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  • Hardware compatibility on H97 chipset/hardware support

    - by user3238850
    I am aware that there is documentation about compatibility but it is way out dated. I am also aware that there is a hardware compatibility page on Ubuntu website, but that one is focused on the whole box rather than a single piece of hardware. I have some experience with Linux OS, and some experience playing Ubuntu Server in a virtual machine, but never worked on a machine that lives in the real internet. I am building a home server with an Intel H97 chipset motherboard. I have looked at several models and none of them has Linux in the supported OS category. I have the experience of installing Ubuntu Desktop 14.04 on my 4-years-old lap top, and except for some system errors on start up, there is not too much I can complain about, so I guess I should be fine. However, this time I am going to install Ubuntu Server 14.04 on a relatively new piece of hardware(I went to http://linux-drivers.org/ but found nothing really helpful). For example the ASUS motherboard has M.2 socket and Intel LAN I218V chip, the Gigabyte motherboard has two LAN chips(Intel LAN WGI217V and ATHEROS AR8161-BL3A-R). So I really want to make sure everything will work. Usually I would just trust Ubuntu and buy all hardware I need, but basing on my past experience with the Ubuntu Desktop version on my lap top, I am not so convinced. There is an easily noticeable difference: when the system is idle, the fan runs much more frequently and longer under Ubuntu. This leads to my suspicion that generally hardware will have worse support for Ubuntu, which is no surprising at all but enough for me to put this post here. And as far as I know, some Intel CPU features come with software that usually will not run under Linux. Any help, idea or thoughts would be greatly appreciated!

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  • Installing a new hardware enablement (HWE) stack in 64 bit Ubuntu

    - by Alexey
    I'd like to install 13.10 (Saucy) hardware enablement (HWE) stack to my Ubuntu 12.04 (64-bit) because I need a newer Linux kernel. This wiki page explains what "hardware enablement stacks" are. Among other things it says: Only the -generic x86 kernel flavor ... will be supported... Also, this answer says: ...This is only recommended for x86 hardware installations... Is x86 here synonymous to 32-bit/i386 architecture (but not 64-bit/AMD64), or is it i386/AMD64 (but not ARM)? Can I install this "hardware enablement stack" in a 64-bit/AMD64 Ubuntu? Will it be supported with future updates?

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  • ASP.NET Web Server Hardware Configuration

    - by Santa Te Banta
    I'm planning on deploying my ASP.NET Web app in the production environment using a Windows Server 2003 machine. But I know nothing about the CPU brand names and what's best. I know 4 GB RAM, with anything over 3 GHz clock speed will be a good bet and will serve a large number of users. But tell me what's the latest and greatest processor brand-names for running a Windows Server 2003 OS today? And what edition of the Windows 2003 Server do I need out of the following, if I have to run a website to support about 100,000 (a hundred thousand) users, 60% of who are expected to be online at all times? Web Edition Standard Enterprise Datacenter source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Server_2003 The article says that the Web edition can only support up to 2 GB of RAM. Will that be sufficient for the above user population?

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  • WebGL and Hardware acceleration problems [duplicate]

    - by Harry
    This question already has an answer here: How To Enable WebGL In Chrome On Ubuntu? 1 answer I am currently running Ubuntu 12.04 and in Windows 7 on my ATI Mobility Radeon 4300 series graphics card WebGL and hardware acceleration worked perfectly fine. Now on Ubuntu 12.04 I have tried both the open-source drivers and the FGLRX drivers and it no longer works. Could somebody please help? I use Google Chrome 18

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  • Best hardware for a Ubuntu Computer?

    - by Dante Ashton
    Hey all. I'll be needing a new PC soon, but I've decided to build my own, so my question is...what's the best hardware for Ubuntu? Specifically, in terms of graphics cards; I'm looking for something that will run smoothly (for Compiz's effects and Unity) but will be quite modern (IE: have a HDMI output) The machine itself is just a generic computer, nothing special; I just want to future-proof it. I'm looking at quad-core chips and 3-4 gig of RAM. I want something that will play nice with Ubuntu; now, and in the future... I used to build machines years ago, but I've fallen behind (that was in the Windows 98 era...so yeah, quite a while ago!) My main problem is the graphics card; I'd prefer to stick with NVIDIA, but only a tiny amount of computers I've seen play nice with Nouveau.

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  • Building small Ubuntu server - What hardware is recommended?

    - by 10robinho
    There are many of us who need to build small Ubuntu server. Problem is that in some countries it is hard to find and quite expensive to buy server motherboards and processors. And when one is building small server with limited budget, buying some Xenons is not really an option. So, are there any general recommendations for hardware (I think that motherboards are the main issue) that is stable and fast under Linux? I read that Intel should be the best choice for cpu + mbo combo. So, I was looking around for some Intel motherboards + i7 Ivy Bridge (like Intel DZ77BH-55K with Z77 chipset and Intel i7 3770K) but I've read that they have some issues with kernel, booting and USB ports. That is why I ask community if you have any experience with this. Maybe Intel is not the best choice here? Maybe ASUS or Gigabyte or _other company_ are more stable with Linux? I hope that this Q&As can help people in building stable Ubuntu server.

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  • How to Tell a Hardware Problem From a Software Problem

    - by Chris Hoffman
    Your computer seems to be malfunctioning — it’s slow, programs are crashing or Windows may be blue-screening. Is your computer’s hardware failing, or does it have a software problem that you can fix on your own? This can actually be a bit tricky to figure out. Hardware problems and software problems can lead to the same symptoms — for example, frequent blue screens of death may be caused by either software or hardware problems. Computer is Slow We’ve all heard the stories — someone’s computer slows down over time because they install too much software that runs at startup or it becomes infected with malware. The person concludes that their computer is slowing down because it’s old, so they replace it. But they’re wrong. If a computer is slowing down, it has a software problem that can be fixed. Hardware problems shouldn’t cause your computer to slow down. There are some rare exceptions to this — perhaps your CPU is overheating and it’s downclocking itself, running slower to stay cooler — but most slowness is caused by software issues. Blue Screens Modern versions of Windows are much more stable than older versions of Windows. When used with reliable hardware with well-programmed drivers, a typical Windows computer shouldn’t blue-screen at all. If you are encountering frequent blue screens of death, there’s a good chance your computer’s hardware is failing. Blue screens could also be caused by badly programmed hardware drivers, however. If you just installed or upgraded hardware drivers and blue screens start, try uninstalling the drivers or using system restore — there may be something wrong with the drivers. If you haven’t done anything with your drivers recently and blue screens start, there’s a very good chance you have a hardware problem. Computer Won’t Boot If your computer won’t boot, you could have either a software problem or a hardware problem. Is Windows attempting to boot and failing part-way through the boot process, or does the computer no longer recognize its hard drive or not power on at all? Consult our guide to troubleshooting boot problems for more information. When Hardware Starts to Fail… Here are some common components that can fail and the problems their failures may cause: Hard Drive: If your hard drive starts failing, files on your hard drive may become corrupted. You may see long delays when you attempt to access files or save to the hard drive. Windows may stop booting entirely. CPU: A failing CPU may result in your computer not booting at all. If the CPU is overheating, your computer may blue-screen when it’s under load — for example, when you’re playing a demanding game or encoding video. RAM: Applications write data to your RAM and use it for short-term storage. If your RAM starts failing, an application may write data to part of the RAM, then later read it back and get an incorrect value. This can result in application crashes, blue screens, and file corruption. Graphics Card: Graphics card problems may result in graphical errors while rendering 3D content or even just while displaying your desktop. If the graphics card is overheating, it may crash your graphics driver or cause your computer to freeze while under load — for example, when playing demanding 3D games. Fans: If any of the fans fail in your computer, components may overheat and you may see the above CPU or graphics card problems. Your computer may also shut itself down abruptly so it doesn’t overheat any further and damage itself. Motherboard: Motherboard problems can be extremely tough to diagnose. You may see occasional blue screens or similar problems. Power Supply: A malfunctioning power supply is also tough to diagnose — it may deliver too much power to a component, damaging it and causing it to malfunction. If the power supply dies completely, your computer won’t power on and nothing will happen when you press the power button. Other common problems — for example, a computer slowing down — are likely to be software problems. It’s also possible that software problems can cause many of the above symptoms — malware that hooks deep into the Windows kernel can cause your computer to blue-screen, for example. The Only Way to Know For Sure We’ve tried to give you some idea of the difference between common software problems and hardware problems with the above examples. But it’s often tough to know for sure, and troubleshooting is usually a trial-and-error process. This is especially true if you have an intermittent problem, such as your computer blue-screening a few times a week. You can try scanning your computer for malware and running System Restore to restore your computer’s system software back to its previous working state, but these aren’t  guaranteed ways to fix software problems. The best way to determine whether the problem you have is a software or hardware one is to bite the bullet and restore your computer’s software back to its default state. That means reinstalling Windows or using the Refresh or reset feature on Windows 8. See whether the problem still persists after you restore its operating system to its default state. If you still see the same problem – for example, if your computer is blue-screening and continues to blue-screen after reinstalling Windows — you know you have a hardware problem and need to have your computer fixed or replaced. If the computer crashes or freezes while reinstalling Windows, you definitely have a hardware problem. Even this isn’t a completely perfect method — for example, you may reinstall Windows and install the same hardware drivers afterwards. If the hardware drivers are badly programmed, the blue-screens may continue. Blue screens of death aren’t as common on Windows these days — if you’re encountering them frequently, you likely have a hardware problem. Most blue screens you encounter will likely be caused by hardware issues. On the other hand, other common complaints like “my computer has slowed down” are easily fixable software problems. When in doubt, back up your files and reinstall Windows. Image Credit: Anders Sandberg on Flickr, comedy_nose on Flickr     

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  • Constructs for wrapping a hardware state machine

    - by Henry Gomersall
    I am using a piece of hardware with a well defined C API. The hardware is stateful, with the relevant API calls needing to be in the correct order for the hardware to work properly. The API calls themselves will always return, passing back a flag that advises whether the call was successful, or if not, why not. The hardware will not be left in some ill defined state. In effect, the API calls advise indirectly of the current state of the hardware if the state is not correct to perform a given operation. It seems to be a pretty common hardware API style. My question is this: Is there a well established design pattern for wrapping such a hardware state machine in a high level language, such that consistency is maintained? My development is in Python. I ideally wish the hardware state machine to be abstracted to a much simpler state machine and wrapped in an object that represents the hardware. I'm not sure what should happen if an attempt is made to create multiple objects representing the same piece of hardware. I apologies for the slight vagueness, I'm not very knowledgeable in this area and so am fishing for assistance of the description as well!

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  • Failure Sucks, But Does It Have To?

    - by steve.diamond
    Hey Folks--It's "elephant in the room" time. Imagine a representative from a CRM VENDOR discussing CRM FAILURES. Well. I recently saw this blog post from Michael Krigsman on "six ways CRM projects go wrong." Now, I know this may come off defensive, but my comments apply to ALL CRM vendors, not just Oracle. As I perused the list, I couldn't find any failures related to technology. They all seemed related to people or process. Now, this isn't about finger pointing, or impugning customers. I love customers! And when they fail, WE fail. Although I sit in the cheap seats, i.e., I haven't funded any multi-million dollar CRM initiatives lately, I kept wondering how to convert the perception of failure as something that ends and is never to be mentioned again (see Michael's reason #4), to something that one learns from and builds upon. So to continue my tradition of speaking in platitudes, let me propose the following three tenets: 1) Try and get ahead of your failures while they're very very small. 2) Immediately assess what you can learn from those failures. 3) With more than 15 years of CRM deployments, seek out those vendors that have a track record both in learning from "misses" and in supporting MANY THOUSANDS of CRM successes at companies of all types and sizes. Now let me digress briefly with an unpleasant (for me, anyway) analogy. I really don't like flying. Call it 'fear of dying' or 'fear of no control.' Whatever! I've spoken with quite a few commercial pilots over the years, and they reassure me that there are multiple failures on most every flight. We as passengers just don't know about them. Most of them are too miniscule to make a difference, and most of them are "caught" before they become LARGER failures. It's typically the mid-sized to colossal failures we hear about, and a significant percentage of those are due to human error. What's the point? I'd propose that organizations consider the topic of FAILURE in five grades. On one end, FAILURE Grade 1 is a minor/miniscule failure. On the other end, FAILURE Grade 5 is a colossal failure A Grade 1 CRM FAILURE could be that a particular interim milestone was missed. Why? What can we learn from that? How can we prevent that from happening as we proceed through the project? Individual organizations will need to define their own Grade 2 and Grade 3 failures. The opportunity is to keep those Grade 3 failures from escalating any further. Because honestly, a GRADE 5 failure may not be recoverable. It could result in a project being pulled, countless amounts of hours and dollars lost, and jobs lost. We don't want to go there. In closing, I want to thank Michael for opening my eyes up to the world of "color," versus thinking of failure as both "black and white" and a dead end road that organizations can't learn from and avoid discussing like the plague.

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  • Windows 7 Not Recognizing Any Hardware, Linux Recognizing Hardware

    - by Newb
    I have a new desktop computer with two SSDs: one running Linux Mint 15 (SSD1), the other running Windows 7 (SSD2). My mint runs perfectly - USB wireless adapter is recognized, SSD2 (connected by SATA) is recognized and accessible through the filesystem, Ethernet works, etc. However, my Windows 7 is not recognizing any of these devices - even plugging in a regular ethernet cable doesn't work. It seems that it's not recognizing any network adapters, and it also doesn't recognize SSD1, connected to the mainboard by SATA. I've installed, uninstalled, and reinstalled Windows multiple times, but the problem persists. I used the Windows 7 CD to install Windows on a machine previously, and that time around, I didn't have any problems, which leads me to suspect that this might be a hardware issue, specifically with the mainboard. My mainboard is an MSI-7641 model, the 760GM-P34 FX. It uses an AMD Chipset and an AMD processor. Can anyone suggest what might be wrong, and how to fix it?

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  • Older SAS1 hardware Vs. newer SAS2 hardware

    - by user12620172
    I got a question today from someone asking about the older SAS1 hardware from over a year ago that we had on the older 7x10 series. They didn't leave an email so I couldn't respond directly, but I said this blog would be blunt, frank, and open so I have no problem addressing it publicly. A quick history lesson here: When Sun first put out the 7x10 family hardware, the 7410 and 7310 used a SAS1 backend connection to a JBOD that had SATA drives in it. This JBOD was not manufactured by Sun nor did Sun own the IP for it. Now, when Oracle took over, they had a problem with that, and I really can’t blame them. The decision was made to cut off that JBOD and it’s manufacturer completely and use our own where Oracle controlled both the IP and the manufacturing. So in the summer of 2010, the cut was made, and the 7410 and 7310 had a hardware refresh and now had a SAS2 backend going to a SAS2 JBOD with SAS2 drives instead of SATA. This new hardware had two big advantages. First, there was a nice performance increase, mostly due to the faster backend. Even better, the SAS2 interface on the drives allowed for a MUCH faster failover between cluster heads, as the SATA drives were the bottleneck on the older hardware. In September of 2010 there was a major refresh of the rest of the 7000 hardware, the controllers and the other family members, and that’s where we got today’s current line-up of the 7x20 series. So the 7x20 has always used the new trays, and the 7410 and 7310 have used the new SAS2 trays since last July of 2010. Now for the bad news. People who have the 7410 and 7310 from BEFORE the July 2010 cutoff have the models with SAS1 HBAs in them to connect to the older SAS1 trays. Remember, that manufacturer cut all ties with us and stopped making the JBOD, so there’s just no way to get more of them, as they don’t exist. There are some options, however. Oracle support does support taking out the SAS1 HBAs in the old 7410 and 7310 and put in newer SAS2 HBAs which can talk to the new trays. Hey, I didn’t say it was a great option, I just said it’s an option. I fully realize that you would then have a SAS1 JBOD full of SATA drives that you could no longer connect. I do know a client that did this, and took the SAS1 JBOD and connected it to another server and formatted the drives and is using it as a plain, non-7000 JBOD. This is not supported by Oracle support. The other option is to just keep it as-is, as it works just fine, but you just can’t expand it. Then you can get a newer 7x20 series, and use the built-in ZFSSA replication feature to move the data over. Now you can use the newer one for your production data and use the older one for DR, snaps and clones.

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  • Small web server hardware advice

    - by Dmitri
    We need to build a new web server for our organization. We have around 100 hundred small traffic web sites, so our hardware requirements are not too tough. We run CentOS 6, Varnish+Apache, PHP, MySQL, Typo3 CMS for most of websites. Here's a hardware we want to buy: SuperMicro X9SCA-F-O (we need to have a remote management capability) (or better X9SCM-F?) Intel Xeon E3-1220 v2 2*4Gb DDR-III 1600MHz Kingston ECC (KVR16E11/4) (currently we have 4gb, and it feels like enough, so no reason for 16gb yet). Procase EB140-B-0 (1 unit) PSU 350W Procase MG1350, Active PFC We already have: Intel 335 120GB SSD (for OS, databases and important websites). 2*2tb WD Green RAID1 (for other data and backups). Does it look like a reasonable choice for our needs? Any issues with hardware compatibility? Any other notes?

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  • Hardware testing tool/suite

    - by Aviator
    Hi All, I just bought a new core i5 system (assembled) and started installing Windows 7. It was failing for many times and at some point got installed. After that, frequent crashes related to MEMORY. So checked the RAM using memtest86+ and found many errors.I got it replaced with the vendor and now if i install ANY OS, at some point in installation it either freezes completely with no response for hours, or restarts automatically. I tried installing Windows 7, Windows Vista and Ubuntu 9.10. I tested the new RAM again and found no problems in about 2 passes using memtest86+. I even updated the BIOS using bootable USB and even the problem persists. I am really not sure which hardware is causing trouble. I dont have any OS inside it, so i have to check using bootable CDs DVDs and USB only. Please advice on how to proceed. Are there any suites/ separate tools for checking integrity of each hardware parts and troubleshoot it? I wanted to confirm which part is problematic before going for replacement. Thanks a lot! This is the config: Core i5, MSI P55-GD65, GSKill 2x2GB, Seagate 500GB 7200rpm, CM Extreme 600W PSU, Saphhire Radeon 5770 1GB, LG DVD Writer

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  • ext4 filesystem corruption -- maybe hardware error?

    - by pts
    I'm getting these errors in dmesg after about half an hour after I turn on the computer: [ 1355.677957] EXT4-fs error (device sda2): htree_dirblock_to_tree: inode #1318420: (comm updatedb.mlocat) bad entry in directory: directory entry across blocks - block=5251700offset=0(0), inode=1802725748, rec_len=179136, name_len=32 [ 1355.677973] Aborting journal on device sda2-8. [ 1355.678101] EXT4-fs (sda2): Remounting filesystem read-only [ 1355.690144] EXT4-fs error (device sda2): htree_dirblock_to_tree: inode #1318416: (comm updatedb.mlocat) bad entry in directory: directory entry across blocks - block=5251699offset=0(0), inode=2194783952, rec_len=53280, name_len=152 [ 1356.864720] EXT4-fs error (device sda2): htree_dirblock_to_tree: inode #1312795: (comm updatedb.mlocat) bad entry in directory: directory entry across blocks - block=5251176offset=1460(13748), inode=1432317541, rec_len=208208, name_len=119 /dev/sda is an SSD, and it's using the noop scheduler. /etc/fstab entry: UUID=acb4eefa-48ff-4ee1-bb5f-2dccce7d011f / ext4 errors=remount-ro,noatime,discard,user_xattr 0 1 System information: $ cat /proc/mounts | grep /dev/sd /dev/sda1 /boot ext2 rw,noatime,errors=continue 0 0 $ cat /etc/lsb-release DISTRIB_ID=Ubuntu DISTRIB_RELEASE=10.04 DISTRIB_CODENAME=lucid DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="Ubuntu 10.04.3 LTS" $ uname -a Linux leetpad 2.6.35-30-generic-pae #61~lucid1-Ubuntu SMP Thu Oct 13 21:14:29 UTC 2011 i686 GNU/Linux I've run memtest for 7 hours, it didn't found any memory errors. Any obvious ideas what can go wrong in this case? The most reasonable thing I can imagine is that the SSD is silently dropping some write requests, which eventually leads to an EXT4 filesystem inconsistency (but no disk I/O errors). How can this happen? Is there a relevant configuration option I should ensure to be set correctly? What tools should I use to diagnose the hardware failures? Would it be possible to diagnose the SSD failure without overwriting data?

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  • Hardware selection for Linux machine

    - by bguiz
    Hi, I am building a new box, and planning to install Ubuntu 9-04 or Ubuntu 9-10 on it. I am wary of the hardware selection because in the past I struggled with lack of drivers or driver incompatibility with the network card and video card, etc. The last time I built a Linux box was 2007, and I have not kept up to date with the changes since. One notable difference is that I can no longer find motherboards with nVidia chip sets. See what I mean (links to my local shop's website): Intel motherboards: http://www.centrecom.com.au/catalog/default.php?page=1&cPath=36_62 AMD motherboards: http://www.centrecom.com.au/catalog/default.php?page=1&cPath=36_63 I have already checked the Ubuntu forums, but their motherboards section is rather outdated, and I did not look further. I would like to know your suggestions for what Linux compatible hardware that you have got. Thank you!

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  • Laptop HDD failure imminent?

    - by Andrei Rinea
    I have an HP Compaq 615 laptop with an 160 GB 7200 rpm HDD. Hasn't been dropped or shaken, in fact it almost always stayed on my desk. I've treated it as nice as I could. The other day, however, my OS froze and I could hear a repeated clink-clink-clink coming from the HDD zone of the laptop. I had to switch off hardware-ly the laptop and re-start it. It worked very well after, including now. However I backed up immediately the core data on my USB drive and ordered an external USB HDD for periodic backups. Will it die soon or it was just a "blip"?

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  • Looking for QNX compatible server hardware

    - by Sergey Sobolev
    Can you help me to find compatible modern server for QNX, please? This is quite rare OS, so most of the hardware vendors do not have compatibility information. It would be very helpful to me if you can do the following: Download iso http://www.qnx.com/download/download/19602/qnxsdp-6.4.1-x86-200905201802-nto.iso burn to cd Start from cd press F2 - try from CD start Utilities/Terminal run sloginfo /tmp/sloginfo.log; get_hw_info; pci -vvv /tmp/pci-vvv.log send logs from /tmp/ to [email protected] with system model/build I will summarize results afterwards and post them here. I'm especially interested in Fujitsu RX100 S5 as it looks like one of the most compatible servers with frontally accessible HDDs.

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  • Looking for Hardware that will easily interface with my .NET code.

    - by SkippyFire
    I'm a .NET C# developer looking to do some hardware interfacing/programming. I just want something super simple to mess around with. I have done one of those basic stamp projects, but I want something with less electrical work. A self-contained piece of hardware would be fine. I'm not really looking to do embedded programming... but that would actually be pretty cool if something was capable of running .net code. I'm looking for something that would be easy to connect, hopefully via USB. Serial ports seems to be more hit or miss nowadays with laptops and netbooks. Something I can easily send data to, like a mini LCD, or series of LED's. Better yet would be something that provides feedback, like a temperature sensor. The best would be something more featured that I could talk to. I would be able to send data to it, and it would send back responses. Maybe something like a servo that could report it's position? Or maybe something that I could set parameters on? Any ideas? Thanks in advance!

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  • Installer Reboots at "Detecting hardware" (disks and other hardware) on all recent Server Installs

    - by Ryan Rosario
    I have a very frustrating problem with my PC. I cannot install any recent version of Ubuntu Server (or even Desktop) since 9.04 even using the text-based installer. I boot from a USB stick created by Unetbootin (I also tried other methods such as startup disk creator with no difference). On the Server installer, it gets to "Detecting Hardware" (the second one about disks and all other hardware, not network hardware) and then either hangs at 0% (waited 24 hours), or reboots after a minute or two. My system (late 2007): ASUS P5NSLI motherboard Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 2.4Ghz 2 x 1GB Corsair 667MHz RAM nVidia GeForce 6600 I have unplugged everything (including the only hard disk, CD-ROMs and floppy). I have only one stick of RAM (tried each one to no avail) and am booting the installer from a USB stick (booting from CD-ROM yields the same problem). I also tried several of the boot options (nomodeset, nousb, acpi=off, noapic, i915.modeset=1/0, xforcevesa) in all combinations) to no avail. The only active parts of my system are the video card, mouse, keyboard and USB stick. I have also updated the BIOS to the most recent version. (FWIW, on the Desktop installer, I get a black screen after hitting the Install option.) Even after removing "quiet" I am unable to see what kernel panic is occurring (or not occurring) to cause the install to crash. I am only able to save the debug logs via a simple webserver in the installer. After the last line (I repeatedly refreshed), the server stops responding and the installer hangs or reboots: Jan 2 01:04:03 main-menu[302]: INFO: Menu item 'disk-detect' selected Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.154372] sata_nv 0000:00:0e.0: version 3.5 Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.154409] sata_nv 0000:00:0e.0: Using SWNCQ mode Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.154531] sata_nv 0000:00:0e.0: setting latency timer to 64 Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.164442] scsi0 : sata_nv Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.167610] scsi1 : sata_nv Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.167762] ata1: SATA max UDMA/133 cmd 0x9f0 ctl 0xbf0 bmdma 0xd400 irq 10 Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.167774] ata2: SATA max UDMA/133 cmd 0x970 ctl 0xb70 bmdma 0xd408 irq 10 Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.167948] sata_nv 0000:00:0f.0: Using SWNCQ mode Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.168071] sata_nv 0000:00:0f.0: setting latency timer to 64 Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.171931] scsi2 : sata_nv Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.173793] scsi3 : sata_nv Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.173943] ata3: SATA max UDMA/133 cmd 0x9e0 ctl 0xbe0 bmdma 0xe800 irq 11 Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.173954] ata4: SATA max UDMA/133 cmd 0x960 ctl 0xb60 bmdma 0xe808 irq 11 Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.174061] pata_amd 0000:00:0d.0: version 0.4.1 Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.174160] pata_amd 0000:00:0d.0: setting latency timer to 64 Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.177045] scsi4 : pata_amd Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.178628] scsi5 : pata_amd Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.178801] ata5: PATA max UDMA/133 cmd 0x1f0 ctl 0x3f6 bmdma 0xf000 irq 14 Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.178811] ata6: PATA max UDMA/133 cmd 0x170 ctl 0x376 bmdma 0xf008 irq 15 Jan 2 01:04:04 net/hw-detect.hotplug: Detected hotpluggable network interface eth0 Jan 2 01:04:04 net/hw-detect.hotplug: Detected hotpluggable network interface lo Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.485062] ata3: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 300) Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.633094] ata1: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300) Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.641647] ata1.00: ATA-8: ST31000528AS, CC38, max UDMA/133 Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.641658] ata1.00: 1953525168 sectors, multi 1: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.657614] ata1.00: configured for UDMA/133 Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.657969] scsi 0:0:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST31000528AS CC38 PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.658482] sd 0:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg0 type 0 Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.658588] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] 1953525168 512-byte logical blocks: (1.00 TB/931 GiB) Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.658812] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Write Protect is off Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.658823] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.658918] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Write cache: enabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.675630] sda: sda1 sda2 Jan 2 01:04:04 kernel: [ 309.676440] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Attached SCSI disk Jan 2 01:04:05 kernel: [ 309.969102] ata2: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 300) Jan 2 01:04:05 kernel: [ 310.281137] ata4: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 300) Anybody have any additional ideas I could try? I am getting ready to just toss the motherboard.

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  • Oracle Standard Installation (OSI) Services – Service für Hardware-Upgrades

    - by swalker
    In diesem Update erfahren Sie alles über die Services der Oracle Standard Installation (OSI) von Oracle Advanced Customer Support (ACS). Oracle imformiert Sie außerdem über die Einführung weiterer OSI-Teile für die Bestellung von Komplettservices zur Installation von Upgrades bei bereits installierten Systemen. Darunter fallen auch zusätzliche Upgrades für Serverprozessoren (CPUs), Arbeitsspeicher, Netzwerkkarten, Speicher-Appliances und Bandbibliotheken. Die OSI Installationsservices für Hardware-Upgrades können wie folgt bestellt werden: beim Hardware Point of Sale (POS) – über den Offline-Prozess für Hardware im Oracle PartnerNetwork (OPN) unabhängige Bestellungen „After Point of Sale (APOS)“ – über den Offline-OSI-Prozess des ACS Services Order Desk. Diese Prozesse sowie die aktualisierten Dateien für die OSI-Teilezuordnung finden Sie auf der Website des Oracle Partner Stores (OPS). Die OSI-Teile für Hardware-Upgrades können im OPS ab Ende 2011 bestellt werden. Wenn Sie Fragen zu diesem Update haben, wenden Sie sich an das Global Partner Support Team unter [email protected]

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  • Hardware Compatibility

    - by thebradnet
    I am looking into buying a LENOVO RD330 SERVER with a ThinkServer RAID 500 Adapter II RAID controller. I am having problems finding out if all of the hardware that I am wanting will be compatible with Ubuntu. I have check the "Certified Hardware" list but the list is very limited. Both the computer and the RAID controller say they support RedHat and Suse but obviously Ubuntu isn't mentioned. I have talked with my vendor and they also not certain if this hardware will work. I have also Google around and the RAID controller appears to be an LSI chipset. But again I haven't been able to find any definitive information saying that this will work. Any suggestions on how I can find out if the hardware will work?

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  • Difference between "machine hardware" and "hardware platform"

    - by Adil
    My Linux machine reports "uname -a" outputs as below:- [[email protected] i386]# uname -a Linux tom 2.6.9-89.ELsmp #1 SMP Mon Apr 20 10:34:33 EDT 2009 i686 i686 i386 GNU/Linux [[email protected] i386]# As per man page of uname, the entries "i686 i686 i386" denotes:- machine hardware name (i686) processor type (i686) hardware platform (i386) Additional info: [[email protected] i386]# cat /proc/cpuinfo <snip> vendor_id : GenuineIntel cpu family : 6 model : 15 model name : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU 5148 @ 2.33GHz stepping : 6 cpu MHz : 2328.038 cache size : 4096 KB </snip>

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  • Installation problem Ubuntu 12.04 Crashing hardware error

    - by user93640
    I am running on Ubuntu 8.04 for quite some time without many problems. About almost a year ago or so I have been trying to upgrade to 10.04 LTS, but without any success. Each time when trying to upgrade or even newly install the installation process crashed after about an hour or so (I forgot exactly how long). Now I wanted to try Ubuntu 12.04 (not even installing, but I only selected "Try Ubuntu without installing") and I got similar errors. I did not try to install it, because of earlier experience with 10.04 when after I also lost 8.04 and had to install from scratch again (after which it worked). I get the following screen (as I am not allowed to upload photos here the text): 26.767262] [Hardware Error]: CPU 0: Machine Check Exception: 0 Bank 5: b200001804000e0f 26.767279] [Hardware Error]: TSC 0 26.767287] [Hardware Error]: PROCESSOR 0:6f6 TIME 1349017924 SOCKET 0 APIC 0 microcode 44 26.767297] [Hardware Error]: Run the above through 'mcelog --ascii' 26.767307] [Hardware Error]: CPU 1: Machine Check Exception: 0 Bank 1: b200000000000175 26.767316] [Hardware Error]: TSC 0 26.767323] [Hardware Error]: PROCESSOR 0:6f6 TIME 1349017924 SOCKET 0 APIC 1 microcode 44 26.767331] [Hardware Error]: Run the above through 'mcelog --ascii' 26.767339] [Hardware Error]: CPU 1: Machine Check Exception: 0 Bank 5: b200003000000e0f 26.767348] [Hardware Error]: TSC 0 26.767354] [Hardware Error]: PROCESSOR 0:6f6 TIME 1349017924 SOCKET 0 APIC 1 microcode 44 26.767363] [Hardware Error]: Run the above through 'mcelog --ascii' 26.767371] [Hardware Error]: CPU 1: Machine Check Exception: 4 Bank 1: b200000000000175 26.767379] [Hardware Error]: TSC 1bf231e65f 26.767386] [Hardware Error]: PROCESSOR 0:6f6 TIME 1349017951 SOCKET 0 APIC 1 microcode 44 26.767395] [Hardware Error]: Run the above through 'mcelog --ascii' 26.767403] [Hardware Error]: CPU 1: Machine Check Exception: 4 Bank 5: b200003008000e0f 26.767413] [Hardware Error]: TSC 1bf231e65f 26.767421] [Hardware Error]: PROCESSOR 0:6f6 TIME 1349017951 SOCKET 0 APIC 1 microcode 44 26.767429] [Hardware Error]: Run the above through 'mcelog --ascii' 26.767437] [Hardware Error]: CPU 0: Machine Check Exception: 5 Bank 5: b200001806000e0f 26.767447] [Hardware Error]: RIP |INEXACT| 60:<00000000c1018b5c> {mwait_idle+0x7c/0x1d0} 26.767464] [Hardware Error]: TSC 1bf231e674 26.767471] [Hardware Error]: PROCESSOR 0:6f6 TIME 1349017951 SOCKET 0 APIC 0 microcode 44 26.767480] [Hardware Error]: Run the above through 'mcelog --ascii' 26.767487] [Hardware Error]: Machine check: Processor context corrupt 26.767495] Kernel panic - not syncing: Fatal Machine check 26.767505] Pid: 579, comm: debconf-communi Tainted: G M 3.2.0.29-generic-pae #46-Ubuntu 26.767515] Call Trace: 26.767525] [<c158f812>] ? printk+0x2d/0x2f 26.767534] [<c158f6e0>] panic+0x5c/0x161 26.767542] [<c10247ef>] mce_panic.part.14+0x13f/0x170 26.767551] [<c1024872>] mce_panic+0x52/0x90 26.767558] [<c1024a18>] mce_reign+0x168/0x170 26.767565] [<c1024bb5>] mce_end+0x105/0x110 26.767572] [<c10252db>] do_machine_check+0x32b/0x4f0 26.767581] [<c1024fb0>] ? mce_log+0x120/0x120 26.767590] [<c15a5e47>] error_code+0x67/0x6c 26.767602] panic occurred, switching back to text console 26.768498] Rebooting in 30 seconds.. For information, I have also tried earlier Arch Linux. I can install it, but when I try to install a window manager (LXDE) again I got similar errors. Fedora also crashes when installing and also Mandriva did not work for me. Therefore I think something deep in the machine might be wrong. But as stated above I can (clean) install 8.04 and also 9.10 can be installed without problems. Also updates for 8.04 can be installed. My machine is dual boot with XP next to it on a different partition. My HW: Memory : 2.0 GiB; Processor 0: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 CPU 6320 @ 1.86GHz; Processor 1: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 CPU 6320 @ 1.86GHz; How can I install Ubuntu 12.04? Last option would be to completely format my machine and install everything from scratch, but even I am not sure if that would solve it in the end. Can anybody help me out?

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  • Does a Samsung G3 Station external hard drive stop working when power supply is too high?

    - by Cacovsky
    I have a Samsung G3 Station 2TB external hard drive (link to PDF specs here). It was working perfectly when I accidentally plugged it in my notebook's power source. The notebook's power source is 19V/3.42A. The hard drive's is 12V/2A and I know that, inside its case, there is regular 2TB SATA drive, along with some sort of adapter. Does this adapter has some kind of power protection? I opened the case and the hard drive board smells bad. Does my data is forever lost or can I replace its board?

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