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  • Could the rel="author" just be a username?

    - by Gkhan14
    I want to use rel="author", however the type of blog I run is about a game, and doesn't relate to my real identity. I'm more known for my screen name, so would this still be okay to use for the rel="author" tag? For example, if my Google+ account is for my user, and not for myself, could I still use it within the rel="author" tag? I don't want to get penalized in any sort of way. My main reason to do this, is to improve click through rate, and just make my blog post sections look better in the searches.

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  • Why does my laptop resume immediately after suspend?

    - by Igor Zinov'yev
    I seem to be having some problem with suspend mode. Every time I try to suspend my laptop, it just locks the screen. Or maybe it successfully suspends just to resume only an instant after. What could cause such a behaviour? I'm running 32-bit Ubuntu 12.04 with the 3.2.0-25 kernel on a HP dv5-1178er Pavilion laptop (Intel Core 2 Duo). Here are the relevant log sections: kern.log: Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.131171] PM: Syncing filesystems ... done. Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.141222] PM: Preparing system for mem sleep Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.141239] Freezing user space processes ... (elapsed 0.01 seconds) done. Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.156171] Freezing remaining freezable tasks ... (elapsed 0.01 seconds) done. Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.172139] PM: Entering mem sleep Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.172169] Suspending console(s) (use no_console_suspend to debug) Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.172895] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Synchronizing SCSI cache Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.181767] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Stopping disk Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.251089] ene_ir 00:0a: wake-up capability enabled by ACPI Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.251115] i8042 aux 00:09: wake-up capability disabled by ACPI Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.251133] i8042 kbd 00:08: wake-up capability enabled by ACPI Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.251286] jmb38x_ms 0000:06:00.3: PCI INT A disabled Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.252491] sdhci-pci 0000:06:00.1: PCI INT A disabled Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.264130] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1d.2: PCI INT D disabled Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.264142] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1d.1: PCI INT B disabled Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.264325] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1a.1: PCI INT B disabled Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.288059] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1a.0: PCI INT A disabled Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.288097] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1d.3: PCI INT C disabled Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.288135] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1d.0: PCI INT A disabled Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.316051] ehci_hcd 0000:00:1d.7: PCI INT A disabled Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.316068] ehci_hcd 0000:00:1a.7: PCI INT D disabled Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.522872] PM: suspend of drv:sd dev:0:0:0:0 complete after 349.979 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.522901] PM: suspend of drv:scsi dev:target0:0:0 complete after 349.955 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.522927] PM: suspend of drv:scsi dev:host0 complete after 272.260 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.522969] ahci 0000:00:1f.2: BIOS update required for suspend/resume Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.522976] pci_legacy_suspend(): ahci_pci_device_suspend+0x0/0x80 returns -5 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.522981] pm_op(): pci_pm_suspend+0x0/0x110 returns -5 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.522984] PM: suspend of drv:ahci dev:0000:00:1f.2 complete after 258.932 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.522987] PM: Device 0000:00:1f.2 failed to suspend async: error -5 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.576228] snd_hda_intel 0000:00:1b.0: PCI INT A disabled Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.576270] ACPI handle has no context! Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592136] PM: suspend of drv:snd_hda_intel dev:0000:00:1b.0 complete after 327.889 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592206] PM: Some devices failed to suspend Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592291] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1a.0: PCI INT A -> GSI 16 (level, low) -> IRQ 16 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592298] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1a.0: setting latency timer to 64 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592325] usb usb3: root hub lost power or was reset Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592339] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1a.1: PCI INT B -> GSI 21 (level, low) -> IRQ 21 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592345] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1a.1: setting latency timer to 64 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592371] usb usb4: root hub lost power or was reset Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592387] ehci_hcd 0000:00:1a.7: PCI INT D -> GSI 19 (level, low) -> IRQ 19 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592395] ehci_hcd 0000:00:1a.7: setting latency timer to 64 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592843] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1d.0: PCI INT A -> GSI 20 (level, low) -> IRQ 20 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592851] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1d.0: setting latency timer to 64 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592854] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1d.1: PCI INT B -> GSI 19 (level, low) -> IRQ 19 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592863] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1d.1: setting latency timer to 64 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592878] usb usb5: root hub lost power or was reset Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592892] usb usb6: root hub lost power or was reset Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592895] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1d.2: PCI INT D -> GSI 16 (level, low) -> IRQ 16 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592903] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1d.2: setting latency timer to 64 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592906] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1d.3: PCI INT C -> GSI 18 (level, low) -> IRQ 18 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592915] uhci_hcd 0000:00:1d.3: setting latency timer to 64 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592930] usb usb7: root hub lost power or was reset Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592946] usb usb8: root hub lost power or was reset Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592949] ehci_hcd 0000:00:1d.7: PCI INT A -> GSI 20 (level, low) -> IRQ 20 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592957] ehci_hcd 0000:00:1d.7: setting latency timer to 64 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.592963] pci 0000:00:1e.0: setting latency timer to 64 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.597106] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Starting disk Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.608138] snd_hda_intel 0000:00:1b.0: BAR 0: set to [mem 0xdf300000-0xdf303fff 64bit] (PCI address [0xdf300000-0xdf303fff]) Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.608180] snd_hda_intel 0000:00:1b.0: restoring config space at offset 0xf (was 0x100, writing 0x10b) Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.608233] snd_hda_intel 0000:00:1b.0: restoring config space at offset 0x3 (was 0x0, writing 0x10) Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.608248] snd_hda_intel 0000:00:1b.0: restoring config space at offset 0x1 (was 0x100000, writing 0x100002) Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.608299] snd_hda_intel 0000:00:1b.0: PCI INT A -> GSI 22 (level, low) -> IRQ 22 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.608313] snd_hda_intel 0000:00:1b.0: setting latency timer to 64 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.608420] snd_hda_intel 0000:00:1b.0: irq 50 for MSI/MSI-X Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.612095] firewire_ohci 0000:06:00.0: restoring config space at offset 0x1 (was 0x100000, writing 0x100006) Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.612181] sdhci-pci 0000:06:00.1: restoring config space at offset 0x1 (was 0x100003, writing 0x100007) Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.612211] sdhci-pci 0000:06:00.1: PCI INT A -> GSI 16 (level, low) -> IRQ 16 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.612225] sdhci-pci 0000:06:00.1: setting latency timer to 64 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.612296] jmb38x_ms 0000:06:00.3: restoring config space at offset 0x1 (was 0x100003, writing 0x100007) Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.612326] jmb38x_ms 0000:06:00.3: PCI INT A -> GSI 16 (level, low) -> IRQ 16 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.612332] jmb38x_ms 0000:06:00.3: setting latency timer to 64 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.699170] PM: resume of drv:uvcvideo dev:2-4:1.0 complete after 101.965 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.699179] PM: resume of drv:uvcvideo dev:2-4:1.1 complete after 101.932 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.699186] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_00 complete after 101.917 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.699197] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_83 complete after 101.972 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.716148] PM: resume of drv:hub dev:3-0:1.0 complete after 119.543 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.716155] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_00 complete after 119.544 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.716161] PM: resume of drv:hub dev:5-0:1.0 complete after 119.420 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.716168] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_00 complete after 119.381 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.716174] PM: resume of drv:hub dev:8-0:1.0 complete after 119.141 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.716181] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_00 complete after 119.104 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.716186] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_81 complete after 119.579 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.716191] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_81 complete after 119.427 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.716197] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_81 complete after 119.143 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.747148] firewire_core: skipped bus generations, destroying all nodes Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.776093] PM: resume of drv:hp_accel dev:HPQ0004:00 complete after 167.225 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.777243] i8042 kbd 00:08: wake-up capability disabled by ACPI Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.777278] ene_ir 00:0a: wake-up capability disabled by ACPI Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.820100] PM: resume of drv:hub dev:4-0:1.0 complete after 223.436 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.820115] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_00 complete after 223.444 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.820123] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_81 complete after 223.456 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.820206] PM: resume of drv:hub dev:7-0:1.0 complete after 223.266 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.820221] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_81 complete after 223.260 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.820238] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_00 complete after 223.255 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.820295] PM: resume of drv:hub dev:6-0:1.0 complete after 223.453 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.820302] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_00 complete after 223.415 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.820321] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_81 complete after 223.457 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2225.932108] usb 4-2: reset full-speed USB device number 2 using uhci_hcd Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.086714] PM: resume of drv:usbhid dev:4-2:1.0 complete after 489.393 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.086728] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_81 complete after 489.384 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.086745] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_00 complete after 489.329 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.086753] PM: resume of drv:usbhid dev:4-2:1.1 complete after 489.384 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.086764] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_82 complete after 489.373 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.180555] usb 7-2: reset full-speed USB device number 2 using uhci_hcd Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.244858] firewire_core: rediscovered device fw0 Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.335066] btusb 7-2:1.0: no reset_resume for driver btusb? Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.335068] btusb 7-2:1.1: no reset_resume for driver btusb? Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.432082] usb 6-1: reset full-speed USB device number 2 using uhci_hcd Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.578280] PM: resume of drv:nvidia dev:0000:01:00.0 complete after 985.301 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.584296] PM: resume of drv:usb dev:7-2:1.0 complete after 986.693 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.584308] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_00 complete after 986.452 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.584311] PM: resume of drv:usb dev:7-2:1.1 complete after 986.616 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.584315] PM: resume of drv:usb dev:7-2:1.3 complete after 986.483 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.584320] PM: resume of drv:usb dev:7-2:1.2 complete after 986.556 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.584328] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_03 complete after 986.588 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.584331] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_81 complete after 986.704 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.584334] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_83 complete after 986.617 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.584337] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_82 complete after 986.688 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.584340] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_02 complete after 986.667 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.584344] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_84 complete after 986.558 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.584352] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_04 complete after 986.542 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.590883] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_00 complete after 993.327 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.590887] PM: resume of drv:usb dev:6-1:1.0 complete after 993.424 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.590927] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_82 complete after 993.395 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.590934] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_81 complete after 993.426 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.590940] PM: resume of drv: dev:ep_01 complete after 993.456 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.592450] PM: resume of drv:sd dev:0:0:0:0 complete after 995.343 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.592461] PM: resume of drv:scsi_disk dev:0:0:0:0 complete after 802.688 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.592472] PM: resume of drv:scsi_device dev:0:0:0:0 complete after 995.324 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.600339] PM: resume of devices complete after 1008.129 msecs Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.601293] PM: resume devices took 1.008 seconds Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.601330] PM: Finishing wakeup. Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.601332] Restarting tasks ... done. Jun 1 10:42:21 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2226.625660] video LNXVIDEO:01: Restoring backlight state Jun 1 10:42:22 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2227.478921] iwlwifi 0000:02:00.0: L1 Disabled; Enabling L0S Jun 1 10:42:22 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2227.481981] iwlwifi 0000:02:00.0: Radio type=0x1-0x2-0x0 Jun 1 10:42:22 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2227.527727] ADDRCONF(NETDEV_UP): wlan0: link is not ready Jun 1 10:42:22 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2227.532468] r8169 0000:03:00.0: eth0: link down Jun 1 10:42:22 igor-laptop kernel: [ 2227.533967] ADDRCONF(NETDEV_UP): eth0: link is not ready pm_suspend.log: Fri Jun 1 10:42:14 MSK 2012: Running hooks for suspend. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/000kernel-change suspend suspend: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/000kernel-change suspend suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/00logging suspend suspend: Linux igor-laptop 3.2.0-25-generic #40-Ubuntu SMP Wed May 23 20:33:05 UTC 2012 i686 i686 i386 GNU/Linux Module Size Used by pci_stub 12550 1 vboxpci 22882 0 vboxnetadp 13328 0 vboxnetflt 27211 0 vboxdrv 252189 3 vboxpci,vboxnetadp,vboxnetflt dm_crypt 22528 0 snd_hda_codec_hdmi 31775 1 snd_hda_codec_idt 60251 1 arc4 12473 2 hp_wmi 13652 0 sparse_keymap 13658 1 hp_wmi rfcomm 38139 12 snd_hda_intel 32765 5 snd_hda_codec 109562 3 snd_hda_codec_hdmi,snd_hda_codec_idt,snd_hda_intel snd_hwdep 13276 1 snd_hda_codec bnep 17830 2 btusb 17912 2 bluetooth 158438 23 rfcomm,bnep,btusb joydev 17393 0 parport_pc 32114 0 snd_pcm 80845 4 snd_hda_codec_hdmi,snd_hda_intel,snd_hda_codec ppdev 12849 0 uvcvideo 67203 0 binfmt_misc 17292 1 videodev 86588 1 uvcvideo snd_seq_midi 13132 0 snd_rawmidi 25424 1 snd_seq_midi nvidia 10958194 43 snd_seq_midi_event 14475 1 snd_seq_midi snd_seq 51567 2 snd_seq_midi,snd_seq_midi_event ir_lirc_codec 12739 0 lirc_dev 18700 1 ir_lirc_codec snd_timer 28931 2 snd_pcm,snd_seq snd_seq_device 14172 3 snd_seq_midi,snd_rawmidi,snd_seq ir_mce_kbd_decoder 12681 0 ir_sony_decoder 12462 0 ir_jvc_decoder 12459 0 ir_rc6_decoder 12459 0 psmouse 87213 0 ir_rc5_decoder 12459 0 serio_raw 13027 0 iwlwifi 287934 0 rc_rc6_mce 12454 0 ir_nec_decoder 12459 0 ene_ir 18019 0 rc_core 21263 10 ir_lirc_codec,ir_mce_kbd_decoder,ir_sony_decoder,ir_jvc_decoder,ir_rc6_decoder,ir_rc5_decoder,rc_rc6_mce,ir_nec_decoder,ene_ir mac80211 436455 1 iwlwifi snd 62064 19 snd_hda_codec_hdmi,snd_hda_codec_idt,snd_hda_intel,snd_hda_codec,snd_hwdep,snd_pcm,snd_rawmidi,snd_seq,snd_timer,snd_seq_device cfg80211 178679 2 iwlwifi,mac80211 hp_accel 25728 0 lis3lv02d 19268 1 hp_accel input_polldev 13648 1 lis3lv02d mac_hid 13077 0 wmi 18744 1 hp_wmi jmb38x_ms 17406 0 soundcore 14635 1 snd snd_page_alloc 14115 2 snd_hda_intel,snd_pcm memstick 15857 1 jmb38x_ms firewire_sbp2 18346 0 lp 17455 0 parport 40930 3 parport_pc,ppdev,lp vesafb 13516 1 usbhid 41906 0 hid 77367 1 usbhid firewire_ohci 40180 0 firewire_core 56906 2 firewire_sbp2,firewire_ohci crc_itu_t 12627 1 firewire_core sdhci_pci 18324 0 sdhci 28241 1 sdhci_pci r8169 56321 0 video 19068 0 total used free shared buffers cached Mem: 3095544 2364260 731284 0 159020 1280240 -/+ buffers/cache: 925000 2170544 Swap: 1718916 0 1718916 /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/00logging suspend suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/00powersave suspend suspend: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/00powersave suspend suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/01PulseAudio suspend suspend: Welcome to PulseAudio! Use "help" for usage information. >>> >>> Welcome to PulseAudio! Use "help" for usage information. >>> >>> Welcome to PulseAudio! Use "help" for usage information. >>> >>> /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/01PulseAudio suspend suspend: success. Running hook /etc/pm/sleep.d/10_grub-common suspend suspend: /etc/pm/sleep.d/10_grub-common suspend suspend: success. Running hook /etc/pm/sleep.d/10_unattended-upgrades-hibernate suspend suspend: /etc/pm/sleep.d/10_unattended-upgrades-hibernate suspend suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/55NetworkManager suspend suspend: Having NetworkManager put all interaces to sleep...Failed. /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/55NetworkManager suspend suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/60_wpa_supplicant suspend suspend: Failed to connect to wpa_supplicant - wpa_ctrl_open: No such file or directory /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/60_wpa_supplicant suspend suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/75modules suspend suspend: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/75modules suspend suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/90clock suspend suspend: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/90clock suspend suspend: not applicable. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/94cpufreq suspend suspend: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/94cpufreq suspend suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/95anacron suspend suspend: stop: Unknown instance: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/95anacron suspend suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/95hdparm-apm suspend suspend: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/95hdparm-apm suspend suspend: not applicable. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/95led suspend suspend: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/95led suspend suspend: not applicable. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/98video-quirk-db-handler suspend suspend: nVidia binary video drive detected, not using quirks. /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/98video-quirk-db-handler suspend suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/99video suspend suspend: kernel.acpi_video_flags = 0 /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/99video suspend suspend: success. Running hook /etc/pm/sleep.d/novatel_3g_suspend suspend suspend: /etc/pm/sleep.d/novatel_3g_suspend suspend suspend: success. Fri Jun 1 10:42:19 MSK 2012: performing suspend Fri Jun 1 10:42:21 MSK 2012: Awake. Fri Jun 1 10:42:21 MSK 2012: Running hooks for resume Running hook /etc/pm/sleep.d/novatel_3g_suspend resume suspend: /etc/pm/sleep.d/novatel_3g_suspend resume suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/99video resume suspend: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/99video resume suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/98video-quirk-db-handler resume suspend: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/98video-quirk-db-handler resume suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/95led resume suspend: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/95led resume suspend: not applicable. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/95hdparm-apm resume suspend: /dev/sda: setting Advanced Power Management level to 0xfe (254) APM_level = 254 /dev/sda: setting Advanced Power Management level to 0xfe (254) APM_level = 254 /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/95hdparm-apm resume suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/95anacron resume suspend: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/95anacron resume suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/94cpufreq resume suspend: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/94cpufreq resume suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/90clock resume suspend: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/90clock resume suspend: not applicable. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/75modules resume suspend: Reloaded unloaded modules. /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/75modules resume suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/60_wpa_supplicant resume suspend: Failed to connect to wpa_supplicant - wpa_ctrl_open: No such file or directory /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/60_wpa_supplicant resume suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/55NetworkManager resume suspend: Having NetworkManager wake interfaces back up...Failed. /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/55NetworkManager resume suspend: success. Running hook /etc/pm/sleep.d/10_unattended-upgrades-hibernate resume suspend: /etc/pm/sleep.d/10_unattended-upgrades-hibernate resume suspend: success. Running hook /etc/pm/sleep.d/10_grub-common resume suspend: /etc/pm/sleep.d/10_grub-common resume suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/01PulseAudio resume suspend: Welcome to PulseAudio! Use "help" for usage information. >>> >>> Welcome to PulseAudio! Use "help" for usage information. >>> >>> Welcome to PulseAudio! Use "help" for usage information. >>> >>> /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/01PulseAudio resume suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/00powersave resume suspend: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/00powersave resume suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/00logging resume suspend: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/00logging resume suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/000kernel-change resume suspend: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/000kernel-change resume suspend: success. Fri Jun 1 10:42:22 MSK 2012: Finished.

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  • SQLAuthority News – Author Visit to Nepal TechMela – 2 Technical Sessions

    - by pinaldave
    Microsoft MDP Nepal is going to organize a Tech Mela for the IT community of Nepal on March 29 & 30, 2010 (2066 Chaitra 16 & 17), Monday and Tuesday,  at the Russian Center for Science & Culture, Kamalpokhari, Kathmandu. The objective of the event is to enhance and exchange knowledge about Information Technology, as well as Microsoft products and technologies, with the IT community. I am very excited to attend this one-of-a-kind event in Nepal. I will be giving two presentations in the said event, which includes: 1) Become An Efficient Developer – Learn The Tricks of SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) There are so many features in SQL Server Management Studio that we may not know or use all of them. This presentation will impart tricks and tips of SQL Server Management Studio to the event goers. This aims to make you an efficient developer by having an edge over the other developers. 2) Good, Bad and Ugly: The Story of Index Index is often considered as the sure shot tool of improving the performance of any query. Learn the basics with examples and discover the good, bad and ugly sides of Index. This session will help you efficiently write queries in future. I am very excited to attend this special event as this is the very first time I will be presenting in technical sessions in Nepal. If you are in Nepal, I strongly suggest that you go to this once-in a lifetime IT fair. Reference : Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLAuthority Author Visit, SQLAuthority News, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQLAuthority News – Author Visit – SQL Server 2008 R2 Launch

    - by pinaldave
    June 11, 2010 was a wonderful day because I attended the very first SQL Server 2008 R2 Launch event held by Microsoft at Mumbai. I traveled to Mumbai from my home town, Ahmedabad. The event was located at one of the best hotels in Mumbai,”The Leela”. SQL Server R2 Launch was an evening event that had a few interesting talks. SQL PASS is associated with this event as one of the partners and its goal is to increase the awareness of the Community about SQL Server. I met many interesting people and had a great networking opportunity at the event. This event was kicked off with an awesome laser show and a “Welcome” video, which was followed by a Microsoft Executive session wherein there were several interesting demo. The very first demo was about Powerpivot. I knew beforehand that there will be Powerpivot demos because it is a very popular subject; however, I was really hoping to see other interesting demos from SQL Server 2008 R2. And believe me; I was happier to see the later demos. There were demos from SQL Server Utility Control Point, as well an integration of Bing Map with Reporting Servers. I really enjoyed the interactive and informative session by Shivaram Venkatesh. He had excellent presentation skills as well as ample technical knowledge to keep the audience attentive. I really liked his presentations skills wherein he did not read the whole slide deck; rather, he picked one point and using that point he told the story of the whole slide deck. I also enjoyed my conversation with Afaq Choonawala, who is one of the “gem guys” in Microsoft. I also want to acknowledge Ashwin Kini and Mohit Panchal for their excellent support to this event. Mumbai IT Pro is a user group which you can really count on for any kind of help. After excellent demos and a vibrant start of the event, all the audience was jazzed up. There were two vendors’ sessions right after the first session. Intel had 15 minutes to present; however, Intel’s representative, who had good knowledge of the subject, had nearly 30+ slides in his presentation, so he had to rush a bit to cover the whole slide deck. Intel presentations were followed up by another vendor presentation from NetApp. I have previously heard about this tool. After I saw the demo which did not work the first time the Net App presenter demonstrated it, I started to have a doubt on this product. I personally went to clarify my doubt to the demo booth after the presentation was over, but I realize the NetApp presenter or booth owner had absolutely a POOR KNOWLEDGE of SQL Server and even of their own NetApp product. The NetApp people tried to misguide us and when we argued, they started to say different things against what they said earlier. At one point in their presentation, they claimed their application does something very fast, which did not really happen in front of all the audience. They blamed SQL Server R2 DBCC CHECKDB command for their product’s failed demonstration. I know that NetApp has many great products; however, this one was not conveyed clearly and even created a negative impression to all of us. Well, let us not judge the potential, fun, education and enigma of the launch event through a small glitch. This event was jam-packed and extremely well-received by everybody who attended it. As what I said, average demos and good presentations by MS folks were really something to cheer about. Any launch event is considered as successful if it achieves its goal to excite users with its cutting edge technology; just like this event that left a very deep impression on me. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLAuthority Author Visit, SQLAuthority News, T SQL, Technology Tagged: PASS, SQLPASS

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  • SQLAuthority News – Author Visit Review – TechMela Nepal – March 29-30, 2010

    - by pinaldave
    I was very fortunate to attend TechMela at Kathmandu, Nepal on 29th and 30th of March 2010. I would like to thank Allen Bailochan Tuladhar from Microsoft MDP Nepal for inviting me. Allen is a person with seemingly infinite energy and unlimited passion for Microsoft Technology. If you get an opportunity to spend just one hour with him, you will surely be more enthusiastic with regards to Microsoft Technology. And, I was lucky enough that I was able to spend about a total of 9 days with him in Kathmandu, working along with him in the Tech Community. TechMela Nepal Pinal at TechMela, Nepal TechMela is considered as one of the biggest events in Nepal, having been organized by Microsoft MDP Nepal. This event was attended by around 500 students and hundreds of Tech professionals. The event was handled very professionally and at very large scale. Every minor detail was properly planned and obviously thought out well. There were around 50+ volunteers from MS MDP who were monitoring this event systematically to make sure the event would run as smooth as planned. Attendees in Geek T-Shirts During this event, I was delighted to meet David Lim of Microsoft Singapore. He is very passionate in working for Microsoft Technology, as well as building deep relations with the Community. I was fortunate to spend my entire afternoon with him during the sight-seeing trip. We discussed various MS technologies and their community’s adoption as well as the way how each of us can be a part of the community activity. He also delivered excellent keynotes at the event. I must say that this is one of the most enjoyable keynotes I have ever attended. It was interesting and interactive, and I must say that I had the 70s feelings with all the fonts and graphics. I still remember him saying, “Yeah, I was a student and I know you.” Allen Tuladhar, David Lim, Pinal Dave and Guests After the keynote, everybody cheered when Allen came on stage to talk about the event and to introduce the agenda for the next two days. I must say that Allen is one of the most well-known people in Nepal. I was impressed with his popularity, and to prove this, when he got on the stage he had to wait for a long full minute before he was able to greet “Welcome” while the attendees were clapping and cheering. Technology Panelist at Techmela Kathmandu, Nepal This event was blessed with the top-of-the-top officials of various IT industries, Nepal ministries and the US Embassy. All the prominent personalities were present for panel discussion on the stage. The talk was done on various subjects. Also, the energy level which was set by Allen really echoed in the audience as they asked certain questions on different global as well local IT-related questions. The panel discussion really was discussion instead of usual monologue of one person. Pinal Dave presending at TechMela Kathmandu, Nepal This was a two-day event and my session was on either of the day. I had a great participation from the audience on both days. The place where the event was organized had a capacity of around 500+ audience. Both of my sessions were heavily attended and volunteers did a fabulous job helping the attendees find empty seats or arrange some additional seats. I was overwhelmed with the interaction I have received in the large hall. Attendees were not so shy to express their thoughts, so both the sessions were followed up by top notch one-on-one conversations for a couple of hours. Pinal Dave presending at TechMela Kathmandu, Nepal Pinal Dave presending at TechMela Kathmandu, Nepal Pinal Dave presending at TechMela Kathmandu, Nepal There are many questions that I have received during the event, and many of them can be interesting for all of us here so I will write detailed blog posts on these subjects. I also tried to participate in the gaming activities held at the event, but I felt I was kind of lost even if I was only playing for the very first minutes. This made me realize that I am really getting old for video games. Allen presending at TechMela Kathmandu, Nepal Allen’s session on Digital Photography was very impressive as he demonstrated so many features of the Windows Live Product that at one point I felt he is MVP for Windows Live. In fact, he demonstrated how all the Microsoft products work together to give users an excellent desktop experience; no wonder he is an MVP for Windows Desktop Experience. Pinal Dave presending at TechMela Kathmandu, Nepal Any event has two common dilemmas – food and logistics. However, this event had excellent food and state-of-the-art organization. I was very glad that this two-day event turned out to be one of the most successful events in Nepal. I also noticed that almost all attendees rate their experience as beyond expectation and truly exceptional. Pinal Dave and Allen Bailochan Tuladhar If you ever get invited by Allen in any of his event, I strongly suggest that you drop all your plans and scheduled stuff, and accept his invitation. For sure, the event will be a very memorable one and would be your once-in-a-lifetime experience. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: MVP, Pinal Dave, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLAuthority Author Visit, SQLAuthority News, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQLAuthority News – Author Visit Review – TechMela Nepal – March 29-30, 2010

    - by pinaldave
    I was very fortunate to attend TechMela at Kathmandu, Nepal on 29th and 30th of March 2010. I would like to thank Allen Bailochan Tuladhar from Microsoft MDP Nepal for inviting me. Allen is a person with seemingly infinite energy and unlimited passion for Microsoft Technology. If you get an opportunity to spend just one hour with him, you will surely be more enthusiastic with regards to Microsoft Technology. And, I was lucky enough that I was able to spend about a total of 9 days with him in Kathmandu, working along with him in the Tech Community. TechMela Nepal Pinal at TechMela, Nepal TechMela is considered as one of the biggest events in Nepal, having been organized by Microsoft MDP Nepal. This event was attended by around 500 students and hundreds of Tech professionals. The event was handled very professionally and at very large scale. Every minor detail was properly planned and obviously thought out well. There were around 50+ volunteers from MS MDP who were monitoring this event systematically to make sure the event would run as smooth as planned. Attendees in Geek T-Shirts During this event, I was delighted to meet David Lim of Microsoft Singapore. He is very passionate in working for Microsoft Technology, as well as building deep relations with the Community. I was fortunate to spend my entire afternoon with him during the sight-seeing trip. We discussed various MS technologies and their community’s adoption as well as the way how each of us can be a part of the community activity. He also delivered excellent keynotes at the event. I must say that this is one of the most enjoyable keynotes I have ever attended. It was interesting and interactive, and I must say that I had the 70s feelings with all the fonts and graphics. I still remember him saying, “Yeah, I was a student and I know you.” Allen Tuladhar, David Lim, Pinal Dave and Guests After the keynote, everybody cheered when Allen came on stage to talk about the event and to introduce the agenda for the next two days. I must say that Allen is one of the most well-known people in Nepal. I was impressed with his popularity, and to prove this, when he got on the stage he had to wait for a long full minute before he was able to greet “Welcome” while the attendees were clapping and cheering. Technology Panelist at Techmela Kathmandu, Nepal This event was blessed with the top-of-the-top officials of various IT industries, Nepal ministries and the US Embassy. All the prominent personalities were present for panel discussion on the stage. The talk was done on various subjects. Also, the energy level which was set by Allen really echoed in the audience as they asked certain questions on different global as well local IT-related questions. The panel discussion really was discussion instead of usual monologue of one person. Pinal Dave presenting at TechMela Kathmandu, Nepal This was a two-day event and my session was on either of the day. I had a great participation from the audience on both days. The place where the event was organized had a capacity of around 500+ audience. Both of my sessions were heavily attended and volunteers did a fabulous job helping the attendees find empty seats or arrange some additional seats. I was overwhelmed with the interaction I have received in the large hall. Attendees were not so shy to express their thoughts, so both the sessions were followed up by top notch one-on-one conversations for a couple of hours. Pinal Dave presenting at TechMela Kathmandu, Nepal Pinal Dave presenting at TechMela Kathmandu, Nepal There are many questions that I have received during the event, and many of them can be interesting for all of us here so I will write detailed blog posts on these subjects. I also tried to participate in the gaming activities held at the event, but I felt I was kind of lost even if I was only playing for the very first minutes. This made me realize that I am really getting old for video games. Allen presenting at TechMela Kathmandu, Nepal Allen’s session on Digital Photography was very impressive as he demonstrated so many features of the Windows Live Product that at one point I felt he is MVP for Windows Live. In fact, he demonstrated how all the Microsoft products work together to give users an excellent desktop experience; no wonder he is an MVP for Windows Desktop Experience. Pinal Dave presending at TechMela Kathmandu, Nepal Any event has two common dilemmas – food and logistics. However, this event had excellent food and state-of-the-art organization. I was very glad that this two-day event turned out to be one of the most successful events in Nepal. I also noticed that almost all attendees rate their experience as beyond expectation and truly exceptional. Pinal Dave and Allen Bailochan Tuladhar If you ever get invited by Allen in any of his event, I strongly suggest that you drop all your plans and scheduled stuff, and accept his invitation. For sure, the event will be a very memorable one and would be your once-in-a-lifetime experience. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: MVP, Pinal Dave, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLAuthority Author Visit, SQLAuthority News, T SQL, Technology

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  • How advanced are author-recognition methods?

    - by Nick Rtz
    From a written text by an author if a computer program analyses the text, how much can a computer program tell today about the author of some (long enough to be statistically significant) texts? Can the computer program even tell with "certainty" whether a man or a woman wrote this text based solely on the contents of the text and not an investigation such as ip numbers etc? I'm interested to know if there are algorithms in use for instance to automatically know whether an author was male or female or similar characteristics of an author that a computer program can decide based on analyses of the written text by an author. It could be useful to know before you read a message what a computer analyses says about the author, do you agree? If I for instance get a longer message from my wife that she has had an accident in Nigeria and the computer program says that with 99 % probability the message was written by a male author in his sixties of non-caucasian origin or likewise, or by somebody who is not my wife, then the computer program could help me investigate why a certain message differs in characteristics. There can also be other uses for instance just detecting outliers in a geographically or demographically bounded larger data set. Scam detection is the obvious use I'm thinking of but there could also be other uses. Are there already such programs that analyse a written text to tell something about the author based on word choice, use of pronouns, unusual language usage, or likewise?

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  • DEB: "Provides:" field ignored

    - by Creshal
    I need to replace a package with a custom one, which gets its own name (foo-origpackage). To allow it to be used as drop-in replacement, I added the Provides: origpackage line to the control file. apt-cache show foo-origpackage lists the "Provides" entry just fine. However, when I want to install a file depending on origpackage, it fails ("Package origpackage not installed"). Is there some distinction between "real" and virtual packages I'm missing? EDIT: To be precise, what I want to replace is xen-utils-common for Squeeze. My tao-xen-utils-common has the following control file: Source: tao-xen-utils-common Section: kernel Priority: optional Maintainer: Creshal <[email protected]> Build-Depends: debhelper Standards-Version: 3.8.0 Homepage: http://tao.at Package: tao-xen-utils-common Architecture: all Depends: gawk, lsb-base, udev, xenstore-utils, tao-firewall Provides: xen-utils-common Conflicts: xen-utils-common Replaces: xen-utils-common Description: Xen administrative tools - common files (modified) The userspace tools to manage a system virtualized through the Xen virtual machine monitor. Modified for use with TAO Firewall. Installing xen-utils-4.0 fails, however: [email protected]# apt-cache showpkg tao-xen-utils-common Package: tao-xen-utils-common Versions: 4.0.0-1tao1 (/var/lib/apt/lists/repo.tao.at_dists_stable_main_binary-amd64_Packages) (/var/lib/dpkg/status) Description Language: File: /var/lib/apt/lists/repo.tao.at_dists_stable_main_binary-amd64_Packages MD5: 7c2503f563fca13b33b4eb3cbcb3c129 Reverse Depends: tao-firewall,tao-xen-utils-common tao-firewall,tao-xen-utils-common Dependencies: 4.0.0-1tao1 - gawk (0 (null)) lsb-base (0 (null)) udev (0 (null)) xenstore-utils (0 (null)) tao-firewall (0 (null)) xen-utils-common (0 (null)) xen-utils-common (0 (null)) Provides: 4.0.0-1tao1 - xen-utils-common Reverse Provides: [email protected]# apt-get install xen-utils-4.0 Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state information... Done The following extra packages will be installed: xen-utils-common Suggested packages: xen-docs-4.0 The following packages will be REMOVED: tao-xen-utils-common The following NEW packages will be installed: xen-utils-4.0 xen-utils-common Edit:[email protected]# apt-cache policy xen-utils-4.0 xen-utils-4.0: Installed: (none) Candidate: 4.0.1-4 Version table: 4.0.1-4 0 500 http://ftp.at.debian.org/debian/ stable/main amd64 Packages 4.0.1-4 0 500 http://security.debian.org/ stable/updates/main amd64 Packages

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  • Text comparison algorithm using java-diff-utils

    - by java_mouse
    One of the features in our project is to implement a comparison algorithm between two versions of text and provide a % change between the two versions. While I was researching, I came across google java-diff-utils project. Has anyone used this for comparing text using java-diff-utils ? Using this utility, I can get a list of "delta" which I assume I can use it for the % of difference between two versions of the text? Is this a correct way of doing this? If you have done any text comparison algorithm using Java, could you give me some pointers?

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  • SharePoint 2010: Set Author (CreatedBy) and Editor (ModifiedBy) in SPFile

    - by user1508154
    I am writing a job to migrate documents to SharePoint 2010 and need to set Author and Editor to the original user for the Source System. The way I have done it was dim ImportFile as SPFile dim ImportFolder as SPFolder dim InternalOperatorUser as SPUser ... ImportFile = ImportFolder.Files.Add(ImportFileName, contents, CreatedBy, ModifiedBy, TimeCreated, TimeModified) ... ImportFile.Item("Author") = InternalOperatorUser ImportFile.Item("Editor") = InternalOperatorUser ImportFile.Item.UpdateOverwriteVersion() ImportFile.Item.SystemUpdate(False) ... That is working fine and it is setting Author and Editor on the ListItem level correctly SPFile.Item("Author") SPFile.Item("Editor") BUT (!!!) SharePoint also stores the Editor on the Attachment level which some tools use as display value instead. This value is set to the system user who is running that script SPFile.Versions.Item(1).CreatedBy This field is readonly. Is there a way to modifiy it so I can set InternalOperatorUser to be the Creator for the Attachment as well. SharePoint 2010 Web only uses the values on the ListItem Attribites which are fine but there are thrid party tools that use the ones on the Attahcment level. Using SharePoint Explorer I could confirm that CreatedBy is set to be the system user. Does anyone here know how to change this value as well? Thanks, Wolfgang

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  • Did anyone experience negative SERP movement after implementing rel=author?

    - by raam86
    I am not intrested in why I don't see the picture in SERPs. So I know this is borderline off-limits but I turned every stone in the web (including DDgo) trying to find anybody experiencing a worse position in SERPs after implementing rel=author tags. In Google Webmaster Tools: Everything seems fine but the first results dropped 14 places in SERPs in the past two days. The original landing page went down from first page to 5th page in a few days. It is a useful site with original content concerning marriage laws. This specific page is no where to be found and now the first result leads to the home page. Assuming everything else is the same with no changes made to the site at all is there a reason the rel=author tag will cause such a plummet? Additional info that might be useful: The google+ account is as dead as a palm pilot.

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  • Problem Trying to Install ROOT (by CERN) on Ubuntu 11.04 i386

    - by Jose Luis
    I hope you can help me with this problem I am trying to install root in my computer, but I have a problem and I don't know what to do to solve it I've downloaded the tar file with the root version that I want to install I've extracted the files in the tar file I've run the configure program succesfully, but when I run "make" command I get this result: cp /root/root/core/utils/src/RClStl.cxx core/utils/src/RClStl_tmp.cxx bin/rmkdepend -R -fcore/utils/src/RClStl_tmp.d -Y -w 1000 -- -pipe -m32 -Wall -W -Woverloaded-virtual -fPIC -Iinclude -DR__HAVE_CONFIG -pthread -UR__HAVE_CONFIG -DROOTBUILD -I/root/root/core/utils/src -D__cplusplus -- core/utils/src/RClStl_tmp.cxx g++ -O2 -pipe -m32 -Wall -W -Woverloaded-virtual -fPIC -Iinclude -DR__HAVE_CONFIG -pthread -UR__HAVE_CONFIG -DROOTBUILD -I/root/root/core/utils/src -o core/utils/src/RClStl_tmp.o -c core/utils/src/RClStl_tmp.cxx In file included from core/utils/src/RClStl.h:28:0, from core/utils/src/RClStl_tmp.cxx:16: core/utils/src/Scanner.h:16:27: fatal error: clang/AST/AST.h: No existe el fichero o el directorio compilation terminated. make: * [core/utils/src/RClStl_tmp.o] Error 1 rm core/utils/src/RClStl_tmp.cxx I don´t know what to do Please, help me thank you in advance

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  • How to wrap console utils in webserver

    - by Alex Brown
    I have a big dataset (100Mbs/day) and a bunch of console a TCL/TK tools to view it - I want to turn it into a web app that I can build, and others can maintain. In long: my group runs simulations yielding 100s of Mbs of data daily, in multiple (mostly but not only) text forms. We have a bunch of scripts and tools, mostly old school 1990's style stuff requiring a 5-button mouse, as well as lots of ad-hoc scripts that engineers build out of frustration every month or so. These produces UIs, graphs, spreadsheets (various sizes), logs, event histories etc. I want to replace (or at least supplement) the xwindows / console style UI with a web-based one, so I need the following properties: pleasant to program can wrap existing command-line tools in separate views (I don't need to scrape GUIs or anything) as I port logic from the existing scripts I can create a modularised and pleasant codebase to replace it I can attach a web-ui to navigate between views - each view is likely to contain keys which might make sense to view in another I am new to building systems that have logic on the back-end and front-end of a web-server. from that point of view, they do this: backend wraps old-school executables, constructs calls into them and them takes the output and wraps it up, niceifies it and delivers it to the web client. For instance the tool might generate a number of indexed images (per invocation) which I might deliver all at once or on-demand. May (probably) need to to heavy stats on some sources. frontend provides navigation connecting multiple views, performs requests from one view for data from another (or self to self), etc. Probably will have some views with a lot of interactivity. Can people please point me towards viable solutions for this? I know it's a bit of an open question so as answers come in I hope to refine the spec until we have a good match. I guess I expect to see answers like "RoR!" "beans!" "Scala!" but please give an indication of why those are a good fit; I know nothing! I got bumped off SO for asking an open-ended question, so sorry if its OT here too (let me know). I take the policy that I use the best/closest matched language for a project but most of my team are extremely low level (ie pipeline stages and CDyn) so I don't have the peer group to know where to start.

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  • How do you author code

    - by garbagecollector
    This is something I was never taught. I have seen alot of different types of authoring styles. I code primarily in Java and Python. I was wondering if there was a standard authoring style or if everything is freestyle. Also if you answer would you mind attaching the style you use to author files that your create at home or at work. I usually just go @author garbagecollector @company garbage inc.

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  • Google Author information in search results still havent displayed my details in search results

    - by Jayapal Chandran
    I followed the following instructions but still not clear whether i had completely understood it. http://www.google.com/support/webmasters/bin/answer.py?answer=1408986 http://www.labnol.org/internet/author-profile-in-google/19775/ I did the above last week and i did not find my picture in google search result. First i added google + link in certain web pages and in my google profile i added those pages which had google + anchor link with rel=author tag. After updating i used the following to verify. http://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/richsnippets?url=http%3A%2F%2Fvikku.info%2Fcodesnippets%2Fphp%2F&view= You can see that my pic is appearing at the right. here is a screen shot. so, what am i missing? why it is not in the search result. The author of labnol.org said it will take 3 days for my profile photo link to appear... ? Google has stated the following Note that there is no guarantee that a Rich Snippet will be shown for this page on actual search results. For more details, see the FAQ( http://knol.google.com/k/google-rich-snippets-tips-and-tricks#Frequently_Asked_Questions ). Fingers crossed. Thoughtful.

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  • Pluralsight Meet the Author Podcast on Building ASP.NET MVC Applications with HTML5 and jQuery

    - by dwahlin
    In the latest installment of Pluralsight’s Meet the Author podcast series, Fritz Onion and I talk about my new course, Building ASP.NET MVC Apps with Entity Framework Code First, HTML5, and jQuery.  In the interview I describe how the course provides a complete end-to-end view of building an application using multiple technologies.  I go into some detail about how the data access layer was built as well as how the UI works. Listen to it below:   Meet the Author:  Dan Wahlin on Building ASP.NET MVC Apps with Entity Framework Code First, HTML5, and jQuery

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  • $TERM set to "dumb" causes problems with suspend

    - by julkiewicz
    I've just upgraded from 11.04 to 11.10. So far I love it, everything seems just so much snappier. Now I just have one minor issue. When I try to suspend my laptop, it doesn't work - instead it fades out the screen, blocks it and then instantly wakes back. I've checked the logs in /var/log/pm-suspend.log and this fragment seems relevant: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/000kernel-change suspend suspend: success. Running hook /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/00clear suspend suspend: TERM environment variable not set. /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/00clear suspend suspend: Returned exit code 1. Sat Nov 19 12:23:20 CET 2011: Inhibit found, will not perform suspend Sat Nov 19 12:23:20 CET 2011: Running hooks for resume The mentioned script at /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d/00clear reads: #!/bin/bash clear When I open a terminal anywhere by hand, $TERM is set to either "linux" or "xterm". However somehow when the 00clear command is executed $TERM is set to "dumb". Two questions: What is the correct value for $TERM when running 00clear script? Where can I set it up? I've looked for solutions on the web, however I could only find information on how to configure $TERM in a regular terminal (and this one is set properly).

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  • Best-selling Author on Servlets and JSP, Marty Hall, to Keynote at GIDS 2010

    Hey Guys,Author of More Servlets and JSP, Marty Hall is coming to Bangalore this April to speak on Choosing an Ajax/JavaScript Toolkit: A Comparison of the Most Popular JavaScript Libraries, Pure Java Ajax: An Overview of GWT 2.0, Integrated Ajax Support in JSF 2.0 and Ajax Support in the Prototype JavaScript Library. You can get more information on developersummit dot com...Did you know that DotNetSlackers also publishes .net articles written by top known .net Authors? We already have over 80 articles in several categories including Silverlight. Take a look: here.

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  • Pluralsight Meet the Author Podcast on Structuring JavaScript Code

    - by dwahlin
    I had the opportunity to talk with Fritz Onion from Pluralsight about one of my recent courses titled Structuring JavaScript Code for one of their Meet the Author podcasts. We talked about why JavaScript patterns are important for building more re-useable and maintainable apps, pros and cons of different patterns, and how to go about picking a pattern as a project is started. The course provides a solid walk-through of converting what I call “Function Spaghetti Code” into more modular code that’s easier to maintain, more re-useable, and less susceptible to naming conflicts. Patterns covered in the course include the Prototype Pattern, Revealing Module Pattern, and Revealing Prototype Pattern along with several other tips and techniques that can be used. Meet the Author:  Dan Wahlin on Structuring JavaScript Code   The transcript from the podcast is shown below: [Fritz]  Hello, this is Fritz Onion with another Pluralsight author interview. Today we’re talking with Dan Wahlin about his new course, Structuring JavaScript Code. Hi, Dan, it’s good to have you with us today. [Dan]  Thanks for having me, Fritz. [Fritz]  So, Dan, your new course, which came out in December of 2011 called Structuring JavaScript Code, goes into several patterns of usage in JavaScript as well as ways of organizing your code and what struck me about it was all the different techniques you described for encapsulating your code. I was wondering if you could give us just a little insight into what your motivation was for creating this course and sort of why you decided to write it and record it. [Dan]  Sure. So, I got started with JavaScript back in the mid 90s. In fact, back in the days when browsers that most people haven’t heard of were out and we had JavaScript but it wasn’t great. I was on a project in the late 90s that was heavy, heavy JavaScript and we pretty much did what I call in the course function spaghetti code where you just have function after function, there’s no rhyme or reason to how those functions are structured, they just kind of flow and it’s a little bit hard to do maintenance on it, you really don’t get a lot of reuse as far as from an object perspective. And so coming from an object-oriented background in JAVA and C#, I wanted to put something together that highlighted kind of the new way if you will of writing JavaScript because most people start out just writing functions and there’s nothing with that, it works, but it’s definitely not a real reusable solution. So the course is really all about how to move from just kind of function after function after function to the world of more encapsulated code and more reusable and hopefully better maintenance in the process. [Fritz]  So I am sure a lot of people have had similar experiences with their JavaScript code and will be looking forward to seeing what types of patterns you’ve put forth. Now, a couple I noticed in your course one is you start off with the prototype pattern. Do you want to describe sort of what problem that solves and how you go about using it within JavaScript? [Dan]  Sure. So, the patterns that are covered such as the prototype pattern and the revealing module pattern just as two examples, you know, show these kind of three things that I harp on throughout the course of encapsulation, better maintenance, reuse, those types of things. The prototype pattern specifically though has a couple kind of pros over some of the other patterns and that is the ability to extend your code without touching source code and what I mean by that is let’s say you’re writing a library that you know either other teammates or other people just out there on the Internet in general are going to be using. With the prototype pattern, you can actually write your code in such a way that we’re leveraging the JavaScript property and by doing that now you can extend my code that I wrote without touching my source code script or you can even override my code and perform some new functionality. Again, without touching my code.  And so you get kind of the benefit of the almost like inheritance or overriding in object oriented languages with this prototype pattern and it makes it kind of attractive that way definitely from a maintenance standpoint because, you know, you don’t want to modify a script I wrote because I might roll out version 2 and now you’d have to track where you change things and it gets a little tricky. So with this you just override those pieces or extend them and get that functionality and that’s kind of some of the benefits that that pattern offers out of the box. [Fritz]  And then the revealing module pattern, how does that differ from the prototype pattern and what problem does that solve differently? [Dan]  Yeah, so the prototype pattern and there’s another one that’s kind of really closely lined with revealing module pattern called the revealing prototype pattern and it also uses the prototype key word but it’s very similar to the one you just asked about the revealing module pattern. [Fritz]  Okay. [Dan]  This is a really popular one out there. In fact, we did a project for Microsoft that was very, very heavy JavaScript. It was an HMTL5 jQuery type app and we use this pattern for most of the structure if you will for the JavaScript code and what it does in a nutshell is allows you to get that encapsulation so you have really a single function wrapper that wraps all your other child functions but it gives you the ability to do public versus private members and this is kind of a sort of debate out there on the web. Some people feel that all JavaScript code should just be directly accessible and others kind of like to be able to hide their, truly their private stuff and a lot of people do that. You just put an underscore in front of your field or your variable name or your function name and that kind of is the defacto way to say hey, this is private. With the revealing module pattern you can do the equivalent of what objective oriented languages do and actually have private members that you literally can’t get to as an external consumer of the JavaScript code and then you can expose only those members that you want to be public. Now, you don’t get the benefit though of the prototype feature, which is I can’t easily extend the revealing module pattern type code if you don’t like something I’m doing, chances are you’re probably going to have to tweak my code to fix that because we’re not leveraging prototyping but in situations where you’re writing apps that are very specific to a given target app, you know, it’s not a library, it’s not going to be used in other apps all over the place, it’s a pattern I actually like a lot, it’s very simple to get going and then if you do like that public/private feature, it’s available to you. [Fritz]  Yeah, that’s interesting. So it’s almost, you can either go private by convention just by using a standard naming convention or you can actually enforce it by using the prototype pattern. [Dan]  Yeah, that’s exactly right. [Fritz]  So one of the things that I know I run across in JavaScript and I’m curious to get your take on is we do have all these different techniques of encapsulation and each one is really quite different when you’re using closures versus simply, you know, referencing member variables and adding them to your objects that the syntax changes with each pattern and the usage changes. So what would you recommend for people starting out in a brand new JavaScript project? Should they all sort of decide beforehand on what patterns they’re going to stick to or do you change it based on what part of the library you’re working on? I know that’s one of the points of confusion in this space. [Dan]  Yeah, it’s a great question. In fact, I just had a company ask me about that. So which one do I pick and, of course, there’s not one answer fits all. [Fritz]  Right. [Dan]  So it really depends what you just said is absolutely in my opinion correct, which is I think as a, especially if you’re on a team or even if you’re just an individual a team of one, you should go through and pick out which pattern for this particular project you think is best. Now if it were me, here’s kind of the way I think of it. If I were writing a let’s say base library that several web apps are going to use or even one, but I know that there’s going to be some pieces that I’m not really sure on right now as I’m writing I and I know people might want to hook in that and have some better extension points, then I would look at either the prototype pattern or the revealing prototype. Now, really just a real quick summation between the two the revealing prototype also gives you that public/private stuff like the revealing module pattern does whereas the prototype pattern does not but both of the prototype patterns do give you the benefit of that extension or that hook capability. So, if I were writing a library that I need people to override things or I’m not even sure what I need them to override, I want them to have that option, I’d probably pick a prototype, one of the prototype patterns. If I’m writing some code that is very unique to the app and it’s kind of a one off for this app which is what I think a lot of people are kind of in that mode as writing custom apps for customers, then my personal preference is the revealing module pattern you could always go with the module pattern as well which is very close but I think the revealing module patterns a little bit cleaner and we go through that in the course and explain kind of the syntax there and the differences. [Fritz]  Great, that makes a lot of sense. [Fritz]  I appreciate you taking the time, Dan, and I hope everyone takes a chance to look at your course and sort of make these decisions for themselves in their next JavaScript project. Dan’s course is, Structuring JavaScript Code and it’s available now in the Pluralsight Library. So, thank you very much, Dan. [Dan]  Thanks for having me again.

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  • How to deal with author rights when building a website

    - by user393381
    I was thinking about developing a website that would involved photos and was wondering how to deal with the legal/author rights aspects. If someone could direct me to some resources to find out, I would appreciate. If I take Flicker as an example, people can upload pictures and share them. What if someone a picture that belong to someone else, like a professional photographer? Or what if someone upload a picture of someone and that person does not agree to that? Same question if someone put a picture in there that is not acceptable? Can a Disclaimer or Terms of Use avoid the Website (or the person managing a Website) to get in trouble when someone violate the law? Thanks.

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  • Pluralsight Meet the Author Podcast on HTML5 Canvas Programming

    - by dwahlin
      In the latest installment of Pluralsight’s Meet the Author podcast series, Fritz Onion and I talk about my new course, HTML5 Canvas Fundamentals.  In the interview I describe different canvas technologies covered throughout the course and a sample application at the end of the course that covers how to build a custom business chart from start to finish. Meet the Author:  Dan Wahlin on HTML5 Canvas Fundamentals   Transcript [Fritz] Hi. This is Fritz Onion. I’m here today with Dan Wahlin to talk about his new course HTML5 Canvas Fundamentals. Dan founded the Wahlin Group, which you can find at thewahlingroup.com, which specializes in ASP.NET, jQuery, Silverlight, and SharePoint consulting. He’s a Microsoft Regional Director and has been awarded Microsoft’s MVP for ASP.NET, Connected Systems, and Silverlight. Dan is on the INETA Bureau’s — Speaker’s Bureau, speaks at conferences and user groups around the world, and has written several books on .NET. Thanks for talking to me today, Dan. [Dan] Always good to talk with you, Fritz. [Fritz] So this new course of yours, HTML5 Canvas Fundamentals, I have to say that most of the really snazzy demos I’ve seen with HTML5 have involved Canvas, so I thought it would be a good starting point to chat with you about why we decided to create a course dedicated just to Canvas. If you want to kind of give us that perspective. [Dan] Sure. So, you know, there’s quite a bit of material out there on HTML5 in general, and as people that have done a lot with HTML5 are probably aware, a lot of HTML5 is actually JavaScript centric. You know, a lot of people when they first learn it, think it’s tags, but most of it’s actually JavaScript, and it just so happens that the HTML5 Canvas is one of those things. And so it’s not just, you know, a tag you add and it just magically draws all these things. You mentioned there’s a lot of cool things you can do from games to there’s some really cool multimedia applications out there where they integrate video and audio and all kinds of things into the Canvas, to more business scenarios such as charting and things along those lines. So the reason we made a course specifically on it is, a lot of the material out there touches on it but the Canvas is actually a pretty deep topic. You can do some pretty advanced stuff or easy stuff depending on what your application requirements are, and the API itself, you know, there’s over 30 functions just in the Canvas API and then a whole set of properties that actually go with that as well. So it’s a pretty big topic, and that’s why we created a course specifically tailored towards just the Canvas. [Fritz] Right. And let’s — let me just review the outline briefly here for everyone. So you start off with an introduction to getting started with Canvas, drawing with the HTML5 Canvas, then you talk about manipulating pixels, and you finish up with building a custom data chart. So I really like your example flow here. I think it will appeal to even business developers, right. Even if you’re not into HTML5 for the games or the media capabilities, there’s still something here for everyone I think working with the Canvas. Which leads me to another question, which is, where do you see the Canvas fitting in to kind of your day-to-day developer, people that are working business applications and maybe vanilla websites that aren’t doing kind of cutting edge stuff with interactivity with users? Is there a still a place for the Canvas in those scenarios? [Dan] Yeah, definitely. I think a lot of us — and I include myself here — over the last few years, the focus has generally been, especially if you’re, let’s say, a PHP or ASP.NET or Java type of developer, we’re kind of accustomed to working on the server side, and, you know, we kind of relied on Flash or Silverlight or these other plug-ins for the client side stuff when it was kind of fancy, like charts and graphs and things along those lines. With the what I call massive shift of applications, you know, mainly because of mobile, to more of client side, one of the big benefits I think from a maybe corporate standard way of thinking of things, since we do a lot of work with different corporations, is that, number one, rather than having to have the plug-in, which of course isn’t going to work on iPad and some of these other devices out there that are pretty popular, you can now use a built-in technology that all the modern browsers support, and that includes things like Safari on the iPad and iPhone and the Android tablets and things like that with their browsers, and actually render some really sophisticated charts. Whether you do it by scratch or from scratch or, you know, get a third party type of library involved, it’s just JavaScript. So it downloads fast so it’s good from a performance perspective; and when it comes to what you can render, it’s extremely robust. You can do everything from, you know, your basic circles to polygons or polylines to really advanced gradients as well and even provide some interactivity and animations, and that’s some of the stuff I touch upon in the class. In fact, you mentioned the last part of the outline there is building a custom data chart and that’s kind of gears towards more of the, what I’d call enterprise or corporate type developer. [Fritz] Yeah, that makes sense. And it’s, you know, a lot of the demos I’ve seen with HTML5 focus on more the interactivity and kind of game side of things, but the Canvas is such a diverse element within HTML5 that I can see it being applicable pretty much anywhere. So why don’t we talk a little bit about some of the specifics of what you cover? You talk about drawing and then manipulating pixels. You want to kind of give us the different ways of working with the Canvas and what some of those APIs provide for you? [Dan] Sure. So going all the way back to the start of the outline, we actually started off by showing different demonstrations of the Canvas in action, and we show some fun stuff — multimedia apps and games and things like that — and then also some more business scenarios; and then once you see that, hopefully it kinds of piques your interest and you go, oh, wow, this is actually pretty phenomenal what you can do. So then we start you off with, so how to you actually draw things. Now, there are some libraries out there that will draw things like graphs, but if you want to customize those or just build something you have from scratch, you need to know the basics, such as, you know, how do you draw circles and lines and arcs and Bezier curves and all those fancy types of shapes that a given chart may have on it or that a game may have in it for that matter. So we start off by covering what I call the core API functions; how do you, for instance, fill a rectangle or convert that to a square by setting the height and the width; how do you draw arcs or different types of curves and there’s different types supported such as I mentioned Bezier curves or quadratic curves; and then we also talk about how do you integrate text into it. You might have some images already that are just regular bitmap type images that you want to integrate, you can do that with a Canvas. And you can even sync video into the Canvas, which actually opens up some pretty interesting possibilities for both business and I think just general multimedia apps. Once you kind of get those core functions down for the basic shapes that you need to be able to draw on any type of Canvas, then we go a little deeper into what are the pixels that are there to manipulate. And that’s one of the important things to understand about the HTML5 Canvas, scalable vector graphics is another thing you can use now in the modern browsers; it’s vector based. Canvas is pixel based. And so we talk about how to do gradients, how can you do transforms, you know, how do you scale things or rotate things, which is extremely useful for charts ’cause you might have text that, you know, flips up on its side for a y-axis or something like that. And you can even do direct pixel manipulation. So it’s really, really powerful. If you want to get down to the RGBA level, you can do that, and I show how to do that in the course, and then kind of wrap that section up with some animation fundamentals. [Fritz] Great. Yeah, that’s really powerful stuff for programmatically rendering data to clients and responding to user inputs. Look forward to seeing what everyone’s going to come up with building this stuff. So great. That’s — that’s HTML5 Canvas Fundamentals with Dan Wahlin. Thanks very much, Dan. [Dan] Thanks again. I appreciate it.

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