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  • Gigabit and Full-Duplex

    - by jchang
    People still talk about checking if the network is in full-duplex mode even when they are on Gigabit Ethernet. Let me say clearly: Gigabit Ethernet is full-duplex period. There is no half-duplex mode. The same goes for 10 Gigabit Ethernet. If Windows Task Manager says the network Link Speed is 1 or 10 Gbps, don’t bother checking the mode, it can only be full-duplex. In the old days of 10Mbit/sec Ethernet was originally half-duplex. The old 10BASE5 (fat) and 10BASE2 (thin) cable had one signal carrier....(read more)

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  • Syncing Data with a Server using Silverlight and HTTP Polling Duplex

    - by dwahlin
    Many applications have the need to stay in-sync with data provided by a service. Although web applications typically rely on standard polling techniques to check if data has changed, Silverlight provides several interesting options for keeping an application in-sync that rely on server “push” technologies. A few years back I wrote several blog posts covering different “push” technologies available in Silverlight that rely on sockets or HTTP Polling Duplex. We recently had a project that looked like it could benefit from pushing data from a server to one or more clients so I thought I’d revisit the subject and provide some updates to the original code posted. If you’ve worked with AJAX before in Web applications then you know that until browsers fully support web sockets or other duplex (bi-directional communication) technologies that it’s difficult to keep applications in-sync with a server without relying on polling. The problem with polling is that you have to check for changes on the server on a timed-basis which can often be wasteful and take up unnecessary resources. With server “push” technologies, data can be pushed from the server to the client as it changes. Once the data is received, the client can update the user interface as appropriate. Using “push” technologies allows the client to listen for changes from the data but stay 100% focused on client activities as opposed to worrying about polling and asking the server if anything has changed. Silverlight provides several options for pushing data from a server to a client including sockets, TCP bindings and HTTP Polling Duplex.  Each has its own strengths and weaknesses as far as performance and setup work with HTTP Polling Duplex arguably being the easiest to setup and get going.  In this article I’ll demonstrate how HTTP Polling Duplex can be used in Silverlight 4 applications to push data and show how you can create a WCF server that provides an HTTP Polling Duplex binding that a Silverlight client can consume.   What is HTTP Polling Duplex? Technologies that allow data to be pushed from a server to a client rely on duplex functionality. Duplex (or bi-directional) communication allows data to be passed in both directions.  A client can call a service and the server can call the client. HTTP Polling Duplex (as its name implies) allows a server to communicate with a client without forcing the client to constantly poll the server. It has the benefit of being able to run on port 80 making setup a breeze compared to the other options which require specific ports to be used and cross-domain policy files to be exposed on port 943 (as with sockets and TCP bindings). Having said that, if you’re looking for the best speed possible then sockets and TCP bindings are the way to go. But, they’re not the only game in town when it comes to duplex communication. The first time I heard about HTTP Polling Duplex (initially available in Silverlight 2) I wasn’t exactly sure how it was any better than standard polling used in AJAX applications. I read the Silverlight SDK, looked at various resources and generally found the following definition unhelpful as far as understanding the actual benefits that HTTP Polling Duplex provided: "The Silverlight client periodically polls the service on the network layer, and checks for any new messages that the service wants to send on the callback channel. The service queues all messages sent on the client callback channel and delivers them to the client when the client polls the service." Although the previous definition explained the overall process, it sounded as if standard polling was used. Fortunately, Microsoft’s Scott Guthrie provided me with a more clear definition several years back that explains the benefits provided by HTTP Polling Duplex quite well (used with his permission): "The [HTTP Polling Duplex] duplex support does use polling in the background to implement notifications – although the way it does it is different than manual polling. It initiates a network request, and then the request is effectively “put to sleep” waiting for the server to respond (it doesn’t come back immediately). The server then keeps the connection open but not active until it has something to send back (or the connection times out after 90 seconds – at which point the duplex client will connect again and wait). This way you are avoiding hitting the server repeatedly – but still get an immediate response when there is data to send." After hearing Scott’s definition the light bulb went on and it all made sense. A client makes a request to a server to check for changes, but instead of the request returning immediately, it parks itself on the server and waits for data. It’s kind of like waiting to pick up a pizza at the store. Instead of calling the store over and over to check the status, you sit in the store and wait until the pizza (the request data) is ready. Once it’s ready you take it back home (to the client). This technique provides a lot of efficiency gains over standard polling techniques even though it does use some polling of its own as a request is initially made from a client to a server. So how do you implement HTTP Polling Duplex in your Silverlight applications? Let’s take a look at the process by starting with the server. Creating an HTTP Polling Duplex WCF Service Creating a WCF service that exposes an HTTP Polling Duplex binding is straightforward as far as coding goes. Add some one way operations into an interface, create a client callback interface and you’re ready to go. The most challenging part comes into play when configuring the service to properly support the necessary binding and that’s more of a cut and paste operation once you know the configuration code to use. To create an HTTP Polling Duplex service you’ll need to expose server-side and client-side interfaces and reference the System.ServiceModel.PollingDuplex assembly (located at C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Silverlight\v4.0\Libraries\Server on my machine) in the server project. For the demo application I upgraded a basketball simulation service to support the latest polling duplex assemblies. The service simulates a simple basketball game using a Game class and pushes information about the game such as score, fouls, shots and more to the client as the game changes over time. Before jumping too far into the game push service, it’s important to discuss two interfaces used by the service to communicate in a bi-directional manner. The first is called IGameStreamService and defines the methods/operations that the client can call on the server (see Listing 1). The second is IGameStreamClient which defines the callback methods that a server can use to communicate with a client (see Listing 2).   [ServiceContract(Namespace = "Silverlight", CallbackContract = typeof(IGameStreamClient))] public interface IGameStreamService { [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)] void GetTeamData(); } Listing 1. The IGameStreamService interface defines server operations that can be called on the server.   [ServiceContract] public interface IGameStreamClient { [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)] void ReceiveTeamData(List<Team> teamData); [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true, AsyncPattern=true)] IAsyncResult BeginReceiveGameData(GameData gameData, AsyncCallback callback, object state); void EndReceiveGameData(IAsyncResult result); } Listing 2. The IGameStreamClient interfaces defines client operations that a server can call.   The IGameStreamService interface is decorated with the standard ServiceContract attribute but also contains a value for the CallbackContract property.  This property is used to define the interface that the client will expose (IGameStreamClient in this example) and use to receive data pushed from the service. Notice that each OperationContract attribute in both interfaces sets the IsOneWay property to true. This means that the operation can be called and passed data as appropriate, however, no data will be passed back. Instead, data will be pushed back to the client as it’s available.  Looking through the IGameStreamService interface you can see that the client can request team data whereas the IGameStreamClient interface allows team and game data to be received by the client. One interesting point about the IGameStreamClient interface is the inclusion of the AsyncPattern property on the BeginReceiveGameData operation. I initially created this operation as a standard one way operation and it worked most of the time. However, as I disconnected clients and reconnected new ones game data wasn’t being passed properly. After researching the problem more I realized that because the service could take up to 7 seconds to return game data, things were getting hung up. By setting the AsyncPattern property to true on the BeginReceivedGameData operation and providing a corresponding EndReceiveGameData operation I was able to get around this problem and get everything running properly. I’ll provide more details on the implementation of these two methods later in this post. Once the interfaces were created I moved on to the game service class. The first order of business was to create a class that implemented the IGameStreamService interface. Since the service can be used by multiple clients wanting game data I added the ServiceBehavior attribute to the class definition so that I could set its InstanceContextMode to InstanceContextMode.Single (in effect creating a Singleton service object). Listing 3 shows the game service class as well as its fields and constructor.   [ServiceBehavior(ConcurrencyMode = ConcurrencyMode.Multiple, InstanceContextMode = InstanceContextMode.Single)] public class GameStreamService : IGameStreamService { object _Key = new object(); Game _Game = null; Timer _Timer = null; Random _Random = null; Dictionary<string, IGameStreamClient> _ClientCallbacks = new Dictionary<string, IGameStreamClient>(); static AsyncCallback _ReceiveGameDataCompleted = new AsyncCallback(ReceiveGameDataCompleted); public GameStreamService() { _Game = new Game(); _Timer = new Timer { Enabled = false, Interval = 2000, AutoReset = true }; _Timer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(_Timer_Elapsed); _Timer.Start(); _Random = new Random(); }} Listing 3. The GameStreamService implements the IGameStreamService interface which defines a callback contract that allows the service class to push data back to the client. By implementing the IGameStreamService interface, GameStreamService must supply a GetTeamData() method which is responsible for supplying information about the teams that are playing as well as individual players.  GetTeamData() also acts as a client subscription method that tracks clients wanting to receive game data.  Listing 4 shows the GetTeamData() method. public void GetTeamData() { //Get client callback channel var context = OperationContext.Current; var sessionID = context.SessionId; var currClient = context.GetCallbackChannel<IGameStreamClient>(); context.Channel.Faulted += Disconnect; context.Channel.Closed += Disconnect; IGameStreamClient client; if (!_ClientCallbacks.TryGetValue(sessionID, out client)) { lock (_Key) { _ClientCallbacks[sessionID] = currClient; } } currClient.ReceiveTeamData(_Game.GetTeamData()); //Start timer which when fired sends updated score information to client if (!_Timer.Enabled) { _Timer.Enabled = true; } } Listing 4. The GetTeamData() method subscribes a given client to the game service and returns. The key the line of code in the GetTeamData() method is the call to GetCallbackChannel<IGameStreamClient>().  This method is responsible for accessing the calling client’s callback channel. The callback channel is defined by the IGameStreamClient interface shown earlier in Listing 2 and used by the server to communicate with the client. Before passing team data back to the client, GetTeamData() grabs the client’s session ID and checks if it already exists in the _ClientCallbacks dictionary object used to track clients wanting callbacks from the server. If the client doesn’t exist it adds it into the collection. It then pushes team data from the Game class back to the client by calling ReceiveTeamData().  Since the service simulates a basketball game, a timer is then started if it’s not already enabled which is then used to randomly send data to the client. When the timer fires, game data is pushed down to the client. Listing 5 shows the _Timer_Elapsed() method that is called when the timer fires as well as the SendGameData() method used to send data to the client. void _Timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e) { int interval = _Random.Next(3000, 7000); lock (_Key) { _Timer.Interval = interval; _Timer.Enabled = false; } SendGameData(_Game.GetGameData()); } private void SendGameData(GameData gameData) { var cbs = _ClientCallbacks.Where(cb => ((IContextChannel)cb.Value).State == CommunicationState.Opened); for (int i = 0; i < cbs.Count(); i++) { var cb = cbs.ElementAt(i).Value; try { cb.BeginReceiveGameData(gameData, _ReceiveGameDataCompleted, cb); } catch (TimeoutException texp) { //Log timeout error } catch (CommunicationException cexp) { //Log communication error } } lock (_Key) _Timer.Enabled = true; } private static void ReceiveGameDataCompleted(IAsyncResult result) { try { ((IGameStreamClient)(result.AsyncState)).EndReceiveGameData(result); } catch (CommunicationException) { // empty } catch (TimeoutException) { // empty } } LIsting 5. _Timer_Elapsed is used to simulate time in a basketball game. When _Timer_Elapsed() fires the SendGameData() method is called which iterates through the clients wanting to be notified of changes. As each client is identified, their respective BeginReceiveGameData() method is called which ultimately pushes game data down to the client. Recall that this method was defined in the client callback interface named IGameStreamClient shown earlier in Listing 2. Notice that BeginReceiveGameData() accepts _ReceiveGameDataCompleted as its second parameter (an AsyncCallback delegate defined in the service class) and passes the client callback as the third parameter. The initial version of the sample application had a standard ReceiveGameData() method in the client callback interface. However, sometimes the client callbacks would work properly and sometimes they wouldn’t which was a little baffling at first glance. After some investigation I realized that I needed to implement an asynchronous pattern for client callbacks to work properly since 3 – 7 second delays are occurring as a result of the timer. Once I added the BeginReceiveGameData() and ReceiveGameDataCompleted() methods everything worked properly since each call was handled in an asynchronous manner. The final task that had to be completed to get the server working properly with HTTP Polling Duplex was adding configuration code into web.config. In the interest of brevity I won’t post all of the code here since the sample application includes everything you need. However, Listing 6 shows the key configuration code to handle creating a custom binding named pollingDuplexBinding and associate it with the service’s endpoint.   <bindings> <customBinding> <binding name="pollingDuplexBinding"> <binaryMessageEncoding /> <pollingDuplex maxPendingSessions="2147483647" maxPendingMessagesPerSession="2147483647" inactivityTimeout="02:00:00" serverPollTimeout="00:05:00"/> <httpTransport /> </binding> </customBinding> </bindings> <services> <service name="GameService.GameStreamService" behaviorConfiguration="GameStreamServiceBehavior"> <endpoint address="" binding="customBinding" bindingConfiguration="pollingDuplexBinding" contract="GameService.IGameStreamService"/> <endpoint address="mex" binding="mexHttpBinding" contract="IMetadataExchange" /> </service> </services>   Listing 6. Configuring an HTTP Polling Duplex binding in web.config and associating an endpoint with it. Calling the Service and Receiving “Pushed” Data Calling the service and handling data that is pushed from the server is a simple and straightforward process in Silverlight. Since the service is configured with a MEX endpoint and exposes a WSDL file, you can right-click on the Silverlight project and select the standard Add Service Reference item. After the web service proxy is created you may notice that the ServiceReferences.ClientConfig file only contains an empty configuration element instead of the normal configuration elements created when creating a standard WCF proxy. You can certainly update the file if you want to read from it at runtime but for the sample application I fed the service URI directly to the service proxy as shown next: var address = new EndpointAddress("http://localhost.:5661/GameStreamService.svc"); var binding = new PollingDuplexHttpBinding(); _Proxy = new GameStreamServiceClient(binding, address); _Proxy.ReceiveTeamDataReceived += _Proxy_ReceiveTeamDataReceived; _Proxy.ReceiveGameDataReceived += _Proxy_ReceiveGameDataReceived; _Proxy.GetTeamDataAsync(); This code creates the proxy and passes the endpoint address and binding to use to its constructor. It then wires the different receive events to callback methods and calls GetTeamDataAsync().  Calling GetTeamDataAsync() causes the server to store the client in the server-side dictionary collection mentioned earlier so that it can receive data that is pushed.  As the server-side timer fires and game data is pushed to the client, the user interface is updated as shown in Listing 7. Listing 8 shows the _Proxy_ReceiveGameDataReceived() method responsible for handling the data and calling UpdateGameData() to process it.   Listing 7. The Silverlight interface. Game data is pushed from the server to the client using HTTP Polling Duplex. void _Proxy_ReceiveGameDataReceived(object sender, ReceiveGameDataReceivedEventArgs e) { UpdateGameData(e.gameData); } private void UpdateGameData(GameData gameData) { //Update Score this.tbTeam1Score.Text = gameData.Team1Score.ToString(); this.tbTeam2Score.Text = gameData.Team2Score.ToString(); //Update ball visibility if (gameData.Action != ActionsEnum.Foul) { if (tbTeam1.Text == gameData.TeamOnOffense) { AnimateBall(this.BB1, this.BB2); } else //Team 2 { AnimateBall(this.BB2, this.BB1); } } if (this.lbActions.Items.Count > 9) this.lbActions.Items.Clear(); this.lbActions.Items.Add(gameData.LastAction); if (this.lbActions.Visibility == Visibility.Collapsed) this.lbActions.Visibility = Visibility.Visible; } private void AnimateBall(Image onBall, Image offBall) { this.FadeIn.Stop(); Storyboard.SetTarget(this.FadeInAnimation, onBall); Storyboard.SetTarget(this.FadeOutAnimation, offBall); this.FadeIn.Begin(); } Listing 8. As the server pushes game data, the client’s _Proxy_ReceiveGameDataReceived() method is called to process the data. In a real-life application I’d go with a ViewModel class to handle retrieving team data, setup data bindings and handle data that is pushed from the server. However, for the sample application I wanted to focus on HTTP Polling Duplex and keep things as simple as possible.   Summary Silverlight supports three options when duplex communication is required in an application including TCP bindins, sockets and HTTP Polling Duplex. In this post you’ve seen how HTTP Polling Duplex interfaces can be created and implemented on the server as well as how they can be consumed by a Silverlight client. HTTP Polling Duplex provides a nice way to “push” data from a server while still allowing the data to flow over port 80 or another port of your choice.   Sample Application Download

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  • NIC: Changing Link Speed & Duplex to Full Duplex Is Drastically Slower

    - by rism
    I have an old Win Xp box with a 100 PRO/100 VE NIC and connecting to a Win 7 box with gigabit NIC via an ASUS gigabit router and peer to peer. I was getting 76% network utilisation on the XP machine using AUTO as the value for Link Speed and Duplex which is fine. But I decided to see what would happen if i selected Full Duplex 100Mbps on the XP box. I thought at worst it would be as good as auto detect since the Win 7 box it's transferring to is faster. Instead network utilisation dropped to 0.12% (as in a 10th of a percent) and the transfers just timed out. No biggie to reverse back to Auto but my question is why is full duplex such a dog? Im not "stuck" but just dont understand. There are only 2 machines here connecting through a router so i cant see how that would cause alot of collisions etc (if thats the problem).

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  • Mac OS X Duplex Printing Paper Handling Oddness

    - by Christian Lindig
    I like to print on stationery with a pre-printed letterhead using the Preview.app and a duplex-capable HP PostScript (Color Laserjet 4700) printer. One would think that pre-printed stationery could be placed into one of the trays and then printed on front and reverse side. Unfortunately, the print dialog handles one and two-paged documents differently: the stationery needs to be placed differently into the tray if the document contains one page versus when it contains two pages. This is not obvious when printing on plain paper but becomes obvious once you mark, say, the upper left front corner of pages and then print different documents on them. I checked the PostScript code generated and indeed it is different for one versus two-page documents with respect to duplex printing, probably causing the difference in paper handling. Obviously this makes it difficult to print pre-printed stationery in duplex mode. I expected others to have stumbled upon this but could not find specific help so far. Any ideas? This is on OS X 10.6 and I checked two different printers.

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  • Manual Duplex printing for Mac (and/or Linux)

    - by chris_l
    My printers don't support automatic duplex printing. I'm looking for a solution for my Mac and Linux computers that I've seen with most Windows printer drivers: Check "Manual duplex" in the printer screen Printer starts printing one side A dialog appears, asking me to flip the pages Printer prints the other side. One thing I can do, is print odd pages, then reopen the dialog and print even pages, but this is very inconvenient, especially when I only want to print a certain page range of the document as the Mac dialog forgets my previous page range every time. It gets even more inconvenient, when printing 2-up double sided, or when changing additional settings for this one printout. Is there maybe some tool, that can do this? Or maybe a "virtual printer driver" that can sit somewhere between the dialog and the actual printer driver, which manages these steps? (The Windows tool http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FinePrint can do something like that, but I don't need all of its features - and I need it on Mac/Linux) Thanks, Chris

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  • Manual Duplex for Mac (and/or Linux)

    - by chris_l
    Hi, my printers don't support automatic duplex printing. I'm looking for a solution for my Mac (BTW, also for Linux) that I've seen with most Windows printer drivers: Check "Manual duplex" in the printer screen Printer starts printing one side A dialog appears, asking me to flip the pages Printer prints the other side. One thing I can do, is "print odd pages", then reopen the dialog and "print even pages", but this is very inconvenient, especially when I only want to print a certain page range of the document (the Mac dialog forgets my previous page range every time). It gets even more inconvenient, when printing 2-up double sided, or when changing additional settings for this one printout. So is there maybe some tool, that can do this? Or maybe a "virtual printer driver" that can sit somewhere between the dialog and the actual printer driver, which manages these steps? (The Windows tool http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FinePrint can do something like that, but I don't need all of its features - and I need it on Mac/Linux) Thanks, Chris

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  • Mac OS X duplex printing problem: one- vs. multi-paged documents

    - by Christian Lindig
    I like to print on pre-printed stationery using the Preview.app and a duplex-capable HP Color Laserjet 4700 (PostScript) printer. The print dialog handles one and two-paged documents differently: the paper needs to be placed differently into the tray if the document contains one page versus when it contains two pages. This is not obvious when printing on plain paper but becomes obvious when front and reverse side of sheets are marked. Otherwise the first page would end up on the reverse side of the first sheet. I believe the problem is caused by the printer driver setting duplex printing to false (using the PostScript setpagedevice operator) when emitting a single-page document versus keeping it set to true when emitting multi-page documents. All this despite that duplex printing is always specified in the printer dialog. When printing a single-sided document, duplex=true and duplex=false seem to make a difference with respect which side of a sheet gets printed on. It would be also helpful if others could confirm the problem actually exists. I suspect this problem is not limited to specific printers. I'm on OS X 10.6 and I checked two different HP printers.

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  • Are there any Multifunction printer/scanners with duplex and long document scanning?

    - by zimmer62
    Do any of the $200 or less multifunction printer / scanners support duplex scanning, and possibly long page scanning? Features I'm looking for in a scanner are: Duplex scanning (scan's both sides) ADF (Document feeder allowing a stack of documents) Long page scanning (legal documents or very long receipts) Good quality for pictures The printer side isn't as important, and in fact if there was a good scanner that did the above well I could do without the printer. I suppose $200 isn't a hard limit, just what I'm aiming for.

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  • Setting my NIC to full duplex

    - by David
    I am trying to optimize the network speed of my Solaris X86 server, and have discovered that the Cisco 3548 that it is connected to has issues with the NIC in my server. The NIC appears to have not been configured fully, and is coming up 100 half-duplex. The 3548 ports are all set to 100 full. Ideally I'd like to have the server set for 100 full, and have been attempting to configure it using ndd commands. However I have had no results. The following command: -bash-3.00# dladm show-dev rtls0 link: unknown speed: 100 Mbps duplex: unknown The NIC shows up as: pci bus 0x0001 cardnum 0x06 function 0x00: vendor 0x10ec device 0x8139 Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. RTL-8139/8139C/8139C+ which should be configurable. I have modified the configuration file from auto config (5) to 100 fdx (4) to no avail. If there is no other choice, I could alter the Cisco 3548 to be 100 half-duplex. However, this solution causes huge performance loss. Currently throughput is about 500Kbps, when it should be around 40Mbps.

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  • Why is the link between my switch and my router always negotiating half-duplex mode?

    - by Massimo
    I have a Cisco 2950 switch which has one of its ports connected to an Internet router provided by my ISP; I have no access to the router configuration, but I manage the switch. If I leave all switch ports with their default setup (auto-negotiation of speed and duplex mode), this link always connects at 100 MBit/s, but in half-duplex mode. I've tried replacing the cable, and also moving the link to another switch port: the result is always the same. A different device connected to the same port (or to any switch port, really) shows no problem at all. It could be guesed that someone configured the router to only connect in half-duplex mode... BUT, here's the catch: if I manually force the switch port to full-duplex mode (duplex full in the interface configuration), the link goes up, stays up and is completely stable. So: The connection is not forced to half-duplex mode by the router, otherwise it would not connect at all if I force the switch end to full-duplex. There is no actual link problem, otherwise the full-duplex connection would not go up or would at least show some errors. But if I leave the port free to auto-negotiate, it always connects in half-duplex mode. Why?

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  • WCF Duplex Interaction with Web Server

    - by Mark Struzinski
    Here is my scenario, and it is causing us a considerable amount of grief at the moment: We have a vendor web service which provides base level telephony functionality. This service has a SOAP api, which we are leveraging to build up a custom UI that is integrated into our in house web apps. The api functions on 2 levels. You make standard client calls into the service to initiate actions, such as Login, Place Call, Hang Up, etc. On a different thread, the service sends events back to the client to alert the user of things that are occurring on the system (agent successfully logged in, call was disconnected, etc). I implemented a WCF service to sit between the web server and the vendor service. This WCF service operates in duplex mode, establishing a 2 way connection with the web server. The web server makes outbound calls to the WCF service, which routes them to the vendor's web service. Events are received back to the WCF service, which passes them onto the web server via a callback channel on the WCF client. As events are received on the web server, they are placed into a hash table with the user's name as the key, and a .NET queue as the value to hold the event. Each event is enqueued to the agent who owns it. On a 2 second interval, the web page polls the web server via an ajax request to get new events for the logged in user. It hits the hash table for the user key, dequeues any events that are present, and serializes them back up to the web page. From there, they are processed in order and appropriate messages are displayed to the user. This implementation performs well in a single user scenario. The second I put more than 1 user on the system, I start getting frequent timeouts with the following CommunicationException: A connection attempt failed because the connected party did not properly respond after a period of time, or established connection failed because connected host has failed to respond We are running Windows Server 2008 R2 both servers. Both the web app and WCF service are running on .NET 3.5. The WCF service is running under the net.tcp protocol in duplex mode. The web app is ASP.NET MVC 2. Has anyone dealt with anything like this scenario? Is there a more efficient way (or a widely accepted pattern) to implement this?

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  • How to achieve maximum callback throughput with WCF duplex channels

    - by Schneider
    I have setup a basic WCF client/server which are communicating via Named pipes. It is a duplex contract with a callback. After the client "subscribes", a thread on the server just invokes the callback as quickly as possible. The problem is I am only getting a throughput of 1000 callbacks per second. And the payload is only an integer! I need to get closer to 10,000. Everything is essentially running with default settings. What can I look at to improve things, or should I just drop WCF for some other technology? Thanks

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  • WCF - calling back to client (duplex ?)

    - by MüllerDK
    Hi, I have a problem with what solution to choose.. I have a server running having a Service running that can receive orders from a website. To this server several client (remote computers) are connected somehow. I would really like to use WCF for all comunication, but not sure it's possible. I dont wanna configure all client firewall settings in their routers, so the clients would have to connect to the server. But when an order is recieved on the server, it should be transferred to a specific client. One solution could be to have the Client connect using a duplex binding, but it will have to somehow keep the connection alive in order to be able to received data from server... Is this a good way to do this ?? Normally the connection times out and probably for a good reason... Anyone have insight to this problem. Thx alot for any advise :-) Best Regards Søren Müller

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  • WCF service using duplex channel in different domains

    - by ds1
    I have a WCF service and a Windows client. They communicate via a Duplex WCF channel which when I run from within a single network domain runs fine, but when I put the server on a separate network domain I get the following message in the WCF server trace... The message with to 'net.tcp://abc:8731/ActiveAreaService/mex/mex' cannot be processed at the receiver, due to an AddressFilter mismatch at the EndpointDispatcher. Check that the sender and receiver's EndpointAddresses agree. So, it looks like the communication just work in one direction (from client to server) if the components are in two separate domains. The Network domains are fully trusted, so I'm a little confused as to what else could cause this? Server app.config <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?> <configuration> <system.serviceModel> <behaviors> <serviceBehaviors> <behavior name="JobController.ActiveAreaBehavior"> <serviceMetadata httpGetEnabled="false" /> <serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="true" /> </behavior> </serviceBehaviors> </behaviors> <services> <service behaviorConfiguration="JobController.ActiveAreaBehavior" name="JobController.ActiveAreaServer"> <endpoint address="mex" binding="mexTcpBinding" bindingConfiguration="" contract="IMetadataExchange" /> <host> <baseAddresses> <add baseAddress="net.tcp://SERVER:8731/ActiveAreaService/" /> </baseAddresses> </host> </service> </services> </system.serviceModel> </configuration> but I also add an end point programmatically in Visual C++ host = gcnew ServiceHost(ActiveAreaServer::typeid); NetTcpBinding^ binding = gcnew NetTcpBinding(); binding->MaxBufferSize = Int32::MaxValue; binding->MaxReceivedMessageSize = Int32::MaxValue; binding->ReceiveTimeout = TimeSpan::MaxValue; binding->Security->Mode = SecurityMode::Transport; binding->Security->Transport->ClientCredentialType = TcpClientCredentialType::Windows; ServiceEndpoint^ ep = host->AddServiceEndpoint(IActiveAreaServer::typeid, binding, String::Empty); // Use the base address Client app.config <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?> <configuration> <system.serviceModel> <bindings> <netTcpBinding> <binding name="NetTcpBinding_IActiveAreaServer" closeTimeout="00:01:00" openTimeout="00:01:00" receiveTimeout="00:10:00" sendTimeout="00:01:00" transactionFlow="false" transferMode="Buffered" transactionProtocol="OleTransactions" hostNameComparisonMode="StrongWildcard" listenBacklog="10" maxBufferPoolSize="524288" maxBufferSize="65536" maxConnections="10" maxReceivedMessageSize="65536"> <readerQuotas maxDepth="32" maxStringContentLength="8192" maxArrayLength="16384" maxBytesPerRead="4096" maxNameTableCharCount="16384" /> <reliableSession ordered="true" inactivityTimeout="00:10:00" enabled="false" /> <security mode="Transport"> <transport clientCredentialType="Windows" protectionLevel="EncryptAndSign" /> <message clientCredentialType="Windows" /> </security> </binding> </netTcpBinding> </bindings> <client> <endpoint address="net.tcp://SERVER:8731/ActiveAreaService/" binding="netTcpBinding" bindingConfiguration="NetTcpBinding_IActiveAreaServer" contract="ActiveArea.IActiveAreaServer" name="NetTcpBinding_IActiveAreaServer"> <identity> <userPrincipalName value="[email protected]" /> </identity> </endpoint> </client> </system.serviceModel> </configuration> Any help is appreciated! Cheers

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  • Duplex communication using NetTcpBinding - ContractFilter mismatch?

    - by Shaul
    I'm making slow and steady progress towards having a duplex communication channel open between a client and a server, using NetTcpBinding. (FYI, you can observe my newbie progress here and here!) I'm now at the stage where I have successfully connected to my server, through the server's firewall, and the client can make requests of the server. In the other direction, however, things aren't quite so happy. It works fine when testing on my own machine, but when testing over the internet, when I try to initiate a callback from the server side, I get an error: The message with Action 'http://MyWebService/IWebService/HelloWorld' cannot be processed at the receiver, due to a ContractFilter mismatch at the EndpointDispatcher. This may be because of either a contract mismatch (mismatched Actions between sender and receiver) or a binding/security mismatch between the sender and the receiver. Check that sender and receiver have the same contract and the same binding (including security requirements, e.g. Message, Transport, None). Here are some of the key bits of code. First, the web interface: [ServiceContract(Namespace = "http://MyWebService", SessionMode = SessionMode.Required, CallbackContract = typeof(ISiteServiceExternal))] public interface IWebService { [OperationContract] void Register(long customerID); } public interface ISiteServiceExternal { [OperationContract] string HelloWorld(); } Then, on the client side (I was fiddling with these attributes without really knowing what I'm doing): [ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode = InstanceContextMode.PerSession, Namespace="http://MyWebService")] class SiteServer : IWebServiceCallback { string IWebServiceCallback.HelloWorld() { return "Hello World!"; } ... } So what am I doing wrong here? EDIT: Adding app.config code. From server: <system.serviceModel> <diagnostics> <messageLogging logMalformedMessages="true" logMessagesAtServiceLevel="true" logMessagesAtTransportLevel="true" logEntireMessage="true" maxMessagesToLog="1000" maxSizeOfMessageToLog="524288" /> </diagnostics> <behaviors> <serviceBehaviors> <behavior name="mex"> <serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="true"/> <serviceMetadata/> </behavior> </serviceBehaviors> </behaviors> <services> <service name ="MyWebService.WebService" behaviorConfiguration="mex"> <endpoint address="net.tcp://localhost:8000" binding="netTcpBinding" contract="MyWebService.IWebService" bindingConfiguration="TestBinding" name="MyEndPoint"></endpoint> <endpoint address ="mex" binding="mexTcpBinding" name="MEX" contract="IMetadataExchange"/> <host> <baseAddresses> <add baseAddress="net.tcp://localhost:8000"/> </baseAddresses> </host> </service> </services> <bindings> <netTcpBinding> <binding name="TestBinding" maxBufferPoolSize="524288" maxReceivedMessageSize="65536" portSharingEnabled="false"> <readerQuotas maxDepth="32" maxStringContentLength ="8192" maxArrayLength ="16384" maxBytesPerRead="4096" maxNameTableCharCount="16384"/> <security mode="None"/> </binding> </netTcpBinding> </bindings> </system.serviceModel> and on the client side: <system.serviceModel> <bindings> <netTcpBinding> <binding name="MyEndPoint" closeTimeout="00:01:00" openTimeout="00:01:00" receiveTimeout="00:10:00" sendTimeout="00:01:00" transactionFlow="false" transferMode="Buffered" transactionProtocol="OleTransactions" hostNameComparisonMode="StrongWildcard" listenBacklog="10" maxBufferPoolSize="524288" maxBufferSize="65536" maxConnections="10" maxReceivedMessageSize="65536"> <readerQuotas maxDepth="32" maxStringContentLength="8192" maxArrayLength="16384" maxBytesPerRead="4096" maxNameTableCharCount="16384" /> <reliableSession ordered="true" inactivityTimeout="00:10:00" enabled="false" /> <security mode="None"> <transport clientCredentialType="Windows" protectionLevel="EncryptAndSign"> <extendedProtectionPolicy policyEnforcement="Never" /> </transport> <message clientCredentialType="Windows" /> </security> </binding> </netTcpBinding> </bindings> <client> <endpoint address="net.tcp://mydomain.gotdns.com:8000/" binding="netTcpBinding" bindingConfiguration="MyEndPoint" contract="IWebService" name="MyEndPoint" /> </client> </system.serviceModel>

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  • deadlock when using WCF Duplex Polling with Silverlight

    - by Kobi Hari
    Hi all. I have followed Tomek Janczuk's demonstration on silverlight tv to create a chat program that uses WCF Duplex Polling web service. The client subscribes to the server, and then the server initiates notifications to all connected clients to publish events. The Idea is simple, on the client, there is a button that allows the client to connect. A text box where the client can write a message and publish it, and a bigger text box that presents all the notifications received from the server. I connected 3 clients (in different browsers - IE, Firefox and Chrome) and it all works nicely. They send messages and receive them smoothly. The problem starts when I close one of the browsers. As soon as one client is out, the other clients get stuck. They stop getting notifications. I am guessing that the loop in the server that goes through all the clients and sends them the notifications is stuck on the client that is now missing. I tried catching the exception and removing it from the clients list (see code) but it still does not help. any ideas? The server code is as follows: using System; using System.Linq; using System.Runtime.Serialization; using System.ServiceModel; using System.ServiceModel.Activation; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Runtime.Remoting.Channels; namespace ChatDemo.Web { [ServiceContract] public interface IChatNotification { // this will be used as a callback method, therefore it must be one way [OperationContract(IsOneWay=true)] void Notify(string message); [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)] void Subscribed(); } // define this as a callback contract - to allow push [ServiceContract(Namespace="", CallbackContract=typeof(IChatNotification))] [AspNetCompatibilityRequirements(RequirementsMode = AspNetCompatibilityRequirementsMode.Allowed)] [ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode=InstanceContextMode.Single)] public class ChatService { SynchronizedCollection<IChatNotification> clients = new SynchronizedCollection<IChatNotification>(); [OperationContract(IsOneWay=true)] public void Subscribe() { IChatNotification cli = OperationContext.Current.GetCallbackChannel<IChatNotification>(); this.clients.Add(cli); // inform the client it is now subscribed cli.Subscribed(); Publish("New Client Connected: " + cli.GetHashCode()); } [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)] public void Publish(string message) { SynchronizedCollection<IChatNotification> toRemove = new SynchronizedCollection<IChatNotification>(); foreach (IChatNotification channel in this.clients) { try { channel.Notify(message); } catch { toRemove.Add(channel); } } // now remove all the dead channels foreach (IChatNotification chnl in toRemove) { this.clients.Remove(chnl); } } } } The client code is as follows: void client_NotifyReceived(object sender, ChatServiceProxy.NotifyReceivedEventArgs e) { this.Messages.Text += string.Format("{0}\n\n", e.Error != null ? e.Error.ToString() : e.message); } private void MyMessage_KeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e) { if (e.Key == Key.Enter) { this.client.PublishAsync(this.MyMessage.Text); this.MyMessage.Text = ""; } } private void Button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { this.client = new ChatServiceProxy.ChatServiceClient(new PollingDuplexHttpBinding { DuplexMode = PollingDuplexMode.MultipleMessagesPerPoll }, new EndpointAddress("../ChatService.svc")); // listen for server events this.client.NotifyReceived += new EventHandler<ChatServiceProxy.NotifyReceivedEventArgs>(client_NotifyReceived); this.client.SubscribedReceived += new EventHandler<System.ComponentModel.AsyncCompletedEventArgs>(client_SubscribedReceived); // subscribe for the server events this.client.SubscribeAsync(); } void client_SubscribedReceived(object sender, System.ComponentModel.AsyncCompletedEventArgs e) { try { Messages.Text += "Connected!\n\n"; gsConnect.Color = Colors.Green; } catch { Messages.Text += "Failed to Connect!\n\n"; } } And the web config is as follows: <system.serviceModel> <extensions> <bindingExtensions> <add name="pollingDuplex" type="System.ServiceModel.Configuration.PollingDuplexHttpBindingCollectionElement, System.ServiceModel.PollingDuplex, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35"/> </bindingExtensions> </extensions> <behaviors> <serviceBehaviors> <behavior name=""> <serviceMetadata httpGetEnabled="true"/> <serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="false"/> </behavior> </serviceBehaviors> </behaviors> <bindings> <pollingDuplex> <binding name="myPollingDuplex" duplexMode="MultipleMessagesPerPoll"/> </pollingDuplex> </bindings> <serviceHostingEnvironment aspNetCompatibilityEnabled="true" multipleSiteBindingsEnabled="true"/> <services> <service name="ChatDemo.Web.ChatService"> <endpoint address="" binding="pollingDuplex" bindingConfiguration="myPollingDuplex" contract="ChatDemo.Web.ChatService"/> <endpoint address="mex" binding="mexHttpBinding" contract="IMetadataExchange"/> </service> </services> </system.serviceModel>

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  • WCF Duplex net.tcp issues on win7

    - by Tom
    We have a WCF service with multiple clients to schedule operations amongst clients. It worked great on XP. Moving to win7, I can only connect a client to the server on the same machine. At this point, I'm thinking it's something to do with IPv6, but I'm stumped as to how to proceed. Client trying to connect to a remote server gives the following exception: System.ServiceModel.EndpointNotFoundException: Could not connect to net.tcp://10.7.11.14:18297/zetec/Service/SchedulerService/Scheduler. The connection attempt lasted for a time span of 00:00:21.0042014. TCP error code 10060: A connection attempt failed because the connected party did not properly respond after a period of time, or established connection failed because connected host has failed to respond 10.7.11.14:18297. --- System.Net.Sockets.SocketException: A connection attempt failed because the connected party did not properly respond after a period of time, or established connection failed because connected host has failed to respond 10.7.11.14:18297 The service is configured like so: <system.serviceModel> <services> <service name="SchedulerService" behaviorConfiguration="SchedulerServiceBehavior"> <host> <baseAddresses> <add baseAddress="net.tcp://localhost/zetec/Service/SchedulerService"/> </baseAddresses> </host> <endpoint address="net.tcp://localhost:18297/zetec/Service/SchedulerService/Scheduler" binding="netTcpBinding" bindingConfiguration = "ConfigBindingNetTcp" contract="IScheduler" /> <endpoint address="net.tcp://localhost:18297/zetec/Service/SchedulerService/Scheduler" binding="netTcpBinding" bindingConfiguration = "ConfigBindingNetTcp" contract="IProcessingNodeControl" /> </service> </services> <bindings> <netTcpBinding> <binding name = "ConfigBindingNetTcp" portSharingEnabled="True"> <security mode="None"/> </binding> </netTcpBinding > </bindings> <behaviors> <serviceBehaviors> <behavior name="SchedulerServiceBehavior"> <serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="true" /> <serviceThrottling maxConcurrentSessions="100"/> </behavior> </serviceBehaviors> </behaviors> </system.serviceModel> I've checked my firewall about a dozen times, but I guess there could be something I'm missing. Tried disabling windows firewall. I tried changing localhost to my ipv4 address to try to keep away from ipv6, I've tried removing any anti-ipv6 code.

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  • Can AVAudioSession do full duplex?

    - by Eric Christensen
    It would seem like it should be able to, but the following breakout test code can't do both: //play a file: NSArray *pathsArray = NSSearchPathForDirectoriesInDomains(NSDocumentDirectory, NSUserDomainMask, YES); NSString *documentsDirectory = [pathsArray objectAtIndex:0]; NSString* playFilePath=[documentsDirectory stringByAppendingPathComponent:@"testplayfile.wav"]; AVAudioPlayer *tempplayer = [[AVAudioPlayer alloc] initWithContentsOfURL:[NSURL fileURLWithPath:playFilePath] error:nil]; [tempplayer prepareToPlay]; [tempplayer play]; //and record a file: NSString* recFilePath=[documentsDirectory stringByAppendingPathComponent:@"testrecordfile.wav"]; AVAudioRecording *soundrecording = [[AVAudioRecorder alloc] initWithURL:[NSURL fileURLWithPath:recFilePath] settings:nil error:nil]; [soundrecording prepareToRecord]; [soundrecording record]; This is the minimum I can think of to individually play one file and record another. And this works just fine in the simulator. I can play back a file and record at the same time. But it doesn't work on the iphone itself. If I comment out either function, the other performs fine. The playback plays fine either alone or with both, if it's first. If I comment out the playback, the record records fine. (There's additional code to stop the recording not shown here.) So each works fine, but not together. I know audioQueue has a setting to allow both, but I don't see an analogue for AVAudioSessions. Any idea if it's possible, and if so, what I need to add? Thanks!

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  • Duplex Contract GetCallbackChannel always returns a null-instance

    - by Yaroslav
    Hi! Here is the server code: using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using System.ServiceModel; using System.Runtime.Serialization; using System.ServiceModel.Description; namespace Console_Chat { [ServiceContract(SessionMode = SessionMode.Required, CallbackContract = typeof(IMyCallbackContract))] public interface IMyService { [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)] void NewMessageToServer(string msg); [OperationContract(IsOneWay = false)] bool ServerIsResponsible(); } [ServiceContract] public interface IMyCallbackContract { [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)] void NewMessageToClient(string msg); [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)] void ClientIsResponsible(); } [ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode = InstanceContextMode.PerSession)] public class MyService : IMyService { public IMyCallbackContract callback = null; /* { get { return OperationContext.Current.GetCallbackChannel<IMyCallbackContract>(); } } */ public MyService() { callback = OperationContext.Current.GetCallbackChannel<IMyCallbackContract>(); } public void NewMessageToServer(string msg) { Console.WriteLine(msg); } public void NewMessageToClient( string msg) { callback.NewMessageToClient(msg); } public bool ServerIsResponsible() { return true; } } class Server { static void Main(string[] args) { String msg = "none"; ServiceMetadataBehavior behavior = new ServiceMetadataBehavior(); ServiceHost serviceHost = new ServiceHost( typeof(MyService), new Uri("http://localhost:8080/")); serviceHost.Description.Behaviors.Add(behavior); serviceHost.AddServiceEndpoint( typeof(IMetadataExchange), MetadataExchangeBindings.CreateMexHttpBinding(), "mex"); serviceHost.AddServiceEndpoint( typeof(IMyService), new WSDualHttpBinding(), "ServiceEndpoint" ); serviceHost.Open(); Console.WriteLine("Server is up and running"); MyService server = new MyService(); server.NewMessageToClient("Hey client!"); /* do { msg = Console.ReadLine(); // callback.NewMessageToClient(msg); } while (msg != "ex"); */ Console.ReadLine(); } } } Here is the client's: using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using System.ServiceModel; using System.Runtime.Serialization; using System.ServiceModel.Description; using Console_Chat_Client.MyHTTPServiceReference; namespace Console_Chat_Client { [ServiceContract(SessionMode = SessionMode.Required, CallbackContract = typeof(IMyCallbackContract))] public interface IMyService { [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)] void NewMessageToServer(string msg); [OperationContract(IsOneWay = false)] bool ServerIsResponsible(); } [ServiceContract] public interface IMyCallbackContract { [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)] void NewMessageToClient(string msg); [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)] void ClientIsResponsible(); } public class MyCallback : Console_Chat_Client.MyHTTPServiceReference.IMyServiceCallback { static InstanceContext ctx = new InstanceContext(new MyCallback()); static MyServiceClient client = new MyServiceClient(ctx); public void NewMessageToClient(string msg) { Console.WriteLine(msg); } public void ClientIsResponsible() { } class Client { static void Main(string[] args) { String msg = "none"; client.NewMessageToServer(String.Format("Hello server!")); do { msg = Console.ReadLine(); if (msg != "ex") client.NewMessageToServer(msg); else client.NewMessageToServer(String.Format("Client terminated")); } while (msg != "ex"); } } } } callback = OperationContext.Current.GetCallbackChannel(); This line constanly throws a NullReferenceException, what's the problem? Thanks!

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  • Xaml parse exception is thrown when i define a duplex contract

    - by Yaroslav
    Hi! I've got a WPF application containing a WCF service. The Xaml code is pretty simple: Enter your text here Send Address: Here is the service: namespace WpfApplication1 { [ServiceContract(CallbackContract=typeof(IMyCallbackContract))] public interface IMyService { [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)] void NewMessageToServer(string msg); [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)] bool ServerIsResponsible(); } [ServiceContract] public interface IMyCallbackContract { [OperationContract] void NewMessageToClient(string msg); [OperationContract] void ClientIsResponsible(); } /// <summary> /// Interaction logic for Window1.xaml /// </summary> public partial class Window1 : Window { public Window1() { InitializeComponent(); ServiceMetadataBehavior behavior = new ServiceMetadataBehavior(); //behavior.HttpGetEnabled = true; //behavior. ServiceHost serviceHost = new ServiceHost( typeof(MyService), new Uri("net.tcp://localhost:8080/")); serviceHost.Description.Behaviors.Add(behavior); serviceHost.AddServiceEndpoint( typeof(IMetadataExchange), MetadataExchangeBindings.CreateMexTcpBinding(), "mex"); serviceHost.AddServiceEndpoint( typeof(IMyService), new NetTcpBinding(), "ServiceEndpoint"); serviceHost.Open(); MessageBox.Show( "server is up"); // label1.Content = label1.Content + String.Format(" net.tcp://localhost:8080/"); } } public class MyService : IMyService { public void NewMessageToServer(string msg) { } public bool ServerIsResponsible() { return true; } } } I am getting a Xaml parse exception in Line 1, what can be the problem? Thanks!

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  • full duplex communication over the web w/o flash sockets

    - by aharon
    A web application I'm helping to develop is faced with a well-known problem: we want to be able to let users know of various events and so forth that can occur at any time, essentially at random, and update their view accordingly. Essentially, we need to allow the server to push requests to individual clients, as opposed to the client asking the server. I understand that WebSockets are an effort to address the problem; however, after a bit of looking around into them, I understand that a) very few web browsers currently offer native websocket support; b) to get around this, you either use flash sockets or some sort of AJAX long-polling; c) a special websockets server must be used. Now, we want to offer our service without Flash. And any sort of servers must have some sort of load-balancing capabilities, or at least some software that can do load balancing for them. As of 2008, everyone was saying that Comet-based solutions (e.g., Bayeux) were the way to go for these sort of situations. However, the various protocols seem to have not had much work put into them since then—which leads (finally) to the question. Is Bayeux-flavored Comet still the right tool for jobs like this? If not, what is?

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  • Printing in booklet fomat

    - by To Do
    In the past I had a printer that had the booklet format option that would print the document two pages at a time ordered in a way that folding the whole printout would produce a booklet which could be stapled in the middle. My current printer does not support this feature. I would like to use some utility or script to convert an A4 pdf to an A5 booklet one. I found this page but I'm getting an error : pdfjam ERROR: can't find pdflatex! How do I get past this issue? Does anybody know of any other solution? I'm on Ubuntu 12.10 AMD64

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  • Download - Upload is too slow on Centos

    - by Mehdi
    My download/upload in server and out of server is too slow (around 50 KB/s !) ! Did I miss some configuration ? Some information: CentOS release 6.3 uptime load average: 0.17, 0.32, 0.37 Memory free -m total used free shared buffers cached Mem: 24009 21988 2021 0 806 18098 -/+ buffers/cache: 3083 20926 Swap: 4095 28 4067 lshw -C network *-network description: Ethernet interface product: 82574L Gigabit Network Connection vendor: Intel Corporation physical id: 0 bus info: [email protected]:02:00.0 logical name: eth0 version: 00 serial: 00:25:90:70:17:4a size: 100MB/s capacity: 1GB/s width: 32 bits clock: 33MHz capabilities: pm msi pciexpress msix bus_master cap_list ethernet physical tp 10bt 10bt-fd 100bt 100bt-fd 1000bt-fd autonegotiation configuration: autonegotiation=off broadcast=yes driver=e1000e driverversion=1.9.5-k duplex=full firmware=2.1-2 ip=108.175.8.123 latency=0 link=yes multicast=yes port=twisted pair speed=100MB/s resources: irq:16 memory:fb900000-fb91ffff ioport:e000(size=32) memory:fb920000-fb923fff ethtool ethtool eth0 Settings for eth0: Supported ports: [ TP ] Supported link modes: 10baseT/Half 10baseT/Full 100baseT/Half 100baseT/Full 1000baseT/Full Supports auto-negotiation: Yes Advertised link modes: Not reported Advertised pause frame use: No Advertised auto-negotiation: No Speed: 100Mb/s Duplex: Full Port: Twisted Pair PHYAD: 1 Transceiver: internal Auto-negotiation: off MDI-X: off Supports Wake-on: pumbg Wake-on: g Current message level: 0x00000001 (1) Link detected: yes dmesg |grep e1000e dmesg |grep e1000e e1000e: Intel(R) PRO/1000 Network Driver - 1.9.5-k e1000e: Copyright(c) 1999 - 2012 Intel Corporation. e1000e 0000:02:00.0: Disabling ASPM L0s e1000e 0000:02:00.0: PCI INT A -> GSI 16 (level, low) -> IRQ 16 e1000e 0000:02:00.0: setting latency timer to 64 e1000e 0000:02:00.0: irq 33 for MSI/MSI-X e1000e 0000:02:00.0: irq 34 for MSI/MSI-X e1000e 0000:02:00.0: irq 35 for MSI/MSI-X e1000e 0000:02:00.0: eth0: (PCI Express:2.5GT/s:Width x1) 00:25:90:70:17:4a e1000e 0000:02:00.0: eth0: Intel(R) PRO/1000 Network Connection e1000e 0000:02:00.0: eth0: MAC: 3, PHY: 8, PBA No: FFFFFF-0FF e1000e: eth0 NIC Link is Up 100 Mbps Full Duplex, Flow Control: None e1000e 0000:02:00.0: eth0: 10/100 speed: disabling TSO e1000e: eth0 NIC Link is Up 100 Mbps Full Duplex, Flow Control: None e1000e 0000:02:00.0: eth0: 10/100 speed: disabling TSO e1000e: eth0 NIC Link is Up 100 Mbps Full Duplex, Flow Control: None e1000e 0000:02:00.0: eth0: 10/100 speed: disabling TSO e1000e: eth0 NIC Link is Up 100 Mbps Full Duplex, Flow Control: None e1000e: eth0 NIC Link is Up 100 Mbps Full Duplex, Flow Control: None e1000e 0000:02:00.0: eth0: 10/100 speed: disabling TSO e1000e 0000:02:00.0: eth0: 10/100 speed: disabling TSO e1000e 0000:02:00.0: eth0: Unsupported Speed/Duplex configuration e1000e: eth0 NIC Link is Up 10 Mbps Full Duplex, Flow Control: None e1000e 0000:02:00.0: eth0: 10/100 speed: disabling TSO e1000e: eth0 NIC Link is Up 100 Mbps Full Duplex, Flow Control: None e1000e 0000:02:00.0: eth0: 10/100 speed: disabling TSO e1000e: eth0 NIC Link is Up 100 Mbps Full Duplex, Flow Control: None e1000e 0000:02:00.0: eth0: 10/100 speed: disabling TSO e1000e 0000:02:00.0: Disabling ASPM L1 e1000e 0000:02:00.0: eth0: changing MTU from 1500 to 9000 e1000e: eth0 NIC Link is Up 100 Mbps Full Duplex, Flow Control: None e1000e 0000:02:00.0: eth0: 10/100 speed: disabling TSO e1000e: eth0 NIC Link is Up 100 Mbps Full Duplex, Flow Control: None e1000e 0000:02:00.0: eth0: 10/100 speed: disabling TSO e1000e: eth0 NIC Link is Up 100 Mbps Full Duplex, Flow Control: None e1000e 0000:02:00.0: eth0: 10/100 speed: disabling TSO

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