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  • IIS at TechEd Europe - Madrid - 26 June 2013

    - by The Official Microsoft IIS Site
    Don't miss the opportunity to hear Wade Hilmo, IIS' principal development lead, at Tech Ed Europe, 26 June 2013 in Madrid, Spain at the IFEMA – Feria de Madrid Convention Centre. Wade will be presenting the latest about IIS in Windows Server 2012 R2, bringing his special insight from his years leading the development team. The full details, including room & time are here: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=309913 Read More......(read more)

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  • IIS 7 Url Rewrite Rules for SEO and Security

    - by The Official Microsoft IIS Site
    Before IIS 7, if you wanted to do url rewriting with IIS 6 you had to use a 3rd party program such as ISAPI Rewrite by helicontech.com. This was a good program but it wasn’t native to IIS and there were limitations such as a site hosting more than 1 domain with different applications running. With IIS 7 url rewriting and redirecting has never been easier thanks to Microsoft’s Url Rewrite module. The rewriting is done by rules which are specified in the web.config under <system.webserver>...(read more)

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  • Installing IIS 8 on Windows 8

    - by The Official Microsoft IIS Site
    In case you haven’t heard Windows 8 is now available. As a web developer I think one of the best reasons to upgrade to Windows 8 is that you can start testing IIS 8 right from your PC. This way if you don’t have a budget for a new server you can start to familiarize yourself with some of the new features. IIS 8 has some great new features such as Dynamic IP Restrictions an Application Initialization . However one of the best new features of IIS 8 enables you to throttle the CPU utilization for any...(read more)

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  • IIS.net is running on IIS 8.0 Beta!

    - by The Official Microsoft IIS Site
    Here at Microsoft we're pretty passionate about testing our own software. We often ask our customers to test the pre-release versions of our new software products, and we wouldn't ask our customers to try something that we're unwilling to do. To that end, we are pleased to announce that IIS.net is fully running on IIS 8.0 Beta. Some of you may have noticed the "Running on IIS8" button above the IIS.net menu bar; this message lets you know that you're browsing to a server...(read more)

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  • September IIS Community Newsletter

    - by The Official Microsoft IIS Site
    For the latest news and happenings in the IIS community over the past month, be sure to check out the September edition of the IIS Community Newsletter: http://www.iisnewsletter.com/archive/september2012.html Make sure you don’t miss an edition and get it delivered directly to your inbox. You can subscribe at the link below. http://www.iisnewsletter.com/Subscribe.aspx Thank you....( read more ) Read More......(read more)

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  • Programmatically Starting and Stopping FTP Sites in IIS 7 and IIS 8

    - by The Official Microsoft IIS Site
    I was recently contacted by someone who was trying to use Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) code to stop and restart FTP websites by using code that he had written for IIS 6.0; his code was something similar to the following: Option Explicit On Error Resume Next Dim objWMIService, colItems, objItem ' Attach to the IIS service. Set objWMIService = GetObject( "winmgmts:\root\microsoftiisv2" ) ' Retrieve the collection of FTP sites. Set colItems = objWMIService.ExecQuery( "Select...(read more)

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  • Visual Studio 2010 SP1 Beta supports IIS Express

    - by DigiMortal
    Visual Studio 2010 SP1 Beta and ASP.NET MVC 3 RC2 were both announced today. I made a little test on one of my web applications to see how Visual Studio 2010 works with IIS Express. In this posting I will show you how to make your ASP.NET MVC 3 application work with IIS Express. Installing new stuff You can install IIS Express using Web Platform Installer. It is not part of WebMatrix anymore and you can just install IIS Express without WebMatrix. NB! You have to install IIS Express using Web Platform installer because IIS Express is not installed by SP1. After installing Visual Studio 2010 SP1 Beta on my machine (it took a long-long-long time to install) I installed also ASP.NET MVC 3 RC2. If you have Async CTP installed on your machine you have to uninstall it to get ASP.NET MVC 3 RC2 installed and run without problems. Screenshot on right shows what kinf of horrors my old laptop had to survive to get all new stuff installer. Setting IIS Express as server for web application Now, when you right-click on some web project you should see new menu item in context menu – Use IIS Express…. If you click on it you are asked for confirmation and if you say Yes then your web application is reconfigured to use IIS Express. After configuration you will see dialog box like this. And you are done. You can run your application now. Running web application When you run your application it is run on IIS Express. You can see IIS Express icon on taskbar and when you click it you can open IIS Express settings. If you closed your application in browser you can open it again from IIS Express icon. Modifying IIS Express settings for web application You can modify IIS Express settings for your application. Just open your project properties and move to Web tab. IIS and IIS Express are using same settings. The difference is if you make check to Use IIS Express checkbox or not. Switching back to Visual Studio Development Server If you don’t want or you can’t use IIS Express for some reason you can easily switch back to Visual Studio Development Server. Just right-click on your web application project and select Use Visual Studio Development Server from context menu. Conclusion IIS Express is more independent than full version of IIS and it can be also installed and run on machines where are very strict rules (some corporate and academic environments by example). IIS Express was previously part of WebMatrix package but now it is separate product and Visual Studio 2010 has very nice support for it thanks to SP1. You can easily make your web applications use IIS Express and if you want to switch back to development server it is also very easy.

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  • Share IIS and related information via IIS Community Newsletter WIKI

    - by steve schofield
    Trying something different!  Do you have something to share with the IIS community?  Are you an IIS community leader wanting to share your info?  Do you run a local usergroup and want to let others know!  Sign-up for our WIKI @ http://www.iislogs.com/wiki/   The information will be reviewed and potentially included in the IIS Community Newsletter.  Cheers, Steve SchofieldMicrosoft MVP - IIS  

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  • Using Wildcard SSL Certificates on IIS 7

    - by The Official Microsoft IIS Site
    The other day I was helping someone who was trying to configure a wildcard certificate on their Windows Cloud Server . Their server was running Windows 2008 R2 server using IIS 7. The were technically savvy and knew how to configure site’s on their own and install a regular SSL certificate but they were stuck trying to get a wildcard certificate configured properly. They had quite a few site’s configured using subdomains such as support.domain.com, mail.domain.com, login.domain.com, etc. To tighten...(read more)

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  • Figuring out the IIS Version for a given OS in .NET Code

    - by Rick Strahl
    Here's an odd requirement: I need to figure out what version of IIS is available on a given machine in order to take specific configuration actions when installing an IIS based application. I build several configuration tools for application configuration and installation and depending on which version of IIS is available on IIS different configuration paths are taken. For example, when dealing with XP machine you can't set up an Application Pool for an application because XP (IIS 5.1) didn't support Application pools. Configuring 32 and 64 bit settings are easy in IIS 7 but this didn't work in prior versions and so on. Along the same lines I saw a question on the AspInsiders list today, regarding a similar issue where somebody needed to know the IIS version as part of an ASP.NET application prior to when the Request object is available. So it's useful to know which version of IIS you can possibly expect. This should be easy right? But it turns there's no real easy way to detect IIS on a machine. There's no registry key that gives you the full version number - you can detect installation but not which version is installed. The easiest way: Request.ServerVariables["SERVER_SOFTWARE"] The easiest way to determine IIS version number is if you are already running inside of ASP.NET and you are inside of an ASP.NET request. You can look at Request.ServerVariables["SERVER_SOFTWARE"] to get a string like Microsoft-IIS/7.5 returned to you. It's a cinch to parse this to retrieve the version number. This works in the limited scenario where you need to know the version number inside of a running ASP.NET application. Unfortunately this is not a likely use case, since most times when you need to know a specific version of IIS when you are configuring or installing your application. The messy way: Match Windows OS Versions to IIS Versions Since Version 5.x of IIS versions of IIS have always been tied very closely to the Operating System. Meaning the only way to get a specific version of IIS was through the OS - you couldn't install another version of IIS on the given OS. Microsoft has a page that describes the OS version to IIS version relationship here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/224609 In .NET you can then sniff the OS version and based on that return the IIS version. The following is a small utility function that accomplishes the task of returning an IIS version number for a given OS: /// <summary> /// Returns the IIS version for the given Operating System. /// Note this routine doesn't check to see if IIS is installed /// it just returns the version of IIS that should run on the OS. /// /// Returns the value from Request.ServerVariables["Server_Software"] /// if available. Otherwise uses OS sniffing to determine OS version /// and returns IIS version instead. /// </summary> /// <returns>version number or -1 </returns> public static decimal GetIisVersion() { // if running inside of IIS parse the SERVER_SOFTWARE key // This would be most reliable if (HttpContext.Current != null && HttpContext.Current.Request != null) { string os = HttpContext.Current.Request.ServerVariables["SERVER_SOFTWARE"]; if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(os)) { //Microsoft-IIS/7.5 int dash = os.LastIndexOf("/"); if (dash > 0) { decimal iisVer = 0M; if (Decimal.TryParse(os.Substring(dash + 1), out iisVer)) return iisVer; } } } decimal osVer = (decimal) Environment.OSVersion.Version.Major + ((decimal) Environment.OSVersion.Version.MajorRevision / 10); // Windows 7 and Win2008 R2 if (osVer == 6.1M) return 7.5M; // Windows Vista and Windows 2008 else if (osVer == 6.0M) return 7.0M; // Windows 2003 and XP 64 bit else if (osVer == 5.2M) return 6.0M; // Windows XP else if (osVer == 5.1M) return 5.1M; // Windows 2000 else if (osVer == 5.0M) return 5.0M; // error result return -1M; } } Talk about a brute force apporach, but it works. This code goes only back to IIS 5 - anything before that is not something you possibly would want to have running. :-) Note that this is updated through Windows 7/Windows Server 2008 R2. Later versions will need to be added as needed. Anybody know what the Windows Version number of Windows 8 is?© Rick Strahl, West Wind Technologies, 2005-2011Posted in ASP.NET  IIS   Tweet (function() { var po = document.createElement('script'); po.type = 'text/javascript'; po.async = true; po.src = 'https://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js'; var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(po, s); })();

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  • Enabling Http caching and compression in IIS 7 for asp.net websites

    - by anil.kasalanati
    Caching – There are 2 ways to set Http caching 1-      Use Max age property 2-      Expires header. Doing the changes via IIS Console – 1.       Select the website for which you want to enable caching and then select Http Responses in the features tab       2.       Select the Expires webcontent and on changing the After setting you can generate the max age property for the cache control    3.       Following is the screenshot of the headers   Then you can use some tool like fiddler and see 302 response coming from the server. Doing it web.config way – We can add static content section in the system.webserver section <system.webServer>   <staticContent>             <clientCache cacheControlMode="UseMaxAge" cacheControlMaxAge="365.00:00:00" />   </staticContent> Compression - By default static compression is enabled on IIS 7.0 but the only thing which falls under that category is CSS but this is not enough for most of the websites using lots of javascript.  If you just thought by enabling dynamic compression would fix this then you are wrong so please follow following steps –   In some machines the dynamic compression is not enabled and following are the steps to enable it – Open server manager Roles > Web Server (IIS) Role Services (scroll down) > Add Role Services Add desired role (Web Server > Performance > Dynamic Content Compression) Next, Install, Wait…Done!   ?  Roles > Web Server (IIS) ?  Role Services (scroll down) > Add Role Services     Add desired role (Web Server > Performance > Dynamic Content Compression)     Next, Install, Wait…Done!     Enable  - ?  Open server manager ?  Roles > Web Server (IIS) > Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager   Next pane: Sites > Default Web Site > Your Web Site Main pane: IIS > Compression         Then comes the custom configuration for encrypting javascript resources. The problem is that the compression in IIS 7 completely works on the mime types and by default there is a mismatch in the mime types Go to following location C:\Windows\System32\inetsrv\config Open applicationHost.config The mimemap is as follows  <mimeMap fileExtension=".js" mimeType="application/javascript" />   So the section in the staticTypes should be changed          <add mimeType="application/javascript" enabled="true" />     Doing the web.config way –   We can add following section in the system.webserver section <system.webServer> <urlCompression doDynamicCompression="false"  doStaticCompression="true"/> More Information/References – ·         http://weblogs.asp.net/owscott/archive/2009/02/22/iis-7-compression-good-bad-how-much.aspx ·         http://www.west-wind.com/weblog/posts/98538.aspx  

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  • Not able to find IIS Manager and enable IIS in Windows7 Home Basic

    - by Akshay
    I enabled IIS services in the add/remove windows components. However, when i want to open the manager, the IIS Manager does not appear under the administrative tools on the control panel. If i type the shortcut "inetmgr" into the run block it doesn't find it. However, i know the service installed correctly. It is a very frustrating problem since everyone says find it here or here but no one gives any help on what to do if is doesn't appear in the said locations at all. Can anyone please help me? The system i am using is Windows 7 home basic. The service installed correctly but i cannot find the IIS Manager.

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  • Use IIS Application Initialization for keeping ASP.NET Apps alive

    - by Rick Strahl
    I've been working quite a bit with Windows Services in the recent months, and well, it turns out that Windows Services are quite a bear to debug, deploy, update and maintain. The process of getting services set up,  debugged and updated is a major chore that has to be extensively documented and or automated specifically. On most projects when a service is built, people end up scrambling for the right 'process' to use for administration. Web app deployment and maintenance on the other hand are common and well understood today, as we are constantly dealing with Web apps. There's plenty of infrastructure and tooling built into Web Tools like Visual Studio to facilitate the process. By comparison Windows Services or anything self-hosted for that matter seems convoluted.In fact, in a recent blog post I mentioned that on a recent project I'd been using self-hosting for SignalR inside of a Windows service, because the application is in fact a 'service' that also needs to send out lots of messages via SignalR. But the reality is that it could just as well be an IIS application with a service component that runs in the background. Either way you look at it, it's either a Windows Service with a built in Web Server, or an IIS application running a Service application, neither of which follows the standard Service or Web App template.Personally I much prefer Web applications. Running inside of IIS I get all the benefits of the IIS platform including service lifetime management (crash and restart), controlled shutdowns, the whole security infrastructure including easy certificate support, hot-swapping of code and the the ability to publish directly to IIS from within Visual Studio with ease.Because of these benefits we set out to move from the self hosted service into an ASP.NET Web app instead.The Missing Link for ASP.NET as a Service: Auto-LoadingI've had moments in the past where I wanted to run a 'service like' application in ASP.NET because when you think about it, it's so much easier to control a Web application remotely. Services are locked into start/stop operations, but if you host inside of a Web app you can write your own ticket and control it from anywhere. In fact nearly 10 years ago I built a background scheduling application that ran inside of ASP.NET and it worked great and it's still running doing its job today.The tricky part for running an app as a service inside of IIS then and now, is how to get IIS and ASP.NET launched so your 'service' stays alive even after an Application Pool reset. 7 years ago I faked it by using a web monitor (my own West Wind Web Monitor app) I was running anyway to monitor my various web sites for uptime, and having the monitor ping my 'service' every 20 seconds to effectively keep ASP.NET alive or fire it back up after a reload. I used a simple scheduler class that also includes some logic for 'self-reloading'. Hacky for sure, but it worked reliably.Luckily today it's much easier and more integrated to get IIS to launch ASP.NET as soon as an Application Pool is started by using the Application Initialization Module. The Application Initialization Module basically allows you to turn on Preloading on the Application Pool and the Site/IIS App, which essentially fires a request through the IIS pipeline as soon as the Application Pool has been launched. This means that effectively your ASP.NET app becomes active immediately, Application_Start is fired making sure your app stays up and running at all times. All the other features like Application Pool recycling and auto-shutdown after idle time still work, but IIS will then always immediately re-launch the application.Getting started with Application InitializationAs of IIS 8 Application Initialization is part of the IIS feature set. For IIS 7 and 7.5 there's a separate download available via Web Platform Installer. Using IIS 8 Application Initialization is an optional install component in Windows or the Windows Server Role Manager: This is an optional component so make sure you explicitly select it.IIS Configuration for Application InitializationInitialization needs to be applied on the Application Pool as well as the IIS Application level. As of IIS 8 these settings can be made through the IIS Administration console.Start with the Application Pool:Here you need to set both the Start Automatically which is always set, and the StartMode which should be set to AlwaysRunning. Both have to be set - the Start Automatically flag is set true by default and controls the starting of the application pool itself while Always Running flag is required in order to launch the application. Without the latter flag set the site settings have no effect.Now on the Site/Application level you can specify whether the site should pre load: Set the Preload Enabled flag to true.At this point ASP.NET apps should auto-load. This is all that's needed to pre-load the site if all you want is to get your site launched automatically.If you want a little more control over the load process you can add a few more settings to your web.config file that allow you to show a static page while the App is starting up. This can be useful if startup is really slow, so rather than displaying blank screen while the user is fiddling their thumbs you can display a static HTML page instead: <system.webServer> <applicationInitialization remapManagedRequestsTo="Startup.htm" skipManagedModules="true"> <add initializationPage="ping.ashx" /> </applicationInitialization> </system.webServer>This allows you to specify a page to execute in a dry run. IIS basically fakes request and pushes it directly into the IIS pipeline without hitting the network. You specify a page and IIS will fake a request to that page in this case ping.ashx which just returns a simple OK string - ie. a fast pipeline request. This request is run immediately after Application Pool restart, and while this request is running and your app is warming up, IIS can display an alternate static page - Startup.htm above. So instead of showing users an empty loading page when clicking a link on your site you can optionally show some sort of static status page that says, "we'll be right back".  I'm not sure if that's such a brilliant idea since this can be pretty disruptive in some cases. Personally I think I prefer letting people wait, but at least get the response they were supposed to get back rather than a random page. But it's there if you need it.Note that the web.config stuff is optional. If you don't provide it IIS hits the default site link (/) and even if there's no matching request at the end of that request it'll still fire the request through the IIS pipeline. Ideally though you want to make sure that an ASP.NET endpoint is hit either with your default page, or by specify the initializationPage to ensure ASP.NET actually gets hit since it's possible for IIS fire unmanaged requests only for static pages (depending how your pipeline is configured).What about AppDomain Restarts?In addition to full Worker Process recycles at the IIS level, ASP.NET also has to deal with AppDomain shutdowns which can occur for a variety of reasons:Files are updated in the BIN folderWeb Deploy to your siteweb.config is changedHard application crashThese operations don't cause the worker process to restart, but they do cause ASP.NET to unload the current AppDomain and start up a new one. Because the features above only apply to Application Pool restarts, AppDomain restarts could also cause your 'ASP.NET service' to stop processing in the background.In order to keep the app running on AppDomain recycles, you can resort to a simple ping in the Application_End event:protected void Application_End() { var client = new WebClient(); var url = App.AdminConfiguration.MonitorHostUrl + "ping.aspx"; client.DownloadString(url); Trace.WriteLine("Application Shut Down Ping: " + url); }which fires any ASP.NET url to the current site at the very end of the pipeline shutdown which in turn ensures that the site immediately starts back up.Manual Configuration in ApplicationHost.configThe above UI corresponds to the following ApplicationHost.config settings. If you're using IIS 7, there's no UI for these flags so you'll have to manually edit them.When you install the Application Initialization component into IIS it should auto-configure the module into ApplicationHost.config. Unfortunately for me, with Mr. Murphy in his best form for me, the module registration did not occur and I had to manually add it.<globalModules> <add name="ApplicationInitializationModule" image="%windir%\System32\inetsrv\warmup.dll" /> </globalModules>Most likely you won't need ever need to add this, but if things are not working it's worth to check if the module is actually registered.Next you need to configure the ApplicationPool and the Web site. The following are the two relevant entries in ApplicationHost.config.<system.applicationHost> <applicationPools> <add name="West Wind West Wind Web Connection" autoStart="true" startMode="AlwaysRunning" managedRuntimeVersion="v4.0" managedPipelineMode="Integrated"> <processModel identityType="LocalSystem" setProfileEnvironment="true" /> </add> </applicationPools> <sites> <site name="Default Web Site" id="1"> <application path="/MPress.Workflow.WebQueueMessageManager" applicationPool="West Wind West Wind Web Connection" preloadEnabled="true"> <virtualDirectory path="/" physicalPath="C:\Clients\…" /> </application> </site> </sites> </system.applicationHost>On the Application Pool make sure to set the autoStart and startMode flags to true and AlwaysRunning respectively. On the site make sure to set the preloadEnabled flag to true.And that's all you should need. You can still set the web.config settings described above as well.ASP.NET as a Service?In the particular application I'm working on currently, we have a queue manager that runs as standalone service that polls a database queue and picks out jobs and processes them on several threads. The service can spin up any number of threads and keep these threads alive in the background while IIS is running doing its own thing. These threads are newly created threads, so they sit completely outside of the IIS thread pool. In order for this service to work all it needs is a long running reference that keeps it alive for the life time of the application.In this particular app there are two components that run in the background on their own threads: A scheduler that runs various scheduled tasks and handles things like picking up emails to send out outside of IIS's scope and the QueueManager. Here's what this looks like in global.asax:public class Global : System.Web.HttpApplication { private static ApplicationScheduler scheduler; private static ServiceLauncher launcher; protected void Application_Start(object sender, EventArgs e) { // Pings the service and ensures it stays alive scheduler = new ApplicationScheduler() { CheckFrequency = 600000 }; scheduler.Start(); launcher = new ServiceLauncher(); launcher.Start(); // register so shutdown is controlled HostingEnvironment.RegisterObject(launcher); }}By keeping these objects around as static instances that are set only once on startup, they survive the lifetime of the application. The code in these classes is essentially unchanged from the Windows Service code except that I could remove the various overrides required for the Windows Service interface (OnStart,OnStop,OnResume etc.). Otherwise the behavior and operation is very similar.In this application ASP.NET serves two purposes: It acts as the host for SignalR and provides the administration interface which allows remote management of the 'service'. I can start and stop the service remotely by shutting down the ApplicationScheduler very easily. I can also very easily feed stats from the queue out directly via a couple of Web requests or (as we do now) through the SignalR service.Registering a Background Object with ASP.NETNotice also the use of the HostingEnvironment.RegisterObject(). This function registers an object with ASP.NET to let it know that it's a background task that should be notified if the AppDomain shuts down. RegisterObject() requires an interface with a Stop() method that's fired and allows your code to respond to a shutdown request. Here's what the IRegisteredObject::Stop() method looks like on the launcher:public void Stop(bool immediate = false) { LogManager.Current.LogInfo("QueueManager Controller Stopped."); Controller.StopProcessing(); Controller.Dispose(); Thread.Sleep(1500); // give background threads some time HostingEnvironment.UnregisterObject(this); }Implementing IRegisterObject should help with reliability on AppDomain shutdowns. Thanks to Justin Van Patten for pointing this out to me on Twitter.RegisterObject() is not required but I would highly recommend implementing it on whatever object controls your background processing to all clean shutdowns when the AppDomain shuts down.Testing it outI'm still in the testing phase with this particular service to see if there are any side effects. But so far it doesn't look like it. With about 50 lines of code I was able to replace the Windows service startup to Web start up - everything else just worked as is. An honorable mention goes to SignalR 2.0's oWin hosting, because with the new oWin based hosting no code changes at all were required, merely a couple of configuration file settings and an assembly directive needed, to point at the SignalR startup class. Sweet!It also seems like SignalR is noticeably faster running inside of IIS compared to self-host. Startup feels faster because of the preload.Starting and Stopping the 'Service'Because the application is running as a Web Server, it's easy to have a Web interface for starting and stopping the services running inside of the service. For our queue manager the SignalR service and front monitoring app has a play and stop button for toggling the queue.If you want more administrative control and have it work more like a Windows Service you can also stop the application pool explicitly from the command line which would be equivalent to stopping and restarting a service.To start and stop from the command line you can use the IIS appCmd tool. To stop:> %windir%\system32\inetsrv\appcmd stop apppool /apppool.name:"Weblog"and to start> %windir%\system32\inetsrv\appcmd start apppool /apppool.name:"Weblog"Note that when you explicitly force the AppPool to stop running either in the UI (on the ApplicationPools page use Start/Stop) or via command line tools, the application pool will not auto-restart immediately. You have to manually start it back up.What's not to like?There are certainly a lot of benefits to running a background service in IIS, but… ASP.NET applications do have more overhead in terms of memory footprint and startup time is a little slower, but generally for server applications this is not a big deal. If the application is stable the service should fire up and stay running indefinitely. A lot of times this kind of service interface can simply be attached to an existing Web application, or if scalability requires be offloaded to its own Web server.Easier to work withBut the ultimate benefit here is that it's much easier to work with a Web app as opposed to a service. While developing I can simply turn off the auto-launch features and launch the service on demand through IIS simply by hitting a page on the site. If I want to shut down an IISRESET -stop will shut down the service easily enough. I can then attach a debugger anywhere I want and this works like any other ASP.NET application. Yes you end up on a background thread for debugging but Visual Studio handles that just fine and if you stay on a single thread this is no different than debugging any other code.SummaryUsing ASP.NET to run background service operations is probably not a super common scenario, but it probably should be something that is considered carefully when building services. Many applications have service like features and with the auto-start functionality of the Application Initialization module, it's easy to build this functionality into ASP.NET. Especially when combined with the notification features of SignalR it becomes very, very easy to create rich services that can also communicate their status easily to the outside world.Whether it's existing applications that need some background processing for scheduling related tasks, or whether you just create a separate site altogether just to host your service it's easy to do and you can leverage the same tool chain you're already using for other Web projects. If you have lots of service projects it's worth considering… give it some thought…© Rick Strahl, West Wind Technologies, 2005-2013Posted in ASP.NET  SignalR  IIS   Tweet !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs"); (function() { var po = document.createElement('script'); po.type = 'text/javascript'; po.async = true; po.src = 'https://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js'; var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(po, s); })();

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  • IIS SEO Toolkit and W3C Validation Service

    - by The Official Microsoft IIS Site
    One thing that I’ve been asked several times about the SEO Toolkit is if it does a full standards validation on the markup and content that is processed, and if not, to add support for more comprehensive standards validation, in particular XHTML and HTML 4.01. Currently the markup validation performed by the SEO Toolkit is really simple, its main goal is to make sure that the markup is correctly organized, for example that things like <b><i>Test</b></i> are not found in the...(read more)

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  • VS 2010 SP1 (Beta) and IIS Express

    - by ScottGu
    Last month we released the VS 2010 Service Pack 1 (SP1) Beta.  You can learn more about the VS 2010 SP1 Beta from Jason Zander’s two blog posts about it, and from Scott Hanselman’s blog post that covers some of the new capabilities enabled with it.  You can download and install the VS 2010 SP1 Beta here. IIS Express Earlier this summer I blogged about IIS Express.  IIS Express is a free version of IIS 7.5 that is optimized for developer scenarios.  We think it combines the ease of use of the ASP.NET Web Server (aka Cassini) currently built-into VS today with the full power of IIS.  Specifically: It’s lightweight and easy to install (less than 5Mb download and a quick install) It does not require an administrator account to run/debug applications from Visual Studio It enables a full web-server feature set – including SSL, URL Rewrite, and other IIS 7.x modules It supports and enables the same extensibility model and web.config file settings that IIS 7.x support It can be installed side-by-side with the full IIS web server as well as the ASP.NET Development Server (they do not conflict at all) It works on Windows XP and higher operating systems – giving you a full IIS 7.x developer feature-set on all Windows OS platforms IIS Express (like the ASP.NET Development Server) can be quickly launched to run a site from a directory on disk.  It does not require any registration/configuration steps. This makes it really easy to launch and run for development scenarios. Visual Studio 2010 SP1 adds support for IIS Express – and you can start to take advantage of this starting with last month’s VS 2010 SP1 Beta release. Downloading and Installing IIS Express IIS Express isn’t included as part of the VS 2010 SP1 Beta.  Instead it is a separate ~4MB download which you can download and install using this link (it uses WebPI to install it).  Once IIS Express is installed, VS 2010 SP1 will enable some additional IIS Express commands and dialog options that allow you to easily use it. Enabling IIS Express for Existing Projects Visual Studio today defaults to using the built-in ASP.NET Development Server (aka Cassini) when running ASP.NET Projects: Converting your existing projects to use IIS Express is really easy.  You can do this by opening up the project properties dialog of an existing project, and then by clicking the “web” tab within it and selecting the “Use IIS Express” checkbox. Or even simpler, just right-click on your existing project, and select the “Use IIS Express…” menu command: And now when you run or debug your project you’ll see that IIS Express now starts up and runs automatically as your web-server: You can optionally right-click on the IIS Express icon within your system tray to see/browse all of sites and applications running on it: Note that if you ever want to revert back to using the ASP.NET Development Server you can do this by right-clicking the project again and then select the “Use Visual Studio Development Server” option (or go into the project properties, click the web tab, and uncheck IIS Express).  This will revert back to the ASP.NET Development Server the next time you run the project. IIS Express Properties Visual Studio 2010 SP1 exposes several new IIS Express configuration options that you couldn’t previously set with the ASP.NET Development Server.  Some of these are exposed via the property grid of your project (select the project node in the solution explorer and then change them via the property window): For example, enabling something like SSL support (which is not possible with the ASP.NET Development Server) can now be done simply by changing the “SSL Enabled” property to “True”: Once this is done IIS Express will expose both an HTTP and HTTPS endpoint for the project that we can use: SSL Self Signed Certs IIS Express ships with a self-signed SSL cert that it installs as part of setup – which removes the need for you to install your own certificate to use SSL during development.  Once you change the above drop-down to enable SSL, you’ll be able to browse to your site with the appropriate https:// URL prefix and it will connect via SSL. One caveat with self-signed certificates, though, is that browsers (like IE) will go out of their way to warn you that they aren’t to be trusted: You can mark the certificate as trusted to avoid seeing dialogs like this – or just keep the certificate un-trusted and press the “continue” button when the browser warns you not to trust your local web server. Additional IIS Settings IIS Express uses its own per-user ApplicationHost.config file to configure default server behavior.  Because it is per-user, it can be configured by developers who do not have admin credentials – unlike the full IIS.  You can customize all IIS features and settings via it if you want ultimate server customization (for example: to use your own certificates for SSL instead of self-signed ones). We recommend storing all app specific settings for IIS and ASP.NET within the web.config file which is part of your project – since that makes deploying apps easier (since the settings can be copied with the application content).  IIS (since IIS 7) no longer uses the metabase, and instead uses the same web.config configuration files that ASP.NET has always supported – which makes xcopy/ftp based deployment much easier. Making IIS Express your Default Web Server Above we looked at how we can convert existing sites that use the ASP.NET Developer Web Server to instead use IIS Express.  You can configure Visual Studio to use IIS Express as the default web server for all new projects by clicking the Tools->Options menu  command and opening up the Projects and Solutions->Web Projects node with the Options dialog: Clicking the “Use IIS Express for new file-based web site and projects” checkbox will cause Visual Studio to use it for all new web site and projects. Summary We think IIS Express makes it even easier to build, run and test web applications.  It works with all versions of ASP.NET and supports all ASP.NET application types (including obviously both ASP.NET Web Forms and ASP.NET MVC applications).  Because IIS Express is based on the IIS 7.5 codebase, you have a full web-server feature-set that you can use.  This means you can build and run your applications just like they’ll work on a real production web-server.  In addition to supporting ASP.NET, IIS Express also supports Classic ASP and other file-types and extensions supported by IIS – which also makes it ideal for sites that combine a variety of different technologies. Best of all – you do not need to change any code to take advantage of it.  As you can see above, updating existing Visual Studio web projects to use it is trivial.  You can begin to take advantage of IIS Express today using the VS 2010 SP1 Beta. Hope this helps, Scott

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  • IIS 7.5 FTP IIS Manager Users Login Fail (530)

    - by Jim
    IIS 7.5 FTP IIS Manager Users Login Fail (530) I'm trying to set up a FTP site on IIS 7.5 that allows IIS Manager Users to login. I'm following this guide: http://learn.iis.net/page.aspx/321/configure-ftp-with-iis-7-manager-authentication/. After set up, I cannot login to the FTP using an IIS Manager User account. The client error I got was 530 User cannot log in. Win32 error: Unspecified error. Error details: An error occured during the authentication process. I tried both with or without a virtual host. A Windows account login fine. The only strange thing I noticed was that when setting up Read permission for Network Service, there was an access denied error when setting up permission for "%SystemDrive%\Windows\System32\inetsrv\config\schema". Any thoughts? Thanks!

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  • Windows 8 / IIS 8 Concurrent Requests Limit

    - by OWScott
    IIS 8 on Windows Server 2012 doesn’t have any fixed concurrent request limit, apart from whatever limit would be reached when resources are maxed. However, the client version of IIS 8, which is on Windows 8, does have a concurrent connection request limitation to limit high traffic production uses on a client edition of Windows. Starting with IIS 7 (Windows Vista), the behavior changed from previous versions.  In previous client versions of IIS, excess requests would throw a 403.9 error message (Access Forbidden: Too many users are connected.).  Instead, Windows Vista, 7 and 8 queue excessive requests so that they will be handled gracefully, although there is a maximum number of requests that will be processed simultaneously. Thomas Deml provided a concurrent request chart for Windows Vista many years ago, but I have been unable to find an equivalent chart for Windows 8 so I asked Wade Hilmo from the IIS team what the limits are.  Since this is controlled not by the IIS team itself but rather from the Windows licensing team, he asked around and found the authoritative answer, which I’ll provide below. Windows 8 – IIS 8 Concurrent Requests Limit Windows 8 3 Windows 8 Professional 10 Windows RT N/A since IIS does not run on Windows RT Windows 7 – IIS 7.5 Concurrent Requests Limit Windows 7 Home Starter 1 Windows 7 Basic 1 Windows 7 Premium 3 Windows 7 Ultimate, Professional, Enterprise 10 Windows Vista – IIS 7 Concurrent Requests Limit Windows Vista Home Basic (IIS process activation and HTTP processing only) 3 Windows Vista Home Premium 3 Windows Vista Ultimate, Professional 10 Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows Server 2012 allow an unlimited amount of simultaneously requests.

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  • How to sort by file's modified date on IIS web server in Windows 7?

    - by ????
    Apache has this built in since 1996 which is 17 years ago... for Microsoft's IIS Web server which is available on Windows 7, is there a way to make it be able to sort the file listing by file modification dates? For example, show the file listing with the label "Date", "Filename", and clicking it will sort the files by that attribute. The only info I could find is: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732762(v=ws.10).aspx cd %windir%\system32\inetsrv appcmd set config /section:directoryBrowse /showFlags:Time|Size|Extension|Date|LongDate|None but it doesn't work.

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  • Access IIS Admin without local administrator rights

    - by Carl
    We are running Microsoft Server 2003 with IIS. We would like to give our developers access to manage IIS (through IIS Admin) but do not want them to be administrators of the entire machine. Putting them in "Power Users" group does not seem to work. What permissions should we grant to our developers to allow them to manage IIS (e.g. add websites, modify app pools, etc.) without giving them full admin rights to the server?

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  • How to fix broken IIS on Windows 7

    - by ruslan
    how can I fix broken IIS on Windows 7 ? Deinstalling it via "Windows Features" doesn't help. Apparently it doesn't uninstall IIS completely so on my subsequent attempts to install it installer hangs and I can see in Process Explorer that it keeps trying to launch svchost.exe -iis for 10 mins and then gives me error message. Reinstalling whole Windows with all apps would take me another 3 days :/ Please help.

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  • IIS 8 FTP

    - by The Official Microsoft IIS Site
    This post began its life as ‘What’s new in IIS 8 FTP’ but has since morphed into something quite different. As the ultimate goal is still to talk about what’s new with FTP for IIS 8, I have retained IIS, 8, and FTP in the title but nothing more. Many of us are cognizant of the history of the Internet but I will do a quick review to build the foundation of this post. We know that it wasn’t Al Gore’s extensive technical knowledge that built the foundations of the...(read more)

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  • Webfarm and IIS configuration tips/tricks

    - by steve schofield
    I was recently talking with some good friends about tips for performance and what an IIS Administrator could do on the server side.  I also see this question from time to time in the forums @ http://forums.iis.net.    Of course, you should test individual settings in a controlled environment while performing load testing before just implementing on your production farm.  IIS Compression enabled (both static and dynamic if possible, set it to 9)  If you are running IIS 6, check this article out by Scott Forsyth. Run FRT for long running pages (Failed Request Tracing) Sql Connection pooling in code Look at using PAL with performance counters ( http://blogs.iis.net/ganekar/archive/2009/08/12/pal-performance-analyzer-with-iis.aspx )  Look at load testing using visual studio load testing tools Log parser finding long running pages.  Here is a couple examples Look at CPU, Memory and disk counters.  Make sure the server has enough resources. Same machineKey account across all same nodes Localize content vs. using UNC based content on a single server (My UNC tag with great posts) Content expiration ETAG’s the same across all web-farms Disable Scalable Networking Pack Use YSlow or Developer tools in Chrome to help measure the client experience improvements. Additionally, some basic counters in for measuring applications is: I would recommend checking out the Chapter 17 in IIS 7 Resource kit. it was one of the chapters I authored. :) Concurrent Connections,  Request Per / Sec, Request Queued.  I strongly suggest testing one change at a time to see how it helps improve your performance.  Hopefully this post provides a few options to review in your environment.   Cheers, Steve SchofieldMicrosoft MVP - IIS

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  • Analyze your IIS Log Files - Favorite Log Parser Queries

    - by The Official Microsoft IIS Site
    The other day I was asked if I knew about a tool that would allow users to easily analyze the IIS Log Files, to process and look for specific data that could easily be automated. My recommendation was that if they were comfortable with using a SQL-like language that they should use Log Parser . Log Parser is a very powerful tool that provides a generic SQL-like language on top of many types of data like IIS Logs, Event Viewer entries, XML files, CSV files, File System and others; and it allows you...(read more)

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  • IIS SEO Toolkit Available in 10 Languages

    - by The Official Microsoft IIS Site
    A couple of months ago I blogged about the release of the v1.0.1 of the IIS Search Engine Optimization Toolkit . In March we released the localized versions of the SEO Toolkit so now it is available in 10 languages: English, Japanese, French, Russian, Korean, German, Spanish, Chinese Simplified, Italian and Chinese Traditional. Here are all the direct links to download it. Name Language Download URL IIS SEO Toolkit 32bit english http://download.microsoft.com/download/A/C/A/ACA8D740-A59D-4D25-A2D5...(read more)

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