine your name. ---------------------------------- ERROR: can't create or update ubuntu package ERROR: package command failed Aborting

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  • Compiling libcurl for mingw32 (Windows) on mac os x 10.6

    - by Daniel
    Hello. I'm compiling libcurl for mingw32 as follows: ./configure --prefix=/Users/daniel/mingw32 "CFLAGS= -ABI=32" make make install But when compiling a program using mingw32-gcc: i386-mingw32-gcc -lcurl -o bin/remote-win.exe remote.c i get: In file included from /Users/daniel/mingw32/usr/local/include/curl/curl.h:34, from remote.c:6: /Users/daniel/mingw32/usr/local/include/curl/curlbuild.h:152:26: sys/socket.h: No such file or directory In file included from /Users/daniel/mingw32/usr/local/include/curl/curl.h:34, from remote.c:6: /Users/daniel/mingw32/usr/local/include/curl/curlbuild.h:165: error: syntax error before "curl_socklen_t" In file included from /Users/daniel/mingw32/usr/local/include/curl/curl.h:35, from remote.c:6: /Users/daniel/mingw32/usr/local/include/curl/curlrules.h:143: error: size of array `__curl_rule_01__' is negative /Users/daniel/mingw32/usr/local/include/curl/curlrules.h:153: error: size of array `__curl_rule_02__' is negative I'm pretty sure the error is because curl_socklen_t does not exist on windows. I've tried --target=--mingw32 but still no success. Please help

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  • Un plugin jQuery multitâche : méthode de construction personnelle et exemples. Adapter jQuery à vos besoins, niveau 2, par Daniel Hagnoul

    Plugin multitâche : méthode de construction personnelle et exemples Adapter jQuery à vos besoins, niveau 2 Résumé : La plupart des plugins exécutent une seule tâche et les méthodes d'écriture de plugin utilisées dans « Mon Cahier d'exercices », dans la FAQ jQuery et dans l'article « Adapter jQuery à vos besoins » couvrent la majorité des besoins. Lorsque l'on souhaite inclure la modification des options et implémenter plusieurs méthodes on doit penser multitâche . Dans cet ...

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  • C++ AMP Video Overview

    - by Daniel Moth
    I hope to be recording some C++ AMP screencasts for channel9 soon (you'll find them through my regular screencasts link on the left), and in all of them I will assume you have watched this short interview overview of C++ AMP.   Note: I think there were some technical problems with streaming so best to download the "High Quality WMV" or switch to progressive format. Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Debugging and Profiling in Visual Studio 2013

    - by Daniel Moth
    The recently released Visual Studio 2013 Preview includes a boat-load of new features in the diagnostics space, that my team delivered (along with other teams at Microsoft). I enumerated my favorites over on the official Visual Studio blog so if you are interested go read the list and follow the links: Visual Studio 2013 Diagnostics Investments Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Confusion on networking service start/stop in Ubuntu

    - by Daniel Ball
    I'm preparing to move and took down two of my servers, leaving only one with some essential services running. What I neglected to consider was that one was the DHCP server(which I realized when somebody contacted me saying they couldn't connect. Whups). So because I only have a few hosts on this small network, I opted to just statically configure them for now. One of these is a new Ubuntu 11.04 server, where I have very little experience. I edited /etc/network/interfaces and /etc/hosts to reflect my changes. I ran $sudo /etc/init.d/networking stop *deconfiguring network interfaces ... So yay. Then I try to start, it gives me the mumbo jumbo about using services (why didn't it do that for the stop?) So instead I run ... $sudo service networking start networking stop/waiting Now, to me that says the status of the service is stopped. But when I ping another computer, I get a successful reply. So is it not actually stopped? More importantly, am I doing something wrong? Edit [email protected]:~$ sudo service networking status networking stop/waiting [email protected]:~$ sudo service networking stop stop: Unknown instance: [email protected]:~$ sudo service networking status networking stop/waiting [email protected]:~$ sudo service networking start networking stop/waiting [email protected]:~$ sudo service networking status networking stop/waiting So you can see why I ran /etc/init.d/networking stop instead. For some reason upstart (that is what "services" is, right?) isn't working with stop. cat /etc/hosts 127.0.0.1 localhost 127.0.1.1 FOOBAR 198.3.9.2 FOOBAR #Added entry July 19 2011 # The following lines are desirable for IPv6 capable hosts ::1 ip6-localhost ip6-loopback fe00::0 ip6-localnet ff00::0 ip6-mcastprefix ff02::1 ip6-allnodes ff02::2 ip6-allrouters cat /etc/network/interfaces # This file describes the network interfaces available on your system # and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5). # The loopback network interface auto lo iface lo inet loopback # The primary network interface #auto eth0 #iface eth0 inet dhcp # hostname FOOBAR auto eth0 iface eth0 inet static address 198.3.9.2 netmask 255.255.255.0 network 198.3.9.0 broadcast 198.3.9.255 gateway 198.3.9.15 No I didn't save backups, it was just a minor change so I just commented out the old DHCP setting. Edit I set everything back to original settings and set up a DHCP server. "starting" networking does the same thing. I can only assume this is normal, I just don't know WHY. It can't be anything to do with the configuration files, since they've been restored.

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  • Screencasts introducing C++ AMP

    - by Daniel Moth
    It has been almost 2.5 years since I last recorded a screencast, and I had forgotten how time consuming they are to plan/record/edit/produce/publish, but at the same time so much fun to see the end result! So below are links to 4 screencasts to teach you C++ AMP basics from scratch (even if you class yourself as a .NET developer you'll be able to follow). Setup code - part 1 array_view, extent, index - part 2 parallel_for_each - part 3 accelerator - part 4 If you have comments/questions about what is shown in each video, please leave them at each video recoding. If you have generic questions about C++ AMP, please ask in the C++ AMP MSDN forum. Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Translator by Moth v2

    - by Daniel Moth
    If you are looking for the full manual for this Windows Phone app you can find it here: "Translator by Moth". While the manual has no images (just text), in this post I will share images and if you like them, go get "Translator by Moth" from the Windows Phone marketplace. open the app from the app list or through a pinned tile (including secondary tiles for specific translations)    language picker (~40 languages)     "current" page     "saved" page    "about" page Like? Go get Translator by Moth! Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Windows 8 Task Manager

    - by Daniel Moth
    If you are a user of Task Manager (btw, make sure you've read my Task Manager shortcut tips), you must read the blog post on the overhaul coming to Task Manager in Windows 8 – coo stuff! Also, long time readers of my blog will know that back in 2008 I wrote about Windows Vista and Windows 7 number_of_cores support, and in 2009 I shared a widely borrowed screenshot of Task Manager from one of our 128-core machines. So I was excited to just read on the Windows 8 blog that Windows 8 will support up to 640 cores. They shared a screenshot of a 160-core machine, so there goes my record ;-) Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • C++ AMP open specification

    - by Daniel Moth
    Those of you interested in C++ AMP should know that I blog about that topic on our team blog. Just now I posted (and encourage you to go read) our much awaited announcement about the publication of the C++ AMP open specification. For those of you into compiling instead of reading, 3 days ago I posted a list of over a dozen C++ AMP samples. To follow what I and others on my team write about C++ AMP, stay tuned on our RSS feed. Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • My MSDN magazine articles are live

    - by Daniel Moth
    Five years ago I wrote my first MSDN magazine article, and 21 months later I wrote my second MSDN Magazine article (during the VS 2010 Beta). By my calculation, that makes it two and a half years without having written anything for my favorite developer magazine! So, I came back with a vengeance, and in this month's April issue of the MSDN magazine you can find two articles from yours truly - enjoy: A Code-Based Introduction to C++ AMP Introduction to Tiling in C++ AMP For more on C++ AMP, please remember that I blog about it on our team blog, and we take questions in our MSDN forum. Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Get started with C++ AMP

    - by Daniel Moth
    With the imminent release of Visual Studio 2012, even if you do not classify yourself as a C++ developer, C++ AMP is something you should learn so you can understand how to speed up your loops by offloading to the GPU the computation performed in the loop (assuming you have large number of iterations/data). We have many C# customers who are using C++ AMP through pinvoke, and of course many more directly from C++. So regardless of your programming language, I hope you'll find helpful these short videos that help you get started with C++ AMP C++ AMP core API introduction... from scratch Tiling Introduction - C++ AMP Matrix Multiplication with C++ AMP GPU debugging in Visual Studio 2012 In particular the work we have done for parallel and GPU debugging in Visual Studio 2012 is market leading, so check it out! Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Screencasts introducing C++ AMP

    - by Daniel Moth
    It has been almost 2.5 years since I last recorded a screencast, and I had forgotten how time consuming they are to plan/record/edit/produce/publish, but at the same time so much fun to see the end result! So below are links to 4 screencasts to teach you C++ AMP basics from scratch (even if you class yourself as a .NET developer you'll be able to follow). Setup code - part 1 array_view, extent, index - part 2 parallel_for_each - part 3 accelerator - part 4 If you have comments/questions about what is shown in each video, please leave them at each video recoding. If you have generic questions about C++ AMP, please ask in the C++ AMP MSDN forum. Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Join the Visual Studio diagnostics team

    - by Daniel Moth
    I have a Program Manager position open on the Visual Studio diagnostics team which owns the debugger, the profiler tools, and IntelliTrace. If you have never worked for Microsoft you may be wondering if the PM position at Microsoft is for you. Read the job description to see what the role entails and to see if you are a fit. I’ll preempt the usual question and say that this is a Redmond-based position. Beyond that, if you are interested in what you read and you think you have what it takes, then email me. http://www.microsoft-careers.com/job/Redmond-Program-Manager-2-Job-WA-98052/2321458/ Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Multi-Device Development in Visual Studio

    - by Daniel Moth
    You've read on Soma's blog post that Microsoft is broadening Visual Studio's reach to other platforms (including for example Android)…  specifically this is what Soma wrote: "With bring-your-own-device trends in the enterprise, and heterogeneity in the consumer mobile device market, developers are increasingly focused on building apps that can target a variety of devices. We are committed to enabling developers to build apps for this heterogeneous, mobile-first world with Visual Studio for the technology of your choice - whether .NET, C++ or JavaScript." If you live in Washington state in the USA (or are willing to relocate here) I am looking for a Program Manager to help with this effort – read the rest of the job description here which is also where you can apply for the position (or email me). Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Best of "The Moth" 2011

    - by Daniel Moth
    Once again (like in 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010) the time has come to wish you a Happy New Year and to share my favorite posts from the year we just left behind. 1. My first blog entry in January and last one in December were both about my Windows Phone app: Translator by Moth and Translator by Moth v2. In between, I shared a few code snippets for Windows Phone development including a watermark textbox, a scroll helper, an RTL helper and a network connectivity helper - there will be more coming in 2012. 2. Efficiently using Microsoft Office products is the hallmark of an efficient Program Manager (and not only), and I'll continue sharing tips on this blog in that area. An example from last year is tracking changes in SharePoint-hosted Word document. 3. Half-way through last year I moved from managing the parallel debugger team to managing the C++ AMP team (both of them in Visual Studio 11). That means I had to deprioritize sharing content on VS parallel debugging features (I promise to do that in 2012), and it also meant that I wrote a lot about C++ AMP. You'll need a few cups of coffee to go through all of it, and most of the links were aggregated on this single highly recommended post: Give a session on C++ AMP – here is how You can stay tuned for more by subscribing via one of the options on the left… Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Attend my Fusion sessions

    - by Daniel Moth
    The inaugural Fusion conference was 1 year ago in June 2011 and I was there doing a demo in the keynote, and also presenting a breakout session. If you look at the abstract and title for that session you won't see the term "C++ AMP" in there because the technology wasn't announced and we didn't want to spill the beans ahead of the keynote, where the technology was announced. It was only an announcement, we did not give any bits out, and in fact the first bits came three months later in September 2011 with the Beta following in February 2012. So it really feels great 1 year later, to be back at Fusion presenting two sessions on C++ AMP, demonstrating our progress from that announcement, to the Visual Studio 2012 Release Candidate that came out last week. If you are attending Fusion (in person or virtually later), be sure to watch my two-part session. Part 1 is PT-3601 on Tuesday 4pm and part 2 is PT-3602 on Wednesday 4pm. Here is the shared abstract for both parts: Harnessing GPU Compute with C++ AMP C++ AMP is an open specification for taking advantage of accelerators like the GPU. In this session we will explore the C++ AMP implementation in Microsoft Visual Studio 2012. After a quick overview of the technology understanding its goals and its differentiation compared with other approaches, we will dive into the programming model and its modern C++ API. This is a code heavy, interactive, two-part session, where every part of the library will be explained. Demos will include showing off the richest parallel and GPU debugging story on the market, in the upcoming Visual Studio release. See you there! Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • ScrollViewer.EnsureVisible for Windows Phone

    - by Daniel Moth
    In my Translator By Moth app, on both the current and saved pivot pages the need arose to programmatically scroll to the bottom. In the former, case it is when a translation takes place (if the text is too long, I want to scroll to the bottom of the translation so the user can focus on that, and not their input text for translation). In the latter case it was when a new translation is saved (it is added to the bottom of the list, so scrolling is required to make it visible). On both pages a ScrollViewer is used. In my exploration of the APIs through intellisense and msdn I could not find a method that auto scrolled to the bottom. So I hacked together a solution where I added a blank textblock to the bottom of each page (within the ScrollViewer, but above the translated textblock and the saved list) and tried to make it scroll it into view from code. After searching the web I found a little algorithm that did most of what I wanted (sorry, I do not have the reference handy, but thank you whoever it was) that after minor tweaking I turned into an extension method for the ScrollViewer that is very easy to use: this.Scroller.EnsureVisible(this.BlankText); The method itself I share with you here: public static void EnsureVisible(this System.Windows.Controls.ScrollViewer scroller, System.Windows.UIElement uiElem) { System.Diagnostics.Debug.Assert(scroller != null); System.Diagnostics.Debug.Assert(uiElem != null); scroller.UpdateLayout(); double maxScrollPos = scroller.ExtentHeight - scroller.ViewportHeight; double scrollPos = scroller.VerticalOffset - scroller.TransformToVisual(uiElem).Transform(new System.Windows.Point(0, 0)).Y; if (scrollPos > maxScrollPos) scrollPos = maxScrollPos; else if (scrollPos < 0) scrollPos = 0; scroller.ScrollToVerticalOffset(scrollPos); } I am sure there are better ways, but this "worked for me" :-) Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • BUILD apps that use C++ AMP

    - by Daniel Moth
    If you are a developer on the Microsoft platform, you are hopefully attending (live or virtually) the sessions of the BUILD conference, aka //build/ in Anaheim, CA. The conference sold out not long after it opened registration, and it achieved that without sharing *any* session details nor a meaningful agenda up until after the keynote today – impressive! I am speaking at BUILD and hope you'll catch my talk at 9am on Friday (the last day of the conference) at Marriott Elite 2 Ballroom. Session details follow. 802 - Taming GPU compute with C++ AMP Developers today inject parallelism into their compute-intensive applications in order to take advantage of multi-core CPU hardware. Beyond CPUs, however, compute accelerators such as general-purpose GPUs can provide orders of magnitude speed-ups for data parallel algorithms. How can you as a C++ developer fully utilize this heterogeneous hardware from your Visual Studio environment?  How can you benefit from this tremendous performance boost in your Visual C++ solutions without sacrificing developer productivity?  The answers will be presented in this session about C++ Accelerated Massive Parallelism. I'll be covering a lot of the material I've been recently blogging about on my blog that you are reading, which I have also indexed over on our team blog under the title: "C++ AMP in a nutshell". Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Best of “The Moth” 2013

    - by Daniel Moth
    As previously (2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012) the time has come again to look back over the year’s activities on this blog, and as predicted there were 3 themes 1. It has been just 15 months since I changed role from what at Microsoft we call an “Individual Contributor” (IC) to a managerial role where ICs report to me. Part of being a manager entails sharing career tips with your team and some of those I have put up on my blog over the last year (and hope to continue to next year): Effectiveness and Efficiency, Lead, Follow, or Get out of the way, and Perfect is the enemy of “Good Enough”. 2. It has also been a 15 months that I joined the Visual Studio Diagnostics team, and we have shipped many capabilities in Visual Studio 2013. I helped the members of my team blog about every single one and create videos of many, and then I created a table of contents pointing to all of their blog posts, so if you are interested in what I have been working on over the last year please follow the links from the master blog post here: Visual Studio 2013 Diagnostics Investments. We are busy working on future Visual Studio releases/updates and I will link to those when we are ready… 3. Finally, I used some of my free time (which is becoming eve so scarce) to do some device development and as part of that I shared a few thoughts and code: Debug.Assert replacement for Phone and Store apps, asynchrony is viral, and MyMessageBox for Phone and Store apps. To see what 2014 will bring to this blog, please subscribe using the link on the left… Happy New Year! Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Visual Studio 11 not 2011

    - by Daniel Moth
    A little pet peeve of mine is when people incorrectly refer to the Developer Preview (or the upcoming Beta) as Visual Studio 2011 instead of the correct Visual Studio 11. The "11" refers to the version number (internally we call it Dev11). What the product will be called when it is released is anyone's guess (it could keep the name or it could have a year appended to it, or it could be something else, who knows). Even if it does have a year appended to the name, I think it is a safe bet it won't be last year! For reference, version 10 was the previous version of Visual Studio which happened to be released in 2010, hence it got the name Visual Studio 2010. That is what confuses new people to this product I guess... they think that the two-digit number matches the year, just because it coincided like that last year. (btw, internally we called it Dev10). For further reference, older releases were: Visual Studio 2008 (v9) aka "Orcas", Visual Studio 2005 (v8) aka "Whidbey", Visual Studio .NET 2003 (v7.1) aka "Everett", and Visual Studio .NET 2002 (v7) aka "Rainier". Before that, we were in the pre-.NET era with Visual Studio 6 (where the version and the product name matched, without the year appended to the name). So next time you hear someone saying "Visual Studio 2011", point them to this post for some mini-education... thanks. Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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  • Start Debugging in Visual Studio

    - by Daniel Moth
    Every developer is familiar with hitting F5 and debugging their application, which starts their app with the Visual Studio debugger attached from the start (instead of attaching later). This is one way to achieve step 1 of the Live Debugging process. Hitting F5, F11, Ctrl+F10 and the other ways to start the process under the debugger is covered in this MSDN "How To". The way you configure the debugging experience, before you hit F5, is by selecting the "Project" and then the "Properties" menu (Alt+F7 on my keyboard bindings). Dependent on your project type there are different options, but if you browse to the Debug (or Debugging) node in the properties page you'll have a way to select local or remote machine debugging, what debug engines to use, command line arguments to use during debugging etc. Currently the .NET and C++ project systems are different, but one would hope that one day they would be unified to use the same mechanism and UI (I don't work on that product team so I have no knowledge of whether that is a goal or if it will ever happen). Personally I like the C++ one better, here is what it looks like (and it is described on this MSDN page): If you were following along in the "Attach to Process" blog post, the equivalent to the "Select Code Type" dialog is the "Debugger Type" dropdown: that is how you change the debug engine. Some of the debugger properties options appear on the standard toolbar in VS. With Visual Studio 11, the Debug Type option has been added to the toolbar If you don't see that in your installation, customize the toolbar to show it - VS 11 tends to be conservative in what you see by default, especially for the non-C++ Visual Studio profiles. Comments about this post by Daniel Moth welcome at the original blog.

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