Search Results

Search found 82 results on 4 pages for 'digimortal'.

Page 1/4 | 1 2 3 4  | Next Page >

  • Visual Studio 2010 SP1 Beta supports IIS Express

    - by DigiMortal
    Visual Studio 2010 SP1 Beta and ASP.NET MVC 3 RC2 were both announced today. I made a little test on one of my web applications to see how Visual Studio 2010 works with IIS Express. In this posting I will show you how to make your ASP.NET MVC 3 application work with IIS Express. Installing new stuff You can install IIS Express using Web Platform Installer. It is not part of WebMatrix anymore and you can just install IIS Express without WebMatrix. NB! You have to install IIS Express using Web Platform installer because IIS Express is not installed by SP1. After installing Visual Studio 2010 SP1 Beta on my machine (it took a long-long-long time to install) I installed also ASP.NET MVC 3 RC2. If you have Async CTP installed on your machine you have to uninstall it to get ASP.NET MVC 3 RC2 installed and run without problems. Screenshot on right shows what kinf of horrors my old laptop had to survive to get all new stuff installer. Setting IIS Express as server for web application Now, when you right-click on some web project you should see new menu item in context menu – Use IIS Express…. If you click on it you are asked for confirmation and if you say Yes then your web application is reconfigured to use IIS Express. After configuration you will see dialog box like this. And you are done. You can run your application now. Running web application When you run your application it is run on IIS Express. You can see IIS Express icon on taskbar and when you click it you can open IIS Express settings. If you closed your application in browser you can open it again from IIS Express icon. Modifying IIS Express settings for web application You can modify IIS Express settings for your application. Just open your project properties and move to Web tab. IIS and IIS Express are using same settings. The difference is if you make check to Use IIS Express checkbox or not. Switching back to Visual Studio Development Server If you don’t want or you can’t use IIS Express for some reason you can easily switch back to Visual Studio Development Server. Just right-click on your web application project and select Use Visual Studio Development Server from context menu. Conclusion IIS Express is more independent than full version of IIS and it can be also installed and run on machines where are very strict rules (some corporate and academic environments by example). IIS Express was previously part of WebMatrix package but now it is separate product and Visual Studio 2010 has very nice support for it thanks to SP1. You can easily make your web applications use IIS Express and if you want to switch back to development server it is also very easy.

    Read the article

  • Windows Phone 7 development: reading RSS feeds

    - by DigiMortal
    One limitation on Windows Phone 7 is related to System.Net namespace classes. There is no convenient way to read data from web. There is no WebClient class. There is no GetResponse() method – we have to do it all asynchronously because compact framework has limited set of classes we can use in our applications to communicate with internet. In this posting I will show you how to read RSS-feeds on Windows Phone 7. NB! This is my draft code and it may contain some design flaws and some questionable solutions. This code is intended to use as test-drive for Windows Phone 7 CTP developer tools and I don’t suppose you are going to use this code in production environment. Current state of my RSS-reader Currently my RSS-reader for Windows Phone 7 is very simple, primitive and uses almost all defaults that come out-of-box with Windows Phone 7 CTP developer tools. My first goal before going on with nicer user interface design was making RSS-reading work because instead of convenient classes from .NET Framework we have to use very limited classes from .NET Framework CE. This is why I took the reading of RSS-feeds as my first task. There are currently more things to solve regarding user-interface. As I am pretty new to all this Silverlight stuff I am not very sure if I can modify default controls easily or should I write my own controls that have better look and that work faster. The image on right shows you how my RSS-reader looks like right now. Upper side of screen is filled with list that shows headlines from this blog. The bottom part of screen is used to show description of selected posting. You can click on the image to see it in original size. In my next posting I will show you some improvements of my RSS-reader user interface that make it look nicer. But currently it is nice enough to make sure that RSS-feeds are read correctly. FeedItem class As this is most straight-forward part of the following code I will show you RSS-feed items class first. I think we have to stop on it because it is simple one. public class FeedItem {     public string Title { get; set; }     public string Description { get; set; }     public DateTime PublishDate { get; set; }     public List<string> Categories { get; set; }     public string Link { get; set; }       public FeedItem()     {         Categories = new List<string>();     } } RssClient RssClient takes feed URL and when asked it loads all items from feed and gives them back to caller through ItemsReceived event. Why it works this way? Because we can make responses only using asynchronous methods. I will show you in next section how to use this class. Although the code here is not very good but it works like expected. I will refactor this code later because it needs some more efforts and investigating. But let’s hope I find excellent solution. :) public class RssClient {     private readonly string _rssUrl;       public delegate void ItemsReceivedDelegate(RssClient client, IList<FeedItem> items);     public event ItemsReceivedDelegate ItemsReceived;       public RssClient(string rssUrl)     {         _rssUrl = rssUrl;     }       public void LoadItems()     {         var request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(_rssUrl);         var result = (IAsyncResult)request.BeginGetResponse(ResponseCallback, request);     }       void ResponseCallback(IAsyncResult result)     {         var request = (HttpWebRequest)result.AsyncState;         var response = request.EndGetResponse(result);           var stream = response.GetResponseStream();         var reader = XmlReader.Create(stream);         var items = new List<FeedItem>(50);           FeedItem item = null;         var pointerMoved = false;           while (!reader.EOF)         {             if (pointerMoved)             {                 pointerMoved = false;             }             else             {                 if (!reader.Read())                     break;             }               var nodeName = reader.Name;             var nodeType = reader.NodeType;               if (nodeName == "item")             {                 if (nodeType == XmlNodeType.Element)                     item = new FeedItem();                 else if (nodeType == XmlNodeType.EndElement)                     if (item != null)                     {                         items.Add(item);                         item = null;                     }                   continue;             }               if (nodeType != XmlNodeType.Element)                 continue;               if (item == null)                 continue;               reader.MoveToContent();             var nodeValue = reader.ReadElementContentAsString();             // we just moved internal pointer             pointerMoved = true;               if (nodeName == "title")                 item.Title = nodeValue;             else if (nodeName == "description")                 item.Description =  Regex.Replace(nodeValue,@"<(.|\n)*?>",string.Empty);             else if (nodeName == "feedburner:origLink")                 item.Link = nodeValue;             else if (nodeName == "pubDate")             {                 if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(nodeValue))                     item.PublishDate = DateTime.Parse(nodeValue);             }             else if (nodeName == "category")                 item.Categories.Add(nodeValue);         }           if (ItemsReceived != null)             ItemsReceived(this, items);     } } This method is pretty long but it works. Now let’s try to use it in Windows Phone 7 application. Using RssClient And this is the fragment of code behing the main page of my application start screen. You can see how RssClient is initialized and how items are bound to list that shows them. public MainPage() {     InitializeComponent();       SupportedOrientations = SupportedPageOrientation.Portrait | SupportedPageOrientation.Landscape;     listBox1.Width = Width;       var rssClient = new RssClient("http://feedproxy.google.com/gunnarpeipman");     rssClient.ItemsReceived += new RssClient.ItemsReceivedDelegate(rssClient_ItemsReceived);     rssClient.LoadItems(); }   void rssClient_ItemsReceived(RssClient client, IList<FeedItem> items) {     Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(delegate()     {         listBox1.ItemsSource = items;     });            } Conclusion As you can see it was not very hard task to read RSS-feed and populate list with feed entries. Although we are not able to use more powerful classes that are part of full version on .NET Framework we can still live with limited set of classes that .NET Framework CE provides.

    Read the article

  • SSAS: Using fake dimension and scopes for dynamic ranges

    - by DigiMortal
    In one of my BI projects I needed to find count of objects in income range. Usual solution with range dimension was useless because range where object belongs changes in time. These ranges depend on calculation that is done over incomes measure so I had really no option to use some classic solution. Thanks to SSAS forums I got my problem solved and here is the solution. The problem – how to create dynamic ranges? I have two dimensions in SSAS cube: one for invoices related to objects rent and the other for objects. There is measure that sums invoice totals and two calculations. One of these calculations performs some computations based on object income and some other object attributes. Second calculation uses first one to define income ranges where object belongs. What I need is query that returns me how much objects there are in each group. I cannot use dimension for range because on one date object may belong to one range and two days later to another income range. By example, if object is not rented out for two days it makes no money and it’s income stays the same as before. If object is rented out after two days it makes some income and this income may move it to another income range. Solution – fake dimension and scopes Thanks to Gerhard Brueckl from pmOne I got everything work fine after some struggling with BI Studio. The original discussion he pointed out can be found from SSAS official forums thread Create a banding dimension that groups by a calculated measure. Solution was pretty simple by nature – we have to define fake dimension for our range and use scopes to assign values for object count measure. Object count measure is primitive – it just counts objects and that’s it. We will use it to find out how many objects belong to one or another range. We also need table for fake ranges and we have to fill it with ranges used in ranges calculation. After creating the table and filling it with ranges we can add fake range dimension to our cube. Let’s see now how to solve the problem step-by-step. Solving the problem Suppose you have ranges calculation defined like this: CASE WHEN [Measures].[ComplexCalc] < 0 THEN 'Below 0'WHEN [Measures].[ComplexCalc] >=0 AND  [Measures].[ComplexCalc] <=50 THEN '0 - 50'...END Let’s create now new table to our analysis database and name it as FakeIncomeRange. Here is the definition for table: CREATE TABLE [FakeIncomeRange] (     [range_id] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,     [range_name] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL,     CONSTRAINT [pk_fake_income_range] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED      (         [range_id] ASC     ) ) Don’t forget to fill this table with range labels you are using in ranges calculation. To use ranges from table we have to add this table to our data source view and create new dimension. We cannot bind this table to other tables but we have to leave it like it is. Our dimension has two attributes: ID and Name. The next thing to create is calculation that returns objects count. This calculation is also fake because we override it’s values for all ranges later. Objects count measure can be defined as calculation like this: COUNT([Object].[Object].[Object].members) Now comes the most crucial part of our solution – defining the scopes. Based on data used in this posting we have to define scope for each of our ranges. Here is the example for first range. SCOPE([FakeIncomeRange].[Name].&[Below 0], [Measures].[ObjectCount])     This=COUNT(            FILTER(                [Object].[Object].[Object].members,                 [Measures].[ComplexCalc] < 0          )     ) END SCOPE To get these scopes defined in cube we need MDX script blocks for each line given here. Take a look at the screenshot to get better idea what I mean. This example is given from SQL Server books online to avoid conflicts with NDA. :) From previous example the lines (MDX scripts) are: Line starting with SCOPE Block for This = Line with END SCOPE And now it is time to deploy and process our cube. Although you may see examples where there are semicolons in the end of statements you don’t need them. Visual Studio BI tools generate separate command from each script block so you don’t need to worry about it.

    Read the article

  • Windows Phone 7 development: Using isolated storage

    - by DigiMortal
    In my previous posting about Windows Phone 7 development I showed how to use WebBrowser control in Windows Phone 7. In this posting I make some other improvements to my blog reader application and I will show you how to use isolated storage to store information to phone. Why isolated storage? Isolated storage is place where your application can save its data and settings. The image on right (that I stole from MSDN library) shows you how application data store is organized. You have no other options to keep your files besides isolated storage because Windows Phone 7 does not allow you to save data directly to other file system locations. From MSDN: “Isolated storage enables managed applications to create and maintain local storage. The mobile architecture is similar to the Silverlight-based applications on Windows. All I/O operations are restricted to isolated storage and do not have direct access to the underlying operating system file system. Ultimately, this helps to provide security and prevents unauthorized access and data corruption.” Saving files from web to isolated storage I updated my RSS-reader so it reads RSS from web only if there in no local file with RSS. User can update RSS-file by clicking a button. Also file is created when application starts and there is no RSS-file. Why I am doing this? I want my application to be able to work also offline. As my code needs some more refactoring I provide it with some next postings about Windows Phone 7. If you want it sooner then please leave me a comment here. Here is the code for my RSS-downloader that downloads RSS-feed and saves it to isolated storage file calles rss.xml. public class RssDownloader {     private string _url;     private string _fileName;       public delegate void DownloadCompleteDelegate();     public event DownloadCompleteDelegate DownloadComplete;       public RssDownloader(string url, string fileName)     {         _url = url;         _fileName = fileName;     }       public void Download()     {         var request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(_url);         var result = (IAsyncResult)request.BeginGetResponse(ResponseCallback, request);            }       private void ResponseCallback(IAsyncResult result)     {         var request = (HttpWebRequest)result.AsyncState;         var response = request.EndGetResponse(result);           using(var stream = response.GetResponseStream())         using(var reader = new StreamReader(stream))         using(var appStorage = IsolatedStorageFile.GetUserStoreForApplication())         using(var file = appStorage.OpenFile("rss.xml", FileMode.OpenOrCreate))         using(var writer = new StreamWriter(file))         {             writer.Write(reader.ReadToEnd());         }           if (DownloadComplete != null)             DownloadComplete();     } } Of course I modified RSS-source for my application to use rss.xml file from isolated storage. As isolated storage files also base on streams we can use them everywhere where streams are expected. Reading isolated storage files As isolated storage files are opened as streams you can read them like usual files in your usual applications. The next code fragment shows you how to open file from isolated storage and how to read it using XmlReader. Previously I used response stream in same place. using(var appStorage = IsolatedStorageFile.GetUserStoreForApplication()) using(var file = appStorage.OpenFile("rss.xml", FileMode.Open)) {     var reader = XmlReader.Create(file);                      // more code } As you can see there is nothing complex. If you have worked with System.IO namespace objects then you will find isolated storage classes and methods to be very similar to these. Also mention that application storage and isolated storage files must be disposed after you are not using them anymore.

    Read the article

  • How to configure Visual Studio 2010 code coverage for ASP.NET MVC unit tests

    - by DigiMortal
    I just got Visual Studio 2010 code coverage work with ASP.NET MVC application unit tests. Everything is simple after you have spent some time with forums, blogs and Google. To save your valuable time I wrote this posting to guide you through the process of making code coverage work with ASP.NET MVC application unit tests. After some fighting with Visual Studio I got everything to work as expected. I am still not very sure why users must deal with this mess, but okay – I survived it. Before you start configuring Visual Studio I expect your solution meets the following needs: there are at least one library that will be tested, there is at least on library that contains tests to be run, there are some classes and some tests for them, and, of course, you are using version of Visual Studio 2010 that supports tests (I have Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate). Now open the following screenshot to separate windows and follow the steps given below. Visual Studio 2010 Test Settings window. Click on image to see it at original size.  Double click on Local.testsettings under Solution Items. Test settings window will be opened. Select “Data and Diagnostics” from left pane. Mark checkboxes “ASP.NET Profiler” and “Code Coverage”. Move cursor to “Code Coverage” line and press Configure button or make double click on line. Assemblies selection window will be opened. Mark checkboxes that are located before assemblies about what you want code coverage reports and apply settings. Save your project and close Visual Studio. Run Visual Studio as Administrator and run tests. NB! Select Test => Run => Tests in Current Context from menu. When tests are run you can open code coverage results by selecting Test => Windows => Code Coverage Results from menu. Here you can see my example test results. Visual Studio 2010 Test Results window. All my tests passed this time. :) Click on image to see it at original size.  And here are the code coverage results. Visual Studio 2101 Code Coverage Results. I need a lot more tests for sure. Click on image to see it at original size.  As you can see everything was pretty simple. But it took me sometime to figure out how to get everything work as expected. Problems? You may face some problems when making code coverage work. Here is my short list of possible problems. Make sure you have all assemblies available for code coverage. In some cases it needs more libraries to be referenced as you currently have. By example, I had to add some more Enterprise Library assemblies to my project. You can use EventViewer to discover errors that where given during testing. Make sure you selected all testable assemblies from Code Coverage settings like shown above. Otherwise you may get empty results. Tests with code coverage are slower because we need ASP.NET profiler. If your machine slows down then try to free more resources.

    Read the article

  • Entity Framework 4.0: Creating objects of correct type when using lazy loading

    - by DigiMortal
    In my posting about Entity Framework 4.0 and POCOs I introduced lazy loading in EF applications. EF uses proxy classes for lazy loading and this means we have new types in that come and go dynamically in runtime. We don’t have these types available when we write code but we cannot forget that EF may expect us to use dynamically generated types. In this posting I will give you simple hint how to use correct types in your code. The background of lazy loading and proxy classes As a first thing I will explain you in short what is proxy class. Business classes when designed correctly have no knowledge about their birth and death – they don’t know how they are created and they don’t know how their data is persisted. This is the responsibility of object runtime. When we use lazy loading we need a little bit different classes that know how to load data for properties when code accesses the property first time. As we cannot add this functionality to our business classes (they may be stored through more than one data access technology or by more than one Data Access Layer (DAL)) we create proxy classes that extend our business classes. If we have class called Product and product has lazy loaded property called Customer then we need proxy class, let’s say ProductProxy, that has same public signature as Product so we can use it INSTEAD OF product in our code. ProductProxy overrides Customer property. If customer is not asked then customer is null. But if we ask for Customer property then overridden property of ProductProxy loads it from database. This is how lazy loading works. Problem – two types for same thing As lazy loading may introduce dynamically generated proxy types we don’t know in our application code which type is returned. We cannot be sure that we have Product not ProductProxy returned. This leads us to the following question: how can we create Product of correct type if we don’t know the correct type? In EF solution is simple. Solution – use factory methods If you are using repositories and you are not using factories (imho it is pretty pointless with mapper) you can add factory methods to your EF based repositories. Take a look at this class. public class Event {     public int ID { get; set; }     public string Title { get; set; }     public string Location { get; set; }     public virtual Party Organizer { get; set; }     public DateTime Date { get; set; } } We have virtual member called Organizer. This property is virtual because we want to use lazy loading on this class so Organizer is loaded only when we ask it. EF provides us with method called CreateObject<T>(). CreateObject<T>() is member of ObjectContext class and it creates the object based on given type. In runtime proxy type for Event is created for us automatically and when we call CreateObject<T>() for Event it returns as object of Event proxy type. The factory method for events repository is as follows. public Event CreateEvent() {     var evt = _context.CreateObject<Event>();     return evt; } And we are done. Instead of creating factory classes we created factory methods that guarantee that created objects are of correct type. Conclusion Although lazy loading introduces some new objects we cannot use at design time because they live only in runtime we can write code without worrying about exact implementation type of object. This holds true until we have clean code and we don’t make any decisions based on object type. EF4.0 provides us with very simple factory method that create and return objects of correct type. All we had to do was adding factory methods to our repositories.

    Read the article

  • Exam 70-448 - TS: Microsoft SQL Server 2008, Business Intelligence Development and Maintenance

    - by DigiMortal
    The another exam I passed was 70-448 - TS: Microsoft SQL Server 2008, Business Intelligence Development and Maintenance. This exam covers Business Intelligence (BI) solutions development and maintenance on SQL Server 2008 platform. It was not easy exam, but if you study then you can do it. To get prepared for 70-488 it is strongly recommended to read self-paced training kit and also make through all examples it contains. If you don’t have strong experiences on Microsoft BI platform and SQL Server then this exam is hard to pass when you just go there and hope to pass somehow. Self-paced training kit is interesting reading and you learn a lot of new stuff for sure when preparing for exam. Questions in exam are divided into topics as follows: SSIS – 32% SSAS – 38% SSRS – 30% Exam 70-448 gives you Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist certificate.

    Read the article

  • Code Contracts: Hiding ContractException

    - by DigiMortal
    It’s time to move on and improve my randomizer I wrote for an example of static checking of code contracts. In this posting I will modify contracts and give some explanations about pre-conditions and post-conditions. Also I will show you how to avoid ContractExceptions and how to replace them with your own exceptions. As a first thing let’s take a look at my randomizer. public class Randomizer {     public static int GetRandomFromRange(int min, int max)     {         var rnd = new Random();         return rnd.Next(min, max);     }       public static int GetRandomFromRangeContracted(int min, int max)     {         Contract.Requires(min < max, "Min must be less than max");           var rnd = new Random();         return rnd.Next(min, max);     } } We have some problems here. We need contract for method output and we also need some better exception handling mechanism. As ContractException as type is hidden from us we have to switch from ContractException to some other Exception type that we can catch. Adding post-condition Pre-conditions are contracts for method’s input interface. Read it as follows: pre-conditions make sure that all conditions for method’s successful run are met. Post-conditions are contracts for output interface of method. So, post-conditions are for output arguments and return value. My code misses the post-condition that checks return value. Return value in this case must be greater or equal to minimum value and less or equal to maximum value. To make sure that method can run only the correct value I added call to Contract.Ensures() method. public static int GetRandomFromRangeContracted(int min, int max) {     Contract.Requires(min < max, "Min must be less than max");       Contract.Ensures(         Contract.Result<int>() >= min &&         Contract.Result<int>() <= max,         "Return value is out of range"     );       var rnd = new Random();     return rnd.Next(min, max); } I think that the line I added does not need any further comments. Avoiding ContractException for input interface ContractException lives in hidden namespace and we cannot see it at design time. But it is common exception type for all contract exceptions that we do not switch over to some other type. The case of Contract.Requires() method is simple: we can tell it what kind of exception we need if something goes wrong with contract it ensures. public static int GetRandomFromRangeContracted(int min, int max) {     Contract.Requires<ArgumentOutOfRangeException>(         min < max,         "Min must be less than max"     );       Contract.Ensures(         Contract.Result<int>() >= min &&         Contract.Result<int>() <= max,         "Return value is out of range"     );       var rnd = new Random();     return rnd.Next(min, max); } Now, if we violate the input interface contract giving min value that is not less than max value we get ArgumentOutOfRangeException. Avoiding ContractException for output interface Output interface is more complex to control. We cannot give exception type there and hope that this type of exception will be thrown if something goes wrong. Instead we have to use delegate that gathers information about problem and throws the exception we expect to be thrown. From documentation you can find the following example about the delegate I mentioned. Contract.ContractFailed += (sender, e) => {     e.SetHandled();     e.SetUnwind(); // cause code to abort after event     Assert.Fail(e.FailureKind.ToString() + ":" + e.DebugMessage); }; We can use this delegate to throw the Exception. Let’s move the code to separate method too. Here is our method that uses now ContractException hiding. public static int GetRandomFromRangeContracted(int min, int max) {     Contract.Requires(min < max, "Min must be less than max");       Contract.Ensures(         Contract.Result<int>() >= min &&         Contract.Result<int>() <= max,         "Return value is out of range"     );     Contract.ContractFailed += Contract_ContractFailed;       var rnd = new Random();     return rnd.Next(min, max)+1000; } And here is the delegate that creates exception. public static void Contract_ContractFailed(object sender,     ContractFailedEventArgs e) {     e.SetHandled();     e.SetUnwind();       throw new Exception(e.FailureKind.ToString() + ":" + e.Message); } Basically we can do in this delegate whatever we like to do with output interface errors. We can even introduce our own contract exception type. As you can see later then ContractFailed event is very useful at unit testing.

    Read the article

  • ASP.NET and WIF: Showing custom profile username as User.Identity.Name

    - by DigiMortal
    I am building ASP.NET MVC application that uses external services to authenticate users. For ASP.NET users are fully authenticated when they are redirected back from external service. In system they are logically authenticated when they have created user profiles. In this posting I will show you how to force ASP.NET MVC controller actions to demand existence of custom user profiles. Using external authentication sources with AppFabric Suppose you want to be user-friendly and you don’t force users to keep in mind another username/password when they visit your site. You can accept logins from different popular sites like Windows Live, Facebook, Yahoo, Google and many more. If user has account in some of these services then he or she can use his or her account to log in to your site. If you have community site then you usually have support for user profiles too. Some of these providers give you some information about users and other don’t. So only thing in common you get from all those providers is some unique ID that identifies user in service uniquely. Image above shows you how new user joins your site. Existing users who already have profile are directed to users homepage after they are authenticated. You can read more about how to solve semi-authorized users problem from my blog posting ASP.NET MVC: Using ProfileRequiredAttribute to restrict access to pages. The other problem is related to usernames that we don’t get from all identity providers. Why is IIdentity.Name sometimes empty? The problem is described more specifically in my blog posting Identifying AppFabric Access Control Service users uniquely. Shortly the problem is that not all providers have claim called http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2005/05/identity/claims/name. The following diagram illustrates what happens when user got token from AppFabric ACS and was redirected to your site. Now, when user was authenticated using Windows Live ID then we don’t have name claim in token and that’s why User.Identity.Name is empty. Okay, we can force nameidentifier to be used as name (we can do it in web.config file) but we have user profiles and we want username from profile to be shown when username is asked. Modifying name claim Now let’s force IClaimsIdentity to use username from our user profiles. You can read more about my profiles topic from my blog posting ASP.NET MVC: Using ProfileRequiredAttribute to restrict access to pages and you can find some useful extension methods for claims identity from my blog posting Identifying AppFabric Access Control Service users uniquely. Here is what we do to set User.Identity.Name: we will check if user has profile, if user has profile we will check if User.Identity.Name matches the name given by profile, if names does not match then probably identity provider returned some name for user, we will remove name claim and recreate it with correct username, we will add new name claim to claims collection. All this stuff happens in Application_AuthorizeRequest event of our web application. The code is here. protected void Application_AuthorizeRequest() {     if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(User.Identity.Name))     {         var identity = User.Identity;         var profile = identity.GetProfile();         if (profile != null)         {             if (profile.UserName != identity.Name)             {                 identity.RemoveName();                   var claim = new Claim("http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2005/05/identity/claims/name", profile.UserName);                 var claimsIdentity = (IClaimsIdentity)identity;                 claimsIdentity.Claims.Add(claim);             }         }     } } RemoveName extension method is simple – it looks for name claims of IClaimsIdentity claims collection and removes them. public static void RemoveName(this IIdentity identity) {     if (identity == null)         return;       var claimsIndentity = identity as ClaimsIdentity;     if (claimsIndentity == null)         return;       for (var i = claimsIndentity.Claims.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)     {         var claim = claimsIndentity.Claims[i];         if (claim.ClaimType == "http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2005/05/identity/claims/name")             claimsIndentity.Claims.RemoveAt(i);     } } And we are done. Now User.Identity.Name returns the username from user profile and you can use it to show username of current user everywhere in your site. Conclusion Mixing AppFabric Access Control Service and Windows Identity Foundation with custom authorization logic is not impossible but a little bit tricky. This posting finishes my little series about AppFabric ACS and WIF for this time and hopefully you found some useful tricks, tips, hacks and code pieces you can use in your own applications.

    Read the article

  • Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship – book review

    - by DigiMortal
       Writing code that is easy read and test is not something that is easy to achieve. Unfortunately there are still way too much programming students who write awful spaghetti after graduating. But there is one really good book that helps you raise your code to new level – your code will be also communication tool for you and your fellow programmers. “Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship” by Robert C. Martin is excellent book that helps you start writing the easily readable code. Of course, you are the one who has to learn and practice but using this book you have very good guide that keeps you going to right direction. You can start writing better code while you read this book and you can do it right in your current projects – you don’t have to create new guestbook or some other simple application to start practicing. Take the project you are working on and start making it better! My special thanks to Robert C. Martin I want to say my special thanks to Robert C. Martin for this book. There are many books that teach you different stuff and usually you have markable learning curve to go before you start getting results. There are many books that show you the direction to go and then leave you alone figuring out how to achieve all that stuff you just read about. Clean Code gives you a lot more – the mental tools to use so you can go your way to clean code being sure you will be soon there. I am reading books as much as I have time for it. Clean Code is top-level book for developers who have to write working code. Before anything else take Clean Code and read it. You will never regret your decision. I promise. Fragment of editorial review “Even bad code can function. But if code isn’t clean, it can bring a development organization to its knees. Every year, countless hours and significant resources are lost because of poorly written code. But it doesn’t have to be that way. What kind of work will you be doing? You’ll be reading code—lots of code. And you will be challenged to think about what’s right about that code, and what’s wrong with it. More importantly, you will be challenged to reassess your professional values and your commitment to your craft. Readers will come away from this book understanding How to tell the difference between good and bad code How to write good code and how to transform bad code into good code How to create good names, good functions, good objects, and good classes How to format code for maximum readability How to implement complete error handling without obscuring code logic How to unit test and practice test-driven development This book is a must for any developer, software engineer, project manager, team lead, or systems analyst with an interest in producing better code.” Table of contents Clean code Meaningful names Functions Comments Formatting Objects and data structures Error handling Boundaries Unit tests Classes Systems Emergence Concurrency Successive refinement JUnit internals Refactoring SerialDate Smells and heuristics A Concurrency II org.jfree.date.SerialDate Cross references of heuristics Epilogue Index

    Read the article

  • Windows Phone 7 development: first impressions

    - by DigiMortal
    After hard week in work I got some free time to play with Windows Phone 7 CTP developer tools. Although my first test application is still unfinished I think it is good moment to share my first experiences to you. In this posting I will give you quick overview of Windows Phone 7 developer tools from developer perspective. If you are familiar with Visual Studio 2010 then you will feel comfortable because Windows Phone 7 CTP developer tools base on Visual Studio 2010 Express. Project templates There are five project templates available. Three of them are based on Silverlight and two on XNA Game Studio: Windows Phone Application (Silverlight) Windows Phone List Application (Silverlight) Windows Phone Class Library (Silverlight) Windows Phone Game (XNA Game Studio) Windows Phone Game Library (XNA Game Studio) Currently I am writing to test applications. One of them is based on Windows Phone Application and the other on Windows Phone List Application project template. After creating these projects you see the following views in Visual Studio. Windows Phone Application. Click on image to enlarge. Windows Phone List Application. Click on image to enlarge.  I suggest you to use some of these templates to get started more easily. Windows Phone 7 emulator You can run your Windows Phone 7 applications on Windows Phone 7 emulator that comes with developer tools CTP. If you run your application then emulator is started automatically and you can try out how your application works in phone-like emulator. You can see screenshot of emulator on right. Currently there is opened Windows Phone List Application as it is created by default. Click on image to enlarge it. Emulator is a little bit slow and uncomfortable but it works pretty well. This far I have caused only couple of crashes during my experiments. In these cases emulator works but Visual Studio gets stuck because it cannot communicate with emulator. One important note. Emulator is based on virtual machine although you can see only phone screen and options toolbar. If you want to run emulator you must close all virtual machines running on your machine and run Visual Studio 2010 as administrator. Once you run emulator you can keep it open because you can stop your application in Visual Studio, modify, compile and re-deploy it without restarting emulator. Designing user interfaces You can design user interface of your application in Visual Studio. When you open XAML-files it is displayed in window with two panels. Left panel shows you device screen and works as visual design environment while right panel shows you XAML mark-up and let’s you modify XML if you need it. As it is one of my very first Silverlight applications I felt more comfortable with XAML editor because property names in property boxes of visual designer confused me a little bit. Designer panel is not very good because it is visually hard to follow. It has black background that makes dark borders of controls very hard to see. If you have monitor with very high contrast then it is may be not a real problem. I have usual monitor and I have problem. :) Putting controls on design surface, dragging and resizing them is also pretty painful. Some controls are drawn correctly but for some controls you have to set width and height in XML so they can be resized. After some practicing it is not so annoying anymore. On the right you can see toolbox with some controllers. This is all you get out of the box. But it is sufficient to get started. After getting some experiences you can create your own controls or use existing ones from other vendors or developers. If it is your first time to do stuff with Silverlight then keep Google open – you need it hard. After getting over the first shock you get the point very quickly and start developing at normal speed. :) Writing source code Writing source code is the most familiar part of this action. Good old Visual Studio code editor with all nice features it has. But here you get also some surprises: The anatomy of Silverlight controls is a little bit different than the one of user controls in web and forms projects. Windows Phone 7 doesn’t run on full version of Windows (I bet it is some version of Windows CE or something like this) then there is less system classes you can use. Some familiar classes have less methods that in full version of .NET Framework and in these cases you have to write all the code by yourself or find libraries or source code from somewhere. These problems are really not so much problems than limitations and you get easily over them. Conclusion Windows Phone 7 CTP developer tools help you do a lot of things on Windows Phone 7. Although I expected better performance from tools I think that current performance is not a problem. This far my first test project is going very well and Google has answer for almost every question. Windows Phone 7 is mobile device and therefore it has less hardware resources than desktop computers. This is why toolset is so limited. The more you need memory the more slower is device and as you may guess it needs the more battery. If you are writing apps for mobile devices then make your best to get your application use as few resources as possible and act as fast as possible.

    Read the article

  • Agile Database Techniques: Effective Strategies for the Agile Software Developer – book review

    - by DigiMortal
       Agile development expects mind shift and developers are not the only ones who must be agile. Every chain is as strong as it’s weakest link and same goes also for development teams. Agile Database Techniques: Effective Strategies for the Agile Software Developer by Scott W. Ambler is book that calls also data professionals to be part of agile development. Often are DBA-s in situation where they are not part of application development and later they have to survive large set of applications that all use databases different way. Of course, only some of these applications are not problematic when looking what database server has to do to serve them. I have seen many applications that rape database servers because developers have no clue what is going on in database (~3K queries to database per web application request – have you seen something like this? I have…) Agile Database Techniques covers some object and database design technologies and gives suggestions to development teams about topics they need help or assistance by DBA-s. The book is also good reading for DBA-s who usually are not very strong in object technologies. You can take this book as bridge between these two worlds. I think teams that build object applications that use databases should buy this book and try at least one or two projects out with Ambler’s suggestions. Table of contents Foreword by Jon Kern. Foreword by Douglas K. Barry. Acknowledgments. Introduction. About the Author. Part One: Setting the Foundation. Chapter 1: The Agile Data Method. Chapter 2: From Use Cases to Databases — Real-World UML. Chapter 3: Data Modeling 101. Chapter 4: Data Normalization. Chapter 5: Class Normalization. Chapter 6: Relational Database Technology, Like It or Not. Chapter 7: The Object-Relational Impedance Mismatch. Chapter 8: Legacy Databases — Everything You Need to Know But Are Afraid to Deal With. Part Two: Evolutionary Database Development. Chapter 9: Vive L’ Évolution. Chapter 10: Agile Model-Driven Development (AMDD). Chapter 11: Test-Driven Development (TDD). Chapter 12: Database Refactoring. Chapter 13: Database Encapsulation Strategies. Chapter 14: Mapping Objects to Relational Databases. Chapter 15: Performance Tuning. Chapter 16: Tools for Evolutionary Database Development. Part Three: Practical Data-Oriented Development Techniques. Chapter 17: Implementing Concurrency Control. Chapter 18: Finding Objects in Relational Databases. Chapter 19: Implementing Referential Integrity and Shared Business Logic. Chapter 20: Implementing Security Access Control. Chapter 21: Implementing Reports. Chapter 22: Realistic XML. Part Four: Adopting Agile Database Techniques. Chapter 23: How You Can Become Agile. Chapter 24: Bringing Agility into Your Organization. Appendix: Database Refactoring Catalog. References and Suggested Reading. Index.

    Read the article

  • Getting MySQL work with Entity Framework 4.0

    - by DigiMortal
    Does MySQL work with Entity Framework 4.0? The answer is: yes, it works! I just put up one experimental project to play with MySQL and Entity Framework 4.0 and in this posting I will show you how to get MySQL data to EF. Also I will give some suggestions how to deploy your applications to hosting and cloud environments. MySQL stuff As you may guess you need MySQL running somewhere. I have MySQL installed to my development machine so I can also develop stuff when I’m offline. The other thing you need is MySQL Connector for .NET Framework. Currently there is available development version of MySQL Connector/NET 6.3.5 that supports Visual Studio 2010. Before you start download MySQL and Connector/NET: MySQL Community Server Connector/NET 6.3.5 If you are not big fan of phpMyAdmin then you can try out free desktop client for MySQL – HeidiSQL. I am using it and I am really happy with this program. NB! If you just put up MySQL then create also database with couple of table there. To use all features of Entity Framework 4.0 I suggest you to use InnoDB or other engine that has support for foreign keys. Connecting MySQL to Entity Framework 4.0 Now create simple console project using Visual Studio 2010 and go through the following steps. 1. Add new ADO.NET Entity Data Model to your project. For model insert the name that is informative and that you are able later recognize. Now you can choose how you want to create your model. Select “Generate from database” and click OK. 2. Set up database connection Change data connection and select MySQL Database as data source. You may also need to set provider – there is only one choice. Select it if data provider combo shows empty value. Click OK and insert connection information you are asked about. Don’t forget to click test connection button to see if your connection data is okay. If everything works then click OK. 3. Insert context name Now you should see the following dialog. Insert your data model name for application configuration file and click OK. Click next button. 4. Select tables for model Now you can select tables and views your classes are based on. I have small database with events data. Uncheck the checkbox “Include foreign key columns in the model” – it is damn annoying to get them away from model later. Also insert informative and easy to remember name for your model. Click finish button. 5. Define your classes Now it’s time to define your classes. Here you can see what Entity Framework generated for you. Relations were detected automatically – that’s why we needed foreign keys. The names of classes and their members are not nice yet. After some modifications my class model looks like on the following diagram. Note that I removed attendees navigation property from person class. Now my classes look nice and they follow conventions I am using when naming classes and their members. NB! Don’t forget to see properties of classes (properties windows) and modify their set names if set names contain numbers (I changed set name for Entity from Entity1 to Entities). 6. Let’s test! Now let’s write simple testing program to see if MySQL data runs through Entity Framework 4.0 as expected. My program looks for events where I attended. using(var context = new MySqlEntities()) {     var myEvents = from e in context.Events                     from a in e.Attendees                     where a.Person.FirstName == "Gunnar" &&                             a.Person.LastName == "Peipman"                     select e;       Console.WriteLine("My events: ");       foreach(var e in myEvents)     {         Console.WriteLine(e.Title);     } }   Console.ReadKey(); And when I run it I get the result shown on screenshot on right. I checked out from database and these results are correct. At first run connector seems to work slow but this is only the effect of first run. As connector is loaded to memory by Entity Framework it works fast from this point on. Now let’s see what we have to do to get our program work in hosting and cloud environments where MySQL connector is not installed. Deploying application to hosting and cloud environments If your hosting or cloud environment has no MySQL connector installed you have to provide MySQL connector assemblies with your project. Add the following assemblies to your project’s bin folder and include them to your project (otherwise they are not packaged by WebDeploy and Azure tools): MySQL.Data MySQL.Data.Entity MySQL.Web You can also add references to these assemblies and mark references as local so these assemblies are copied to binary folder of your application. If you have references to these assemblies then you don’t have to include them to your project from bin folder. Also add the following block to your application configuration file. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <configuration> ...   <system.data>     <DbProviderFactories>         <add              name=”MySQL Data Provider”              invariant=”MySql.Data.MySqlClient”              description=”.Net Framework Data Provider for MySQL”              type=”MySql.Data.MySqlClient.MySqlClientFactory, MySql.Data,                   Version=6.2.0.0, Culture=neutral,                   PublicKeyToken=c5687fc88969c44d”          />     </DbProviderFactories>   </system.data> ... </configuration> Conclusion It was not hard to get MySQL connector installed and MySQL connected to Entity Framework 4.0. To use full power of Entity Framework we used InnoDB engine because it supports foreign keys. It was also easy to query our model. To get our project online we needed some easy modifications to our project and configuration files.

    Read the article

  • Interface contracts – forcing code contracts through interfaces

    - by DigiMortal
    Sometimes we need a way to make different implementations of same interface follow same rules. One option is to duplicate contracts to all implementation but this is not good option because we have duplicated code then. The other option is to force contracts to all implementations at interface level. In this posting I will show you how to do it using interface contracts and contracts class. Using code from previous example about unit testing code with code contracts I will go further and force contracts at interface level. Here is the code from previous example. Take a careful look at it because I will talk about some modifications to this code soon. public interface IRandomGenerator {     int Next(int min, int max); }   public class RandomGenerator : IRandomGenerator {     private Random _random = new Random();       public int Next(int min, int max)     {         return _random.Next(min, max);     } }    public class Randomizer {     private IRandomGenerator _generator;       private Randomizer()     {         _generator = new RandomGenerator();     }       public Randomizer(IRandomGenerator generator)     {         _generator = generator;     }       public int GetRandomFromRangeContracted(int min, int max)     {         Contract.Requires<ArgumentOutOfRangeException>(             min < max,             "Min must be less than max"         );           Contract.Ensures(             Contract.Result<int>() >= min &&             Contract.Result<int>() <= max,             "Return value is out of range"         );           return _generator.Next(min, max);     } } If we look at the GetRandomFromRangeContracted() method we can see that contracts set in this method are applicable to all implementations of IRandomGenerator interface. Although we can write new implementations as we want these implementations need exactly the same contracts. If we are using generators somewhere else then code contracts are not with them anymore. To solve the problem we will force code contracts at interface level. NB! To make the following code work you must enable Contract Reference Assembly building from project settings. Interface contracts and contracts class Interface contains no code – only definitions of members that implementing type must have. But code contracts must be defined in body of member they are part of. To get over this limitation, code contracts are defined in separate contracts class. Interface is bound to this class by special attribute and contracts class refers to interface through special attribute. Here is the IRandomGenerator with contracts and contracts class. Also I write simple fake so we can test contracts easily based only on interface mock. [ContractClass(typeof(RandomGeneratorContracts))] public interface IRandomGenerator {     int Next(int min, int max); }   [ContractClassFor(typeof(IRandomGenerator))] internal sealed class RandomGeneratorContracts : IRandomGenerator {     int IRandomGenerator.Next(int min, int max)     {         Contract.Requires<ArgumentOutOfRangeException>(                 min < max,                 "Min must be less than max"             );           Contract.Ensures(             Contract.Result<int>() >= min &&             Contract.Result<int>() <= max,             "Return value is out of range"         );           return default(int);     } }   public class RandomFake : IRandomGenerator {     private int _testValue;       public RandomGen(int testValue)     {         _testValue = testValue;     }       public int Next(int min, int max)     {         return _testValue;     } } To try out these changes use the following code. var gen = new RandomFake(3);   try {     gen.Next(10, 1); } catch(Exception ex) {     Debug.WriteLine(ex.Message); }   try {     gen.Next(5, 10); } catch(Exception ex) {     Debug.WriteLine(ex.Message); } Now we can force code contracts to all types that implement our IRandomGenerator interface and we must test only the interface to make sure that contracts are defined correctly.

    Read the article

  • Quick example: why coding standards must be in place

    - by DigiMortal
    One quick example why coding standards must be in place. Take a look at the following code – property names are changed but not anything else. public string Property1 { get; set; }   public string Property2 {     get;     set; }   public string Property3 {     get; set; } And yes – it is real-world example.

    Read the article

  • Why Software Sucks...and What You Can Do About It – book review

    - by DigiMortal
        How do our users see the products we are writing for them and how happy they are with our work? Are they able to get their work done without fighting with cool features and crashes or are they just switching off resistance part of their brain to survive our software? Yeah, the overall picture of software usability landscape is not very nice. Okay, it is not even nice. But, fortunately, Why Software Sucks...and What You Can Do About It by David S. Platt explains everything. Why Software Sucks… is book for software users but I consider it as a-must reading also for developers and specially for their managers whose politics often kills all usability topics as soon as they may appear. For managers usability is soft topic that can be manipulated the way it is best in current state of project. Although developers are not UI designers and usability experts they are still very often forced to deal with these topics and this is how usability problems start (of course, also designers are able to produce designs that are stupid and too hard to use for users, but this blog here is about development). I found this book to be very interesting and funny reading. It is not humor book but it explains you all so you remember later very well what you just read. It took me about three evenings to go through this book and I am still enjoying what I found and how author explains our weird young working field to end users. I suggest this book to all developers – while you are demanding your management to hire or outsource usability expert you are at least causing less pain to end users. So, go and buy this book, just like I did. And… they thanks to mr. Platt :) There is one book more I suggest you to read if you are interested in usability - Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability, 2nd Edition by Steve Krug. Editorial review from Amazon Today’s software sucks. There’s no other good way to say it. It’s unsafe, allowing criminal programs to creep through the Internet wires into our very bedrooms. It’s unreliable, crashing when we need it most, wiping out hours or days of work with no way to get it back. And it’s hard to use, requiring large amounts of head-banging to figure out the simplest operations. It’s no secret that software sucks. You know that from personal experience, whether you use computers for work or personal tasks. In this book, programming insider David Platt explains why that’s the case and, more importantly, why it doesn’t have to be that way. And he explains it in plain, jargon-free English that’s a joy to read, using real-world examples with which you’re already familiar. In the end, he suggests what you, as a typical user, without a technical background, can do about this sad state of our software—how you, as an informed consumer, don’t have to take the abuse that bad software dishes out. As you might expect from the book’s title, Dave’s expose is laced with humor—sometimes outrageous, but always dead on. You’ll laugh out loud as you recall incidents with your own software that made you cry. You’ll slap your thigh with the same hand that so often pounded your computer desk and wished it was a bad programmer’s face. But Dave hasn’t written this book just for laughs. He’s written it to give long-overdue voice to your own discovery—that software does, indeed, suck, but it shouldn’t. Table of contents Acknowledgments xiii Introduction Chapter 1: Who’re You Calling a Dummy? Where We Came From Why It Still Sucks Today Control versus Ease of Use I Don’t Care How Your Program Works A Bad Feature and a Good One Stopping the Proceedings with Idiocy Testing on Live Animals Where We Are and What You Can Do Chapter 2: Tangled in the Web Where We Came From How It Works Why It Still Sucks Today Client-Centered Design versus Server-Centered Design Where’s My Eye Opener? It’s Obvious—Not! Splash, Flash, and Animation Testing on Live Animals What You Can Do about It Chapter 3: Keep Me Safe The Way It Was Why It Sucks Today What Programmers Need to Know, but Don’t A Human Operation Budgeting for Hassles Users Are Lazy Social Engineering Last Word on Security What You Can Do Chapter 4: Who the Heck Are You? Where We Came From Why It Still Sucks Today Incompatible Requirements OK, So Now What? Chapter 5: Who’re You Looking At? Yes, They Know You Why It Sucks More Than Ever Today Users Don’t Know Where the Risks Are What They Know First Milk You with Cookies? Privacy Policy Nonsense Covering Your Tracks The Google Conundrum Solution Chapter 6: Ten Thousand Geeks, Crazed on Jolt Cola See Them in Their Native Habitat All These Geeks Who Speaks, and When, and about What Selling It The Next Generation of Geeks—Passing It On Chapter 7: Who Are These Crazy Bastards Anyway? Homo Logicus Testosterone Poisoning Control and Contentment Making Models Geeks and Jocks Jargon Brains and Constraints Seven Habits of Geeks Chapter 8: Microsoft: Can’t Live With ’Em and Can’t Live Without ’Em They Run the World Me and Them Where We Came From Why It Sucks Today Damned if You Do, Damned if You Don’t We Love to Hate Them Plus ça Change Growing-Up Pains What You Can Do about It The Last Word Chapter 9: Doing Something About It 1. Buy 2. Tell 3. Ridicule 4. Trust 5. Organize Epilogue About the Author

    Read the article

  • ASP.NET MVC: Using jQuery context menu with tables

    - by DigiMortal
    I needed to add context menus to some tables of my intranet application. After trying some components I found one that does everything I need and has no overhead. In this posting I will show you how to use jQuery context menu plug-in and how to attach it to tables. I found context menu plug-in by Chris Domigan and it was very easy to integrate to my application (when comparing some other plug-ins that work only on demo pages and in simple scenarios). Thanks, Chris, for great work! Now let’s use this context menu plug-in with table. Before we go on let’s see what we are trying to achieve. The following screenshot fragment shows simple context menu that we want to attach to our table. And when we click some menu option then something should happen too. :) Installing context menu plug-in Download plug-in (if download link is broken then open demo page and I think you know how to get plug-in from there). Copy jquery.contextmenu.js to your scripts folder. Include it in your masterpage or in the page where you plan to use context menus. Make sure plug-in is included correctly (use Firebug or some other tool you like). Save the page. Defining context menu Now let’s define context menu. Here is fragment on context menu definition from my code. <div class="contextMenu" id="myMenu1">     <ul>     <li id="email"><img src="/img/e-mail.png" />E-mail</li>     <li id="homepage"><img src="/img/homepage.png" />Homepage</li>     </ul> </div> div with id myMenu1 is container of context menu. Unordered list inside container defines items in context menu – simple and elegant! Adding context menu to table I have table with persons. It is simple HTML. I omitted commands column from this and the next table to keep them simple and more easily readable. <table>   <tr>     <th>Name</th>     <th>Short</th>     <th>Address</th>     <th>Mobile</th>     <th>E-mail</th>   </tr>   <% foreach(var person in Model.Results) { %>   <tr>     <td><%=person.FullName %></td>     <td><%=person.ShortName %></td>     <td><%=person.FullAddress %></td>     <td><%=person.Mobile %></td>     <td><%=person.Email %></td>   </tr>   <% } %> </table> To get context menu linked to table rows first cells we need to specify class for cells and ID. We need ID because we have to know later which ID has the row on which user selected something from context menu. <table>   <tr>     <th>Name</th>     <th>Short</th>     <th>Address</th>     <th>Mobile</th>     <th>E-mail</th>   </tr>   <% foreach(var person in Model.Results) { %>   <tr>     <td class="showContext" id="<%= person.Id %>"><%=person.FullName %></td>     <td><%=person.ShortName %></td>     <td><%=person.FullAddress %></td>     <td><%=person.Mobile %></td>     <td><%=person.Email %></td>   </tr>   <% } %> </table> Now we have only one thing to do – we have to write some code that attaches context menu to table cells. Catching context menu events Now we will make everything work. Relax, it is only couple of lines of code, thank to jQuery. <script type="text/javascript">   $(document).ready(function () {     $('td.showContext').contextMenu('myMenu1', {         bindings: {         'email': function (t) {           document.location.href = '/contact/sendmail/' + t.id;         },         'homepage': function (t) {           document.location.href = '/contact/homepage/' + t.id;         }       }     });   }); </script> I think that first lines doesn’t need any comments. Take a look at bindings. We gave ID to table cells because it is carried also to bound events. We can use also more complex ID-s if we have more than one table with context menus on our form. Now we are done. Save all files, compile solution, run it and try out how context menu works. Conclusion We saw than using jQuery with context menu component allows us easily create powerful context menus for our user interfaces. Context menu was very easy to define. We were also able to attach context menu to table and use ID of current row entity also in events of context menu. To achieve this we needed only some minor modifications in view and couple of lines of JavaScript.

    Read the article

  • ASP.NET MVC: Simple view to display contents of DataTable

    - by DigiMortal
    In one of my current projects I have to show reports based on SQL Server views. My code should be not aware of data it shows. It just asks data from view and displays it user. As WebGrid didn’t seem to work with DataTable (at least with no hocus-pocus) I wrote my own very simple view that shows contents of DataTable. I don’t focus right now on data querying questions as this part of my simple generic reporting stuff is still under construction. If the final result is something good enough to share with wider audience I will blog about it for sure. My view uses DataTable as model. It iterates through columns collection to get column names and then iterates through rows and writes out values of all columns. Nothing special, just simple generic view for DataTable. @model System.Data.DataTable @using System.Data; <h2>Report</h2> <table>     <thead>     <tr>     @foreach (DataColumn col in Model.Columns)         {                  <th>@col.ColumnName</th>     }         </tr>     </thead>             <tbody>     @foreach (DataRow row in Model.Rows)         {                 <tr>         @foreach (DataColumn col in Model.Columns)                 {                          <td>@row[col.ColumnName]</td>         }                 </tr>     }         </tbody> </table> In my controller action I have code like this. GetParams() is simple function that reads parameter values from form. This part of my simple reporting system is still under construction but as you can see it will be easy to use for UI developers. public ActionResult TasksByProjectReport() {      var data = _reportService.GetReportData("MEMOS",GetParams());      return View(data); } Before seeing next silver bullet in this example please calm down. It is just plain and simple stuff for simple needs. If you need advanced and powerful reporting system then better use existing components by some vendor.

    Read the article

  • Code Contracts: Unit testing contracted code

    - by DigiMortal
    Code contracts and unit tests are not replacements for each other. They both have different purpose and different nature. It does not matter if you are using code contracts or not – you still have to write tests for your code. In this posting I will show you how to unit test code with contracts. In my previous posting about code contracts I showed how to avoid ContractExceptions that are defined in code contracts runtime and that are not accessible for us in design time. This was one step further to make my randomizer testable. In this posting I will complete the mission. Problems with current code This is my current code. public class Randomizer {     public static int GetRandomFromRangeContracted(int min, int max)     {         Contract.Requires<ArgumentOutOfRangeException>(             min < max,             "Min must be less than max"         );           Contract.Ensures(             Contract.Result<int>() >= min &&             Contract.Result<int>() <= max,             "Return value is out of range"         );           var rnd = new Random();         return rnd.Next(min, max);     } } As you can see this code has some problems: randomizer class is static and cannot be instantiated. We cannot move this class between components if we need to, GetRandomFromRangeContracted() is not fully testable because we cannot currently affect random number generator output and therefore we cannot test post-contract. Now let’s solve these problems. Making randomizer testable As a first thing I made Randomizer to be class that must be instantiated. This is simple thing to do. Now let’s solve the problem with Random class. To make Randomizer testable I define IRandomGenerator interface and RandomGenerator class. The public constructor of Randomizer accepts IRandomGenerator as argument. public interface IRandomGenerator {     int Next(int min, int max); }   public class RandomGenerator : IRandomGenerator {     private Random _random = new Random();       public int Next(int min, int max)     {         return _random.Next(min, max);     } } And here is our Randomizer after total make-over. public class Randomizer {     private IRandomGenerator _generator;       private Randomizer()     {         _generator = new RandomGenerator();     }       public Randomizer(IRandomGenerator generator)     {         _generator = generator;     }       public int GetRandomFromRangeContracted(int min, int max)     {         Contract.Requires<ArgumentOutOfRangeException>(             min < max,             "Min must be less than max"         );           Contract.Ensures(             Contract.Result<int>() >= min &&             Contract.Result<int>() <= max,             "Return value is out of range"         );           return _generator.Next(min, max);     } } It seems to be inconvenient to instantiate Randomizer now but you can always use DI/IoC containers and break compiled dependencies between the components of your system. Writing tests for randomizer IRandomGenerator solved problem with testing post-condition. Now it is time to write tests for Randomizer class. Writing tests for contracted code is not easy. The main problem is still ContractException that we are not able to access. Still it is the main exception we get as soon as contracts fail. Although pre-conditions are able to throw exceptions with type we want we cannot do much when post-conditions will fail. We have to use Contract.ContractFailed event and this event is called for every contract failure. This way we find ourselves in situation where supporting well input interface makes it impossible to support output interface well and vice versa. ContractFailed is nasty hack and it works pretty weird way. Although documentation sais that ContractFailed is good choice for testing contracts it is still pretty painful. As a last chance I got tests working almost normally when I wrapped them up. Can you remember similar solution from the times of Visual Studio 2008 unit tests? Cannot understand how Microsoft was able to mess up testing again. [TestClass] public class RandomizerTest {     private Mock<IRandomGenerator> _randomMock;     private Randomizer _randomizer;     private string _lastContractError;       public TestContext TestContext { get; set; }       public RandomizerTest()     {         Contract.ContractFailed += (sender, e) =>         {             e.SetHandled();             e.SetUnwind();               throw new Exception(e.FailureKind + ": " + e.Message);         };     }       [TestInitialize()]     public void RandomizerTestInitialize()     {         _randomMock = new Mock<IRandomGenerator>();         _randomizer = new Randomizer(_randomMock.Object);         _lastContractError = string.Empty;     }       #region InputInterfaceTests     [TestMethod]     [ExpectedException(typeof(Exception))]     public void GetRandomFromRangeContracted_should_throw_exception_when_min_is_not_less_than_max()     {         try         {             _randomizer.GetRandomFromRangeContracted(100, 10);         }         catch (Exception ex)         {             throw new Exception(string.Empty, ex);         }     }       [TestMethod]     [ExpectedException(typeof(Exception))]     public void GetRandomFromRangeContracted_should_throw_exception_when_min_is_equal_to_max()     {         try         {             _randomizer.GetRandomFromRangeContracted(10, 10);         }         catch (Exception ex)         {             throw new Exception(string.Empty, ex);         }     }       [TestMethod]     public void GetRandomFromRangeContracted_should_work_when_min_is_less_than_max()     {         int minValue = 10;         int maxValue = 100;         int returnValue = 50;           _randomMock.Setup(r => r.Next(minValue, maxValue))             .Returns(returnValue)             .Verifiable();           var result = _randomizer.GetRandomFromRangeContracted(minValue, maxValue);           _randomMock.Verify();         Assert.AreEqual<int>(returnValue, result);     }     #endregion       #region OutputInterfaceTests     [TestMethod]     [ExpectedException(typeof(Exception))]     public void GetRandomFromRangeContracted_should_throw_exception_when_return_value_is_less_than_min()     {         int minValue = 10;         int maxValue = 100;         int returnValue = 7;           _randomMock.Setup(r => r.Next(10, 100))             .Returns(returnValue)             .Verifiable();           try         {             _randomizer.GetRandomFromRangeContracted(minValue, maxValue);         }         catch (Exception ex)         {             throw new Exception(string.Empty, ex);         }           _randomMock.Verify();     }       [TestMethod]     [ExpectedException(typeof(Exception))]     public void GetRandomFromRangeContracted_should_throw_exception_when_return_value_is_more_than_max()     {         int minValue = 10;         int maxValue = 100;         int returnValue = 102;           _randomMock.Setup(r => r.Next(10, 100))             .Returns(returnValue)             .Verifiable();           try         {             _randomizer.GetRandomFromRangeContracted(minValue, maxValue);         }         catch (Exception ex)         {             throw new Exception(string.Empty, ex);         }           _randomMock.Verify();     }     #endregion        } Although these tests are pretty awful and contain hacks we are at least able now to make sure that our code works as expected. Here is the test list after running these tests. Conclusion Code contracts are very new stuff in Visual Studio world and as young technology it has some problems – like all other new bits and bytes in the world. As you saw then making our contracted code testable is easy only to the point when pre-conditions are considered. When we start dealing with post-conditions we will end up with hacked tests. I hope that future versions of code contracts will solve error handling issues the way that testing of contracted code will be easier than it is right now.

    Read the article

  • Using ExcelPacke to create Excel sheets on server

    - by DigiMortal
    In one of my community projects I needed to output some listings as Excel file. As installing Excel to server is non-sense that I was easily able to avoid I found simple solution for Excel 2007 files – open-source project called ExcelPackage. In this posting I will show you hot to create simple event attendees report in Excel 2007 format using ExcelPackage. Cautions Although ExcelPackage works well for me here are some things you should be aware of. ExcelPackage needs file system access because compression library it uses is designed so. There is only very old source code available and it is published under GPL. So if you are writing application to your customers then you cannot use this library unless you make your whole application open-source. ExcelPackage has also some technical problems and it is not very easy to use in simple cases. Authors have not provided any new releases since the beginning of 2007 so I have good reason to consider this project as abandoned. You may find the extensive package EPPlus also useful as there are new versions coming over time. EPPlus is also published under GPL (because ExcelPackage is under GPL), so you can use it only on very limited manner. If you don’t afraid some s*itfight with technology and GPL is okay for your system then let’s go on. Exporting event attendees list to Excel Suppose we have list with event attendees and we want to export it to Excel. We are behaving normally and we don’t install Excel desktop software to our web server. Here is the code. void ExportToExcel(Event evt) {     var fileInfo = new FileInfo(Path.GetTempPath() + "\\" +                                  DateTime.Now.Ticks + ".xlsx");       using (var xls = new ExcelPackage(fileInfo))     {         var sheet = xls.Workbook.Worksheets.Add(evt.Title);           sheet.Cell(1, 1).Value = "First name";         sheet.Cell(1, 2).Value = "Last name";         sheet.Cell(1, 3).Value = "E-mail";         sheet.Cell(1, 4).Value = "Phone";         sheet.Cell(1, 5).Value = "Registered";         sheet.Cell(1, 6).Value = "Live Meeting";           var i = 1;         foreach(var attendee in evt.Attendees)         {             i++;               var profile = attendee.Profile;             sheet.Cell(i, 1).Value = profile.FirstName;             sheet.Cell(i, 2).Value = profile.LastName;             sheet.Cell(i, 3).Value = profile.Email;             sheet.Cell(i, 4).Value = profile.Phone;             sheet.Cell(i, 5).Value = att.Created.ToString();             sheet.Cell(i, 6).Value = att.LiveMeeting.ToString();         }           xls.Save();      }       Response.Clear();     Response.ContentType = "application/vnd.openxmlformats";     Response.AddHeader("Content-Disposition",                        "attachment; filename=" + fileInfo.Name);     Response.WriteFile(fileInfo.FullName);     Response.Flush();       if (fileInfo.Exists)         fileInfo.Delete(); } And here is the result. Although it is possible to make this list more effective and nice it works and users can start using it until all the nice bells and whistles are coming. Conclusion After some fighting with technology it was not very hard to get nice Excel 2007 sheets coming out from our server. We used ExcelPackage library to create list of event attendees and our event organizers can now simply download data to Excel if they need to contact with attendees or manage their data using Excel tools.

    Read the article

  • Hosting WCF service in Windows Service

    - by DigiMortal
    When building Windows services we often need a way to communicate with them. The natural way to communicate to service is to send signals to it. But this is very limited communication. Usually we need more powerful communication mechanisms with services. In this posting I will show you how to use service-hosted WCF web service to communicate with Windows service. Create Windows service Suppose you have Windows service created and service class is named as MyWindowsService. This is new service and all we have is default code that Visual Studio generates. Create WCF service Add reference to System.ServiceModel assembly to Windows service project and add new interface called IMyService. This interface defines our service contracts. [ServiceContract] public interface IMyService {     [OperationContract]     string SayHello(int value); } We keep this service simple so it is easy for you to follow the code. Now let’s add service implementation: [ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode=InstanceContextMode.Single)] public class MyService : IMyService {     public string SayHello(int value)     {         return string.Format("Hello, : {0}", value);     } } With ServiceBehavior attribute we say that we need only one instance of WCF service to serve all requests. Usually this is more than enough for us. Hosting WCF service in Windows Service Now it’s time to host our WCF service and make it available in Windows service. Here is the code in my Windows service: public partial class MyWindowsService : ServiceBase {     private ServiceHost _host;     private MyService _server;       public MyWindowsService()     {         InitializeComponent();     }       protected override void OnStart(string[] args)     {         _server = new MyService();         _host = new ServiceHost(_server);         _host.Open();     }       protected override void OnStop()     {         _host.Close();     } } Our Windows service now hosts our WCF service. WCF service will be available when Windows service is started and it is taken down when Windows service stops. Configuring WCF service To make WCF service usable we need to configure it. Add app.config file to your Windows service project and paste the following XML there: <system.serviceModel>   <serviceHostingEnvironment aspNetCompatibilityEnabled="true" />   <services>     <service name="MyWindowsService.MyService" behaviorConfiguration="def">       <host>         <baseAddresses>           <add baseAddress="http://localhost:8732/MyService/"/>         </baseAddresses>       </host>       <endpoint address="" binding="wsHttpBinding" contract="MyWindowsService.IMyService">       </endpoint>       <endpoint address="mex" binding="mexHttpBinding" contract="IMetadataExchange"/>     </service>   </services>   <behaviors>     <serviceBehaviors>       <behavior name="def">         <serviceMetadata httpGetEnabled="True"/>         <serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="True"/>       </behavior>     </serviceBehaviors>   </behaviors> </system.serviceModel> Now you are ready to test your service. Install Windows service and start it. Open your browser and open the following address: http://localhost:8732/MyService/ You should see your WCF service page now. Conclusion WCF is not only web applications fun. You can use WCF also as self-hosted service. Windows services that lack good communication possibilities can be saved by using WCF self-hosted service as it is the best way to talk to service. We can also revert the context and say that Windows service is good host for our WCF service.

    Read the article

  • Invariant code contracts – using class-wide contracts

    - by DigiMortal
    It is possible to define invariant code contracts for classes. Invariant contracts should always hold true whatever member of class is called. In this posting I will show you how to use invariant code contracts so you understand how they work and how they should be tested. This is my randomizer class I am using to demonstrate code contracts. I added one method for invariant code contracts. Currently there is one contract that makes sure that random number generator is not null. public class Randomizer {     private IRandomGenerator _generator;       private Randomizer() { }       public Randomizer(IRandomGenerator generator)     {         _generator = generator;     }       public int GetRandomFromRangeContracted(int min, int max)     {         Contract.Requires<ArgumentOutOfRangeException>(             min < max,             "Min must be less than max"         );           Contract.Ensures(             Contract.Result<int>() >= min &&             Contract.Result<int>() <= max,             "Return value is out of range"         );           return _generator.Next(min, max);     }       [ContractInvariantMethod]     private void ObjectInvariant()     {         Contract.Invariant(_generator != null);     } } Invariant code contracts are define in methods that have ContractInvariantMethod attribute. Some notes: It is good idea to define invariant methods as private. Don’t call invariant methods from your code because code contracts system does not allow it. Invariant methods are defined only as place where you can keep invariant contracts. Invariant methods are called only when call to some class member is made! The last note means that having invariant method and creating Randomizer object with null as argument does not automatically generate exception. We have to call at least one method from Randomizer class. Here is the test for generator. You can find more about contracted code testing from my posting Code Contracts: Unit testing contracted code. There is also explained why the exception handling in test is like it is. [TestMethod] [ExpectedException(typeof(Exception))] public void Should_fail_if_generator_is_null() {     try     {         var randomizer = new Randomizer(null);         randomizer.GetRandomFromRangeContracted(1, 4);     }     catch (Exception ex)     {         throw new Exception(ex.Message, ex);     } } Try out this code – with unit tests or with test application to see that invariant contracts are checked as soon as you call some member of Randomizer class.

    Read the article

  • ASP.NET MVC: MVC Time Planner is available at CodePlex

    - by DigiMortal
    I get almost every week some e-mails where my dear readers ask for source code of my ASP.NET MVC and FullCalendar example. I have some great news, guys! I ported my sample application to Visual Studio 2010 and made it available at CodePlex. Feel free to visit the page of MVC Time Planner. NB! Current release of MVC Time Planner is initial one and it is basically conversion sfrom VS2008 example solution to VS2010. Current source code is not any study material but it gives you idea how to make calendars work together. Future releases will introduce many design and architectural improvements. I have planned also some new features. How MVC Time Planner looks? Image on right shows you how time planner looks like. It uses default design elements of ASP.NET MVC applications and jQueryUI. If I find some artist skills from myself I will improve design too, of course. :) Currently only day view of calendar is available, other views are coming in near future (I hope future will be week or two). Important links And here are some important links you may find useful. MVC Time Planner page @ CodePlex Documentation Release plan Help and support – questions, ideas, other communication Bugs and feature requests If you have any questions or you are interested in new features then please feel free to contact me through MVC Time Planner discussion forums.

    Read the article

  • Creating vCard action result

    - by DigiMortal
    I added support for vCards to one of my ASP.NET MVC applications. I worked vCard support out as very simple and intelligent solution that fits perfectly to ASP.NET MVC applications. In this posting I will show you how to send vCards out as response to ASP.NET MVC request. We need three things: some vCard class, vCard action result, controller method to test vCard action result. Everything is very simple, let’s get hands on. vCard class As first thing we need vCard class. Last year I introduced vCard class that supports also images. Let’s take this class because it is easy to use and some dirty work is already done for us. NB! Take a look at ASP.NET example in the blog posting referred above. We need it later when we close the topic. Now think about how useful blogging and information sharing with others can be. With this class available at public I saved pretty much time now. :) vCardResult As we have vCard it is now time to write action result that we can use in our controllers. Here’s the code. public class vCardResult : ActionResult {     private vCard _card;       protected vCardResult() { }       public vCardResult(vCard card)     {         _card = card;     }       public override void ExecuteResult(ControllerContext context)     {         var response = context.HttpContext.Response;         response.ContentType = "text/vcard";         response.AddHeader("Content-Disposition", "attachment; fileName=" + _card.FirstName + " " + _card.LastName + ".vcf");           var cardString = _card.ToString();         var inputEncoding = Encoding.Default;         var outputEncoding = Encoding.GetEncoding("windows-1257");         var cardBytes = inputEncoding.GetBytes(cardString);           var outputBytes = Encoding.Convert(inputEncoding,                                 outputEncoding, cardBytes);           response.OutputStream.Write(outputBytes, 0, outputBytes.Length);     } } And we are done. Some notes: vCard is sent to browser as downloadable file (user can save or open it with Outlook or any other e-mail client that supports vCards), File name is made of first and last name of contact. Encoding is important because Outlook may not understand vCards otherwise (don’t know if this problem is solved in Outlook 2010). Using vCardResult in controller Now let’s tale a look at simple controller method that accepts person ID and returns vCardResult. public class ContactsController : Controller {       // ... other controller methods ...       public vCardResult vCard(int id)     {         var person = _partyRepository.GetPersonById(id);         var card = new vCard                 {                     FirstName=person.FirstName,                     LastName = person.LastName,                     StreetAddress = person.StreetAddress,                     City = person.City,                     CountryName = person.Country.Name,                       Mobile = person.Mobile,                     Phone = person.Phone,                     Email = person.Email,                 };           return new vCardResult(card);     } } Now you can run Visual Studio and check out how your vCard is moving from your web application to your e-mail client. Conclusion We took old code that worked well with ASP.NET Forms and we divided it into action result and controller method that uses vCard as bridge between our controller and action result. All functionality is located where it should be and we did nothing complex. We wrote only couple of lines of very easy code to achieve our goal. Do you understand now why I love ASP.NET MVC? :)

    Read the article

  • F# in ASP.NET, mathematics and testing

    - by DigiMortal
    Starting from Visual Studio 2010 F# is full member of .NET Framework languages family. It is functional language with syntax specific to functional languages but I think it is time for us also notice and study functional languages. In this posting I will show you some examples about cool things other people have done using F#. F# and ASP.NET As I am ASP/ASP.NET MVP I am – of course – interested in how people use different languages and technologies with ASP.NET. C# MVP Tomáš Petrícek writes about developing ASP.NET MVC applications using F#. He also shows how to use LINQ To SQL in F# (using F# PowerPack) and provides sample solution and Visual Studio 2010 template for F# MVC web applications. You may also find interesting how you can create controllers in F#. Excellent work, Tomáš! Vladimir Matveev has interesting example about how to use F# and ApplicationHost class to process ASP.NET requests ouside of IIS. This is simple and very straight-forward example and I strongly suggest you to take a look at it. Very cool example is project Strom in Codeplex. Storm is web services testing tool that is fully written on F#. Take a look at this site because Codeplex offers also source code besides binaries. Math Functional languages are strong in fields like mathematics and physics. When I wrote my C# example about BigInteger class I found out that recursive version of Fibonacci algorithm in C# is not performing well. In same time I made same experiment on F# and in F# there were no performance problems with recursive version. You can find F# version of Fibonacci algorithm from Bob Palmer’s blog posting Fibonacci numbers in F#. Although golden spiral is useful for solving many problems I looked for some practical code example and found one. Kean Walmsley published in his Through the Interface blog very interesting posting Creating Fibonacci spirals in AutoCAD using F#. There are also other cool examples you may be interested in. Using numerical components by Extreme Optimization  it is possible to make some numerical integration (quadrature method) using F# (also C# example is available). fsharp.it introduces factorials calculation on F#. Robert Pickering has made very good work on programming The Game of Life in Silverlight and F# – I definitely suggest you to try out this example as it is very illustrative too. Who wants something more complex may take a look at Newton basin fractal example in F# by Jonathan Birge. Testing After some searching and surfing I found out that there is almost everything available for F# to write tests and test your F# code. FsCheck - FsCheck is a port of Haskell's QuickCheck. Important parts of the manual for using FsCheck is almost literally "adapted" from the QuickCheck manual and paper. Any errors and omissions are entirely my responsibility. FsTest - This project is designed to Language Oriented Programming constructs around unit testing and behavior testing in F#. The goal of this project is to create a Domain Specific Language for testing F# code in a way that makes sense for functional programming. FsUnit - FsUnit makes unit-testing with F# more enjoyable. It adds a special syntax to your favorite .NET testing framework. xUnit.NET - xUnit.net is a developer testing framework, built to support Test Driven Development, with a design goal of extreme simplicity and alignment with framework features. It is compatible with .NET Framework 2.0 and later, and offers several runners: console, GUI, MSBuild, and Visual Studio integration via TestDriven.net, CodeRush Test Runner and Resharper. It also offers test project integration for ASP.NET MVC. Getting started Well, as a first thing you need Visual Studio 2010. Then take a look at these resources: F# samples @ MSDN Microsoft F# Developer Center @ MSDN F# Language Reference @ MSDN F# blog F# forums Real World Functional Programming: With Examples in F# and C# (Amazon) Happy F#-ing! :)

    Read the article

1 2 3 4  | Next Page >