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  • What's New & Cool in NetBeans IDE 7.x

    - by Geertjan
    Loads of new features have been added to NetBeans IDE during the NetBeans IDE 7.x release cycle, i.e., 7.0 together with all the minor releases that have come after that, up to 7.4, which was released during the last few days. Hard to keep track of everything added over all those releases, so instead of making a "What's New in NetBeans IDE 7.4" slide deck (which would only cover the highlights of the NetBeans IDE 7.4 Release Notes), as we would normally do, we've instead produced "What's New in NetBeans IDE 7.x", which is around 50 slides presenting all the key features of the IDE, together with all the key newest features. Here it is: If you want to present the wonderful world that is the NetBeans ecosystem to your JUG or school or university or colleagues in your company, just download the above slide deck (either PDF or the PowerPoint sources) here: https://netbeans.org/community/teams/evangelism And happy NetBeans IDE 7.4 to everyone using NetBeans IDE everywhere in the world!

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  • YouTube: Chrome Dev Tools Integration with NetBeans IDE!

    - by Geertjan
    Some time ago my colleague David Konecny discussed the question "What works better for you? NetBeans IDE or Chrome Developer Tools?". It's a good read. David highlights the point that it's not a question of either/or but both, since the two tools are like the apple/pear dichotmoy. However, good news! The two worlds are not divided in NetBeans IDE 7.4. Changes you make in Chrome Developer Tools (CDT) are automatically persisted to the related files in NetBeans IDE, as you can see in a new YouTube clip I made today. The new integration of CDT with NetBeans IDE has been mentioned in the NetBeans IDE 7.4 New & Noteworthy, while on Twitter this was sighted yesterday: Watch the movie above and within 5 minutes you too will see the simplicity and power of CDT integration with NetBeans IDE. In other news. I consider the above to be my favorite (though it's a tough choice, since there are so many new features in NetBeans IDE 7.4) new feature, for the article "What is your favorite new NetBeans IDE 7.4 feature?"

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  • Dark themes in IDE with multiple monitors

    - by nivlam
    There has been numerous posts about developers that prefer a dark color scheme in their IDE. Most of the themes at studiostyl.es are dark themes. Back when I had a single monitor, I did enjoy using a dark theme since it was easier on the eyes. But now that I utilize multiple monitors, I find dark themes actually hurt my eyes. Most of the time I have my IDE open on one monitor and a browser/email/documentation open on my other monitors. Only my IDE has a dark theme and most of websites/documentation have a white background. This forces my eyes to constantly adjust between my dark IDE and the white website, which puts strain on my eyes. I'm sure I'm not the only person who tries to use a dark theme for the IDE and have multiple monitors. How do other people deal with this issue?

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  • Dark themes in IDE with multiple monitors [closed]

    - by nivlam
    There has been numerous posts about developers that prefer a dark color scheme in their IDE. Most of the themes at studiostyl.es are dark themes. Back when I had a single monitor, I did enjoy using a dark theme since it was easier on the eyes. But now that I utilize multiple monitors, I find dark themes actually hurt my eyes. Most of the time I have my IDE open on one monitor and a browser/email/documentation open on my other monitors. Only my IDE has a dark theme and most of websites/documentation have a white background. This forces my eyes to constantly adjust between my dark IDE and the white website, which puts strain on my eyes. I'm sure I'm not the only person who tries to use a dark theme for the IDE and have multiple monitors. How do other people deal with this issue?

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  • What counts as an IDE?

    - by Matt Ellen
    Recently reading the question What languages do you use without an IDE? One question asked in a few answers was "is Notepad++ and IDE?" One answers to the original question said "None, I use vim...", implying that vim is an IDE. But then another answer suggested vim isn't an IDE. So where is the line? What about notepad, ed, or nano? Is the only non-IDE coding technique the butterfly technique?

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  • Developing Ext JS Charts in NetBeans IDE

    - by Geertjan
    I took my first tentative steps into the world of Ext JS charts today, in NetBeans IDE 7.4. Click to enlarge the image. I will make a screencast soon showing how charts such as the above can be created with NetBeans IDE and Ext JS. Setting up Ext JS is easy in NetBeans IDE because there's a JavaScript library browser, by means of which I can browse for the Ext JS libraries that I need and then NetBeans IDE sets up the project for me. The JavaScript code shown above comes directly from here: http://www.quizzpot.com/courses/learning-ext-js-3/articles/chart-series The index.html is as follows: <html> <head> <title>TODO supply a title</title> <meta charset="UTF-8"> <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width"> <link rel="stylesheet" href="js/libs/extjs/resources/css/ext-all.css"/> <script src="js/libs/ext-core/ext-core.js"></script> <script src="js/libs/extjs/adapter/ext/ext-base-debug.js"></script> <script src="js/libs/extjs/ext-all-debug.js"></script> <script src="app.js"></script> </head> <body> </body> </html> More info on Ext JS: http://docs.sencha.com/extjs/4.1.3/ By the way, quite a few other articles are out there on Ext JS and NetBeans IDE, such as these, which I will be learning from during the coming days: http://netbeans.dzone.com/extjs-rest-netbeans http://netbeans.dzone.com/articles/create-your-first-extjs-4 http://netbeans.dzone.com/articles/mixing-extjs-json-p-and-java

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  • Oracle DB, Oracle ADF, GlassFish, JDeveloper, NetBeans IDE

    - by Geertjan
    Today I started some experiments with Oracle guru Steven Davelaar, who lives about 20 minutes away from my place in Amsterdam by underground. Very convenient. He showed me a bunch of things in JDeveloper, while I showed him a bunch of things in NetBeans IDE. He managed to deploy an ADF application to GlassFish in JDeveloper. And, so far, I failed to do the same thing in NetBeans IDE. Quite a few (around 100) JARs are needed, aside from the question of correctly setting up or importing an ADF application, and we're still figuring out which and who and when and where. And how. And if. And why. Nonetheless, I did manage to get Oracle DB set up in NetBeans IDE, after downloading it from here: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/products/express-edition/downloads/index.html Here's what it looks like when registered in NetBeans IDE, i.e., notice that I have a cool sample database available:   Data from the above database I managed to display very easily via the various NetBeans code generators in a PrimeFaces application, exactly as has been done many times in demonstrations and tutorials everywhere, i.e., generate JPA entities, then create an EJB, then inject the EJB into a PrimeFaces data table: The next step is to somehow do the same with ADF in NetBeans IDE. I had some trouble with passwords for Oracle DB, the command line (with Steven's help) proved helpful: Wish us luck as we continue our ADF-inspired journey. This blog entry by Shay is also relevant: Deploying Oracle ADF Essentials Applications to Glassfish

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  • Code Coverage for Maven Integrated in NetBeans IDE 7.2

    - by Geertjan
    In NetBeans IDE 7.2, JaCoCo is supported natively, i.e., out of the box, as a code coverage engine for Maven projects, since Cobertura does not work with JDK 7 language constructs. (Although, note that Cobertura is supported as well in NetBeans IDE 7.2.) It isn't part of NetBeans IDE 7.2 Beta, so don't even try there; you need some development build from after that. I downloaded the latest development build today. To enable JaCoCo features in NetBeans IDE, you need do no different to what you'd do when enabling JaCoCo in Maven itself, which is rather wonderful. In both cases, all you need to do is add this to the "plugins" section of your POM: <plugin> <groupId>org.jacoco</groupId> <artifactId>jacoco-maven-plugin</artifactId> <version>0.5.7.201204190339</version> <executions> <execution> <goals> <goal>prepare-agent</goal> </goals> </execution> <execution> <id>report</id> <phase>prepare-package</phase> <goals> <goal>report</goal> </goals> </execution> </executions> </plugin> Now you're done and ready to examine the code coverage of your tests, whether they are JUnit or TestNG. At this point, i.e., for no other reason than that you added the above snippet into your POM, you will have a new Code Coverage menu when you right-click on the project node: If you click Show Report above, the Code Coverage Report window opens. Here, once you've run your tests, you can actually see how many classes have been covered by your tests, which is pretty useful since 100% tests passing doesn't mean much when you've only tested one class, as you can see very graphically below: Then, when you click the bars in the Code Coverage Report window, the class under test is shown, with the methods for which tests exist highlighted in green and those that haven't been covered in red: (Note: Of course, striving for 100% code coverage is a bit nonsensical. For example, writing tests for your getters and setters may not be the most useful way to spend one's time. But being able to measure, and visualize, code coverage is certainly useful regardless of the percentage you're striving to achieve.) Best of all about all this is that everything you see above is available out of the box in NetBeans IDE 7.2. Take a look at what else NetBeans IDE 7.2 brings for the first time to the world of Maven: http://wiki.netbeans.org/NewAndNoteworthyNB72#Maven

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  • Using irc in NetBeans IDE 7.2

    - by Geertjan
    Turns out to be easy to use irc in NetBeans IDE 7.2. Install Irssi (I was able to do apt-get to install it), which has a handy guide here, and then use the Terminal window in NetBeans IDE (Window | Output | Terminal): In the above, do this: irssi /connect irc.freenode.net /join #netbeans Then, next time you have a problem in NetBeans IDE or there's some question you have about how to do something, just type your question in the Terminal window and someone will help you, if someone is there who knows the answer.

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  • Smarter Search Results in NetBeans IDE 7.2

    - by Geertjan
    After you search your code using NetBeans IDE (using Ctrl-F for "Find" or Ctrl-H for "Replace"), you see the Search Results window, which looks like this: At least, the above is how it looks in NetBeans IDE 7.2. Before that, you didn't have all those extra columns (which can be displayed in the Search Results window after clicking the small button top right in the view) and you also didn't have the quick search (which is invoked by typing directly into the Search Results window), as can be seen here: So, the Search Results window now provides a lot more info than before. Being able to know the path to a file I've found, as well as the last modification date, file size, and the number of matches within the file, is useful at the end of a search process. In the NetBeans IDE 7.2 New & Noteworthy, the above changes are described in the Utilities section, as well as in the Quick Search in OutlineView section, where you can read that these are generic solutions that can be used in your own OutlineViews. Other OutlineViews in NetBeans IDE 7.2, such as the Debugger window, now also have these new features. A related article worth reading is Beefed Up Code Navigation Tools in NetBeans IDE 7.2. 

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  • "44 Tips" in PHP Magazin and Other NetBeans IDE Screencasts

    - by Geertjan
    My recent YouTube series "44 Tips for Front End Web Devs" (part 1, part 2) has been picked up by PHP Magazin: http://phpmagazin.de/news/Frontend-Entwicklung-mit-NetBeans-IDE-168339 Great. I'm working on more screencasts like that, from different angles. For example, one will methodically explain each and every window in NetBeans IDE; another will step through the creation of an application from conception to deployment; while another will focus on the NetBeans IDE extension points and how easily they can be used to add new features to NetBeans IDE. The screencast approach has, I think, a lot of advantages. They take less time to make and they seem to be more effective, in several ways, than tutorials. Hearing someone talk through a scenario seems to also put things in a clearer perspective than when you have everything written out in a document, where small details get lost and diversions are more difficult to make. Anyway, onwards to more screencasts. Any special requests?

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  • Dart and NetBeans IDE 7.4

    - by Geertjan
    Here's the start of Dart in NetBeans IDE. Basic Dart editing support is done and on saving a Dart file the related JavaScript files are automatically generated. In the context of an HTML5 application in NetBeans IDE, that gives you deep integration with the embedded browser and, even better, Chrome, as well as Chrome Developer Tools. Below, notice that the "Sunflower Spectacular" H1 element is selected (click the image to enlarge it to get a better view), which is therefore highlighted in the live DOM view in the bottom left, as well as in the CSS Styles window in the top right, from where the CSS styles can be edited and from where the related files can be opened in the IDE. Identical features are available for Chrome, as well as on Android and iOS. And if you like that, watch this YouTube movie showing how Chrome Developer Tools integration can fit directly into the workflow below. Anyone want to help get this plugin further? What's needed: Much deeper Dart editing support, i.e., right now only very basic syntax coloring is provided, i.e., an ANTLR lexer is integrated into the NetBeans syntax coloring infrastructure. Parsing, error checking, code completion, and some small code templates are needed. A new panel is needed in the Project Properties dialog on NetBeans HTML5 projects for enabling Dart (i.e., similar to enabling Cordova), at which point the "dart.js" file and other Dart artifacts should be added to the project, so that a Dart project is immediately generated and the application should be immediately deployable. Whenever changes are made to a Dart file, Dart should run in the background to create the Dart artifacts in some hidden way, so that the user doesn't see all the Dart artifacts as is currently the case. Some way of recognizing Dart projects (there's a YAML file as an identifier) and creating NetBeans HTML5 projects from that, i.e., from Dart projects outside the IDE. I think that's all... The official Dart Editor is based on Eclipse and requires a massive download of heaps of Eclipse bundles. Compare that to the NetBeans equivalent, which is a very small "HTML5 and PHP" bundle (60 MB), available here, together with the above small Dart plugin. Plus, when you look at how NetBeans IDE integrates with a bunch of Google-oriented projects, i.e., Chrome, Chrome Developer Tools, and Android (via Cordova), that's a pretty interesting toolbox for anyone using Dart. And bear in mind that ANTLRWorks, Microchip, and heaps of other organizations have built and are building their tools on top of NetBeans!

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  • Notes for a NetBeans IDE 7.4 HTML5 Screencast

    - by Geertjan
    I'm making a screencast that intends to thoroughly introduce NetBeans IDE 7.4 as a tool for HTML, JavaScript, and CSS developers. Here's the current outline, additions and other suggestions are welcome. Getting Started Downloading NetBeans IDE for HTML5 and PHP Examining the NetBeans installation directory, especially netbeans.conf Examining the NetBeans user directory Command line options for starting NetBeans IDE Exploring NetBeans IDE Menus and toolbars Versioning tools Options Window Go through whole Options window Change look and feels Adding themes Syntax coloring Code templates Plugin Manager and Plugin Portal Dark Look and Feel Themes Toggle line wrap Emmet HTML Tidy NetBeans Cheat Sheets Creating HTML5 projects From scratch From online template, e.g., Twitter Bootstrap From ZIP file From folder on disk From sample Editing Useful shortcuts Alt-Enter: see the current hints Alt-Shift-DOT/COMMA: expand selection (CTRL instead of Alt on Mac) Ctrl-Shift-Up/Down: copy up/down Alt-Shift-Up/Down: move up/down Alt-Insert: generate code (Lorum Ipsum) View menu | Show Non-printable Characters Source menu Show keyboard shortcut card Useful hints Surround with Tag Remove Surrounding Tag Useful code completion Link tag for CSS, show completion Script tag for JavaScript, show completion Create code templates in Options window Useful HTML Palette items Unordered List Link Useful code navigation Navigator Navigate menu Useful project settings Project-level deployment settings CSS Preprocessors (SASS/LESS) Cordova support Useful window management Dragging, minimizing, undocking Ctrl-Shift-Enter: distraction-free mode Alt-Shift Enter: maximization Debugging JavaScript debugger Deploying Embedded browser Responsive design Inspect in NetBeans mode Chrome browser with NetBeans plugin Android and iOS browsers Cordova makes native packages On device debugging On device styling Documentation PHP and HTML5 Learning Trail: https://netbeans.org/kb/trails/php.html Contributing Social Media: Twitter, Facebook, blogs Plugin Portal Planning to complete the above screencast this week, will continue editing this page as more useful features arise in my mind or hopefully in the comments in this blog entry!

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  • Code Generation and IDE vs writing per Hand

    - by sytycs
    I have been programming for about a year now. Pretty soon I realized that I need a great Tool for writing code and learned Vim. I was happy with C and Ruby and never liked the idea of an IDE. Which was encouraged by a lot of reading about programming.[1] However I started with (my first) Java Project. In a CS Course we were using Visual Paradigm and encouraged to let the program generate our code from a class diagram. I did not like that Idea because: Our class diagram was buggy. Students more experienced in Java said they would write the code per hand. I had never written any Java before and would not understand a lot of the generated code. So I took a different approach and wrote all methods per Hand (getter and Setter included). My Team-members have written their parts (partly generated by VP) in an IDE and I was "forced" to use it too. I realized they had generated equal amounts of code in a shorter amount of time and did not spend a lot of time setting their CLASSPATH and writing scripts for compiling that son of a b***. Additionally we had to implement a GUI and I dont see how we could have done that in a sane matter in Vim. So here is my Problem: I fell in love with Vim and the Unix way. But it looks like for getting this job done (on time) the IDE/Code generation approach is superior. Do you have equal experiences? Is Java by the nature of the language just more suitable for an IDE/Code generated approach? Or am I lacking the knowledge to produce equal amounts of code "per Hand"? [1] http://heather.cs.ucdavis.edu/~matloff/eclipse.html

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  • Does an inexperienced programmer need an IDE?

    - by Torben Gundtofte-Bruun
    Reading this other question makes me wonder if I (as an absolute beginner PHP programmer) should stick with WAMP and Notepad++ or to switch to some IDE like Eclipse. It's understandable that skilled developers will benefit from a big shiny IDE. But why should an absolute beginner use an IDE? Do the benefits outweigh the extra challenge of learning the IDE on top of learning to develop? Update for clarification: My goal is to get some basic programming experience. By choosing PHP and WAMP (and FogBugz and Kiln) I hope to avoid having to navigate the tricky / messy OS specifics and compiling etc. and just focus on basic functionality like an online user registration form. I've got lots of theoretical understanding from university a decade ago but no practical experience. I want to remedy that with a hobby project that would be similar to a real-world sellable web app. There are so many questions to ask. So many pitfalls I probably have to blunder into. This question is just one piece (my first!) of that puzzle.

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  • AT&T Application Resource Analyzer in NetBeans IDE

    - by Geertjan
    Here at Øredev in Malmö I met Doug Sillars who does developer outreach for the AT&T Application Resource Optimizer. In this YouTube clip you see Doug explaining how it works and what it can do for optimizing performance of mobile applications. There's a free and open source Android app on GitHub that you can install on Android to collect data and then there's a Java Swing application for analyzing the results. And here's what that application looks like as a plugin in NetBeans IDE, click to enlarge the image, which shows the Android sources of the Data Collector, as well as the Data Analyzer ready to be used to collect data: Since the ARO Data Analyzer is written in Java and has JPanels defining its UI layer, integrating the user interface wasn't hard. Now working on the Actions, so there'll be a new ARO menu with start/stop data collecting menu items, etc, reusing as much of the original code as possible. That part is actually already working. I started up an Android emulator, then started the data collection process from the IDE. Now need to include the Actions for importing the data into the analyzer, together with a few other related features. A pretty cool feature in ARO is video capture, so that a movie can be made by ARO of all the steps taken on the device during the collection process, which will also be nice to have integrated into the NetBeans plugin. Ultimately, this will be handy for anyone creating Android applications in NetBeans IDE since they'll be able to use AT&T's ARO tool for optimizing the performance of the applications they're developing. It will also be useful for those using the built-in Cordova tools in NetBeans IDE to create iOS applications because ARO is also applicable to analyzing iOS application performance.

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  • Python script liking to GUI using IDE

    - by YomalSamindu
    I am studying python. Now I can write python scripts (codes) to some extent. I used IDLE for this. I am interested in making GUI to those written programs. I like to do it using an IDE rather than using PyGTK or Tkinter. Can anyone help me how to start with this and link my scripts to a GUI? I downloaded a IDE called glade, but I don't know how to use this IDE. I need some tutorial guide also. Can anyone help me, please? Thank you!

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  • Using Visual Studio as a Task-Focused IDE

    - by Jay Stevens
    Are there patterns or libraries or any official Microsoft SDK for using Visual Studio as a specifically Task-Focused UI? For example, both Revolution R (IDE for the R language) and SQL 2012 (and I think SQL 2008 and possibly 2005) use Visual Studio as the underlying IDE framework. Is there an officially supported SDK and/or examples/samples for doing this type of thing? I am building a language Parser for an existing language - whose only available IDE is INSANELY expensive - using Irony (and eventually will generate a Language Service as well). Any direct or indirect suggestions/answers are appreciated.

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  • Android Layout Preview for NetBeans IDE

    - by Geertjan
    More often than not, the reason that Eclipse has more plugins than NetBeans IDE is because Eclipse has far less features out of the box. For example, thanks to its out of the box support, NetBeans IDE doesn't need a Maven plugin and it doesn't need a Java EE plugin, which are two of the most popular plugins for Eclipse. However, what would be great for NetBeans IDE to have is support for Android. It's existed for a while, thanks to the community-driven NBAndroid project, but without much desired GUI functionality. Today, the project announced a leap forward, that is, early results in providing a layout preview: Looking forward to more GUI functionality for this project!   

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  • YouTube: CoffeeScript Rocks (in NetBeans IDE)

    - by Geertjan
    CoffeeScript is a handy preprocessor for JavaScript, as shown in a quick demo below on YouTube, using the CoffeeScript plugin for NetBeans IDE. Right now, the NetBeans Plugin Portal doesn't have a CoffeeScript plugin for NetBeans IDE 7.4, but not to worry, the NetBeans IDE 7.3 plugin works just fine. http://plugins.netbeans.org/plugin/39007/coffeescript-netbeans Here's a small YouTube clip I made today showing how it all works: Also read this very handy and detailed NetBeans tutorial, on which I based the demo above: https://netbeans.org/kb/docs/web/js-toolkits-jquery.html Related info: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QgqVh_KpVKY http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/wa-coffee1/ http://blog.sethladd.com/2012/01/vanilla-dart-ftw.html http://api.jquery.com/fadeOut/

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  • Upcoming Enhancements in AngularJS Integration in NetBeans IDE

    - by Geertjan
    New bleeding edge enhancements in AngularJS support in NetBeans IDE enable many more controllers to be found than in NetBeans IDE 7.4. The next version of NetBeans IDE parses all JavaScript files and checks for defined AngularJS controllers, such as the below: All recognized AngularJS controllers are offered in code completion, as shown below. In other words, code completion works better in finding AngularJS controllers. Another improvement is in the "Go To Declaration" feature. When you click Ctrl+Mouse over the name of a controller inside an NG-controller directive, you will be navigated to the related controller declaration. More accurate results can be shown in code completion mainly because there are changes in the generation of JavaScript virtual sources in an AngularJS page.

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  • Gradle Support in NetBeans IDE 7.2

    - by Geertjan
    Russel Winder and Steve Chin spent half an hour, and then gave up, setting up NetBeans IDE to use Gradle, because they couldn't find the NetBeans Gradle plugin, during Steve's NightHacking tour. That need happen no more because Attila Kelemen's NetBeans Gradle plugin is now available in the Plugin Manager in NetBeans IDE 7.2: Aside from opening Gradle-based applications, you can now also create new ones: Details and documentation: https://github.com/kelemen/netbeans-gradle-project

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  • IDE for visually impaired

    - by Eli Rosencruft
    A visually impaired colleague has asked me to recommend an IDE with easy-to-find and easy-to-use controls for: font size background and foreground colors changing syntax color scheme support for at least C/C++ and Java He would prefer an IDE that is either portable or that has similar versions for Linux, Windows and Mac. He prefers a dark background and light colored fonts and needs to sit very close to the display.

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  • NetBeans IDE 7.3 Knows Null

    - by Geertjan
    What's the difference between these two methods, "test1" and "test2"? public int test1(String str) {     return str.length(); } public int test2(String str) {     if (str == null) {         System.err.println("Passed null!.");         //forgotten return;     }     return str.length(); } The difference, or at least, the difference that is relevant for this blog entry, is that whoever wrote "test2" apparently thinks that the variable "str" may be null, though did not provide a null check. In NetBeans IDE 7.3, you see this hint for "test2", but no hint for "test1", since in that case we don't know anything about the developer's intention for the variable and providing a hint in that case would flood the source code with too many false positives:  Annotations are supported in understanding how a piece of code is intended to be used. If method return types use @Nullable, @NullAllowed, @CheckForNull, the value is considered to be "strongly possible to be null", as well as if the variable is tested to be null, as shown above. When using @NotNull, @NonNull, @Nonnull, the value is considered to be non-null. (The exact FQNs of the annotations are ignored, only simple names are checked.) Here are examples showing where the hints are displayed for the non-null hints (the "strongly possible to be null" hints are not shown below, though you can see one of them in the screenshot above), together with a comment showing what is shown when you hover over the hint: There isn't a "one size fits all" refactoring for these various instances relating to null checks, hence you can't do an automated refactoring across your code base via tools in NetBeans IDE, as shown yesterday for class member reordering across code bases. However, you can, instead, go to Source | Inspect and then do a scan throughout a scope (e.g., current file/package/project or combinations of these or all open projects) for class elements that the IDE identifies as potentially having a problem in this area: Thanks to Jan Lahoda, who reports that this currently also works in NetBeans IDE 7.3 dev builds for fields but that may need to be disabled since right now too many false positives are returned, for help with the info above and any misunderstandings are my own fault!

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