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  • How do I install Dan's Guardian on 12.04?

    - by Matt
    I'm trying to install Dans Guardian on a virtual machine. The instructions ask me to run the ./configure script and then execute the command make install. The configure script runs fine but the make install throws errors. Making all in src make[2]: Entering directory `/webmin/dansguardian-2.10/src' g++ -DHAVE_CONFIG_H -I. -I.. -D__CONFFILE='"/usr/local/etc/dansguardian/dansguardian.conf"' -D__LOGLOCATION='"/usr/local/var/log/dansguardian/"' -D__PIDDIR='"/usr/local/var/run"' -D__PROXYUSER='"nobody"' -D__PROXYGROUP='"nobody"' -D__CONFDIR='"/usr/local/etc/dansguardian"' -g -O2 -MT dansguardian-fancy.o -MD -MP -MF .deps/dansguardian-fancy.Tpo -c -o dansguardian-fancy.o `test -f 'downloadmanagers/fancy.cpp' || echo './'`downloadmanagers/fancy.cpp downloadmanagers/fancy.cpp: In member function âstd::string fancydm::timestring(int)â: downloadmanagers/fancy.cpp:507:72: error: âsnprintfâ was not declared in this scope make[2]: *** [dansguardian-fancy.o] Error 1 make[2]: Leaving directory `/webmin/dansguardian-2.10/src' make[1]: *** [all-recursive] Error 1 make[1]: Leaving directory `/webmin/dansguardian-2.10' make: *** [all] Error 2 I'm running 12.04 LTS server x64

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  • Willy Rotstein on Analytics and Social Media in Retail

    - by sarah.taylor(at)oracle.com
    Recently I came across a presentation from Dan Zarrella on "The Science of Retweets. (http://www.slideshare.net/HubSpot/the-science-of-retweets-with-dan-zarrella). It is an insightful, fact-based analysis of how tweets propagate and what makes them successful. The analysis is of course very interesting for those of us interested Tweeting. However, what really caught my attention is how well it illustrates, form a very different angle, some of the issues I am discussing with retailers these days. In particular the opportunities that e-commerce and social media open to those retailers with the appetite and vision to tackle the associated analytical challenges. And these challenges are of course not straightforward.   In his presentation Dan introduces the concept of Observability, I haven't had the opportunity to discuss with Dan his specific definition for the term. However, in practical retail terms, I would say that it means that through social media (and other web channels such as search) we can analyze and track processes by measuring Indicators that were not measurable before. The focus is in identifying patterns across a large number of consumers rather than what a particular individual "Likes".   The potential impact for retailers is huge. It opens the opportunity to monitor changes in consumer preference  and plan the business accordingly. And you can do this almost "real time" rather than through infrequent surveys that provide a "rear view" picture of your consumer behaviour. For instance, you could envision identifying when a particular set of fashion styles are breaking out from the pack, and commit a re-buy. Or you could monitor when the preference for a specific mobile device has declined and hence markdowns should be considered; or how demand for a specific ready-made food typically flows across regions and manage the inventory accordingly. Search, blogging, website and store data may need to be considered in identifying these trends. The data volumes involved are huge (check Andrea Morgan's recent post on "Big Data" in retail) but so are the benefits. As Andrea says, for the first time we can start getting insight into "Why" the business is performing in a certain way rather than just reporting on what is happening. And it is not just about the data volumes. Tackling the challenge also calls for integrated planning systems that can bring data and insight into the context of the Decision Making process Buyers, Merchandisers and Supply Chain managers are following. I strongly believe that only when data and process come together you can move from the anecdotal to systematically improving business performance.   I would love to hear your opinions on these trends and where you think Retail is heading to exploit these topics - please email me: [email protected]

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  • Pluralsight Meet the Author Podcast on Structuring JavaScript Code

    - by dwahlin
    I had the opportunity to talk with Fritz Onion from Pluralsight about one of my recent courses titled Structuring JavaScript Code for one of their Meet the Author podcasts. We talked about why JavaScript patterns are important for building more re-useable and maintainable apps, pros and cons of different patterns, and how to go about picking a pattern as a project is started. The course provides a solid walk-through of converting what I call “Function Spaghetti Code” into more modular code that’s easier to maintain, more re-useable, and less susceptible to naming conflicts. Patterns covered in the course include the Prototype Pattern, Revealing Module Pattern, and Revealing Prototype Pattern along with several other tips and techniques that can be used. Meet the Author:  Dan Wahlin on Structuring JavaScript Code   The transcript from the podcast is shown below: [Fritz]  Hello, this is Fritz Onion with another Pluralsight author interview. Today we’re talking with Dan Wahlin about his new course, Structuring JavaScript Code. Hi, Dan, it’s good to have you with us today. [Dan]  Thanks for having me, Fritz. [Fritz]  So, Dan, your new course, which came out in December of 2011 called Structuring JavaScript Code, goes into several patterns of usage in JavaScript as well as ways of organizing your code and what struck me about it was all the different techniques you described for encapsulating your code. I was wondering if you could give us just a little insight into what your motivation was for creating this course and sort of why you decided to write it and record it. [Dan]  Sure. So, I got started with JavaScript back in the mid 90s. In fact, back in the days when browsers that most people haven’t heard of were out and we had JavaScript but it wasn’t great. I was on a project in the late 90s that was heavy, heavy JavaScript and we pretty much did what I call in the course function spaghetti code where you just have function after function, there’s no rhyme or reason to how those functions are structured, they just kind of flow and it’s a little bit hard to do maintenance on it, you really don’t get a lot of reuse as far as from an object perspective. And so coming from an object-oriented background in JAVA and C#, I wanted to put something together that highlighted kind of the new way if you will of writing JavaScript because most people start out just writing functions and there’s nothing with that, it works, but it’s definitely not a real reusable solution. So the course is really all about how to move from just kind of function after function after function to the world of more encapsulated code and more reusable and hopefully better maintenance in the process. [Fritz]  So I am sure a lot of people have had similar experiences with their JavaScript code and will be looking forward to seeing what types of patterns you’ve put forth. Now, a couple I noticed in your course one is you start off with the prototype pattern. Do you want to describe sort of what problem that solves and how you go about using it within JavaScript? [Dan]  Sure. So, the patterns that are covered such as the prototype pattern and the revealing module pattern just as two examples, you know, show these kind of three things that I harp on throughout the course of encapsulation, better maintenance, reuse, those types of things. The prototype pattern specifically though has a couple kind of pros over some of the other patterns and that is the ability to extend your code without touching source code and what I mean by that is let’s say you’re writing a library that you know either other teammates or other people just out there on the Internet in general are going to be using. With the prototype pattern, you can actually write your code in such a way that we’re leveraging the JavaScript property and by doing that now you can extend my code that I wrote without touching my source code script or you can even override my code and perform some new functionality. Again, without touching my code.  And so you get kind of the benefit of the almost like inheritance or overriding in object oriented languages with this prototype pattern and it makes it kind of attractive that way definitely from a maintenance standpoint because, you know, you don’t want to modify a script I wrote because I might roll out version 2 and now you’d have to track where you change things and it gets a little tricky. So with this you just override those pieces or extend them and get that functionality and that’s kind of some of the benefits that that pattern offers out of the box. [Fritz]  And then the revealing module pattern, how does that differ from the prototype pattern and what problem does that solve differently? [Dan]  Yeah, so the prototype pattern and there’s another one that’s kind of really closely lined with revealing module pattern called the revealing prototype pattern and it also uses the prototype key word but it’s very similar to the one you just asked about the revealing module pattern. [Fritz]  Okay. [Dan]  This is a really popular one out there. In fact, we did a project for Microsoft that was very, very heavy JavaScript. It was an HMTL5 jQuery type app and we use this pattern for most of the structure if you will for the JavaScript code and what it does in a nutshell is allows you to get that encapsulation so you have really a single function wrapper that wraps all your other child functions but it gives you the ability to do public versus private members and this is kind of a sort of debate out there on the web. Some people feel that all JavaScript code should just be directly accessible and others kind of like to be able to hide their, truly their private stuff and a lot of people do that. You just put an underscore in front of your field or your variable name or your function name and that kind of is the defacto way to say hey, this is private. With the revealing module pattern you can do the equivalent of what objective oriented languages do and actually have private members that you literally can’t get to as an external consumer of the JavaScript code and then you can expose only those members that you want to be public. Now, you don’t get the benefit though of the prototype feature, which is I can’t easily extend the revealing module pattern type code if you don’t like something I’m doing, chances are you’re probably going to have to tweak my code to fix that because we’re not leveraging prototyping but in situations where you’re writing apps that are very specific to a given target app, you know, it’s not a library, it’s not going to be used in other apps all over the place, it’s a pattern I actually like a lot, it’s very simple to get going and then if you do like that public/private feature, it’s available to you. [Fritz]  Yeah, that’s interesting. So it’s almost, you can either go private by convention just by using a standard naming convention or you can actually enforce it by using the prototype pattern. [Dan]  Yeah, that’s exactly right. [Fritz]  So one of the things that I know I run across in JavaScript and I’m curious to get your take on is we do have all these different techniques of encapsulation and each one is really quite different when you’re using closures versus simply, you know, referencing member variables and adding them to your objects that the syntax changes with each pattern and the usage changes. So what would you recommend for people starting out in a brand new JavaScript project? Should they all sort of decide beforehand on what patterns they’re going to stick to or do you change it based on what part of the library you’re working on? I know that’s one of the points of confusion in this space. [Dan]  Yeah, it’s a great question. In fact, I just had a company ask me about that. So which one do I pick and, of course, there’s not one answer fits all. [Fritz]  Right. [Dan]  So it really depends what you just said is absolutely in my opinion correct, which is I think as a, especially if you’re on a team or even if you’re just an individual a team of one, you should go through and pick out which pattern for this particular project you think is best. Now if it were me, here’s kind of the way I think of it. If I were writing a let’s say base library that several web apps are going to use or even one, but I know that there’s going to be some pieces that I’m not really sure on right now as I’m writing I and I know people might want to hook in that and have some better extension points, then I would look at either the prototype pattern or the revealing prototype. Now, really just a real quick summation between the two the revealing prototype also gives you that public/private stuff like the revealing module pattern does whereas the prototype pattern does not but both of the prototype patterns do give you the benefit of that extension or that hook capability. So, if I were writing a library that I need people to override things or I’m not even sure what I need them to override, I want them to have that option, I’d probably pick a prototype, one of the prototype patterns. If I’m writing some code that is very unique to the app and it’s kind of a one off for this app which is what I think a lot of people are kind of in that mode as writing custom apps for customers, then my personal preference is the revealing module pattern you could always go with the module pattern as well which is very close but I think the revealing module patterns a little bit cleaner and we go through that in the course and explain kind of the syntax there and the differences. [Fritz]  Great, that makes a lot of sense. [Fritz]  I appreciate you taking the time, Dan, and I hope everyone takes a chance to look at your course and sort of make these decisions for themselves in their next JavaScript project. Dan’s course is, Structuring JavaScript Code and it’s available now in the Pluralsight Library. So, thank you very much, Dan. [Dan]  Thanks for having me again.

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  • Tricky SQL - Select non-adjacent numbers

    - by Daniel
    Given this data on SQL Server 2005: SectionID Name 1 Dan 2 Dan 4 Dan 5 Dan 2 Tom 7 Tom 9 Tom 10 Tom How would I select records where the sectionID must be +-2 or more from another section for the same name. The result would be: 1 Dan 4 Dan 2 Tom 7 Tom 9 Tom Thanks for reading!

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  • Sendmail not working from local PHP when headers not specified

    - by Dan
    Hi. I'm having trouble getting my local XAMPP server to send emails via my remote SMTP server. In PHP, if I put: $headers = "From: [email protected]\r\n"; mail('[email protected]', 'test', '', $headers); Then this works. However, if I don't specify the header, ie.: mail('[email protected]', 'test', ''); Then this fails. The sendmail.log file says: smtpstatus=554 smtpmsg='554 Message refused.' errormsg='the server did not accept the mail' exitcode=EX_UNAVAILABLE I've tried changing my sendmail command in my php.ini to: sendmail_path = "C:/xampp/sendmail/sendmail.exe -t -f [email protected]" but this doesn't work either. Thanks for any help with this, Dan. ps. this is on windows.

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  • Pluralsight Meet the Author Podcast on HTML5 Canvas Programming

    - by dwahlin
      In the latest installment of Pluralsight’s Meet the Author podcast series, Fritz Onion and I talk about my new course, HTML5 Canvas Fundamentals.  In the interview I describe different canvas technologies covered throughout the course and a sample application at the end of the course that covers how to build a custom business chart from start to finish. Meet the Author:  Dan Wahlin on HTML5 Canvas Fundamentals   Transcript [Fritz] Hi. This is Fritz Onion. I’m here today with Dan Wahlin to talk about his new course HTML5 Canvas Fundamentals. Dan founded the Wahlin Group, which you can find at thewahlingroup.com, which specializes in ASP.NET, jQuery, Silverlight, and SharePoint consulting. He’s a Microsoft Regional Director and has been awarded Microsoft’s MVP for ASP.NET, Connected Systems, and Silverlight. Dan is on the INETA Bureau’s — Speaker’s Bureau, speaks at conferences and user groups around the world, and has written several books on .NET. Thanks for talking to me today, Dan. [Dan] Always good to talk with you, Fritz. [Fritz] So this new course of yours, HTML5 Canvas Fundamentals, I have to say that most of the really snazzy demos I’ve seen with HTML5 have involved Canvas, so I thought it would be a good starting point to chat with you about why we decided to create a course dedicated just to Canvas. If you want to kind of give us that perspective. [Dan] Sure. So, you know, there’s quite a bit of material out there on HTML5 in general, and as people that have done a lot with HTML5 are probably aware, a lot of HTML5 is actually JavaScript centric. You know, a lot of people when they first learn it, think it’s tags, but most of it’s actually JavaScript, and it just so happens that the HTML5 Canvas is one of those things. And so it’s not just, you know, a tag you add and it just magically draws all these things. You mentioned there’s a lot of cool things you can do from games to there’s some really cool multimedia applications out there where they integrate video and audio and all kinds of things into the Canvas, to more business scenarios such as charting and things along those lines. So the reason we made a course specifically on it is, a lot of the material out there touches on it but the Canvas is actually a pretty deep topic. You can do some pretty advanced stuff or easy stuff depending on what your application requirements are, and the API itself, you know, there’s over 30 functions just in the Canvas API and then a whole set of properties that actually go with that as well. So it’s a pretty big topic, and that’s why we created a course specifically tailored towards just the Canvas. [Fritz] Right. And let’s — let me just review the outline briefly here for everyone. So you start off with an introduction to getting started with Canvas, drawing with the HTML5 Canvas, then you talk about manipulating pixels, and you finish up with building a custom data chart. So I really like your example flow here. I think it will appeal to even business developers, right. Even if you’re not into HTML5 for the games or the media capabilities, there’s still something here for everyone I think working with the Canvas. Which leads me to another question, which is, where do you see the Canvas fitting in to kind of your day-to-day developer, people that are working business applications and maybe vanilla websites that aren’t doing kind of cutting edge stuff with interactivity with users? Is there a still a place for the Canvas in those scenarios? [Dan] Yeah, definitely. I think a lot of us — and I include myself here — over the last few years, the focus has generally been, especially if you’re, let’s say, a PHP or ASP.NET or Java type of developer, we’re kind of accustomed to working on the server side, and, you know, we kind of relied on Flash or Silverlight or these other plug-ins for the client side stuff when it was kind of fancy, like charts and graphs and things along those lines. With the what I call massive shift of applications, you know, mainly because of mobile, to more of client side, one of the big benefits I think from a maybe corporate standard way of thinking of things, since we do a lot of work with different corporations, is that, number one, rather than having to have the plug-in, which of course isn’t going to work on iPad and some of these other devices out there that are pretty popular, you can now use a built-in technology that all the modern browsers support, and that includes things like Safari on the iPad and iPhone and the Android tablets and things like that with their browsers, and actually render some really sophisticated charts. Whether you do it by scratch or from scratch or, you know, get a third party type of library involved, it’s just JavaScript. So it downloads fast so it’s good from a performance perspective; and when it comes to what you can render, it’s extremely robust. You can do everything from, you know, your basic circles to polygons or polylines to really advanced gradients as well and even provide some interactivity and animations, and that’s some of the stuff I touch upon in the class. In fact, you mentioned the last part of the outline there is building a custom data chart and that’s kind of gears towards more of the, what I’d call enterprise or corporate type developer. [Fritz] Yeah, that makes sense. And it’s, you know, a lot of the demos I’ve seen with HTML5 focus on more the interactivity and kind of game side of things, but the Canvas is such a diverse element within HTML5 that I can see it being applicable pretty much anywhere. So why don’t we talk a little bit about some of the specifics of what you cover? You talk about drawing and then manipulating pixels. You want to kind of give us the different ways of working with the Canvas and what some of those APIs provide for you? [Dan] Sure. So going all the way back to the start of the outline, we actually started off by showing different demonstrations of the Canvas in action, and we show some fun stuff — multimedia apps and games and things like that — and then also some more business scenarios; and then once you see that, hopefully it kinds of piques your interest and you go, oh, wow, this is actually pretty phenomenal what you can do. So then we start you off with, so how to you actually draw things. Now, there are some libraries out there that will draw things like graphs, but if you want to customize those or just build something you have from scratch, you need to know the basics, such as, you know, how do you draw circles and lines and arcs and Bezier curves and all those fancy types of shapes that a given chart may have on it or that a game may have in it for that matter. So we start off by covering what I call the core API functions; how do you, for instance, fill a rectangle or convert that to a square by setting the height and the width; how do you draw arcs or different types of curves and there’s different types supported such as I mentioned Bezier curves or quadratic curves; and then we also talk about how do you integrate text into it. You might have some images already that are just regular bitmap type images that you want to integrate, you can do that with a Canvas. And you can even sync video into the Canvas, which actually opens up some pretty interesting possibilities for both business and I think just general multimedia apps. Once you kind of get those core functions down for the basic shapes that you need to be able to draw on any type of Canvas, then we go a little deeper into what are the pixels that are there to manipulate. And that’s one of the important things to understand about the HTML5 Canvas, scalable vector graphics is another thing you can use now in the modern browsers; it’s vector based. Canvas is pixel based. And so we talk about how to do gradients, how can you do transforms, you know, how do you scale things or rotate things, which is extremely useful for charts ’cause you might have text that, you know, flips up on its side for a y-axis or something like that. And you can even do direct pixel manipulation. So it’s really, really powerful. If you want to get down to the RGBA level, you can do that, and I show how to do that in the course, and then kind of wrap that section up with some animation fundamentals. [Fritz] Great. Yeah, that’s really powerful stuff for programmatically rendering data to clients and responding to user inputs. Look forward to seeing what everyone’s going to come up with building this stuff. So great. That’s — that’s HTML5 Canvas Fundamentals with Dan Wahlin. Thanks very much, Dan. [Dan] Thanks again. I appreciate it.

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  • Cannot get realtek8188ee to work in 14.04

    - by dang42
    I have a Toshiba Satellite C55-A5300 laptop. When I run lspci -nn it shows 02:00.0 Network controller [0280]: Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. RTL8188EE Wireless Network Adapter [10ec:8179] (rev 01) It has always had the common problem others have asked about here (and many, many other places on the web) where it would connect, then drop the connection at random intervals. I tried every solution I could find, here & elsewhere, and they always caused errors after running "make" (more details below), but as I could still connect to networks I just dealt with it. I upgraded to 14.04 a few days ago and now it won't connect at all - I need help getting this to work. I originally followed the instructions posted by chili555 found here: Wireless not working on Toshiba Satellite C55-A5281, but I get the following errors when running "make": /home/dan/backports-3.11-rc3-1/net/wireless/sysfs.c:151:2: error: unknown field ‘dev_attrs’ specified in initializer .dev_attrs = ieee80211_dev_attrs, ^ /home/dan/backports-3.11-rc3-1/net/wireless/sysfs.c:151:2: warning: initialization from incompatible pointer type [enabled by default] /home/dan/backports-3.11-rc3-1/net/wireless/sysfs.c:151:2: warning: (near initialization for ‘ieee80211_class.suspend’) [enabled by default] make[6]: * [/home/dan/backports-3.11-rc3-1/net/wireless/sysfs.o] Error 1 make[5]: [/home/dan/backports-3.11-rc3-1/net/wireless] Error 2 make[4]: [module/home/dan/backports-3.11-rc3-1] Error 2 make[3]: [modules] Error 2 make2: [modules] Error 2 make1: * [modules] Error 2 make: * [default] Error 2 I have no clue how to diagnose the problem or how to proceed from here. I also don't know what information one might need from me in order to move forward. I'll be happy to share anything you'd like to know if it results in this thing (finally!) working properly. Thanks in advance for any / all help. ETA: I did see this post - Realtek 8188ee wireless driver SOLVED - and it looks like it is discussing the same problem I'm having, but I cannot for the life of me figure out what I had to add the testing repository to my /etc/apt/sources.list means, so I am still stuck.

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  • Splitting strings using a delimiter in python.

    - by Jahkr
    OK so I have a string that has this: Dan|warrior|54 I'm trying to make so I can use python and split it using | as the delimiter. Here's what I have so far: #!/usr/bin/env python dan = 'dan|warrior|54' print dan.split('|') and that results into this: ['dan', 'warrior', '54'] I know it's incomplete but what do I have to do to finish it? Yes, I tried googling this problem... but it's not happening. :( I want so that I can choose specifically which one from the delimiter so if I was dan.split('|')[1] .. it would pick warrior. See my point?

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  • Learn Behavior-Driven Development

    - by Ben Griswold
    In this presentation, I provided a brief introduction into TDD and talked about the confusion and misconceptions around the discipline. I, of course, shared a bit about Dan North, the father of BDD and touched upon some crazy hypothesis dreamed up by Sapir and Whorf. I then gave a Behavior Driven Development overview (my impressions of the implementation and lifecycle) and then touched upon available tools, how to get started and I threw in a number of reference and reading materials which you will find below. As an added bonus, I demonstrated how easy it is to include/exclude hyphens and alter the spelling of “behavior” at will.   Introducing BDD, Dan North Oredev 2007 – Behaviour-Driven Development, Dan North Behavior-Driven Development, Scott Bellware Behavior Driven Development, Wikipedia BDD Wiki A New Look at Test-Driven Development, Dave Astels Behavior Driven Development – An Evolution in Testing, Bob Cotton The Truth about BDD, Uncle Bob Martin Language and Thought, Wikipedia Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis, Wikipedia What’s in a Story?, Dan North

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  • IPv6 local address in hosts file

    - by Dan
    I have set up a local domain on my Apache server. Then I added the following line in my /etc/hosts file ::1 exampledomain.local After I trying to navigate to it, (I tried Firefox and Chromium) I got a server not found error. Then I tried ping6 and it worked: [email protected]:~$ ping6 exampledomain.local PING exampledomain.local(exampledomain.local) 56 data bytes 64 bytes from exampledomain.local: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.032 ms If I replace ::1 with 127.0.0.1 in my hosts file, it works fine. I'm not sure if this is relevant but this is my Virtual Host configuration in Apache2: <VirtualHost *:80> ServerAlias exampledomain.local DocumentRoot /home/dan/sites/exampledomain <Directory /home/dan/sites/exampledomain> Options Indexes FollowSymLinks MultiViews AllowOverride All Order allow,deny allow from all </Directory> ErrorLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/exampledomain-error.log # Possible values include: debug, info, notice, warn, error, crit, # alert, emerg. LogLevel debug CustomLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/exampledomain-access.log combined </VirtualHost> My question is: How can I make it work with the IPv6 address?

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  • Xforwarding in Ubuntu

    - by Dan
    I'm trying to get Xforwarding working in Ubuntu... On the server I have uncommented the following lines of /etc/ssh/sshd_config: X11Forwarding yes AllowTcpForwarding yes Now I try to ssh in, but I get the following error messages (and Xforwarding isn't working). $ssh -Y example.com /usr/bin/xauth: /home/dan/.Xauthority not writable, changes will be ignored $ssh -X example.com /usr/bin/xauth: error in locking authority file /home/dan/.Xauthority Any suggestions? Thanks

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  • Connecting to a Ghost User in Flex RTMFP

    - by Dan
    I have a simple Flex RTMFP P2P video app in the same mold as the Adobe Cirrus VideoPhone Sample application. A problem I've been encountering in developing this app (the same problem occurs in the sample) is when you try to connect to a ghost Stratus instance i.e you try to call someone whose Stratus id is in the database but who is no longer on the page. So here's an example of what I mean: Let's say you go to the Adobe Stratus sample and connect as Dan. Then open up a new tab, go to the sample again and connect as Fred. If from this point, you (as Fred) call Dan everything will work fine. But, if you close the tab in which you connected as Dan, and then from the Fred tab try to connect to Dan the program will just hang. I would have thought there would be a NetStream event that would be triggered if you tried to connect to a Stratus instance that is not longer online but I can't seem to find anything besides NetStream.Connect.Rejected which doesn't seem to be called. Any help is much appreciated!

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  • Drag and drop image from and to fixed position on fixed path

    - by DMan
    I am trying to allow the user to drag and drop and image from on position to another. The screen layout is as follows: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 I want the user to grab image 2, 4, 6, or 8 and drag it to image 5. Upon dragging to image 5 I want to load up a fragment. The user can only drag the image in a straight line from it's current position to 5's position. ie image 2 and only drag down and only until it is overtop of image 5, image 4 can only drag right until overtop of 5, etc. Any insight on how to do this is greatly appreciated. Thanks, DMan

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  • Converting SQL statement into Linq

    - by DMan
    I'm trying to convert the following to a LINQ to SQL statement in C#. Can anyone give me a hand? Basically my table keeps record of all history of changes such that the created date max date for each seedlot is the most recent record and the correct one to show. SELECT reports.* FROM [dbo].[Reports] reports WHERE reports.createdDate IN ( SELECT MAX(report_max_dates.createdDate) FROM [dbo].[Reports] report_max_dates GROUP BY report_max_dates.Lot ) So far this is what I have. var result = (from report in db.Reports where report.createdDate == (from report_max in db.Reports group report_max by report_max.Lot into report_max_grouped select report_max_grouped).Max() select report); I can't figure out how to get the MAX dates for all reports and how to do an IN statement on the report.createdDate. Thansk, Dman

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  • /etc/environment not being read into PATH variable

    - by Dan
    In Ubuntu the path variable is stored in /etc/environment. This is mine (I've made no changes to it, this is the system default): $ cat /etc/environment PATH="/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/games" but when I examine my PATH variable: $ echo $PATH /home/dan/bin:/home/dan/bin:/bin:/usr/bin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin/X11 You'll notice /usr/games is missing (it was there up until a few days ago). My /etc/profile makes no mention of PATH. My ~/.profile is the default and only has: if [ -d "$HOME/bin" ] ; then PATH="$HOME/bin:$PATH" fi This only happens in gnome, not in tty1-6. This is missing from both gnome terminal and when I try to call applications from the applications dropdown. Anyone know what could be causing this? Thanks.

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  • /etc/enviorment not being read into PATH variable

    - by Dan
    In Ubuntu the path variable is stored in /etc/enviorment. This is mine (I've made no changes to it, this is the system default): $ cat /etc/environment PATH="/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/games" but when I examine my PATH variable: $ echo $PATH /home/dan/bin:/home/dan/bin:/bin:/usr/bin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin/X11 You'll notice /usr/games is missing (it was there up until a few days ago). My /etc/profile makes no mention of PATH. My ~/.profile is the default and only has: if [ -d "$HOME/bin" ] ; then PATH="$HOME/bin:$PATH" fi This only happens in gnome, not in tty1-6. This is missing from both gnome terminal and when I try to call applications from the applications dropdown. Anyone know what could be causing this? Thanks.

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  • launching a program from bash causes bash to go to new prompt

    - by Dan Dman
    When I run a program from the console, e.g. [email protected]:~$ firefox I expect the console to log error messages (I think this is std out or std err?) and other items from the program, firefox in this case. But today I notice that bash just opens the program and goes to a new prompt, e.g. [email protected]:~$ firefox [email protected]:~$ How do I launch a program from bash such that error messages will be written to the console? Why is it that some programs operate this way by default and others (firefox) do not?

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  • sudo credential caching on by default

    - by Dan Dman
    Just installed a minimal ubuntu 12.04, then installed xfce4 and xinit from the command line after first boot. Totally vanilla installation afaik. I'm noticing that sudo caches the password until I issue sudo -k to clear it. This is unexpected behavior in my mind. I've run xfce4 before and don't recall credential caching being on, nor have I experienced it in the many previous ubuntu installs I've had over the years. Is this a new feature of Ubuntu? Is this something that's the result of the minimal install? Is this an xfce default that's been added recently?

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  • I have permanent connections to Canonical servers, what are they for?

    - by Dan Dman
    After the recent upgrade to 12, I notice permanent connections to canonical servers. Running netstat -tp gives: Foreign Address State PID/Program name mulberry.canonical:http CLOSE_WAIT 6537/ubuntu-geoip-p alkes.canonical.co:http CLOSE_WAIT 6667/python alkes.canonical.co:http CLOSE_WAIT 6667/python Why are there permanent connections and how could I stop this behavior? And if this is intentional, who is responsible? I would like to understand why this was done because to me it seems like a bad idea.

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  • I have permanent connections to Canonical servers, what are they for and how can I turn them off?

    - by Dan Dman
    After the recent upgrade to 12, I notice permanent connections to canonical servers. Running netstat -tp gives: Foreign Address State PID/Program name mulberry.canonical:http CLOSE_WAIT 6537/ubuntu-geoip-p alkes.canonical.co:http CLOSE_WAIT 6667/python alkes.canonical.co:http CLOSE_WAIT 6667/python Why are there permanent connections and how could I stop this behavior? And if this is intentional, who is responsible? I would like to understand why this was done because to me it seems like a bad idea.

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  • Oracle WebCenter - Well Connected

    - by Brian Dirking
    800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";} An good post from Dan Elam on the state of the ECM industry (http://www.aiim.org/community/blogs/community/ECM-Vendors-go-to-War) . For those of you who don’t know Dan, he is one of the major forces in the content management industry. He founded eVisory and IMERGE Consulting, he is an AIIM Fellow and a former US Technical Expert to the International Standards Organization (ISO), and has been a driving force behind EmTag, AIIM’s Emerging Technologies Group. His post is interesting – it starts out talking about our Moveoff Documentum campaign, but then it becomes a much deeper insight into the ECM industry. Dan points out that Oracle has been making quiet strides in the ECM industry. In fact, analysts share this view Oracle, pointing out Oracle is growing greater than 20% annually while many of the big vendors are shrinking. And as Dan points out, this cements Oracle as one of the big five in the ECM space – the same week that Autonomy was removed from the Gartner Magic Quadrant for ECM. One of the key things points out is that Oracle WebCenter is well connected. WebCenter has out-of-the-box connections to key enterprise applications such as E-Business Suite, PeopleSoft, Siebel and JD Edwards. Those out-of-the-box integrations make it easy for organizations to drive content right into the places where it is needed, in the midst of business processes. At the same time, WebCenter provides composite interface capabilities to bring together two or more of these enterprise applications onto the same screen. Combine that with the capabilities of Oracle Social Network, you start to see how Oracle is providing a full platform for user engagement. But beyond those connections, WebCenter can also connect to other content management systems. It can index and search those systems from a single point of search, bringing back results in a single combined hitlist. WebCenter can also extend records management capabilities into Documentum, SharePoint, and email archiving systems. From a single console, records managers can define a series, set a retention schedule, and place holds – without having to go to each system to make these updates. Dan points out that there are some new competitive dynamics – to be sure. And it is interesting when a system can interact with another system, enforce dispositions and holds, and enable users to search and retrieve content. Oracle WebCenter is providing the infrastructure to build on, and the interfaces to drive user engagement. It’s an interesting time.

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  • Select Union Query problem

    - by Krishma
    I have 2 tables Table A id name ------------ 1 Scott 2 Dan 3 Sam Table B id name ------------ 1 Dan 2 Andi 3 Jess Result needs to be Id Name Found 1 Scott A 2 Dan C i.e. found in both 3 Sam A 2 Andi B 3 Jess B I am able to do UNION to fetch the result but how i generate column Founds. Any idea ?? Thank you in advance :)

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  • Core Data grouping data in table

    - by OscarTheGrouch
    I am using core data trying to create a simple database app, I have an entity called "Game" which has a "creator". I have basically used the iPhone table view template and replaced the names. I have the games listed by creator. Currently the tableview looks like this... Chris Ryder Chris Ryder Chris Ryder Chris Ryder Dan Grimaldi Dan Grimaldi Dan Grimaldi Scott Ricardo Tim Thermos Tim Thermos I am trying to group the tableview, so that each creator has only one cell in the tableview and is listed once and only once like this... Chris Ryder Dan Grimaldi Scott Ricardo Tim Thermos any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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  • FairScheduling Conventions in Hadoop

    - by dan.mcclary
    While scheduling and resource allocation control has been present in Hadoop since 0.20, a lot of people haven't discovered or utilized it in their initial investigations of the Hadoop ecosystem. We could chalk this up to many things: Organizations are still determining what their dataflow and analysis workloads will comprise Small deployments under tests aren't likely to show the signs of strains that would send someone looking for resource allocation options The default scheduling options -- the FairScheduler and the CapacityScheduler -- are not placed in the most prominent position within the Hadoop documentation. However, for production deployments, it's wise to start with at least the foundations of scheduling in place so that you can tune the cluster as workloads emerge. To do that, we have to ask ourselves something about what the off-the-rack scheduling options are. We have some choices: The FairScheduler, which will work to ensure resource allocations are enforced on a per-job basis. The CapacityScheduler, which will ensure resource allocations are enforced on a per-queue basis. Writing your own implementation of the abstract class org.apache.hadoop.mapred.job.TaskScheduler is an option, but usually overkill. If you're going to have several concurrent users and leverage the more interactive aspects of the Hadoop environment (e.g. Pig and Hive scripting), the FairScheduler is definitely the way to go. In particular, we can do user-specific pools so that default users get their fair share, and specific users are given the resources their workloads require. To enable fair scheduling, we're going to need to do a couple of things. First, we need to tell the JobTracker that we want to use scheduling and where we're going to be defining our allocations. We do this by adding the following to the mapred-site.xml file in HADOOP_HOME/conf: <property> <name>mapred.jobtracker.taskScheduler</name> <value>org.apache.hadoop.mapred.FairScheduler</value> </property> <property> <name>mapred.fairscheduler.allocation.file</name> <value>/path/to/allocations.xml</value> </property> <property> <name>mapred.fairscheduler.poolnameproperty</name> <value>pool.name</value> </property> <property> <name>pool.name</name> <value>${user.name}</name> </property> What we've done here is simply tell the JobTracker that we'd like to task scheduling to use the FairScheduler class rather than a single FIFO queue. Moreover, we're going to be defining our resource pools and allocations in a file called allocations.xml For reference, the allocation file is read every 15s or so, which allows for tuning allocations without having to take down the JobTracker. Our allocation file is now going to look a little like this <?xml version="1.0"?> <allocations> <pool name="dan"> <minMaps>5</minMaps> <minReduces>5</minReduces> <maxMaps>25</maxMaps> <maxReduces>25</maxReduces> <minSharePreemptionTimeout>300</minSharePreemptionTimeout> </pool> <mapreduce.job.user.name="dan"> <maxRunningJobs>6</maxRunningJobs> </user> <userMaxJobsDefault>3</userMaxJobsDefault> <fairSharePreemptionTimeout>600</fairSharePreemptionTimeout> </allocations> In this case, I've explicitly set my username to have upper and lower bounds on the maps and reduces, and allotted myself double the number of running jobs. Now, if I run hive or pig jobs from either the console or via the Hue web interface, I'll be treated "fairly" by the JobTracker. There's a lot more tweaking that can be done to the allocations file, so it's best to dig down into the description and start trying out allocations that might fit your workload.

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