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  • Hyper-V and Hyper-threading: On or off?

    - by CapBBeard
    Hey all, With the new Xeon CPUs supporting Hyper-threading, what is the current wisdom with regard to using it (or not) on a Hyper-V host machine? I was originally under the impression that turning it on in a virtual host environment could be detrimental as the 'extra' CPUs were not true cores. However I've also read (unconfirmed) comments along the lines of MS doing some hard work to get Hyper-V running well in a Hyper-threading environment. Does anyone have any solid information or experience in this regard? Cheers!

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  • Comparison of Hyper-V, Hyper-V Server, VMware ESXi, Xen and Parallels Bare Metal (Community Wiki)

    - by Andrew J. Brehm
    Can we use this question to collect information and the pros and cons of each of the above products? Specifically I am wondering whethere there is any sane reason to use Hyper-V (the role built into Windows Server) over Hyper-V server (the stand-alone product based on the same technology) and what exactly the differences are between ESXi, Xen and Hyper-V and why nobody seems to use Parallels Bare Metal. Make this a Community Wiki. I want comparisons, not reputation.

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  • Migration of VM from Hyper-V to Hyper-V R2 - Pass through disks

    - by Andrew Gillen
    I am trying to migrate a VM which is using two pass through disks from a legacy Hyper-V Cluster to a new R2 cluster. The migrated VM cannot use the pass through disks though. The guest OS (2008 R2) doesn't seem to like the disk and eventually tries to format the disk instead of mounting it. The migration process I have been using for all my VMs is to export the VM to a new lun, then add that new lun to the new cluster, importing the vm off it in the hyper-v console, then making it highly available. I assumed I could do the same thing and just add the two pass through disks to the new cluster and then attach them inside Hyper-V. Is there a process I need to follow to migrate pass through disks that does not involve setting up new Luns and robocopying the data over?

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  • Problems with Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V

    - by user3438673
    I install a windows server 2012 R2 and then install a virtual machine on hyper-v. When i configure the virtual machine in hyper-v i configure 4gb of ram then few days later y change it to 12gb of Ram Problem the problem is when i change the ram the virtual machine star working slower and i have to return the 4gb of ram. i cretae a new virtual machine and i configure the virtual machine with 12gb of ram from start but still working to slow do you know how to solve this problem in hyper-v?

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  • VMRC equivalent for Hyper-V?

    - by Ian Boyd
    VMRC was the client tool used to connect to virtual machines running on Virtual Server. Upgrading to Windows Server 2008 R2 with the Hyper-V role, i need a way for people to be able to use the virtual machines. Note: not all virtual machines will have network connectivity not all virtual machines will be running Windows some people needing to connect to a virtual machine will be running Windows XP Hyper-V manager, allowing management of the hyper-v server, is less desirable (since it allows management of the hyper-v server (and doesn't work on all operating systems)) What is the Windows Server 2008 R2 equivalent of VMRC; to "vnc" to a virtual server? Update: i think Tatas was suggesting Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager Self-Service Portal 2.0 (?): Which requires SQL Server IIS Installing those would unfortunately violate our Windows Server 2008 R2 license. i might be looking at the wrong product link, since commenter said there is a version that doesn't require "System Center". Update 2: The Windows Server 2008 R2 running HyperV is being licensed with the understanding that it only be used to host HyperV. From the [Windows Server 2008 R2 Licensing FAQ][4]: Q. If I have one license for Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard and want to run it in a virtual operating system environment, can I continue running it in the physical operating system environment? A. Yes, with Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard, you may run one instance in the physical operating system environment and one instance in the virtual operating system environment; however, the instance running in the physical operating system environment may be used only to run hardware virtualization software, provide hardware virtualization services, or to run software to manage and service operating system environments on the licensed server. This is why i'm weary about installing IIS or SQL Server.

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  • Running Debian as guest operating system on a Hyper-V VM

    - by kce
    Hello. Layer-9 considerations are prompting a migration from Citrix XenServer to Hyper-V as our shop's virtualization platform of choice. This will require me to migrate our existing virtual machines from XenServer to Hyper-V. A hand full of these VMs are running Debian. Unfortunately, Debian does not seem to be on the list of approved/supported guest operating systems. In fact it seems that running Debian as a guest operating system of is rather difficult, although apparently not impossible. I have two interrelated questions: Does anyone have any experience running a Debian guest on Hyper-V? Is it one of those things where it just will not work at all or is more along the lines of "it will probably work fine, but we won't support it". Any experience here, positive or negative, would be helpful. How much of a bad idea is it to deviate from Hyper-V's list of supported guest operating systems? Again, is it either basically asking for Bad Things (TM) to happen or is just another instance of "it will probably work fine, but we won't support it"? Or is it somewhere in the middle? Thank you.

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  • hyper-v server 2003 instance using internet connection sharing disconnects remote desktop to hyper-v host

    - by Joseph Southwell
    I have a windows server 2003 R2 instance running in a hyper-v instance on windows 8. I have setup an internal switch that uses internet connection sharing to get out to the internet. It works fine except for when I try to do windows update on the server 2003 instance it disconnects my remote desktop session to the windows 8 hyper-v host. When I reconnect it says windows update failed. I know that sounds crazy but I have tested it over and over again. If I change the instance to use my external switch (I have an external switch defined on another network adapter) windows update works fine.

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  • Hyper-V cluster VS regular cluster

    - by Sasha
    We need to choice between Hyper-V and regular cluster technologies. What is the advantage and disadvantage of these approaches? Update: We have to physical servers and want to build reliably solution using cluster approach. We need to clustering our application and DB (MS SQL). We know that we can use: Regular Windows Cluster Service. Application and DB will be migrating from one node to other. Hyper-V Failover Cluster. Virtual machine will be migrating from one node to other. Combined variant. DB mirroring for MS SQL and Hyper-V for our application. We need to make a choice between this approach. So we need to know advantage and disadvantage of these approaches?

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  • SQL Server and Hyper-V Dynamic Memory Part 2

    - by SQLOS Team
    Part 1 of this series was an introduction and overview of Hyper-V Dynamic Memory. This part looks at SQL Server memory management and how the SQL engine responds to changing OS memory conditions.   Part 2: SQL Server Memory Management As with any Windows process, sqlserver.exe has a virtual address space (VAS) of 4GB on 32-bit and 8TB in 64-bit editions. Pages in its VAS are mapped to pages in physical memory when the memory is committed and referenced for the first time. The collection of VAS pages that have been recently referenced is known as the Working Set. How and when SQL Server allocates virtual memory and grows its working set depends on the memory model it uses. SQL Server supports three basic memory models:   1. Conventional Memory Model   The Conventional model is the default SQL Server memory model and has the following properties: - Dynamic - can grow or shrink its working set in response to load and external (operating system) memory conditions. - OS uses 4K pages – (not to be confused with SQL Server “pages” which are 8K regions of committed memory).- Pageable - Can be paged out to disk by the operating system.   2. Locked Page Model The locked page memory model is set when SQL Server is started with "Lock Pages in Memory" privilege*. It has the following characteristics: - Dynamic - can grow or shrink its working set in the same way as the Conventional model.- OS uses 4K pages - Non-Pageable – When memory is committed it is locked in memory, meaning that it will remain backed by physical memory and will not be paged out by the operating system. A common misconception is to interpret "locked" as non-dynamic. A SQL Server instance using the locked page memory model will grow and shrink (allocate memory and release memory) in response to changing workload and OS memory conditions in the same way as it does with the conventional model.   This is an important consideration when we look at Hyper-V Dynamic Memory – “locked” memory works perfectly well with “dynamic” memory.   * Note in “Denali” (Standard Edition and above), and in SQL 2008 R2 64-bit (Enterprise and above editions) the Lock Pages in Memory privilege is all that is required to set this model. In 2008 R2 64-Bit standard edition it also requires trace flag 845 to be set, in 2008 R2 32-bit editions it requires sp_configure 'awe enabled' 1.   3. Large Page Model The Large page model is set using trace flag 834 and potentially offers a small performance boost for systems that are configured with large pages. It is characterized by: - Static - memory is allocated at startup and does not change. - OS uses large (>2MB) pages - Non-Pageable The large page model is supported with Hyper-V Dynamic Memory (and Hyper-V also supports large pages), but you get no benefit from using Dynamic Memory with this model since SQL Server memory does not grow or shrink. The rest of this article will focus on the locked and conventional SQL Server memory models.   When does SQL Server grow? For “dynamic” configurations (Conventional and Locked memory models), the sqlservr.exe process grows – allocates and commits memory from the OS – in response to a workload. As much memory is allocated as is required to optimally run the query and buffer data for future queries, subject to limitations imposed by:   - SQL Server max server memory setting. If this configuration option is set, the buffer pool is not allowed to grow to more than this value. In SQL Server 2008 this value represents single page allocations, and in “Denali” it represents any size page allocations and also managed CLR procedure allocations.   - Memory signals from OS. The operating system sets a signal on memory resource notification objects to indicate whether it has memory available or whether it is low on available memory. If there is only 32MB free for every 4GB of memory a low memory signal is set, which continues until 64MB/4GB is free. If there is 96MB/4GB free the operating system sets a high memory signal. SQL Server only allocates memory when the high memory signal is set.   To summarize, for SQL Server to grow you need three conditions: a workload, max server memory setting higher than the current allocation, high memory signals from the OS.    When does SQL Server shrink caches? SQL Server as a rule does not like to return memory to the OS, but it will shrink its caches in response to memory pressure. Memory pressure can be divided into “internal” and “external”.   - External memory pressure occurs when the operating system is running low on memory and low memory signals are set. The SQL Server Resource Monitor checks for low memory signals approximately every 5 seconds and it will attempt to free memory until the signals stop.   To free memory SQL Server does the following: ·         Frees unused memory. ·         Notifies Memory Manager Clients to release memory o   Caches – Free unreferenced cache objects. o   Buffer pool - Based on oldest access times.   The freed memory is released back to the operating system. This process continues until the low memory resource notifications stop.    - Internal memory pressure occurs when the size of different caches and allocations increase but the SQL Server process needs to keep its total memory within a target value. For example if max server memory is set and certain caches are growing large, it will cause SQL to free memory for re-use internally, but not to release memory back to the OS. If you lower the value of max server memory you will generate internal memory pressure that will cause SQL to release memory back to the OS.    Memory pressure handling has not changed much since SQL 2005 and it was described in detail in a blog post by Slava Oks.   Note that SQL Server Express is an exception to the above behavior. Unlike other editions it does not assume it is the most important process running on the system but tries to be more “desktop” friendly. It will empty its working set after a period of inactivity.   How does SQL Server respond to changing OS memory?    In SQL Server 2005 support for Hot-Add memory was introduced. This feature, available in Enterprise and above editions, allows the server to make use of any extra physical memory that was added after SQL Server started. Being able to add physical memory when the system is running is limited to specialized hardware, but with the Hyper-V Dynamic Memory feature, when new memory is allocated to a guest virtual machine, it looks like hot-add physical memory to the guest. What this means is that thanks to the hot-add memory feature, SQL Server 2005 and higher can dynamically grow if more “physical” memory is granted to a guest VM by Hyper-V dynamic memory.   SQL Server checks OS memory every second and dynamically adjusts its “target” (based on available OS memory and max server memory) accordingly.   In “Denali” Standard Edition will also have sqlserver.exe support for hot-add memory when running virtualized (i.e. detecting and acting on Hyper-V Dynamic Memory allocations).   How does a SQL Server workload in a guest VM impact Hyper-V dynamic memory scheduling?   When a SQL workload causes the sqlserver.exe process to grow its working set, the Hyper-V memory scheduler will detect memory pressure in the guest VM and add memory to it. SQL Server will then detect the extra memory and grow according to workload demand. In our tests we have seen this feedback process cause a guest VM to grow quickly in response to SQL workload - we are still working on characterizing this ramp-up.    How does SQL Server respond when Hyper-V removes memory from a guest VM through ballooning?   If pressure from other VM's cause Hyper-V Dynamic Memory to take memory away from a VM through ballooning (allocating memory with a virtual device driver and returning it to the host OS), Windows Memory Manager will page out unlocked portions of memory and signal low resource notification events. When SQL Server detects these events it will shrink memory until the low memory notifications stop (see cache shrinking description above).    This raises another question. Can we make SQL Server release memory more readily and hence behave more "dynamically" without compromising performance? In certain circumstances where the application workload is predictable it may be possible to have a job which varies "max server memory" according to need, lowering it when the engine is inactive and raising it before a period of activity. This would have limited applicaability but it is something we're looking into.   What Memory Management changes are there in SQL Server “Denali”?   In SQL Server “Denali” (aka SQL11) the Memory Manager has been re-written to be more efficient. The main changes are summarized in this post. An important change with respect to Hyper-V Dynamic Memory support is that now the max server memory setting includes any size page allocations and managed CLR procedure allocations it now represents a closer approximation to total sqlserver.exe memory usage. This makes it easier to calculate a value for max server memory, which becomes important when configuring virtual machines to work well with Hyper-V Dynamic Memory Startup and Maximum RAM settings.   Another important change is no more AWE or hot-add support for 32-bit edition. This means if you're running a 32-bit edition of Denali you're limited to a 4GB address space and will not be able to take advantage of dynamically added OS memory that wasn't present when SQL Server started (though Hyper-V Dynamic Memory is still a supported configuration).   In part 3 we’ll develop some best practices for configuring and using SQL Server with Dynamic Memory. Originally posted at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/sqlosteam/

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  • FreeBSD running in Hyper-V

    - by dmo
    I'd like to install FreeBSD 8.0 in a Hyper-V VM but I get a kernel panic whenever I try to boot the install ISO. I've tried both i386 and amd64; with and without APIC enabled; with and without processor features disabled in Hyper-V. Is it necessary to use the procedure in the Handbook for Xen domU? Does anyone has experience with this configuration?

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  • SQL Server and Hyper-V Dynamic Memory - Part 1

    - by SQLOS Team
    SQL and Dynamic Memory Blog Post Series   Hyper-V Dynamic Memory is a new feature in Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 that allows the memory assigned to guest virtual machines to vary according to demand. Using this feature with SQL Server is supported, but how well does it work in an environment where available memory can vary dynamically, especially since SQL Server likes memory, and is not very eager to let go of it? The next three posts will look at this question in detail. In Part 1 Serdar Sutay, a program manager in the Windows Hyper-V team, introduces Dynamic Memory with an overview of the basic architecture, configuration and monitoring concepts. In subsequent parts we will look at SQL Server memory handling, and develop some guidelines on using SQL Server with Dynamic Memory.   Part 1: Dynamic Memory Introduction   In virtualized environments memory is often the bottleneck for reaching higher VM densities. In Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 Hyper-V introduced a new feature “Dynamic Memory” to improve VM densities on Hyper-V hosts. Dynamic Memory increases the memory utilization in virtualized environments by enabling VM memory to be changed dynamically when the VM is running.   This brings up the question of how to utilize this feature with SQL Server VMs as SQL Server performance is very sensitive to the memory being used. In the next three posts we’ll discuss the internals of Dynamic Memory, SQL Server Memory Management and how to use Dynamic Memory with SQL Server VMs.   Memory Utilization Efficiency in Virtualized Environments   The primary reason memory is usually the bottleneck for higher VM densities is that users tend to be generous when assigning memory to their VMs. Here are some memory sizing practices we’ve heard from customers:   ·         I assign 4 GB of memory to my VMs. I don’t know if all of it is being used by the applications but no one complains. ·         I take the minimum system requirements and add 50% more. ·         I go with the recommendations provided by my software vendor.   In reality correctly sizing a virtual machine requires significant effort to monitor the memory usage of the applications. Since this is not done in most environments, VMs are usually over-provisioned in terms of memory. In other words, a SQL Server VM that is assigned 4 GB of memory may not need to use 4 GB.   How does Dynamic Memory help?   Dynamic Memory improves the memory utilization by removing the requirement to determine the memory need for an application. Hyper-V determines the memory needed by applications in the VM by evaluating the memory usage information in the guest with Dynamic Memory. VMs can start with a small amount of memory and they can be assigned more memory dynamically based on the workload of applications running inside.   Overview of Dynamic Memory Concepts   ·         Startup Memory: Startup Memory is the starting amount of memory when Dynamic Memory is enabled for a VM. Dynamic Memory will make sure that this amount of memory is always assigned to the VMs by default.   ·         Maximum Memory: Maximum Memory specifies the maximum amount of memory that a VM can grow to with Dynamic Memory. ·         Memory Demand: Memory Demand is the amount determined by Dynamic Memory as the memory needed by the applications in the VM. In Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1, this is equal to the total amount of committed memory of the VM. ·         Memory Buffer: Memory Buffer is the amount of memory assigned to the VMs in addition to their memory demand to satisfy immediate memory requirements and file cache needs.   Once Dynamic Memory is enabled for a VM, it will start with the “Startup Memory”. After the boot process Dynamic Memory will determine the “Memory Demand” of the VM. Based on this memory demand it will determine the amount of “Memory Buffer” that needs to be assigned to the VM. Dynamic Memory will assign the total of “Memory Demand” and “Memory Buffer” to the VM as long as this value is less than “Maximum Memory” and as long as physical memory is available on the host.   What happens when there is not enough physical memory available on the host?   Once there is not enough physical memory on the host to satisfy VM needs, Dynamic Memory will assign less than needed amount of memory to the VMs based on their importance. A concept known as “Memory Weight” is used to determine how much VMs should be penalized based on their needed amount of memory. “Memory Weight” is a configuration setting on the VM. It can be configured to be higher for the VMs with high performance requirements. Under high memory pressure on the host, the “Memory Weight” of the VMs are evaluated in a relative manner and the VMs with lower relative “Memory Weight” will be penalized more than the ones with higher “Memory Weight”.   Dynamic Memory Configuration   Based on these concepts “Startup Memory”, “Maximum Memory”, “Memory Buffer” and “Memory Weight” can be configured as shown below in Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 Hyper-V Manager. Memory Demand is automatically calculated by Dynamic Memory once VMs start running.     Dynamic Memory Monitoring    In Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1, Hyper-V Manager displays the memory status of VMs in the following three columns:         ·         Assigned Memory represents the current physical memory assigned to the VM. In regular conditions this will be equal to the sum of “Memory Demand” and “Memory Buffer” assigned to the VM. When there is not enough memory on the host, this value can go below the Memory Demand determined for the VM. ·         Memory Demand displays the current “Memory Demand” determined for the VM. ·         Memory Status displays the current memory status of the VM. This column can represent three values for a VM: o   OK: In this condition the VM is assigned the total of Memory Demand and Memory Buffer it needs. o   Low: In this condition the VM is assigned all the Memory Demand and a certain percentage of the Memory Buffer it needs. o   Warning: In this condition the VM is assigned a lower memory than its Memory Demand. When VMs are running in this condition, it’s likely that they will exhibit performance problems due to internal paging happening in the VM.    So far so good! But how does it work with SQL Server?   SQL Server is aggressive in terms of memory usage for good reasons. This raises the question: How do SQL Server and Dynamic Memory work together? To understand the full story, we’ll first need to understand how SQL Server Memory Management works. This will be covered in our second post in “SQL and Dynamic Memory” series. Meanwhile if you want to dive deeper into Dynamic Memory you can check the below posts from the Windows Virtualization Team Blog:   http://blogs.technet.com/virtualization/archive/2010/03/18/dynamic-memory-coming-to-hyper-v.aspx   http://blogs.technet.com/virtualization/archive/2010/03/25/dynamic-memory-coming-to-hyper-v-part-2.aspx   http://blogs.technet.com/virtualization/archive/2010/04/07/dynamic-memory-coming-to-hyper-v-part-3.aspx   http://blogs.technet.com/b/virtualization/archive/2010/04/21/dynamic-memory-coming-to-hyper-v-part-4.aspx   http://blogs.technet.com/b/virtualization/archive/2010/05/20/dynamic-memory-coming-to-hyper-v-part-5.aspx   http://blogs.technet.com/b/virtualization/archive/2010/07/12/dynamic-memory-coming-to-hyper-v-part-6.aspx   - Serdar Sutay   Originally posted at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/sqlosteam/

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  • SQL Server and Hyper-V Dynamic Memory - Part 1

    - by SQLOS Team
    SQL and Dynamic Memory Blog Post Series   Hyper-V Dynamic Memory is a new feature in Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 that allows the memory assigned to guest virtual machines to vary according to demand. Using this feature with SQL Server is supported, but how well does it work in an environment where available memory can vary dynamically, especially since SQL Server likes memory, and is not very eager to let go of it? The next three posts will look at this question in detail. In Part 1 Serdar Sutay, a program manager in the Windows Hyper-V team, introduces Dynamic Memory with an overview of the basic architecture, configuration and monitoring concepts. In subsequent parts we will look at SQL Server memory handling, and develop some guidelines on using SQL Server with Dynamic Memory.   Part 1: Dynamic Memory Introduction   In virtualized environments memory is often the bottleneck for reaching higher VM densities. In Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 Hyper-V introduced a new feature “Dynamic Memory” to improve VM densities on Hyper-V hosts. Dynamic Memory increases the memory utilization in virtualized environments by enabling VM memory to be changed dynamically when the VM is running.   This brings up the question of how to utilize this feature with SQL Server VMs as SQL Server performance is very sensitive to the memory being used. In the next three posts we’ll discuss the internals of Dynamic Memory, SQL Server Memory Management and how to use Dynamic Memory with SQL Server VMs.   Memory Utilization Efficiency in Virtualized Environments   The primary reason memory is usually the bottleneck for higher VM densities is that users tend to be generous when assigning memory to their VMs. Here are some memory sizing practices we’ve heard from customers:   ·         I assign 4 GB of memory to my VMs. I don’t know if all of it is being used by the applications but no one complains. ·         I take the minimum system requirements and add 50% more. ·         I go with the recommendations provided by my software vendor.   In reality correctly sizing a virtual machine requires significant effort to monitor the memory usage of the applications. Since this is not done in most environments, VMs are usually over-provisioned in terms of memory. In other words, a SQL Server VM that is assigned 4 GB of memory may not need to use 4 GB.   How does Dynamic Memory help?   Dynamic Memory improves the memory utilization by removing the requirement to determine the memory need for an application. Hyper-V determines the memory needed by applications in the VM by evaluating the memory usage information in the guest with Dynamic Memory. VMs can start with a small amount of memory and they can be assigned more memory dynamically based on the workload of applications running inside.   Overview of Dynamic Memory Concepts   ·         Startup Memory: Startup Memory is the starting amount of memory when Dynamic Memory is enabled for a VM. Dynamic Memory will make sure that this amount of memory is always assigned to the VMs by default.   ·         Maximum Memory: Maximum Memory specifies the maximum amount of memory that a VM can grow to with Dynamic Memory. ·         Memory Demand: Memory Demand is the amount determined by Dynamic Memory as the memory needed by the applications in the VM. In Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1, this is equal to the total amount of committed memory of the VM. ·         Memory Buffer: Memory Buffer is the amount of memory assigned to the VMs in addition to their memory demand to satisfy immediate memory requirements and file cache needs.   Once Dynamic Memory is enabled for a VM, it will start with the “Startup Memory”. After the boot process Dynamic Memory will determine the “Memory Demand” of the VM. Based on this memory demand it will determine the amount of “Memory Buffer” that needs to be assigned to the VM. Dynamic Memory will assign the total of “Memory Demand” and “Memory Buffer” to the VM as long as this value is less than “Maximum Memory” and as long as physical memory is available on the host.   What happens when there is not enough physical memory available on the host?   Once there is not enough physical memory on the host to satisfy VM needs, Dynamic Memory will assign less than needed amount of memory to the VMs based on their importance. A concept known as “Memory Weight” is used to determine how much VMs should be penalized based on their needed amount of memory. “Memory Weight” is a configuration setting on the VM. It can be configured to be higher for the VMs with high performance requirements. Under high memory pressure on the host, the “Memory Weight” of the VMs are evaluated in a relative manner and the VMs with lower relative “Memory Weight” will be penalized more than the ones with higher “Memory Weight”.   Dynamic Memory Configuration   Based on these concepts “Startup Memory”, “Maximum Memory”, “Memory Buffer” and “Memory Weight” can be configured as shown below in Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 Hyper-V Manager. Memory Demand is automatically calculated by Dynamic Memory once VMs start running.     Dynamic Memory Monitoring    In Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1, Hyper-V Manager displays the memory status of VMs in the following three columns:         ·         Assigned Memory represents the current physical memory assigned to the VM. In regular conditions this will be equal to the sum of “Memory Demand” and “Memory Buffer” assigned to the VM. When there is not enough memory on the host, this value can go below the Memory Demand determined for the VM. ·         Memory Demand displays the current “Memory Demand” determined for the VM. ·         Memory Status displays the current memory status of the VM. This column can represent three values for a VM: o   OK: In this condition the VM is assigned the total of Memory Demand and Memory Buffer it needs. o   Low: In this condition the VM is assigned all the Memory Demand and a certain percentage of the Memory Buffer it needs. o   Warning: In this condition the VM is assigned a lower memory than its Memory Demand. When VMs are running in this condition, it’s likely that they will exhibit performance problems due to internal paging happening in the VM.    So far so good! But how does it work with SQL Server?   SQL Server is aggressive in terms of memory usage for good reasons. This raises the question: How do SQL Server and Dynamic Memory work together? To understand the full story, we’ll first need to understand how SQL Server Memory Management works. This will be covered in our second post in “SQL and Dynamic Memory” series. Meanwhile if you want to dive deeper into Dynamic Memory you can check the below posts from the Windows Virtualization Team Blog:   http://blogs.technet.com/virtualization/archive/2010/03/18/dynamic-memory-coming-to-hyper-v.aspx   http://blogs.technet.com/virtualization/archive/2010/03/25/dynamic-memory-coming-to-hyper-v-part-2.aspx   http://blogs.technet.com/virtualization/archive/2010/04/07/dynamic-memory-coming-to-hyper-v-part-3.aspx   http://blogs.technet.com/b/virtualization/archive/2010/04/21/dynamic-memory-coming-to-hyper-v-part-4.aspx   http://blogs.technet.com/b/virtualization/archive/2010/05/20/dynamic-memory-coming-to-hyper-v-part-5.aspx   http://blogs.technet.com/b/virtualization/archive/2010/07/12/dynamic-memory-coming-to-hyper-v-part-6.aspx   - Serdar Sutay   Originally posted at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/sqlosteam/

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  • Cannot get SCVMM Admin Console to Connect to Hyper-V Server 2008 R2

    - by user63250
    I cannot get SCVMM Admin console to connect to Hyper-V Server 2008. I have changed all firewall settings on the server to allow for a connection, I have even tried turning the firewall off completely. I am getting this error message: Unable to connect to the Virtual Machine Manager server xx.xxx.xxx.xx. the Virtual Machine Manager service on that servier did not respond. Verify that Virtual Machine Manager has been installed on the server and that the Virtual Machine Manager service is running. Then try to connect again. If the problem persists, restart the Virtual Machine Manager Service. ID: 1602 I have tried restarting the VMMS service, and that did not work. I have posted a similar question to this before, and was told to make sure to intall the Hyper-V agent on the Hyper-V server. I was told that SCVMM can push the agent out to the server. However, if I cannot connect to the server, how can I use SCVMM to push out the agent? Thanks for any help.

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  • SQL Server and Hyper-V Dynamic Memory Part 3

    - by SQLOS Team
    In parts 1 and 2 of this series we looked at the basics of Hyper-V Dynamic Memory and SQL Server memory management. In this part Serdar looks at configuration guidelines for SQL Server memory management. Part 3: Configuration Guidelines for Hyper-V Dynamic Memory and SQL Server Now that we understand SQL Server Memory Management and Hyper-V Dynamic Memory basics, let’s take a look at general configuration guidelines in order to utilize benefits of Hyper-V Dynamic Memory in your SQL Server VMs. Requirements Host Operating System Requirements Hyper-V Dynamic Memory feature is introduced with Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1. Therefore in order to use Dynamic Memory for your virtual machines, you need to have Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 or Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2008 R2 SP1 in your Hyper-V host. Guest Operating System Requirements In addition to this Dynamic Memory is only supported in Standard, Web, Enterprise and Datacenter editions of windows running inside VMs. Make sure that your VM is running one of these editions. For additional requirements on each operating system see “Dynamic Memory Configuration Guidelines” here. SQL Server Requirements All versions of SQL Server support Hyper-V Dynamic Memory. However, only certain editions of SQL Server are aware of dynamically changing system memory. To have a truly dynamic environment for your SQL Server VMs make sure that you are running one of the SQL Server editions listed below: ·         SQL Server 2005 Enterprise ·         SQL Server 2008 Enterprise / Datacenter Editions ·         SQL Server 2008 R2 Enterprise / Datacenter Editions Configuration guidelines for other versions of SQL Server are covered below in the FAQ section. Guidelines for configuring Dynamic Memory Parameters Here is how to configure Dynamic Memory for your SQL VMs in a nutshell: Hyper-V Dynamic Memory Parameter Recommendation Startup RAM 1 GB + SQL Min Server Memory Maximum RAM > SQL Max Server Memory Memory Buffer % 5 Memory Weight Based on performance needs   Startup RAM In order to ensure that your SQL Server VMs can start correctly, ensure that Startup RAM is higher than configured SQL Min Server Memory for your VMs. Otherwise SQL Server service will need to do paging in order to start since it will not be able to see enough memory during startup. Also note that Startup Memory will always be reserved for your VMs. This will guarantee a certain level of performance for your SQL Servers, however setting this too high will limit the consolidation benefits you’ll get out of your virtualization environment. Maximum RAM This one is obvious. If you’ve configured SQL Max Server Memory for your SQL Server, make sure that Dynamic Memory Maximum RAM configuration is higher than this value. Otherwise your SQL Server will not grow to memory values higher than the value configured for Dynamic Memory. Memory Buffer % Memory buffer configuration is used to provision file cache to virtual machines in order to improve performance. Due to the fact that SQL Server is managing its own buffer pool, Memory Buffer setting should be configured to the lowest value possible, 5%. Configuring a higher memory buffer will prevent low resource notifications from Windows Memory Manager and it will prevent reclaiming memory from SQL Server VMs. Memory Weight Memory weight configuration defines the importance of memory to a VM. Configure higher values for the VMs that have higher performance requirements. VMs with higher memory weight will have more memory under high memory pressure conditions on your host. Questions and Answers Q1 – Which SQL Server memory model is best for Dynamic Memory? The best SQL Server model for Dynamic Memory is “Locked Page Memory Model”. This memory model ensures that SQL Server memory is never paged out and it’s also adaptive to dynamically changing memory in the system. This will be extremely useful when Dynamic Memory is attempting to remove memory from SQL Server VMs ensuring no SQL Server memory is paged out. You can find instructions on configuring “Locked Page Memory Model” for your SQL Servers here. Q2 – What about other SQL Server Editions, how should I configure Dynamic Memory for them? Other editions of SQL Server do not adapt to dynamically changing environments. They will determine how much memory they should allocate during startup and don’t change this value afterwards. Therefore make sure that you configure a higher startup memory for your VM because that will be all the memory that SQL Server utilize Tune Maximum Memory and Memory Buffer based on the other workloads running on the system. If there are no other workloads consider using Static Memory for these editions. Q3 – What if I have multiple SQL Server instances in a VM? Having multiple SQL Server instances in a VM is not a general recommendation for predictable performance, manageability and isolation. In order to achieve a predictable behavior make sure that you configure SQL Min Server Memory and SQL Max Server Memory for each instance in the VM. And make sure that: ·         Dynamic Memory Startup Memory is greater than the sum of SQL Min Server Memory values for the instances in the VM ·         Dynamic Memory Maximum Memory is greater than the sum of SQL Max Server Memory values for the instances in the VM Q4 – I’m using Large Page Memory Model for my SQL Server. Can I still use Dynamic Memory? The short answer is no. SQL Server does not dynamically change its memory size when configured with Large Page Memory Model. In virtualized environments Hyper-V provides large page support by default. Most of the time, Large Page Memory Model doesn’t bring any benefits to a SQL Server if it’s running in virtualized environments. Q5 – How do I monitor SQL performance when I’m trying Dynamic Memory on my VMs? Use the performance counters below to monitor memory performance for SQL Server: Process - Working Set: This counter is available in the VM via process performance counters. It represents the actual amount of physical memory being used by SQL Server process in the VM. SQL Server – Buffer Cache Hit Ratio: This counter is available in the VM via SQL Server counters. This represents the paging being done by SQL Server. A rate of 90% or higher is desirable. Conclusion These blog posts are a quick start to a story that will be developing more in the near future. We’re still continuing our testing and investigations to provide more detailed configuration guidelines with example performance numbers with a white paper in the upcoming months. Now it’s time to give SQL Server and Hyper-V Dynamic Memory a try. Use this guidelines to kick-start your environment. See what you think about it and let us know of your experiences. - Serdar Sutay Originally posted at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/sqlosteam/

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  • Hyper-V Manager: right-clicking on remote VM crashes MMC snap-in

    - by Greg Bray
    I have a Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise SP1 machine that I log into and use to manage virtual machines running on multiple Hyper-V servers on our domain. Sometimes, when I right-click on a remote VM, the Hyper-V Manager will crash and display the following error message: If I use the Actions menu on the lower right, it works just fine, but for some reason right-clicking causes MMC to stop working. Is there any way to fix this issue? Here are the full details of the error message. Description: Stopped working Problem signature: Problem Event Name: CLR20r3 Problem Signature 01: mmc.exe Problem Signature 02: 6.1.7600.16385 Problem Signature 03: 4a5bc808 Problem Signature 04: Microsoft.Virtualization.Client Problem Signature 05: 6.1.0.0 Problem Signature 06: 4ce7c9e3 Problem Signature 07: 342 Problem Signature 08: 1f Problem Signature 09: System.OverflowException OS Version: 6.1.7601.2.1.0.274.10 Locale ID: 1033 Read our privacy statement online: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=104288&clcid=0x0409 If the online privacy statement is not available, please read our privacy statement offline: C:\Windows\system32\en-US\erofflps.txt

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  • Is Hyper-V Server 2008 working on Intel's Atom platform

    - by Josip Medved
    Did anybody try to install Hyper-V on Intel Atom platform? Hyper-V requires: x64 compatible processor with Intel VT or AMD-V technology enabled Hardware Data Execution Prevention (DEP) It seems that both requirements are satisfied with Atom as processor. However, I wonder whether there is some blocking issue (e.g. BIOS that does not support it) since all Atom motherboards I checked had quite old north/south-bridge. My intentions are to run two low-requirements virtual machines (embedded Linux), so performance should not be an issue.

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  • Hyper-V extensible virtual switch disables network

    - by Sebastian Krysmanski
    I just installed the Hyper-V role on my Windows Server 2012. It comes with something called a "Hyper-V extensible virtual switch". I assigned it to the only network card in my server. By doing so, the network card became useless/disabled/inactive/.. because the virtual switch disabled all features (IPv4, IPv6, Client for Microsoft Networks, ...) on the network adapter. Is this supposed to happen? I admit I've no idea what this "extensible virtual switch" actually does. A short explanation would be nice as well.

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  • Windows Server 2008 Stops Responding (Hyper-V Role Enabled)

    - by blackf0rk
    The machine is a brand new Dell Precision m6500, Core i5, 8GB RAM. Windows Server 2008 R2 (fully patched) with Hyper-V Role Enabled. Virtualization options in the BIOS are ON, SpeedStep is OFF, couldn't find C1E option in the BIOS to turn it off (I also got the impression that SpeedStep is C1E, but the Intel Product site lists them as separate "features." shrug) The server stops responding without any apparent reason. I've tried testing in multiple scenarios, all of which result in a crash at seemingly random times: With the Server sitting idle, no apps running. Server sitting idle with a Virtual Machine running. Using a BurnInTest application There's no blue screen. It doesn't restart. The screen just sits there. The keyboard backlight still responds and comes on with input, but nothing on the screen changes. There are no errors in the error log. I have to hold down the power button to turn it off. Doing memory tests on bootup results in no errors with the memory. I have a second identical system and the same thing happens there too. I've dual-booted into Windows 7 Profession x64 on this system with no problems. Further testing has shown that the issue is definitely related to Windows Server 2008 R2 and Hyper-V as it appears the crashing does not happen when the services are not running. I've installed all hotfixes relating to this issue (that I could find): 975530, 979444, 979491, 976427 System is still crashing without response.

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  • Virutal Machine loses network connectivity on Hyper V Cluster

    - by Chris W
    We're running a number of VMs on a 6 node failover cluster of blades using Hyper V. We have an intermittent issue (every few days at different times - not a fixed frequency) of VMs losing network connectivity. Console access to the VM suggests all is fine and the underlying blade has normal connectivity. To resolve the problem we either have to re-start the VM or, more usually, we do a live migration to another blade which fires up connectivity and we then migrate it back to the original blade. I've had 3 instances of this happen with a specific VM running on a particular blade however it has happened once with a different VM running on a different blade. All VMs and blades have the same basic setup and are running Windows 2008 R2. Any ideas where I should be looking to diagnose the possible causes of this problem as the event logs provide no help? Edit: I've checked that each blade is running the latest NIC drivers and all seem to be fine. Something that is confusing me - a failover or restart of the VM resolves the issue. Whilst I need to work out the underlying issue that is causing the NICs to hang I'm also concerned that the VM didn't failover to another node which would have solved the outage for me. Is there a way to configure the cluster so that it can tell that the VM guest has lost connectivity and fail it over? As things stand the cluster is assuming that the VM is running happily as I presume Hyper V says everything is great even though there is a problem.

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  • Hyper-V Virtual Machine Networking issues related to Max Ethernet Frame Size

    - by Goatmale
    I fixed an issue today earlier today but i'm interested in learning WHY it worked. We set up a new Hyper-V virtual machine only to discover that HTTP traffic wasn't working. HTTPS, pings, everything else was working fine. After months of prodding around I took a shot in the dark. On the Hyper-V host server, the physical NIC card had an advanced setting of "Max Ethernet Frame Size" set to 1500. After setting this setting to 1514 the issue was fixed. Alternatively, setting this to 1512 did not solve the issue; 1514 is the magic number. My best guess it that when this setting was set to 1500 it was allowing incoming pings because the data payload was a lot smaller of say, HTTP traffic. As far as HTTPS traffic, I read about something called "Path MTU discovery" which i'm going to assume why is HTTPs traffic was getting through fine, albeit slower. Looking at this post, people agree that 1518 is the max total frame size. Why didn't I need to change this to 1518 instead of 1514 bytes? Why is the default frame size 1500 if that's the max size of the Ethernet payload and not the max size.

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  • BSOD in a Hyper-V Guest VM on install

    - by Greg Hurlman
    I've got Windows Server 2008 R2 running as a development environment, with Hyper-V hosting a few different VMs. I've created a new VM - 4GB of RAM, 2 virtual procs, legacy network adapter, removed the SCSI interface. I'm booting to an ISO image of the Windows Server 2008 R2 DVD, for OS install. The problem is, after the "Windows is loading files" screen, but before the Windows logo animation, I get a blue screen: BAD_SYSTEM_CONFIG_INFO yada yada yada *** STOP: 0x00000074 (etc, etc) I've used this same ISO several times to install to other VMs, no issue.

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  • APCUPSD and Hyper V R2

    - by Jason Berg
    I'm about to deploy a Windows Server 2008 R2 machine with the Hyper V role. I'd like to get away from having to use a network management card with my APC UPS as I'm only shutting down 1 server (it just seems like an unneeded point of failure). I'd like to look into using apcupsd instead. Will this work properly if I use a serial connection? Have you got it working yourself? How is the SNMP monitoring? I really like being able to easily monitor my UPS with SNMP when powerchute is installed. Will I be sacrificing this completely? Is the network management card really the way to go with this? If so, why? Bonus question: Is there a better UPS out there that I should be recommending in the future?

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  • Virutal Machine loses network connectivity on Hyper V

    - by Chris W
    We're running a number of VMs on a 6 node failover cluster of blades using Hyper V. We have an intermittent issue (every few days at different times - not a fixed frequency) of VMs losing network connectivity. Console access to the VM suggests all is fine and the underlying blade has normal connectivity. To resolve the problem we either have to re-start the VM or, more usually, we do a live migration to another blade which fires up connectivity and we then migrate it back to the original blade. I've had 3 instances of this happen with a specific VM running on a particular blade however it has happened once with a different VM running on a different blade. All VMs and blades have the same basic setup and are running Windows 2008 R2. Any ideas where I should be looking to diagnose the possible causes of this problem as the event logs provide no help?

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  • Windows Server 2012 and Ubuntu 12.04.1 under Hyper-V

    - by Technicolour
    I've set up an instance of Ubuntu 12.04.1 LTS under Hyper-V 2012. However it seems to be nondeterministic as to whether or not it completes the boot process. I get a Kernel Panic, "IO-APIC + timer doesn't work!", which from my research is caused by not having integration services correctly installed? It was my understanding that the integration services were all now baked into the kernel? It should then be fine to update the OS (including any kernel updates, as I'm guessing that's what has happened) Being able to rely on this successfully booting would be great as I intend on using ssh for crisis situations.

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  • How to separate Hyper-V Private network from the External network

    - by Ron Ratzlaff
    I am setting up a virtual test lab and I configured a domain controller VM running Windows 2008 R2 on my Hyper-V 2008 R2 server. I needed to download and install updates on it so I added an External NIC adapter and got that done. However, systems on my actual real physical domain were pulling IPs from this server and that was a big oopsy on my part so I immediately removed the External NIC adapter until I could find out how to go about keeping the Private and the External separate. If someone from the Server Fault community can help with this since I am pretty new to this, I would be very grateful. Thanks everyone.

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