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  • Chalk Talk, Glenn Block – Leith, Edinburgh 12th March 2011

    - by David Christiansen
    Exciting news. I am proud to announce that Glenn Block from Microsoft  will be coming all the way from Seattle to Scotland on the 12th March to talk to you!. Glenn is a PM on the WCF team working on Microsoft’s future HTTP and REST stack and has been involved in some pretty exciting and ground-breaking Microsoft development mind-shifts in recent times. Don’t miss the chance to hear him speak and ask him questions. Brief history of Glenn Prior to WCF he was a PM on the new Managed Extensibility Framework in .NET 4.0. Glenn has a breadth of experience both inside and outside Microsoft developing software solutions for ISVs and the enterprise. Glenn has also been very active in involving folks from the community in the development of software at Microsoft. This has included shipping several products under open source licenses, as well as assisting other teams looking to do so. Glenn is also a frequent speaker at local and international events and user groups.  When he's not working and playing with technology, he spends his time with his wife and daughter either at their home in Seattle or at one of the local coffee shops. Glenn Block on the web mvcConf 2 - Glenn Block: Take some REST with WCF (Feb 2011) @gblock on twitter My Technobabble - Glenn’s Blog Sponsored by Storm ID is an award winning full service digital agency in Edinburgh

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  • SQL SERVER – Guest Post – Glenn Berry – Wait Type – Day 26 of 28

    - by pinaldave
    Glenn Berry works as a Database Architect at NewsGator Technologies in Denver, CO. He is a SQL Server MVP, and has a whole collection of Microsoft certifications, including MCITP, MCDBA, MCSE, MCSD, MCAD, and MCTS. He is also an Adjunct Faculty member at University College – University of Denver, where he has been teaching since 2000. He is one wonderful blogger and often blogs at here. I am big fan of the Dynamic Management Views (DMV) scripts of Glenn. His script are extremely popular and the reality is that he has inspired me to start this series with his famous DMV which I have mentioned in very first  wait stats blog post (I had forgot to request his permission to re-use the script but when asked later on his whole hearty approved it). Here is is his excellent blog post on this subject of wait stats: Analyzing cumulative wait stats in SQL Server 2005 and above has become a popular and effective technique for diagnosing performance issues and further focusing your troubleshooting and diagnostic  efforts.  Rather than just guessing about what resource(s) that SQL Server is waiting on, you can actually find out by running a relatively simple DMV query. Once you know what resources that SQL Server is spending the most time waiting on, you can run more specific queries that focus on that resource to get a better idea what is causing the problem. I do want to throw out a few caveats about using wait stats as a diagnostic tool. First, they are most useful when your SQL Server instance is experiencing performance problems. If your instance is running well, with no indication of any resource pressure from other sources, then you should not worry that much about what the top wait types are. SQL Server will always be waiting on some resource, but many wait types are quite benign, and can be safely ignored. In spite of this, I quite often see experienced DBAs obsessing over the top wait type, even when their SQL Server instance is running extremely well. Second, I often see DBAs jump to the wrong conclusion based on seeing a particular well-known wait type. A good example is CXPACKET waits. People typically jump to the conclusion that high CXPACKET waits means that they should immediately change their instance-level MADOP setting to 1. This is not always the best solution. You need to consider your workload type, and look carefully for any important “missing” indexes that might be causing the query optimizer to use a parallel plan to compensate for the missing index. In this case, correcting the index problem is usually a better solution than changing MAXDOP, since you are curing the disease rather than just treating the symptom. Finally, you should get in the habit of clearing out your cumulative wait stats with the  DBCC SQLPERF(‘sys.dm_os_wait_stats’, CLEAR); command. This is especially important if you have made an configuration or index changes, or if your workload has changed recently. Otherwise, your cumulative wait stats will be polluted with the old stats from weeks or months ago (since the last time SQL Server was started or the stats were cleared).  If you make a change to your SQL Server instance, or add an index, you should clear out your wait stats, and then wait a while to see what your new top wait stats are. At any rate, enjoy Pinal Dave’s series on Wait Stats. This blog post has been written by Glenn Berry (Twitter | Blog) Read all the post in the Wait Types and Queue series. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, Readers Contribution, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQL Wait Stats, SQL Wait Types, T SQL, Technology

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  • Glenn Fiedler's fixed timestep with fake threads

    - by kaoD
    I've implemented Glenn Fiedler's Fix Your Timestep! quite a few times in single-threaded games. Now I'm facing a different situation: I'm trying to do this in JavaScript. I know JS is single-threaded, but I plan on using requestAnimationFrame for the rendering part. This leaves me with two independent fake threads: simulation and rendering (I suppose requestAnimationFrame isn't really threaded, is it? I don't think so, it would BREAK JS.) Timing in these threads is independent too: dt for simulation and render is not the same. If I'm not mistaken, simulation should be up to Fiedler's while loop end. After the while loop, accumulator < dt so I'm left with some unspent time (dt) in the simulation thread. The problem comes in the draw/interpolation phase: const double alpha = accumulator / dt; State state = currentState*alpha + previousState * ( 1.0 - alpha ); render( state ); In my render callback, I have the current timestamp to which I can subtract the last-simulated-in-physics-timestamp to have a dt for the current frame. Should I just forget about this dt and draw using the physics thread's dt? It seems weird, since, well, I want to interpolate for the unspent time between simulation and render too, right? Of course, I want simulation and rendering to be completely independent, but I can't get around the fact that in Glenn's implementation the renderer produces time and the simulation consumes it in discrete dt sized chunks. A similar question was asked in Semi Fixed-timestep ported to javascript but the question doesn't really get to the point, and answers there point to removing physics from the render thread (which is what I'm trying to do) or just keeping physics in the render callback too (which is what I'm trying to avoid.)

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  • Twitter Integration in Windows 8

    - by Joe Mayo
    Glenn Versweyveld, @Depechie, blogged about Twitter Integration in Windows 8. The post describes how to use WinRtAuthorizer to perform OAuth authentication with LINQ to Twitter. If you’re using LINQ to Twitter with Windows 8, the WinRtAuthorizer is definitely the way to go. It lets you perform the entire OAuth dance with a single method call, which is a huge time savings and simplification of your code. In addition to Glenn’s excellent post, I’ve posted a sample app named MetroWinRtAuthorizerDemo.zip on the LINQ to Twitter Samples Page. @JoeMayo

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  • Importing Variables from PHP 4 into Flash

    - by Glenn
    I'm trying to get variable importing from a PHP script before I implement it into a larger project. So far all I've gotten is headaches. //this is all thats in test.php other than the open and close brackets. Normally I'd have it doing a mysql_query and putting useful information into the print statement. print( "lamegame.net/test/test.php?val=foo&id=0000&name=Glenn"); All test.as has to do is access the three variables. The problem comes in that 'val' is undefined. The id and name variables however are just fine and return 0000 and Glenn respectively. package { import flash.display.MovieClip; import flash.text.TextField; import flash.events.; import flash.net.; public class test extends MovieClip { public function test() { super(); //prep request var request:URLRequest = new URLRequest("test.php"); request.method = URLRequestMethod.GET; var loader:URLLoader = new URLLoader(); //load request loader.dataFormat = URLLoaderDataFormat.VARIABLES; loader.addEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, dataLoaded); loader.load(request); } public function dataLoaded(e:Event):void { var name = e.target.data.name; var id = e.target.data.id; var val = e.target.data.val; trace("Val: " + val + "ID: " + id + " Name: " + name); } } }

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  • My .htaccess file re-directed problems?

    - by Glenn Curtis
    I am hoping you can help me! Below is my .htaccess files for my Apache server running on top of Ubuntu server. This is my local server which I installed so I can develop my site on this instead of using my live site! However i have all my files and the database on my localhost now but each time I access my server, vaio-server (its a sony laptop), it just takes me to my live site! Now eveything is in the root of Apache, /var/www - its the only site I will develop on this system so I don't need to config this to look at any many than this one site! I think thats all, all the Apache files, site-available/default ect are as standard. - Please Help!! Many Thanks Glenn Curtis. DirectoryIndex index.php index.html # Upload sizes php_value upload_max_filesize 25M php_value post_max_size 25M # Avoid folder listings Options -Indexes <IfModule mod_rewrite.c> Options +FollowSymlinks RewriteEngine on RewriteBase / # Maintenance #RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !/maintenance.html$ #RewriteRule $ /maintenance.html [R=302,L] #Redirects to www #RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !^vaio-server [NC] #RewriteCond %{HTTPS}s ^on(s)|off #RewriteRule ^(.*)$ glenns-showcase.net/$1 [R=301,QSA,L] #Empty string RewriteRule ^$ app/webroot/ [L] RewriteRule (.*) app/webroot/$1 [L] </IfModule>

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  • An Open Letter from Lyle Ekdahl, Group Vice President and General Manager, Oracle's JD Edwards

    - by Brian Dayton
    From Lyle Ekdahl, Group Vice President and General Manager, Oracle's JD Edwards As you may have heard, we recently announced some changes to the way Oracle will offer licensing of technology products with JD Edwards EnterpriseOne. Specifically, we have withdrawn from new sales the product known as JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Technology Foundation ("Blue Stack"). Our motivation for this change is simply to streamline licensing for our customers. Going forward, customers will license Oracle products from Oracle and IBM products from IBM. Customers who are currently licensed for Technology Foundation will continue to receive support--unchanged--through September 30, 2016. This announcement affects how customers license these IBM products; it does not affect Oracle's certification roadmap for IBM products with JD Edwards EnterpriseOne. Customers who are currently running their JD Edwards EnterpriseOne infrastructure using IBM platform components can continue to do so regardless of whether they license these components via Technology Foundation or directly from IBM. New customers choosing to run JD Edwards EnterpriseOne on IBM technology should license JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Core Tools from Oracle while licensing Infrastructure and any licenses of IBM products from IBM. For more information about this announcement, customers should refer to My Oracle Support article 1232453.1 Questions included in the "Frequently Asked Questions" document on My Oracle Support: Is Oracle dropping support for IBM DB2 and IBM WebSphere with JD Edwards EnterpriseOne? No. This announcement affects how customers license these IBM products; it does not affect Oracle's certification roadmap for these products. The JD Edwards EnterpriseOne matrix of supported databases, web servers, and portals remains unchanged, including planned support for IBM DB2, IBM WebSphere Application Server, and IBM WebSphere Portal. Customers who are currently running their JD Edwards EnterpriseOne infrastructure using IBM platform components can continue to do so regardless of whether they license these components via Technology Foundation or directly from IBM. As always, the timing and versions of such third-party certifications remain at Oracle's discretion. Does this announcement mean that Oracle is withdrawing support for JD Edwards EnterpriseOne on the IBM i platform? Absolutely not. JD Edwards EnterpriseOne support on the IBM i platform remains unchanged. This announcement simply states that customers will acquire Oracle products from Oracle and IBM products from IBM. In fact, as evidenced by the recent "IBM i Solution Edition for JD Edwards" offering, IBM and the JD Edwards product teams continue to innovate and offer attractive, cost-competitive solutions to the ERP marketplace. For more information about this offering see: http://www-03.ibm.com/systems/i/advantages/oracle/. I hope this clarifies any concerns. Let me know if you have any additional questions or concerns. -Lyle

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  • If You Could Cut Your Meeting Times in ½ Would You?

    - by Brian Dayton
                    I know it sounds like a big promise. And what I'm thinking about may not cut a :60 minute meeting into :30 minutes, but it could make meetings and interactions up to 2X more productive. How? Social Media for the Enterprise, Not Social Media In the Enterprise Bear with me. I'm not talking about whether or not workers should or shouldn't have access to Facebook on corporate networks. That topic has been discussed @ length. I'm also not talking about the direct benefits of Social Networking tools like Presence (the ability to see someone online and ask a question in real-time), blogs, RSS feeds or external tools like Twitter. The Un-Measurable Benefits Would you do something that you believe will have a positive effect--but can't be measured? It's impossible to quantify the effectiveness of a meeting. However, what I am talking about would be more of a byproduct of all of the social networking tools above. Here's the hypothesis: As I've gotten more and more busy with work, family, travel and kids--and the same has happened to my friends and family--I'm less and less connected. But by introducing Facebook to my life I've not only made connections with longtime friends whom I haven't spoken to in years--but I've increased the pace and quality of interactions, on and offline, with close friends who I see and speak to every week. In some cases it even enhances the connections and interactions with those I see or speak to every day. The same holds true in an organization. Especially a larger one with highly matrixed organizational structures. You work with people on a project, new people come in with each different project and a disproportionate amount of time is spent getting oriented and staying current. Going back to the initial value proposition--making meetings shorter/more effective--a large amount of time is spent: -          At Project Kick-off: Meeting and understanding team member's histories, goals & roles -          Ongoing: Summarizing events since the last meeting or update email In my personal, Facebook life today I know that: -          My best friend from college - has been stranded in India for 5 days because of the volcano in Iceland and is now only 250 miles from home -          One of my co-workers started conference calls at 6:30 this morning -          My wife wasn't terribly pleased with my painting skills in our new bathroom (disclosure: she told me this face to face too) Strengthening Weak Links A recent article in CIO Magazine, Three Dangerous Social Media Misconceptions (Kristen Burnham, March 12, 2010) calls out the #1 misconception as follows: 1. "Face-to-face relationships are far more valuable than virtual ones." While some level of physical interaction will always add value to relationships, Gartner says that come 2020, most relationships and teams will be based on "weak links"--that is, you may not have personally met a contact, but you'll know of or may have interacted with him via social sites like Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. The sooner your enterprise adopts these tools, the sooner your employees will learn them, and the sooner you'll begin to cultivate these relationships-of-the-future.   I personally believe that it's not an either/or choice between face-to-face and virtual interactions. In fact, I'll be as bold as saying it doesn't matter. I can point to two extremely valuable work relationships that I've had over the past 5 years: -          I shared an office with one of them -          I met the other person, face-to-face, only once Both relationships were very productive. The dynamics were similar. The communication tactics differed immensely. What does matter is the quality, frequency and relevance of interactions. Still sound like too much? An over-promise? Stay tuned for my next post The Gap Between Facebook and LinkedIn. I'll also connect some of the dots with where Oracle Applications and technologies are headed.        

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  • The Other "C" in CRM

    - by Brian Dayton
    Folks who know me know that I rarely, if ever, talk politics. And I never talk politicians. Having grown up in a household with one parent leaning left and the other leaning to the right it was the best way to keep the peace. This isn't about politics. It's about "constituents" and the need to improve the services and service levels for people--at the city, county, state/province, etc. level all the way up to national governments. As a citizen and tax payer it's also important to me that these services be provided at a reasonable cost. If there's a better and more efficient way to do something then it's my hope that a public sector organization takes advantage of technology the same way private sector companies do. Social services organizations have a complex job. They provide the services that people need, from healthcare and children's assistance to helping people find jobs. But many of these organizations are still managing these processes manually or outdated, home-grown applications that could have been written up to 30 years ago. A lot has changed in technology. On the (this is as political as I'm going to get) political front, stakeholders like you and me are expecting greater transparency on where and how funds are spent. I'll admit that most of the time, when I think about CRM systems, I think about my experience as a customer of my bank, utilities company or cable operator. But now that I'm older, have children and a house--I find myself interacting more and more with agencies and services organizations. My experiences are sometimes good and sometimes not so good. Along those lines, last week's announcement of Siebel CRM 8.2 for Public Sector caught my eye. You may not work in the public sector, but you are a constituent of some--actually a lot--of public sector organizations. I don't know which CRM systems city and county utilize but I'm going to start paying closer attention.

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  • Good Scoop: The PeopleSoft/IBM Backstory

    - by Brian Dayton
    Sometimes you're searching for something online and you find an unrelated, bonus nugget. Last week I stumbled across an interesting blog post from Chris Heller of a PeopleSoft consulting shop in San Ramon, CA called Grey Sparling. I don't know these guys. But Chris, who apparently used to work on the PeopleTools team, wrote a great article on a pre-acquisition, would-be deal between IBM and PeopleSoft that would have standardized PeopleSoft on IBM technology. The behind-the-scenes perspective is interesting. His commentary on the challenges that the company and PeopleSoft customers would have encountered if the deal had gone through was also interesting: ·         "No common ownership. It's hard enough to get large groups of people to work together when they work for the same company, but with two separate companies it is much, much harder. Even within Oracle, progress on Fusion applications was slow until Thomas Kurian took over Fusion applications in addition to Fusion middleware." ·         "No customer buy-in. PeopleSoft customers weren't asking for a conversion to WebSphere, so the fact that doing that could have helped PeopleSoft stay independent wouldn't have meant much to them, especially since the cost of moving to whatever a "PeopleSoft built on WebSphere" would have been significant." ·         "No executive buy-in. This is related to the previous point, but it's worth calling out separately. If Oracle had walked away and the deal with IBM had gone through, and PeopleSoft customers got put through the wringer as part of WebSphere move, all of the PeopleSoft project teams would be put in the awkward position of explaining to their management why these additional costs and headaches were happening. Essentially they would need to "sell" the partnership internally to their own management team. That's not a fun conversation to have." I'm not surprised that something like this was in the works. But I did find the inside scoop and Heller's perspective on the challenges particularly interesting. Especially the advantages of aligning development of applications and infrastructure development under one roof. Here's a link to the whole blog entry.  

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  • We're Back: I'm Here

    - by Brian Dayton
    After a busy Fall and Winter post-Oracle OpenWorld 2009 Oracle's Application Strategy Blog is back. More on what we've been up to shortly. Me, I'm blogging here for the first time. After nearly 6 years at Oracle working on the Oracle Fusion Middleware business I've recently joined the Oracle Applications team. For me, what's old is new again. Prior to working on applications infrastructure at Oracle...and at BEA Systems before that...I worked at PeopleSoft in a number of roles spanning Enterprise Performance Management, Supply Chain, Public Sector and Financial Services and more. Some of the acronyms are the same, there are (of course) some new ones too. But what I'm really excited about is the intersection of Enterprise Applications and Applications Infrastructure that's happening right now. "Aligning IT with Business Strategy" has been the buzzphrase for longer than we can all remember---but what I've seen over the past 5 months makes me start to believe that it's finally starting to happen.

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  • New Year's Resolutions and Keeping in Touch in 2011

    - by Brian Dayton
    The run-up to Oracle OpenWorld 2010 San Francisco--and the launch of Fusion Applications--was a busy time for many of us working on the applications business at Oracle. The great news was that the Oracle Applications general sessions, sessions, demogrounds and other programs were very well attended and well received. Unfortunately, for this blog, the work wasn't done there. Yes, there haven't been many additional blog entries since the previous one, which one industry analyst told us "That's a good post!" That being said, our New Year's Resolution is to blog more frequently about what's been keeping us busy since Oracle OpenWorld San Francisco. A quick summary: - A 4-part webcast series covering major elements of Oracle's Applications strategy - Oracle OpenWorld Brazil - Oracle OpenWorld China - A stellar fiscal Q2 for Oracle and our applications business - Engagement with many Oracle Fusion Applications Early Adopter customers (more on this in the coming year) Objectives for the Coming Year Looking forward at 2011 there are many ways in which we hope to continue making connections with our valued customers and partners, sharing information about where Oracle Applications are headed, and answering questions about how to manage your Oracle Applications roadmap. Things to look for in 2011: - Stay connected with Oracle Applications on a daily basis via our Facebook page. You don't have to be a member of Facebook---but if you are and "like" the page you'll have daily insights and updates delivered to your account http://www.facebook.com/OracleApps - Coming soon, an Oracle Applications strategy update World Tour---a global program that takes key updates and information to cities around the globe - Save the date: On February 3rd, Oracle will be hosting a global, online conference for Oracle Applications customers, partners and interested parties Happy New Year and look for us in 2011.

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  • Who Are the BI Users in Your Neighborhood?

    - by Brian Dayton
    Forrester's Boris Evelson recently wrote a blog titled "Who are the BI Personas?" that I enjoyed for a number of reasons. It's a quick read, easy to grasp and (refreshingly) focuses on the users of technology VS the technology. As Evelson admits, he meant to keep the reference chart at a high-level because there are too many different permutations and additional sub-categories to make such a chart useful. For me, I wouldn't head into the technical permutations but more the contextual use of BI and the issues that users experience.  My thoughts brought up more questions than answers such as: Context: -          HOW: With the exception of the "Power User" persona--likely some sort of business or operations analyst? -          WHEN: Are they using the information to make real-time decisions on the front lines (a customer service manager or shipping/logistics VP) or are they using this information for cumulative analysis and business planning? Or both? -          WHERE: What areas of the business are more or less likely to rely on BI across an organization? Human Resources, Operations, Facilities, Finance--- and why are some more prone to use data-driven analysis than others? Issues: -          DELAYS & DRAG ON IT?: One of the persona characteristics Evelson calls out is a reliance on IT. Every persona except for the "Power User" has a heavy reliance on IT for support. What business issues or delays does that cause to users? What is the drag on IT resources who could potentially be creating instead of reporting? -          HOW MANY CLICKS: If BI is being used within the context of a transaction (sales manager looking for upsell opportunities as an example) is that person getting the information within the context of that action or transaction? Or are they minimizing screens, logging into another application or reporting tool, running queries, etc.?   Who are the BI Users in your neighborhood or line of business? Do Evelson's personas resonate--and do the tools that he calls out (he refers to it as "BI Style") resonate with what your personas have or need? Finally, I'm very interested if BI use is viewed as  a bolt-on...or an integrated part of your daily enterprise processes?

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  • IT Optimization Plan Pays Off For UK Retailer

    - by Brian Dayton
    I caught this article in ComputerworldUK yesterday. The headline talks about UK-based supermarket chain Morrisons is increasing their IT spend...OK, sounds good. Even nicer that Oracle is a big part of that. But what caught my eye were three things: 1) Morrison's truly has a long term strategy for IT. In this case, modernizing and optimizing how they use IT for business advantage.   2) Even in a tough economic climate, Morrison's views IT investments as contributing to and improving the bottom line. Specifically, "The investment in IT contributed to a 21 percent increase in Morrison's underlying profit.."   3) The phased, 3-year "Optimization Plan" took a holistic approach to their business--from CRM and Supply Chain systems to the underlying application infrastructure. On the infrastructure front, adopting a more flexible Service-Oriented Architecture enabled them to be more agile and adapt their business and Identity Management helped with sometimes mundane (but costly) issues like lost passwords and being able to document who has access to what.   Things don't always turn out so rosy. And I know it was a long and difficult process...but it's nice to see a happy ending every once in a while.  

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  • What Would a CyberWar Do To Your Business?

    - by Brian Dayton
    In mid-February the Bipartisan Policy Center in the United States hosted Cyber ShockWave, a simulation of how the country might respond to a catastrophic cyber event. An attack takes place, they can't isolate where it came from or who did it, simulated press reports and market impacts...and the participants in the exercise have to brief the President and advise him/her on what to do. Last week, Former Department of Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff who participated in the exercise summarized his findings in Federal Computer Weekly. The article, given FCW's readership and the topic is obviously focused on the public sector and US Federal policies. However, it touches on some broader issues that impact the private sector as well--which are applicable to any government and country/region-- such as: ·         How would the US (or any) government collaborate to identify and defeat such an attack? Chertoff calls this out as a current gap. How do the public and private sector collaborate today? How would the massive and disparate collection of agencies and companies act together in a crunch? ·         What would the impact on industries and global economies be? Chertoff, and a companion article in Government Computer News, only touch briefly on the subject--focusing on the impact on capital markets. "There's no question this has a disastrous impact on the economy," said Stephen Friedman, former director of the National Economic Council under President George W. Bush who played the role of treasury secretary. "You have financial markets shut down at this point, ordinary transactions are dramatically depleted, there's no question that this has a major impact on consumer confidence." That Got Me Thinking ·         How would it impact Oracle's customers? I know they have business continuity plans--is this one of their scenarios? What if it's not? How would it impact manufacturing lines, ATM networks, customer call centers... ·         How would it impact me and the companies I rely on? The supermarket down the street, my Internet Service Provider, the service station where I bought gas last night.   I sure don't have any answers, and neither do Chertoff or the participants in the exercise. "I have to tell you that ... we are operating in a bit of unchartered territory." said Jamie Gorelick, a former deputy attorney general who played the role of attorney general in the exercise.    But it is a good thing that governments and businesses are considering this scenario and doing what they can to prevent it from happening.

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  • My Doors - Why Standards Matter to Business

    - by Brian Dayton
    "Standards save money." "Standards accelerate projects." "Standards make better solutions."   What do these statements mean to you? You buy technology solutions like Oracle Applications but you're a business person--trying to close the quarter, get performance reviews processed, negotiate a new sourcing contract, etc.   When "standards" come up in presentations and discussions do you: -          Nod your head politely -          Tune out and check your smart phone -          Turn to your IT counterpart and say "Bob's all over this standards thing, right Bob?"   Here's why standards matter. My wife wants new external doors downstairs, ones that would get more light into the rooms. Am I OK with that? "Uhh, sure...it's a little dark in the kitchen."   -          24 hours ago - wife calls to tell me that she's going to the hardware store and may look at doors -          20 hours ago - wife pulls into driveway, informs me that two doors are in the back of her station wagon, ready for me to carry -          19 hours ago - I re-discovered the fact that it's not fun to carry a solid wood door by myself -          5 hours ago - Local handyman, who was at our house anyway, tells me that the doors we bought will likely cost 2-3x the material cost in installation time and labor...the doors are standard but our doorways aren't   We could have done more research. I could be more handy. Sure. But the fact is, my 1951 house wasn't built with me in mind. They built what worked and called it a day.   The same holds true with a lot of business applications. They were designed and architected for one-time use with one use-case in mind. Today's business climate is different. If you're going to use your processes and technology to differentiate your business you should have at least a working knowledge of: -          How standards can benefit your business -          Your IT organization's philosophy around standards -          Your vendor's track-record around standards...and watch for those who pay lip-service to standards but don't follow through   The rallying cry in most IT organizations today is "learn more about the business, drop the acronyms." I'm not advocating that you go out and learn how to code in Java. But I do believe it will help your business and your decision-making process if you meet IT ½...even ¼ of the way there.   Epilogue: The door project has been put on hold and yours truly has to return the doors to the hardware store tomorrow.

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  • We've Been Busy: World Tour 2010

    - by Brian Dayton
    Right after Oracle OpenWorld 2009 we went right into planning for our 2010 World Tour. An ambitious 90+ city tour visiting cities on every continent.   The Oracle Applications Strategy Update Tour started January 19th and is in full swing right now. We've put some heavy hitters on the road. If you didn't get a chance to see Steve Miranda, Senior Vice President of Oracle Application Development in Tokyo, Anthony Lye, Senior Vice President of Oracle CRM Development in New Delhi or Sonny Singh, Senior Vice President of Oracle Industries Business Unit in Stockholm don't worry...we're not done yet. The theme, Smart Strategies: Your Roadmap to the Future is a nod to the fact that everyone needs to be smart about what's going on in their business and industry right now. But just as important---how to make sure that you're on the course to where you need to be down the road. Get the big picture and key trends in "The New Normal" of today's business climate and drill down and find out about the latest and greatest innovations in Oracle Applications. Check out http://www.oracle.com/events/applicationstour/index.html for an upcoming tour date near you. Pictures, feedback, summaries and learnings from the tour to come soon.

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  • Avoid the “Social Silo” - Learn Why and How

    - by Brian Dayton
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} I’m not going to spend any more real estate than needed on this—social media is big. Facebook hit the Billion user mark in October, that’s 1 out of every 7 humans on the planet. This past Summer (in the Northern hemisphere) Twitter passed the 400 Million Tweet/day mark. The list of social properties and data points goes on and on. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} With social your customer, prospect, or constituent has pervasive access—through mobile—to a global audience, the ability to influence friends, friends of friends, and even people they will never meet. They also have the unique opportunity to forge a deeper relationship with your business—telling you what they like, what they don’t like, how you can help, and what they’d like to see more of. Are you listening? Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} What’s the Bottom Line for Business? Businesses need to be where their customers are—on social properties. They need to be available and responsive in those channels—24x7x365. They need to engage and communicate in new ways—sometimes in less than 140 characters and with empathy, not a 1-way megaphone. Finally, businesses need to look at social as an extension of their existing business practices. Not as a silo’d communication channel limited to marketing. Social Can’t Be a Silo – Learn Why @ Oracle CloudWorld When a business is on social networks they represent the whole business. That’s how a customer, constituent, partner or potential candidate sees it. Those organizations that have moved on the opportunity to build closer relationships through social marketing have already made the first step. Social Selling, Service, eCommerce, and Recruiting are external-facing opportunities that leading organizations are moving on right now. This strategy, one of weaving social into and across your business processes—and leveraging social concepts and technologies for internal collaboration—is something you can learn about during an Oracle CloudWorld event in a city near you. You’ll hear and see social relationship management concepts, best-practices, and recommendations woven into topics, discussions, and demonstrations throughout the event—from Marketing and Sales to Service and Human Resources. Stay Tuned and Avoid Potholes By all indications social is here to stay but it’s moving fast and social business strategies are evolving rapidly. At Oracle CloudWorld you’ll also get the opportunity to learn how to avoid some of the potholes on the road to #socialbusiness. Stay tuned to this blog. In future posts I’ll cover some of those potholes including the challenges of Social@Scale and Parallel Processes. Jump-start your social business strategy or learn how to refine and expand what you’re doing already at Oracle CloudWorld. Want to learn more about what Oracle is doing in social? Check out www.oracle.com/social or, if you're looking for a quick read my co-worker, Pat Ma, has a great post on this blog summarizing some popular Social Relationship Management use cases.

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  • Nesting, grouping Sqlite syntax?

    - by Linda
    I can't for the life of me figure out this Sqlite syntax. Our database contains records like: TX, Austin OH, Columbus OH, Columbus TX, Austin OH, Cleveland OH, Dayton OH, Columbus TX, Dallas TX, Houston TX, Austin (State-field and a city-field.) I need output like this: OH: Columbus, Cleveland, Dayton TX: Dallas, Houston, Austin (Each state listed once... and all the cities in that state.) What would the SELECT statement(s) look like?

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  • Same Great Insights, New Location

    - by Brian Dayton
    With Spring, at least in the Northern Hemisphere, comes a little house cleaning.   Going forward the writers of this blog will now be posting to http://blogs.oracle.com/applications/   If you've been following Linda Fishman Hoyle's Yak About Apps blog she can now be found at http://blogs.oracle.com/lindafishman/  Thanks for following us.  

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  • Looking at EMEA and Telecommunications

    - by Brian Dayton
    With Summer holidays starting up we've been spending a lot of time speaking with our counterparts in EMEA. Often we talk about recent customer successes. One of my recent discoveries is this great video covering BT's move towards SOA and how this initiative not only accelerated order delivery time from 6 days to 6 minutes but created new revenue streams and reduced time to implementation.

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  • Google's process for publishing/modifying pages [closed]

    - by Glenn Dayton
    I'm assuming that a group of people at Google have control of certain sections of google.com, but how does Google make sure that employees don't accidentally or intentionally sabotage the website? Does Google use Adobe Contribute or some similar product for sharing/publishing the website. Do employees use WebDAV, FTP, SFTP, or SSH to publish the site. Since Google has hundreds of thousands of servers it probably takes some time for its servers to update. Do they transmit the new copy of the website to all servers before publishing at once? This question does not apply to Google editing a database and having a page reflect the database's changes. It applies to employees editing the source code and/ or back end of the site.

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  • Garbled text in server logs

    - by Glenn Dayton
    I recently looked over my server's logs and I found a bunch of garbled text. Here is a link to the full log, and here is a snapshot of what it looks like: ¹^œÌÓûFF™ÃŒ-ôÚÏàÃÒNRs§cÝi ~F#J"|³Ôq0ã~QQbA ¼¹¦’š¶É3œßå<ú€Ç©XAwdL?R°ÝbÒt©ôÇ·Æ…÷q˜ÇѺ| Þ,߯¡Êr yR¤Q¹Jêlš‘AzP\ ¦ÂY„ÉÉ,æ™ U™»ì³ÔÝáCÿ42‹Ö.nŽÉ2%ÓN8i4Œ®¿‘•"-se•äŽ¿ÊÁ§€þ 8åv%'#Äpžs/ÙÍ:¡1ÑÖÃå ºu|Q®!ÏyÆ,­NR@¶ËȯRDkã=ÿÀܸ ›¼Ô ’ð>ÓÌBftdÃ8–é}‰[øbãÝÁ嘲b¾W n´tT­œpäNëëÔ ·RUÓP+ÅuKÁ£¬\âÌ®:J<ÍÁ0:Q%ª(Œ˜E-ÁI:ï™4®hæœT†«);°Çda@´#èì}‡£ü•{57ý]¼|øÓñð÷ÈÌð‡MkŠâ•C~$Óô#ÙV¾Núå.#Á]vôžóæ» V&8)%øVSž“±ÔQLåÓý1–ŽÃßQ$¹ýž")ÈûQcÄý_ÔüGP=s‹vq#Pmoo.tigertutorialscomµÐOKÃ0ð»Ÿâ‘ØH“ What is this? and is someone trying to do something to my website?

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  • How Does a 724% Return on Your Salesforce Automation Investment Sound?

    - by Brian Dayton
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Oracle Sales Cloud and Marketing Cloud customer Apex IT gained just that, a 724% return on investment (ROI) when they implemented these Oracle Cloud solutions in their fast-moving, rapidly-growing business. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";} Congratulations Apex IT! Apex IT was just announced as a winner of the Nucleus Research 11th annual Technology ROI Awards. The award, given by the analyst firm highlights organizations that have successfully leveraged IT deployments to maximize value per dollar spent. Fast Facts: Return on Investment - 724% Payback - 2 months Average annual benefit - $91,534 Cost: Benefit Ratio – 1:48 Business Benefits In addition to the ROI and cost metrics the award calls out improvements in Apex IT’s business operations—across both Sales and Marketing teams: Improved ability to identify new opportunities and focus sales resources on higher-probability deals Reduced administration and manual lead tracking—resulting in more time selling and a net new client increase of 46% Increased campaign productivity for both Marketing and Sales, including Oracle Marketing Cloud’s automation of campaign tracking and nurture programs Improved margins with more structured and disciplined sales processes—resulting in more effective deal negotiations Please join us in congratulating Apex IT on this award and their business achievements. Want More Details? Don’t take our word for it. Read the full Apex IT ROI Case Study and learn more about Apex IT’s business—including their work with Oracle Sales and Marketing Cloud on behalf of their clients in leading Sales organizations. Learn More About Oracle Sales Cloud www.oracle.com/salescloud www.facebook.com/oraclesalescloud www.youtube.com/oraclesalescloud Oracle Customer Experience and Complementary Sales Solutions Oracle Configure, Price and Quote (CPQ) Cloud Oracle Marketing Cloud Oracle Customer Experience /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

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  • SSIS Configuration error: Cannot retrieve configuration table schema

    - by Glenn M
    I'm trying to add a simple configuration to a SSIS package, of type SQL Server, so stored in a table. At the end of the wizard, when it goes to try and write a new row to the nominated table to store the configuration it fails with the error: TITLE: Microsoft Visual Studio Could not complete wizard actions. Cannot retrieve configuration table schema. (Microsoft.DataTransformationServices.Wizards) I can't seem to resolve this. The configuration connection has full permissions on the table, and it sees it and can read from it as it reports there is no current data for the filter I provide. It just wont write to it. A Google search of the error message above in quotes returns literally no hits! Any suggestions? Glenn

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