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  • Codeigniter Open Source Applications for Coding References

    - by Hafizul Amri
    I choose codeigniter to be my first framework to work with. Now I'm looking for open source applications built based on this framework to be my references for good coding practices and standards. From my previous experiences in application development, it was hard for me to maintain, upgrade, or modify existing applications due to my bad coding practices. Do you have any suggestion of application based on codeigniter framework for me to be referred? So that it can help me to write better coding by referring to their good and maybe best coding pratices. Thank you!

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  • Are there well-known PowerShell coding conventions?

    - by Tahir Hassan
    Are there any well-defined conventions when programming in PowerShell? For example, in scripts which are to be maintained long-term, do we need to: Use the real cmdlet name or alias? Specify the cmdlet parameter name in full or only partially (dir -Recurse versus dir -r) When specifying string arguments for cmdlets do you enclose them in quotes (New-Object 'System.Int32' versus New-Object System.Int32 When writing functions and filters do you specify the types of parameters? Do you write cmdlets in the (official) correct case? For keywords like BEGIN...PROCESS...END do you write them in uppercase only? It seems that MSDN lack coding conventions document for PowerShell, while such document exist for example for C#.

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  • I need help with some terminology

    - by Christine
    I'm not a programmer; I'm a freelance writer and researcher. I have a client who'd looking for stats on certain "threats" to the apps market. One of them is cowboy coding. (I know what that means; that's not my question.) Specifically, he wants to see numbers regarding how many apps have failed/crashed/removed because of errors made by, in essence, sloppy coding. (I'm not here to debate the merits of cowboy coding, and whether or not it is sloppy; work with me here.) I've used every possible search term/phrase I can think of, but I can't find any hard numbers, just anecdotal evidence. Have any of you seen any reports that have this kind of data?

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  • Working on someone else's code

    - by Xavi Valero
    I have hardly a year's experience in coding. After I started working, most of the time I would be working on someone else's code, either adding new features over the existing ones or modifying the existing features. The guy who has written the actual code doesn't work in my company any more. I am having a hard time understanding his code and doing my tasks. Whenever I tried modifying the code, I have in some way messed with the working features. What all should I keep in mind, while working over someone else's code?

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  • Music While Coding [closed]

    - by inspectorG4dget
    Hi SO, Generally, while I'm coding, I prefer to listen to some background music. Nothing that'll get me distracted, but something that'll help keep the rhythm and isn't counterproductive when I need to stop coding to debug or to think of a way to solve a small problem that stands in the way of progress. Now, I have read some similar questions on reddit and on SO - specifically: which songs do you find most productive to listen to while coding, Music while programming and more. Sadly a lot of these questions were closed as off-topic, etc. But (1) I don't think this question is off-topic and I think that a lot of programmers can benefit from it. (2) It's a real question. I really want to know what music you guys would recommend because music helps when I'm coding. It's sad that SO: Music to listen to while coding cannot be found and this isn't of much help. I hope this doesn't get closed. PS: I want to turn this into a community wiki, but I don't seem to know how. I'd appreciate any help. Thank you, all. In response to kirk.burleson's comment: In case the question isn't already clear, I'm asking for recommendations/opinions of music to listen to while coding. I would like to know what you listen to when you code so that I can try it too. I am running out of good "coding music" and this is a problem for me because good "coding music" helps me code better.

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  • Evolution in coding standards, how do you deal with them?

    - by WardB
    How do you deal with evolution in the coding standards / style guide in a project for the existing code base? Let's say someone on your team discovered a better way of object instantiation in the programming language. It's not that the old way is bad or buggy, it's just that the new way is less verbose and feels much more elegant. And all team members really like it. Would you change all exisiting code? Let's say your codebase is about 500.000+ lines of code. Would you still want to change all existing code? Or would you only let new code adhere to the new standard? Basically lose consistency? How do you deal with an evolution in the coding standards on your project?

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  • Coding standards in programming?

    - by vicky
    I am an WordPress Plugin Developer. I am not sure how to follow the coding standard while creating a plugin of wordpress. I check with some of the plugins like woocommerce and All in one SEO Plugin in that they are maintaining the proper coding standard. Basically I am Using the NetBeans IDE. Is it possible to make the proper space and coding standards in that IDE. I am Wondering to View his code is very neat and clean. How can i do this or how they are maintaining this. Anyone suggest me to make the wordpress plugin with well coding standards. Thanks, vicky

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  • Is a coding standard even needed anymore?

    - by SomeKittens
    I know that it's been proven that a coding standard helps enormously. However, there are many different tools and IDEs that will format to whatever standard the programmer prefers. So long as the code's neat/commented (and not a spaghetti mess), I don't see the need for a coding standard. Are there any arguments for the development of a coding standard (we don't have one, but I was looking into creating one)?

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  • Is a coding standard even needed any more?

    - by SomeKittens
    I know that it's been proven that a coding standard helps enormously. However, there are many different tools and IDEs that will format to whatever standard the programmer prefers. So long as the code's neat/commented (and not a spaghetti mess), I don't see the need for a coding standard. Are there any arguments for the development of a coding standard (we don't have one, but I was looking into creating one)?

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  • coding after a couple beers

    - by Patrick
    Sometimes after work I'll come home and have a beer or two and I've found that once I have a beer in me, my desire to code drops precipitously. I'm not talking about getting hammered or anything, but I can't seem to get up the gumption to do any coding. I'm still fine to do other things, i.e.- paying bills, playing games, reading, etc, it's just coding. I know that some people prefer to code with some beer in them. Is this normal, or do I need to practice coding under the influence so if the need ever arises, I'm ready for it. (I will only be coding on pet projects, nothing serious while CUI)

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  • Python Coding standards vs. productivity

    - by Shroatmeister
    I work for a large humanitarian organisation, on a project building software that could help save lives in emergencies by speeding up the distribution of food. Many NGOs desperately need our software and we are weeks behind schedule. One thing that worries me in this project is what I think is an excessive focus on coding standards. We write in python/django and use a version of PEP0008, with various modifications e.g. line lengths can go up to 160 chars and all lines should go that long if possible, no blank lines between imports, line wrapping rules that apply only to certain kinds of classes, lots of templates that we must use, even if they aren't the best way to solve a problem etc. etc. One core dev spent a week rewriting a major part of the system to meet the then new coding standards, throwing away several suites of tests in the process, as the rewrite meant they were 'invalid'. We spent two weeks rewriting all the functionality that was lost, and fixing bugs. He is the lead dev and his word carries weight, so he has convinced the project manager that these standards are necessary. The junior devs do as they are told. I sense that the project manager has a strong feeling of cognitive dissonance about all this but nevertheless agrees with it vehemently as he feels unsure what else to do. Today I got in serious trouble because I had forgotten to put some spaces after commas in a keyword argument. I was literally shouted at by two other devs and the project manager during a Skype call. Personally I think coding standards are important but also think that we are wasting a lot of time obsessing with them, and when I verbalized this it provoked rage. I'm seen as a troublemaker in the team, a team that is looking for scapegoats for its failings. Since the introduction of the coding standards, the team's productivity has measurably plummeted, however this only reinforces the obsession, i.e. the lead dev simply blames our non-adherence to standards for the lack of progress. He believes that we can't read each other's code if we don't adhere to the conventions. This is starting to turn sticky. Now I am trying to modify various scripts, autopep8, pep8ify and PythonTidy to try to match the conventions. We also run pep8 against source code but there are so many implicit amendments to our standard that it's hard to track them all. The lead dev simple picks faults that the pep8 script doesn't pick up and shouts at us in the next stand-up meeting. Every week there are new additions to the coding standards that force us to rewrite existing, working, tested code. Thank heavens we still have tests, (I reverted some commits and fixed a bunch of the ones he removed). All the while there is increasing pressure to meet the deadline. I believe a fundamental issue is that the lead dev and another core dev refuse to trust other developers to do their job. But how to deal with that? We can't do our job because we are too busy rewriting everything. I've never encountered this dynamic in a software engineering team. Am I wrong to question their adherence to coding standards? Has anyone else experienced a similar situation and how have they dealt with it successfully? (I'm not looking for a discussion just actual solutions people have found)

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  • What data is available regarding cowboy coding?

    - by Christine
    I'm not a programmer; I'm a freelance writer and researcher. I have a client who is looking for stats on certain "threats" to the apps market in general (not any specific app store). One of them is cowboy coding: specifically, he wants to see numbers regarding how many apps have failed to function as intended/crashed/removed because of errors made by, in essence, sloppy coding. Note that I'm not here to debate the merits of cowboy coding, and whether or not it is sloppy. Is there any data about this type of development?

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  • C# coding standards” Use the const directive only on natural constants

    - by Nathan Wilfert
    I've seen these 2 guidelines in coding c# standard and I’m not sure the what the 2nd one means. With the exception of zero and one, never hard-code a numeric value; always declare a constant instead. Use the const directive only on natural constants such as the number of days of the week. 1st what is the definition of a natural constants and if the number is not a natural constants given the 1st rule how does one declare a constant in c# without the const directive? See http://www.scribd.com/doc/10731655/IDesign-C-Coding-Standard-232 for reference.

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  • Worst coding standard you've ever had to follow?

    - by finnw
    Have you ever had to work to coding standards that: Greatly decreased your productivity? Were originally included for good reasons but were kept long after the original concern became irrelevant? Were in a list so long that it was impossible to remember them all? Made you think the author was just trying to leave their mark rather than encouraging good coding practice? You had no idea why they were included? If so, what is your least favourite rule and why? Some examples here

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  • Established coding standards for pl/pgsql code

    - by jb01
    I need to standardize coding practises for project that compromises, among others has pl/pgsql database, that has some amount of nontrivial code. I look for: Code formatting guidelines, especially inside procedures. Guidelines on what constructs are consigered unsafe (if any) Naming coventions. Code documentation conventions (if this is pracicised) Any hints to documets that define good practises in pl/pgsql code? If not i'm looking for hints to practices that you consider good. There is related question regarding TSQL: Can anyone recommend coding standards for TSQL?, which is relevant to psql as well, but I need more information on stored procedures. Other related questions: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1070275/what-indenting-style-do-you-use-in-sql-server-stored-procedures

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  • Debugging android application on HTC Hero

    - by w00tfest99
    Is it possible to connect the ADB with an HTC Hero? I tried following the instructions for the Win USB driver but when I try to install the driver I just get a generic message saying that there was a problem installing the driver. Looking at the supported devices, the HTC Hero isn't listed. Is this even possible? As a note, I've tried removing drivers and then re-adding using USBDeview and I've also tried adding in the line ";HTC Hero %USB\VID_0BB4&PID_0FFE.DeviceDescRelease%=androidusb.Dev, USB\Vid_0bb4&Pid_0ffe&Rev_0100" in the inf file for the driver.

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  • Arguments for a coding standard?

    - by acidzombie24
    A few friends and i are planning to work on a project together and we want a COMPLETELY DIFFERENT coding standard. We do NOT want to use the coding standard the libraries/language uses. Its our project and we want to mess around. So i came here to ask what you guys think are good standards and arguments for it (or what not to do and arguments against it). The styles i remember most are Upper casing the entire word Camel and Pascal casing Using '_' to separate each word pre or postfixing letters or words (i hate m for member but i think IsCond() is a good func name. SomethingException as a postfix example) Using '_' at the start or end of words Brace placement. On a new or same line? I know of libs that use Pascal casing on all public and protected members. But would you ever get confused if something is a func, var or even property if the lang supports it? What about if you decide a public member to be private (or vice versa) wouldnt that great a lot of fix up work or inconsistencies? Is prefixing C to every class a good idea? I ask what do you think and why?

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  • How to make developers follow coding standards?

    - by Josh
    How can I make developers follow coding standards? In our company: I've given documents and they don't have the patience to read it and follow it. I've tried telling them again and again "please do it this way" they nod their heads, but still do it the wrong way We're doing a project for the third time and still they don't seem to follow it properly. I'm now so tired of this. What is the best way to set standards for coding and make sure they follow them? Edit: There are just about 10 developers in my team. They're over pressurized and do not take the time to put comments and do the code neatly since there's more pressure to complete the product from our management. What would be the solution for this?

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  • Handling Coding Standards at Work (I'm not the boss)

    - by Josh Johnson
    I work on a small team, around 10 devs. We have no coding standards at all. There are certain things that have become the norm but some ways of doing things are completely disparate. My big one is indentation. Some use tabs, some use spaces, some use a different number of spaces, which creates a huge problem. I often end up with conflicts when I merge because someone used their IDE to auto format and they use a different character to indent than I do. I don't care which we use I just want us all to use the same one. Or else I'll open a file and some lines have curly brackets on the same line as the condition while others have them on the next line. Again, I don't mind which one so long as they are all the same. I've brought up the issue of standards to my direct manager, one on one and in group meetings, and he is not overly concerned about it (there are several others who share the same view as myself). I brought up my specific concern about indentation characters and he thought a better solution would be to, "create some kind of script that could convert all that when we push/pull from the repo." I suspect that he doesn't want to change and this solution seems overly complicated and prone to maintenance issues down the road (also, this addresses only one manifestation of a larger issue). Have any of you run into a similar situation at work? If so, how did you handle it? What would be some good points to help sell my boss on standards? Would starting a grass roots movement to create coding standards, among those of us who are interested, be a good idea? Am I being too particular, should I just let it go? Thank you all for your time. Note: Thanks everyone for the great feedback so far! To be clear, I don't want to dictate One Style To Rule Them All. I'm willing to concede my preferred way of doing something in favor of what suits everyone the best. I want consistency and I want this to be a democracy. I want it to be a group decision that everyone agrees on. True, not everyone will get their way, but I'm hoping that everyone will be mature enough to compromise for the betterment of the group. Note 2: Some people are getting caught up in the two examples I gave above. I'm more after the heart of the matter. It manifests itself with many examples: naming conventions, huge functions that should be broken up, should something go in a util or service, should something be a constant or injected, should we all use different versions of a dependency or the same, should an interface be used for this case, how should unit tests be set up, what should be unit tested, (Java specific) should we use annotations or external config. I could go on.

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  • What C++ coding standard do you use?

    - by gablin
    For some time now, I've been unable to settle on a coding standard and use it concistently between projects. When starting a new project, I tend to change some things around (add a space there, remove a space there, add a line break there, an extra indent there, change naming conventions, etc.). So I figured that I might provide a piece of sample code, in C++, and ask you to rewrite it to fit your standard of coding. Inspiration is always good, I say. ^^ So here goes: #ifndef _DERIVED_CLASS_H__ #define _DERIVED_CLASS_H__ /** * This is an example file used for sampling code layout. * * @author Firstname Surname */ #include <stdio> #include <string> #include <list> #include "BaseClass.h" #include "Stuff.h" /** * The DerivedClass is completely useless. It represents uselessness in all its * entirety. */ class DerivedClass : public BaseClass { //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// // CONSTRUCTORS / DESTRUCTORS //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// public: /** * Constructs a useless object with default settings. * * @param value * Is never used. * @throws Exception * If something goes awry. */ DerivedClass (const int value) : uselessSize_ (0) {} /** * Constructs a copy of a given useless object. * * @param object * Object to copy. * @throws OutOfMemoryException * If necessary data cannot be allocated. */ ItemList (const DerivedClass& object) {} /** * Destroys this useless object. */ ~ItemList (); //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// // PUBLIC METHODS //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// public: /** * Clones a given useless object. * * @param object * Object to copy. * @return This useless object. */ DerivedClass& operator= (const DerivedClass& object) { stuff_ = object.stuff_; uselessSize_ = object.uselessSize_; } /** * Does absolutely nothing. * * @param useless * Pointer to useless data. */ void doNothing (const int* useless) { if (useless == NULL) { return; } else { int womba = *useless; switch (womba) { case 0: cout << "This is output 0"; break; case 1: cout << "This is output 1"; break; case 2: cout << "This is output 2"; break; default: cout << "This is default output"; break; } } } /** * Does even less. */ void doEvenLess () { int mySecret = getSecret (); int gather = 0; for (int i = 0; i < mySecret; i++) { gather += 2; } } //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// // PRIVATE METHODS //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// private: /** * Gets the secret value of this useless object. * * @return A secret value. */ int getSecret () const { if ((RANDOM == 42) && (stuff_.size() > 0) || (1000000000000000000 > 0) && true) { return 420; } else if (RANDOM == -1) { return ((5 * 2) + (4 - 1)) / 2; } int timer = 100; bool stopThisMadness = false; while (!stopThisMadness) { do { timer--; } while (timer > 0); stopThisMadness = true; } } //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// // FIELDS //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// private: /** * Don't know what this is used for. */ static const int RANDOM = 42; /** * List of lists of stuff. */ std::list <Stuff> stuff_; /** * Specifies the size of this object's uselessness. */ size_t uselessSize_; }; #endif

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  • What is the recommended coding style for PowerShell?

    - by stej
    Is there any recommended coding style how to write PowerShell scripts? It's not about how to structure the code (how many functions, if to use module, ...). It's about 'how to write the code so that it is readable'. In programming languages there are some recommended coding styles (what to indent, how to indent - spaces/tabs, where to make new line, where to put braces,...), but I haven't seen any suggestion for PowerShell. What I'm interested particularly in: How to write parameters function New-XYZItem ( [string] $ItemName , [scriptblock] $definition ) { ... (I see that it's more like 'V1' syntax) or function New-PSClass { param([string] $ClassName ,[scriptblock] $definition )... or (why to add empty attribute?) function New-PSClass { param([Parameter()][string] $ClassName ,[Parameter()][scriptblock] $definition )... or (other formatting I saw maybe in Jaykul's code) function New-PSClass { param( [Parameter()] [string] $ClassName , [Parameter()] [scriptblock] $definition )... or ..? How to write complex pipeline Get-SomeData -param1 abc -param2 xyz | % { $temp1 = $_ 1..100 | % { Process-somehow $temp1 $_ } } | % { Process-Again $_ } | Sort-Object -desc or (name of cmdlet on new line) Get-SomeData -param1 abc -param2 xyz | % { $temp1 = $_ 1..100 | % { Process-somehow $temp1 $_ } } | % { Process-Again $_ } | Sort-Object -desc | and what if there are -begin -process -end params? how to make it the most readable? Get-SomeData -param1 abc -param2 xyz | % -begin { init } -process { Process-somehow2 ... } -end { Process-somehow3 ... } | % -begin { } .... or Get-SomeData -param1 abc -param2 xyz | % ` -begin { init } ` -process { Process-somehow2 ... } ` -end { Process-somehow3 ... } | % -begin { } .... the indentitation is important here and what element is put on new line as well. I have covered only questions that come on my mind very frequently. There are some others, but I'd like to keep this SO question 'short'. Any other suggestions are welcome.

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  • Arithmetic Coding Questions

    - by Xophmeister
    I have been reading up on arithmetic coding and, while I understand how it works, all the guides and instructions I've read start with something like: Set up your intervals based upon the frequency of symbols in your data; i.e., more likely symbols get proportionally larger intervals. My main query is, once I have encoded my data, presumably I also need to include this statistical model with the encoding, otherwise the compressed data can't be decoded. Is that correct? I don't see this mentioned anywhere -- the most I've seen is that you need to include the number of iterations (i.e., encoded symbols) -- but unless I'm missing something, this also seems necessary to me. If this is true, that will obviously add an overhead to the final output. At what point does this outweigh the benefits of compression (e.g., say if I'm trying to compress just a few thousand bits)? Will the choice of symbol size also make a significant difference (e.g., if I'm looking at 2-bit words, rather than full octets/whatever)?

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  • Can someone explain to me C#'s coding convention?

    - by AedonEtLIRA
    I recently started working with Unity3D and primarily scripting with C#. As, I normally program in Java, the differences aren't too great but I still referred to a crash course just to make sure I am on the right track. However, My biggest curiosity with C# is that is capitalises the first letter its method names (eg. java: getPrime() C#: GetPrime() aka: Pascal Case?). Is there a good reason for this? I understand from the crash course page that I read that apparently it's convention for .Net and I have no way of ever changing it, but I am curious to hear why it was done like this as opposed to the normal (relative?) camel case that, say, Java uses. Note: I understand that languages have their own coding conventions (python methods are all lower case which also applies in this question) but I've never really understood why it isn't formalised into a standard.

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  • Coding style advice? [closed]

    - by user1064918
    I'm a newly grad. I've got a lot of complaints from my supervisor at work during code-review sessions with regard to my coding style (Surprise!). I don't know if it's just him being cranky or my style is really that annoying to read. I come from the low-level language world (assembly, mostly), so I've been taught to use bitwise ops and all the cool tricks to do math whenever possible. I also have the habits of doing some other things that've been regarded as "too excessively dense to read". So I'm hoping to get some feedback from any experienced programmers! :) Also how should I justify between code performance and readability? Thanks!!

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