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  • Keyboard similar to laptop keyboards for a desktop

    - by Yktula
    I want to use a keyboard that requires minimal effort pushing down with minimal (if any at all) space between keys. I like the new Apple keyboards, but I want something closer to the feel of a laptop keyboard (the keys on the Apple keyboards are still raised up a bit). Are there any that fit this description?

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  • What is the difference between these two nloglog(n) sorting algorithms? (Andersson et al., 1995 vs.

    - by Yktula
    Swanepoel's comment here lead me to this paper. Then, searching for an implementation in C, I came across this, which referenced another paper on an algorithm described here. Both papers describe integer sorting algorithms that run in O(nloglog(n)) time. What is the difference between the two? Have there been any more recent findings about this topic? Andersson et al., 1995 Han, 2004

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  • Emacs: selective c-auto-newline

    - by Yktula
    When c-auto-newline is set to non-nil, it re-indents the current line and inserts a carriage return and then indents the new line. However. I'm using 1TBS indent-style, which means if/else statements are made like this: if (n == 1) { exit(EXIT_SUCCESS); } else { perror("n"); } Also, I write do/while write loops like this: do { printf("%d\n", n++); } while (n < 64); As such, while I do want a newline automatically inserted after every opening brace and semicolon, I don't want newlines to be automatically inserted after an if statement or do loop is concluded with a closing brace. How can I have GNU Emacs (23.2.1, *nix) selectively insert newlines like that? Along the same lines, can I have Emacs insert an opening brace, a newline, and a closing brace on another newline, while putting the cursor in the middle of the two braces after closing parentheses following an if statement, function declaration, and the like?

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  • Clever ways of implementing different data structures in C & data structures that should be used mor

    - by Yktula
    What are some clever (not ordinary) ways of implementing data structures in C, and what are some data structures that should be used more often? For example, what is the most effective way (generating minimal overhead) to implement a directed and cyclic graph with weighted edges in C? I know that we can store the distances in an array as is done here, but what other ways are there to implement this kind of a graph?

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  • Emacs follow-mode with multiple splits

    - by Yktula
    My question is related to the following two: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/970292/emacs-multiple-columns-one-buffer http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2588706/vim-configuration-setting-up-autocomplete-and-columns I'm using MPage now in vim, and it works well even when I have more than two columns. How can I use follow-mode to mimic that behavior in Emacs, and have flowing code in more than two columns?

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  • Arbitrary-precision random numbers in C: generation for Monte Carlo simulation without atmospheric n

    - by Yktula
    I know that there are other questions similar to this one, however the following question pertains to arbitrary-precision random number generation in C for use in Monte Carlo simulation. How can we generate good quality arbitrary-precision random numbers in C, when atmospheric noise isn't always available, without relying on disk i/o or network access that would create bottlenecks? libgmp is capable of generating random numbers, but, like other implementations of pseudo-random number generators, it requires a seed. As the manual mentions, "the system time is quite easy to guess, so if unpredictability is required then it should definitely not be the only source for the seed value." Is there a portable/ported library for generating random numbers, or seeds for random numbers? The libgmp also mentions that "On some systems there's a special device /dev/random which provides random data better suited for use as a seed." However, /dev/random and /dev/urandom can only be used on *nix systems.

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  • Programmer's editor or IDE for C code

    - by Yktula
    I feel like this question has been repeated here, but I couldn't find it. What open-source programmer's editor or IDE is best for writing code in C? A GUI and integration with Clang for static code analysis or git for version control would be convenient, but aren't necessary. I would ideally use two editors: one feature-filled IDE and one with a small memory footprint, but editors like jEdit, Geany, Diakonos, nano, etc. don't satisfy many of my needs, which include: Good support for refactoring and code completion. Extensibility in C or a "modern" scripting language (i.e. Ruby or Python) Relatively good performance and lack of bloated-ness

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  • When to address integer overflow in C

    - by Yktula
    Related question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/199333/best-way-to-detect-integer-overflow-in-c-c In C code, should integer overflow be addressed whenever integers are added? It seems like pointers and array indexes should be checked at all. When should integer overflow be checked for? When numbers are added in C without type explicitly mentioned, or printed with printf, when will overflow occur? Is there a way to automatically detect when an integer arithmetic overflow?

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  • Calling Perl and/or Python from Ruby

    - by Yktula
    Would it be possible to integrate Python (and/or Perl) and Ruby with some degree of transparency? I've looked at http://www.goto.info.waseda.ac.jp/~fukusima/ruby/python/doc/ and http://code.google.com/p/ruby-perl/ , but they both seem rather outdated. Perhaps this is not an appropriate approach, but would it be possible to generate a Ruby interface for Python's C API?

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  • Incorporating MIT/X11 licensed code into project

    - by Yktula
    I'm rewriting a small MIT-licensed program in C, and I intend to copy a segment from it (though not verbatim) that prints usage information and such things. The programs are going to behave, for the most part, the same, but the implementations are going to be much different. What is the best way to incorporate this code into my program, whether it's licensed under Apache 2, GPLv2/3, or under the MIT license? My guess is that for the first two listed I'd just add the original authors name to the NOTICE file along with relevant information and paste the license header as a comment above the derived code, and for the latter I'd just add the original author's copyright statement above my own.

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  • Calling Python from Ruby

    - by Yktula
    Would it be possible to integrate Python and Ruby with some degree of transparency? I've looked at http://www.goto.info.waseda.ac.jp/~fukusima/ruby/python/doc/ , but it seems rather outdated. Perhaps this is not an appropriate approach, but would it be possible to generate a Ruby interface for Python's C API?

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  • Reliable portability for C code without relying on the preprocessor

    - by Yktula
    Relying on the preprocessor and predefined compiler macros for achieving portability seems hard to manage. What's a better way to achieve portability for a C project? I want to put environment-specific code in headers that behave the same way. Is there a way to have the build environment choose which headers to include? I was thinking that I'd put the environment-specific headers into directories for specific environments. The build environment would then just copy the headers from the platform's directory into the root directory, build the project, and then remove the copies.

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  • C variable declarations after function heading in definition

    - by Yktula
    When reading some FreeBSD source code (See: radix.h lines 158-173), I found variable declarations that followed the "function heading" in the definition. Is this valid in ISO C (C99)? when should this be done in production code instead of just declaring the variables within the "function heading?" Why is it being done here? I refer to the function heading the string that looks like this: int someFunction(int i, int b) {

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  • va_arg with pointers

    - by Yktula
    I want to initialize a linked list with pointer arguments like so: /* * Initialize a linked list using variadic arguments * Returns the number of structures initialized */ int init_structures(struct structure *first, ...) { struct structure *s; unsigned int count = 0; va_list va; va_start(va, first); for (s = first; s != NULL; s = va_arg(va, (struct structure *))) { if ((s = malloc(sizeof(struct structure))) == NULL) { perror("malloc"); exit(EXIT_FAILURE); } count++; } va_end(va); return count; } The problem is that clang errors type name requires a specifier or qualifier at va_arg(va, (struct structure *)), and says that the type specifier defaults to int. It also notes instantiated form at (struct structure *) and struct structure *. This, what seems to be getting assigned to s is int (struct structure *). It compiles fine when parentheses are removed from (struct structure *), but the structures that are supposed to be initialized are inaccessible. Why is int assumed when parentheses are around the type argument passed to va_arg? How can I fix this?

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