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  • How to install JavaFx in Ubuntu 12.04?

    - by Ant's
    I download JavaFx from here. I placed it in my home directory(anto) under the name javafx. Then I did something like this : vi ~/.bashrc and added the following lines: javaFx_home=/anto/javafx/rt/lib/jfxrt.jar export PATH=$PATH:$javaFx_home But after providing the classpath, I tried running : groovy MyProgram (which depends on the JavaFx classpath). But that throws me an error. Where I went wrong?

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  • Error when compiling code with the Protege API

    - by Anto
    I am new to Protege API and I have just created on Eclipse a small application which uses an external OWL file. Also I did import all the necessary libraries. import java.util.Collection; import java.util.Iterator; import edu.stanford.smi.protege.exception.OntologyLoadException; import edu.stanford.smi.protegex.owl.ProtegeOWL; import edu.stanford.smi.protegex.owl.model.*; public class Trial { public static void main(String[] args) throws OntologyLoadException{ String uri = "C:/Documents and Settings/Anto/Desktop/travel.owl"; OWLModel owlModel = ProtegeOWL.createJenaOWLModelFromURI(uri); Collection classes = owlModel.getUserDefinedOWLNamedClasses(); for(Iterator it = classes.iterator(); it.hasNext();){ OWLNamedClass cls = (OWLNamedClass) it.next(); Collection instances = cls.getInstances(false); System.out.println("Class " + cls.getBrowserText()+ " (" + instances.size()+")"); for(Iterator jt = instances.iterator(); jt.hasNext();){ OWLIndividual individual = (OWLIndividual) jt.next(); System.out.println(" - "+ individual.getBrowserText()); } } } } When I do compile however I get the following errors: WARNING: [Local Folder Repository] The specified file must be a directory. (C:\Documents and Settings\Anto\My Documents\Eclipse Workspace\ProtegeTrial\plugins\edu.stanford.smi.protegex.owl) LocalFolderRepository.update() SEVERE: Exception caught -- java.net.URISyntaxException: Illegal character in path at index 12: C:/Documents and Settings/CiuffreA/Desktop/travel.owl at java.net.URI$Parser.fail(URI.java:2809) at java.net.URI$Parser.checkChars(URI.java:2982) at java.net.URI$Parser.parseHierarchical(URI.java:3066) at java.net.URI$Parser.parse(URI.java:3014) at java.net.URI.<init>(URI.java:578) at edu.stanford.smi.protegex.owl.jena.JenaKnowledgeBaseFactory.getFileURI(Unknown Source) at edu.stanford.smi.protegex.owl.jena.JenaKnowledgeBaseFactory.loadKnowledgeBase(Unknown Source) at edu.stanford.smi.protege.model.Project.loadDomainKB(Unknown Source) at edu.stanford.smi.protege.model.Project.createDomainKnowledgeBase(Unknown Source) at edu.stanford.smi.protegex.owl.jena.creator.OwlProjectFromUriCreator.create(Unknown Source) at edu.stanford.smi.protegex.owl.ProtegeOWL.createJenaOWLModelFromURI(Unknown Source) at Trial.main(Trial.java:14) Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NullPointerException at edu.stanford.smi.protegex.owl.jena.JenaKnowledgeBaseFactory.loadKnowledgeBase(Unknown Source) at edu.stanford.smi.protege.model.Project.loadDomainKB(Unknown Source) at edu.stanford.smi.protege.model.Project.createDomainKnowledgeBase(Unknown Source) at edu.stanford.smi.protegex.owl.jena.creator.OwlProjectFromUriCreator.create(Unknown Source) at edu.stanford.smi.protegex.owl.ProtegeOWL.createJenaOWLModelFromURI(Unknown Source) at Trial.main(Trial.java:14) Does anyone have an idea on where the problem should be?

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  • Recommended books on math for programmers

    - by Anto
    Some programmers do, besides programming, like math (others don't). What books on math do you recommend programmers who like math to read? There are books which present concepts which are applicable in programming and/or computer science, other books about things which will fascinate programmers etc. Books on applying math to programming are okey, but they should be mainly about math (and not programming). Motivate your answers, with focus on why programmers should read the book(s).

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  • Checking out systems programming, what should I learn, using what resources?

    - by Anto
    I have done some hobby application development, but now I'm interested in checking out systems programming (mainly operating systems, Linux kernel etc.). I know low-level languages like C, and I know minimal amounts of x86 Assembly (should I improve on it?). What resources/books/websites/projects etc. do you recommend for one to get started with systems programming and what topics are important? Note that I know close to nothing about the subject, so whatever resources you suggest should be introductory resources. I still know what the subject is and what it includes etc., but I have not done systems programming before (but some application development, as previously noted, and I'm familiar with a bunch of programming languages as well as software engineering in general and algorithms, data structures etc.).

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  • What do you consider to be a high-level language and for what reason?

    - by Anto
    Traditionally, C was called a high-level language, but these days it is often referred to as a low-level language (it is high-level compared to Assembly, but it is very low-level compared to, for instance, Python, these days). Generally, everyone calls languages of the sort of Python and Java high-level languages nowadays. How would you judge whether a programming language really is a high-level language (or a low-level one)? Must you give direct instructions to the CPU while programming in a language to call it low-level (e.g. Assembly), or is C, which provides some abstraction from the hardware, a low-level language too? Has the meaning of "high-level" and "low-level" changed over the years?

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  • Is there a trend for cross-platform GUI toolkits?

    - by Anto
    What is the trend like for the usage of cross-platform GUI frameworks right now? Are more people starting to use cross-platform frameworks (such as GTK+, Qt and wxWidgets) or are there more who use more platform-tied frameworks (e.g. Cocoa or WPF)? Is it more or less stagnant? Is it like a rollercoaster? What do you think the trend will be like, say, 5 years from now? The OS landscape is shifting with less people using Windows (personal observation). This should increase the demand for cross-platform toolkits, shouldn't it? Edit: Also, which (cross-platform) toolkits are growing the most, if so?

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  • Why isn't Java more widely used for game development?

    - by Anto
    I'm not a game developer or anything, but I know that Java is not very widely used for game development. Java should be fast enough for most games, so where's the catch? I can think of some reasons: Lack of game developers with expertice in Java Lack of good game development frameworks Programmers don't want to accept Java as a games programming language. Most only accept C++ as that? No support for game consoles (though the PC market still exists) It could of course be something else. Could someone who knows the business better than me explain why Java isn't getting momentum when it comes to game development?

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  • I'm interested in checking out a stack-oriented programming language. Which one would you recommend?

    - by Anto
    I'm interested in learning a stack-oriented programming language (such as Forth), which one would you recommend? The qualities I want are: You should be able to develop non-trivial software in it, but it mustn't be a great language for that as: I want to learn the language so I can try out a new paradigm (that is, not because I (think) that I will have great use of it). The reason I want to learn another paradigm is that I want to broaden my views on different approaches (learn to think in new ways, different from OOP, functional and structured). The language should let me do that (learn to think differently). The language should have available and good resources to learn from. The resources should also approach stack-oriented programming in a way that you understand the paradigm (after all, I do this for the paradigm).

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  • Can't specify window's class in CCSM's Place Windows

    - by Anto
    Following this method, I wanted to "place" some of my windows on specific viewports. For instance, I want Xchat to always start on my top right viewport (x=2, y=1). But after I have set everything up and clicked the "Close" button to validate it (I don't have any other action button, like "OK" or "Apply"), the only thing that get saved up are the viewport X and Y coordinates. The window class (in my case class=Xchat) remains empty. This bug only occurs in the "Windows with fixed viewport" section; it works well in the "Windows with fixed placement mode", for instance. How can I solve or circumvent this issue ?

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  • Why (not) logic programming?

    - by Anto
    I have not yet heard about any uses of a logical programming language (such as Prolog) in the software industry, nor do I know of usage of it in hobby programming or open source projects. It (Prolog) is used as an academic language to some extent, though (why is it used in academia?). This makes me wonder, why should you use logic programming, and why not? Why is it not getting any detectable industry usage?

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  • Small projects using the cathedral model: does open-source lower security?

    - by Anto
    We know of Linus' law: With enough eyeballs all bugs are shallow In general, people seem to say that open-source software is more secure because of that very thing, but... There are many small OSS projects with just 1 or 2 developers (the cathedral model, as described by ESR). For these projects, does releasing the source-code actually lower the security? For projects like the Linux kernel there are thousands of developers and security vulnerabilities are quite likely going to be found, but when just some few people look through the source code, while allowing crackers (black hat hackers) to see the source as well, is the security lowered instead of increased? I know that the security advantage closed-source software has over OSS is security through obscurity, which isn't good (at all), but it could help to some degree, at least by giving those few devs some more time (security through obscurity doesn't help with the if but with the when). EDIT: The question isn't whether OSS is more secure than non-OSS software but if the advantages for crackers are greater than the advantages for the developers who want to prevent security vulnerabilities from being exploited.

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  • Should Swing knowledge be required from Java programmers?

    - by Anto
    Swing is an integral part of the Java API. It is also the most popular GUI framework for Java. I still wonder, should every Java programmer still know, or at least be pretty familiar with, Swing (possibly excluding web developers)? There are alternatives (e.g. SWT), but they are not very widely used (compared to Swing). What do you think about requiring Swing knowledge from Java programmers? If such knowledge is important, to what degree? Are the basics enough or not? The reason I wonder is because I really don't like Swing but wonder if I still should brush up my skills in it. I'm able to create simple GUIs in it, but I would definitely not say that I know Swing well.

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  • What programming languages should every computer science student be taught?

    - by Anto
    What languages (or classes (as in paradigms) of programming languages, plus a recommended language of that class) should every computer science student be taught in college according to you? Motivate your answers; why that language? What use will one have from it? What concepts does it teach (better than language X does)? Note/clarification: This question is about computer science with heavy focus on software engineering, not pure computer science. It is still computer science education and not software engineering education which is the focus.

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  • Should Swing knowledge be required from Java programmers?

    - by Anto
    Swing is an integral part of the Java API. It is also the most popular GUI framework for Java. I still wonder, should every Java programmer still know, or at least be pretty familiar with, Swing (possibly excluding web developers)? There are alternatives (e.g. SWT), but they are not very widely used (compared to Swing). What do you think about requiring Swing knowledge from Java programmers? If such knowledge is important, to what degree? Are the basics enough or not? The reason I wonder is because I really don't like Swing but wonder if I still should brush up my skills in it. I'm able to create simple GUIs in it, but I would definitely not say that I know Swing well.

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  • Should you use "internal abbreviations" in code comments?

    - by Anto
    Should you use "internal abbreviations/slang" inside comments, that is, abbreviations and slang people outside the project could have trouble understanding, for instance, using something like //NYI instead of //Not Yet Implemented? There are advantages of this, such as there is less "code" to type (though you could use autocomplete on the abbreviations) and you can read something like NYE faster than something like Not Yet Implemented, assuming you are aware of the abbreviation and its (unabbreviated) meaning. Myself, I would be careful with this as long as it is not a project on which I for sure will be the only developer.

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  • PHP usage outside the web?

    - by Anto
    As you probably are aware, PHP is not only usable for web programming, but also desktop programming. It even has things such as GTK bindings. Do you have any examples of places where PHP is actually used outside web programming for anything more than just very trivial programs? Do you know of any desktop program which uses PHP to some extent (e.g. as Python could be used in a C program)? Note: I don't program in PHP myself, I'm just curious

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  • I'm doing hobby programming; what programming methodologies (e.g. XP, Agile...) do you recommend me to read up on?

    - by Anto
    Most of you would probably just call me a kid (I'm 15). I'm doing hobby programming (I started fiddling around with ActionScript 2.0 in Flash 8 when I was 11, now I do mostly C, Python and Java). As I'm 15, I won't get a job for a long period of time (I'm going to spend years in academia before that) and thus this question is not about which programming methodologies you recommend me to read up on for a software engineering job, but instead which methodologies should a hobby programmer read about? What will a hobby developer learn from reading about your recommendation(s)?

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  • What is the greatest design flaw you have faced in any programming language?

    - by Anto
    All programming languages are having their design flaws simply because not a single language can be perfect, just as with most (all?) other things. That aside, which design fault in a programming language has annoyed you the most through your history as a programmer? Note that if a language is "bad" just because it isn't designed for a specific thing isn't a design flaw, but a feature of design, so don't list such annoyances of languages. If a language is illsuited for what it is designed for, that is of course a flaw in the design. Implementation specific things and under the hood things do not count either.

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  • Why isn't Java more widely used for game development?

    - by Anto
    I'm not a game developer or anything, but I know that Java is not very widely used for game development. Java should be fast enough for most games, so where's the catch? I can think of some reasons: Lack of game developers with expertice in Java Lack of good game development frameworks Programmers don't want to accept Java as a games programming language. Most only accept C++ as that? No support for game consoles (though the PC market still exists) It could of course be something else. Could someone who knows the business better than me explain why Java isn't getting momentum when it comes to game development?

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  • Most underestimated programming tool

    - by Anto
    We have many great tools which helps a lot when programming, such as good programmers text editors, IDEs, debuggers, version control systems etc. Some of the tools are more or less "must have" tools for getting the job done (e.g. compilers). There are still always tools which do help a lot, but still don't get so much attention, for various reasons, for instance, when they were released, they were ahead of their time and now are more or less forgotten. What type of programming tool do you think is the most underestimated one? Motivate your answer.

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  • Should data structures be integrated into the language (as in Python) or be provided in the standard library (as in Java)?

    - by Anto
    In Python, and most likely many other programming languages, common data structures can be found as an integrated part of the core language with their own dedicated syntax. If we put LISP's integrated list syntax aside, I can't think of any other languages that I know which provides some kind of data structure above the array as an integrated part of their syntax, though all of them (but C, I guess) seem to provide them in the standard library. From a language design perspective, what are your opinions on having a specific syntax for data structures in the core language? Is it a good idea, and does the purpose of the language (etc.) change how good this could be of a choice? Edit: I'm sorry for (apparently) causing some confusion about which data structures I mean. I talk about the basic and commonly used ones, but still not the most basic ones. This excludes trees (too complex, uncommon), stacks (too seldom used), arrays (too simple) but includes e.g. sets, lists and hashmaps.

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  • What do I need to do, to get placed in any software company?

    - by Anto Aravinth
    I'm doing my 3rd year CSE Engineering. I guess this is the right time to ask this question! As in the next year, I'm going to do projects, "get my hands dirty". And there is only few days left out, as I know many people in Stack Overflow are working in Software field, I thought to ask these question. Does the project that I'm doing in my final year need to be excellent? If so, what kind of project to do? And how do you say that the project is excellent or not? Writing the code is very fun and serious at times. But the code should have a good algorithm? And mostly in any software companies interview, what kind of question they ask? Not but not the least, mastering in any particular language speaks in interviews?

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  • Would you use (a dialect of) LISP for a real-world application? Where and why?

    - by Anto
    LISP (and dialects such as Scheme, Common LISP and Clojure) haven't gained much industry support even though they are quite decent programming languages. (At the moment though it seems like they are gaining some traction). Now, this is not directly related to the question, which is would you use a LISP dialect for a production program? What kind of program and why? Usages of the kind of being integrated into some other code (e.g. C) are included as well, but note that it is what you mean in your answer. Broad concepts are preferred but specific applications are okey as well.

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  • git for personal (one-man) projects. Overkill?

    - by Anto
    I know, and use, two version control systems: Subversion and git. Subversion, as of now, gets used for personal projects where I am the only developer and git gets used for open source projects and projects where I believe others will also work on the project. This is mostly because of git's amazing forking and merging capabilities, where everyone may work on their own branch; very handy. Now, I use Subversion for personal projects, as I think git makes little sense there. It seems to be a little bit of overkill. It is OK for me if it is centralized (on my home server, usually) when I am the only developer; I take regular backups anyway. I don't need the ability to make my own branch, the main branch is my branch. Yes, SVN has simple support for branching, but much more powerful support for it makes no sense, I think. Merging can be a pain with it, or at least from my little experience. Is there any good reason for me to use git on personal projects, or is it just simply overkill?

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  • Detailed C++ book for a programmer already familiar with C and object-oriented programming?

    - by Anto
    I know (to some extent) a few languages, including C, Java and Python. I'm also (somewhat) familiar with Scala and Scheme, plus I can read (but not write) x86 Assembly. Say I want to learn C++, what is a good book which doesn't try to teach me what a class is, teach me inheritance, polymorphism or loosely coupled classes again, nor does try to teach me other basics, just the C++ language (as well as how to write idiomatic C++ code, not e.g. Java with C++ syntax) and its standard library? Note: "Detailed" as used in the title means that it doesn't try to cover C++ in 100 pages, I want to know the details of the language. Of course, mastery comes from practice, but I don't want to learn just a little bit of C++ from the book, but learn it quite thoroughly.

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