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  • SCCM Report to identify machines with 64-bit capable hardware

    - by GAThrawn
    Currently looking at deployment options for Windows 7. One of the questions we're looking into is 32 bit vs 63 bit. I'm trying to run a SCCM report against our estate to identify which machines are 64-bit capable (whether or not they're currently running a 64-bit OS). There seem to be a few resources out on the net for this (here, here and here) but none of them seem to work right on machines running 32-bit Windows XP. 32-bit XP machines seem to always report that they're running on 32-bit hardware. The query I'm currently running is: select sys.netbios_name0, sys.Operating_System_Name_and0 as OperatingSystem, case when pr.addresswidth0=64 then '64bit OS' when pr.addresswidth0=32 then '32bit OS' end as [Operating System Type], case when pr.DataWidth0=64 then '64bit Processor' when pr.DataWidth0=32 then '32bit Processor' end as [Processor Type], case when pr.addresswidth0=32 and pr.DataWidth0=64 then 'YES' end as [32-bit OS on x64 processor] from v_r_system sys join v_gs_processor pr on sys.resourceid=pr.resourceid I've also tried this, which reports all "Windows XP Professional" systems are on "X86-based PC", not x64 based even though a number of them definitely are: select OS.Caption0, CS.SystemType0, Count(*) from dbo.v_GS_COMPUTER_SYSTEM CS Left Outer Join dbo.v_GS_OPERATING_SYSTEM OS on CS.ResourceID = OS.ResourceId Group by OS.Caption0, CS.SystemType0 Order by OS.Caption0, CS.SystemType0 For instance we have a set of Dell Latitude E4200 laptops. Some of these are running 32-bit Windows XP SP3, some of them are running 32-bit Windows 7, some are running 64-bit Windows 7. All the laptops are identical, having come from the same order. Out of these the Windows 7 (32 and 64-bit) report that the hardware is 64-bit capable, and the Windows XP machines report that they're only 32-bit capable. Does anyone know if there's another value I can query to get the hardware's capabilities correctly on XP, or is there a hotfix that will get it reporting the correct info?

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  • Server with IIS and Apache - how to SSL encrypt Apache with IIS

    - by GAThrawn
    I have a Windows Server 2003 box already setup and working with IIS 6. IIS is set to serve a site out over both HTTP and HTTPS connections using default ports. For various reasons I need to set Apache up on the same server and it needs to serve its pages to end-users as SSL encrypted HTTPS pages. Neither IIS or Apache are (or are ever likely to be) particularly high traffic or high usage. The way I see it there are two possible ways this could be done. Either export the SSL cert from IIS,set it up in Apache and get Apache to server the HTTPS connections itself over a non-default port. Or use IIS to proxy Apache in some way over it's existing SSL security. What is going to end up easiest to setup, configure, maintain and run? Which is going to work best? Has anyone done this sort of thing before? Any tips or things to look out for?

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  • App-V Problems After SCCM 2007 SP2 Upgrade

    - by GAThrawn
    We're running an SCCM (MS System Centre Config Manager, successor to SMS) 2007 environment and delivering a number of applications to clients virtualized using App-V 4.5.1. The App-V apps are delivered by SCCM in Download-and-Execute, not streaming mode. The SCCM environment was recently service packed to SCCM 2007 SP2 (amongst other things this gives Win7 support). We also pushed out the updated SCCM clients to our workstations. This seems to have broken file associations for virtual apps for a large number of our users. The users can still open their App-V apps by finding the specific app on their Start Menu and clicking it's icon, but double-clicking an associated file in Explorer, or opening an email attachment gives the "This action is only valid for installed applications" error. There is a Technet blog entry from the App-V team talking about this issue "Upgrade to ConfigMgr 2007 SP2 may break App-V File Type Associations" but running the script there comes back saying "The User Interface option has been updated" but hasn't seemed to fix the problems for any of our users. Unfortunately the Technet blogs don't seem to have comments switched on so you can't see how this has worked out for other people. Anyone else had this problem, have you found any other way to fix it?

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  • Windows XP mounting USB drive to same letter as previously mapped network drive

    - by GAThrawn
    Why does Windows always mount a USB drive as the next drive letter after the last physical drive, even when that letter is already taken by a mapped drive, and is there any way to improve this behaviour? What happens is I tend to use a few different flash drives on my PC, as well as having both a Blackberry and a personal phone that mount as USB drives when I plug them in to charge. Being on a corporate PC I also have a number of mapped network drives (some set by login script, some set as persistent mappings in my profile). When I first login I'll have drive letters like this: C: - Local Drive D: - DVD Drive G: - Login script mapped drive J: - Login script mapped drive When I plug the Blackberry in it'll mount two drives (one for onboard storage, one for the SD card) as E: and F:. If I then plug in another USB drive it will mount as G:, even though that's already taken by a network mapped drive. This leaves me with the following drives: C: - Local Drive D: - DVD Drive E: - USB drive (Blackberry) F: - USB drive (Blackberry) G: - Login script mapped drive [G: - USB drive - mounted but not visible in Explorer or command prompt] J: - Login script mapped drive I then have to go into Disk Management, find the new USB drive that's mounted to G: and re-assign it to another letter eg Z:, once this is done Auto-Play detects it and throws up its normal dialog, and its browseable in Explorer. While this is OK to do if you only use one or two USB drives and have admin access to your PC with your login account, its a total pain in the proverbial if you regularly use a whole load of different USB devices, and corporate policy means you have one account for your normal login (that only has User access to workstations), but have to use a different account for any privileged action. I realize that one possible reason for this is the difference between hardware which is mounted and assigned drive letters at the systen level, and mapped drives which are done at the user level. For USB devices that are already plugged in before login, then obviously they're mounted before Windows knows what network drives may be mapped. However if you plug the USB devices in after you're fully logged in and have drives mapped then Windows must know which letters are available?

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