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  • Netbeans Error "build-impl.xml:688" : The module has not been deployed.

    - by Sarang
    Hi everyone, I am getting this error while deploying the jsp project : In-place deployment at C:\Users\Admin\Documents\NetBeansProjects\send-mail\build\web Initializing... deploy?path=C:\Users\Admin\Documents\NetBeansProjects\send-mail\build\web&name=send-mail&force=true failed on GlassFish Server 3 C:\Users\Admin\Documents\NetBeansProjects\send-mail\nbproject\build-impl.xml:688: The module has not been deployed. BUILD FAILED (total time: 0 seconds) Is there any solution for this ? Stack Trace : SEVERE: DPL8015: Invalid Deployment Descriptors in Deployment descriptor file WEB-INF/web.xml in archive [web]. Line 19 Column 23 -- cvc-complex-type.2.4.a: Invalid content was found starting with element 'display-name'. One of '{"http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":servlet-class, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":jsp-file, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":init-param, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":load-on-startup, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":enabled, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":async-supported, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":run-as, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":security-role-ref, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":multipart-config}' is expected. SEVERE: DPL8005: Deployment Descriptor parsing failure : cvc-complex-type.2.4.a: Invalid content was found starting with element 'display-name'. One of '{"http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":servlet-class, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":jsp-file, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":init-param, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":load-on-startup, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":enabled, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":async-supported, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":run-as, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":security-role-ref, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":multipart-config}' is expected. SEVERE: Exception while deploying the app java.io.IOException: org.xml.sax.SAXParseException: cvc-complex-type.2.4.a: Invalid content was found starting with element 'display-name'. One of '{"http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":servlet-class, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":jsp-file, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":init-param, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":load-on-startup, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":enabled, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":async-supported, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":run-as, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":security-role-ref, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":multipart-config}' is expected. at org.glassfish.javaee.core.deployment.DolProvider.load(DolProvider.java:170) at org.glassfish.javaee.core.deployment.DolProvider.load(DolProvider.java:79) at com.sun.enterprise.v3.server.ApplicationLifecycle.loadDeployer(ApplicationLifecycle.java:612) at com.sun.enterprise.v3.server.ApplicationLifecycle.setupContainerInfos(ApplicationLifecycle.java:554) at com.sun.enterprise.v3.server.ApplicationLifecycle.deploy(ApplicationLifecycle.java:262) at com.sun.enterprise.v3.server.ApplicationLifecycle.deploy(ApplicationLifecycle.java:183) at org.glassfish.deployment.admin.DeployCommand.execute(DeployCommand.java:272) at com.sun.enterprise.v3.admin.CommandRunnerImpl$1.execute(CommandRunnerImpl.java:305) at com.sun.enterprise.v3.admin.CommandRunnerImpl.doCommand(CommandRunnerImpl.java:320) at com.sun.enterprise.v3.admin.CommandRunnerImpl.doCommand(CommandRunnerImpl.java:1176) at com.sun.enterprise.v3.admin.CommandRunnerImpl.access$900(CommandRunnerImpl.java:83) at com.sun.enterprise.v3.admin.CommandRunnerImpl$ExecutionContext.execute(CommandRunnerImpl.java:1235) at com.sun.enterprise.v3.admin.CommandRunnerImpl$ExecutionContext.execute(CommandRunnerImpl.java:1224) at com.sun.enterprise.v3.admin.AdminAdapter.doCommand(AdminAdapter.java:365) at com.sun.enterprise.v3.admin.AdminAdapter.service(AdminAdapter.java:204) at com.sun.grizzly.tcp.http11.GrizzlyAdapter.service(GrizzlyAdapter.java:166) at com.sun.enterprise.v3.server.HK2Dispatcher.dispath(HK2Dispatcher.java:100) at com.sun.enterprise.v3.services.impl.ContainerMapper.service(ContainerMapper.java:245) at com.sun.grizzly.http.ProcessorTask.invokeAdapter(ProcessorTask.java:791) at com.sun.grizzly.http.ProcessorTask.doProcess(ProcessorTask.java:693) at com.sun.grizzly.http.ProcessorTask.process(ProcessorTask.java:954) at com.sun.grizzly.http.DefaultProtocolFilter.execute(DefaultProtocolFilter.java:170) at com.sun.grizzly.DefaultProtocolChain.executeProtocolFilter(DefaultProtocolChain.java:135) at com.sun.grizzly.DefaultProtocolChain.execute(DefaultProtocolChain.java:102) at com.sun.grizzly.DefaultProtocolChain.execute(DefaultProtocolChain.java:88) at com.sun.grizzly.http.HttpProtocolChain.execute(HttpProtocolChain.java:76) at com.sun.grizzly.ProtocolChainContextTask.doCall(ProtocolChainContextTask.java:53) at com.sun.grizzly.SelectionKeyContextTask.call(SelectionKeyContextTask.java:57) at com.sun.grizzly.ContextTask.run(ContextTask.java:69) at com.sun.grizzly.util.AbstractThreadPool$Worker.doWork(AbstractThreadPool.java:330) at com.sun.grizzly.util.AbstractThreadPool$Worker.run(AbstractThreadPool.java:309) at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:662) Caused by: org.xml.sax.SAXParseException: cvc-complex-type.2.4.a: Invalid content was found starting with element 'display-name'. One of '{"http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":servlet-class, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":jsp-file, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":init-param, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":load-on-startup, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":enabled, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":async-supported, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":run-as, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":security-role-ref, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":multipart-config}' is expected. at com.sun.enterprise.deployment.io.DeploymentDescriptorFile.read(DeploymentDescriptorFile.java:304) at com.sun.enterprise.deployment.io.DeploymentDescriptorFile.read(DeploymentDescriptorFile.java:225) at com.sun.enterprise.deployment.archivist.Archivist.readStandardDeploymentDescriptor(Archivist.java:614) at com.sun.enterprise.deployment.archivist.Archivist.readDeploymentDescriptors(Archivist.java:366) at com.sun.enterprise.deployment.archivist.Archivist.open(Archivist.java:238) at com.sun.enterprise.deployment.archivist.Archivist.open(Archivist.java:247) at com.sun.enterprise.deployment.archivist.Archivist.open(Archivist.java:208) at com.sun.enterprise.deployment.archivist.ApplicationFactory.openArchive(ApplicationFactory.java:148) at org.glassfish.javaee.core.deployment.DolProvider.load(DolProvider.java:162) ... 31 more Caused by: org.xml.sax.SAXParseException: cvc-complex-type.2.4.a: Invalid content was found starting with element 'display-name'. One of '{"http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":servlet-class, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":jsp-file, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":init-param, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":load-on-startup, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":enabled, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":async-supported, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":run-as, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":security-role-ref, "http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee":multipart-config}' is expected. at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.util.ErrorHandlerWrapper.createSAXParseException(ErrorHandlerWrapper.java:195) at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.util.ErrorHandlerWrapper.error(ErrorHandlerWrapper.java:131) at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.impl.XMLErrorReporter.reportError(XMLErrorReporter.java:384) at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.impl.XMLErrorReporter.reportError(XMLErrorReporter.java:318) at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.impl.xs.XMLSchemaValidator$XSIErrorReporter.reportError(XMLSchemaValidator.java:417) at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.impl.xs.XMLSchemaValidator.reportSchemaError(XMLSchemaValidator.java:3182) at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.impl.xs.XMLSchemaValidator.handleStartElement(XMLSchemaValidator.java:1806) at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.impl.xs.XMLSchemaValidator.startElement(XMLSchemaValidator.java:705) at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.impl.XMLNSDocumentScannerImpl.scanStartElement(XMLNSDocumentScannerImpl.java:400) at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.impl.XMLDocumentFragmentScannerImpl$FragmentContentDriver.next(XMLDocumentFragmentScannerImpl.java:2755) at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.impl.XMLDocumentScannerImpl.next(XMLDocumentScannerImpl.java:648) at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.impl.XMLNSDocumentScannerImpl.next(XMLNSDocumentScannerImpl.java:140) at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.impl.XMLDocumentFragmentScannerImpl.scanDocument(XMLDocumentFragmentScannerImpl.java:511) at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.parsers.XML11Configuration.parse(XML11Configuration.java:808) at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.parsers.XML11Configuration.parse(XML11Configuration.java:737) at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.parsers.XMLParser.parse(XMLParser.java:119) at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.parsers.AbstractSAXParser.parse(AbstractSAXParser.java:1205) at com.sun.org.apache.xerces.internal.jaxp.SAXParserImpl$JAXPSAXParser.parse(SAXParserImpl.java:522) at javax.xml.parsers.SAXParser.parse(SAXParser.java:395) at com.sun.enterprise.deployment.io.DeploymentDescriptorFile.read(DeploymentDescriptorFile.java:298) ... 39 more Any Solution for this ?

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  • ClassFormatError when using javaee:javaee-api

    - by Digambar Daund
    This is my pom.xml <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/maven-v4_0_0.xsd"> <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion> <parent> <groupId>dd</groupId> <artifactId>jee6</artifactId> <version>0.0.1-SNAPSHOT</version> </parent> <groupId>dd</groupId> <artifactId>business-tier-impl</artifactId> <name>business-tier-impl</name> <version>0.0.1-SNAPSHOT</version> <packaging>ejb</packaging> <description>business-tier-impl</description> <dependencies> <dependency> <groupId>javax</groupId> <artifactId>javaee-api</artifactId> <version>6.0</version> <scope>provided</scope> </dependency> <dependency> <groupId>org.testng</groupId> <artifactId>testng</artifactId> <version>5.11</version> <scope>test</scope> <classifier>jdk15</classifier> </dependency> <dependency> <groupId>org.apache.openejb</groupId> <artifactId>openejb-core</artifactId> <version>3.1.2</version> <scope>test</scope> </dependency> </dependencies> <build> <plugins> <plugin> <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId> <configuration> <source>1.6</source> <target>1.6</target> </configuration> </plugin> <plugin> <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId> <artifactId>maven-ejb-plugin</artifactId> <configuration> <ejbVersion>3.1.2</ejbVersion> </configuration> </plugin> <plugin> <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId> <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId> </plugin> </plugins> </build> </project> Below is the testcase setup methhod: @BeforeClass public void bootContainer() throws Exception { Properties props = new Properties(); props.setProperty(Context.INITIAL_CONTEXT_FACTORY, LocalInitialContextFactory.class.getName()); Context context = new InitialContext(props); service = (HelloService) context.lookup("HelloServiceLocal"); } I get error at line where InitialContext() is created... Apache OpenEJB 3.1 build: 20081009-03:31 http://openejb.apache.org/ INFO - openejb.home = C:\DD\WORKSPACES\jee6\business-tier-impl INFO - openejb.base = C:\DD\WORKSPACES\jee6\business-tier-impl FATAL - OpenEJB has encountered a fatal error and cannot be started: OpenEJB encountered an unexpected error while attempting to instantiate the assembler. java.lang.ClassFormatError: Absent Code attribute in method that is not native or abstract in class file javax/resource/spi/ResourceAdapterInternalException . . . FAILED CONFIGURATION: @BeforeClass bootContainer javax.naming.NamingException: Attempted to load OpenEJB. OpenEJB has encountered a fatal error and cannot be started: OpenEJB encountered an unexpected error while attempting to instantiate the assembler.: Absent Code attribute in method that is not native or abstract in class file javax/resource/spi/ResourceAdapterInternalException [Root exception is org.apache.openejb.OpenEJBException: OpenEJB has encountered a fatal error and cannot be started: OpenEJB encountered an unexpected error while attempting to instantiate the assembler.: Absent Code attribute in method that is not native or abstract in class file javax/resource/spi/ResourceAdapterInternalException] at org.apache.openejb.client.LocalInitialContextFactory.init(LocalInitialContextFactory.java:54) at org.apache.openejb.client.LocalInitialContextFactory.getInitialContext(LocalInitialContextFactory.java:41) at javax.naming.spi.NamingManager.getInitialContext(NamingManager.java:667) at javax.naming.InitialContext.getDefaultInitCtx(InitialContext.java:288) at javax.naming.InitialContext.init(InitialContext.java:223) at javax.naming.InitialContext.<init>(InitialContext.java:197) at dd.jee6.app.HelloServiceTest.bootContainer(HelloServiceTest.java:26) Caused by: org.apache.openejb.OpenEJBException: OpenEJB has encountered a fatal error and cannot be started: OpenEJB encountered an unexpected error while attempting to instantiate the assembler.: Absent Code attribute in method that is not native or abstract in class file javax/resource/spi/ResourceAdapterInternalException at org.apache.openejb.OpenEJB$Instance.<init>(OpenEJB.java:133) at org.apache.openejb.OpenEJB.init(OpenEJB.java:299) at org.apache.openejb.OpenEJB.init(OpenEJB.java:278) at org.apache.openejb.loader.OpenEJBInstance.init(OpenEJBInstance.java:36) at org.apache.openejb.client.LocalInitialContextFactory.init(LocalInitialContextFactory.java:69) at org.apache.openejb.client.LocalInitialContextFactory.init(LocalInitialContextFactory.java:52) ... 28 more Caused by: java.lang.ClassFormatError: Absent Code attribute in method that is not native or abstract in class file javax/resource/spi/ResourceAdapterInternalException at java.lang.ClassLoader.defineClass1(Native Method)

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  • Java Spotlight Episode 84: Anil Gaur on JavaEE 7

    - by Roger Brinkley
    Tweet Interview with Anil Gaur, VP of Java Platform for Enterprise Edition and GlassFish Server, on JavaEE 7. Joining us this week on the Java All Star Developer Panel are Dalibor Topic, Java Free and Open Source Software Ambassador and Arun Gupta, Java EE Guy. Right-click or Control-click to download this MP3 file. You can also subscribe to the Java Spotlight Podcast Feed to get the latest podcast automatically. If you use iTunes you can open iTunes and subscribe with this link:  Java Spotlight Podcast in iTunes. Show Notes News Tori Wieldt - Judges Selected for Duke's Choice Awards Donald Smith - #OpenJDK interview in Java Magazine Henrik Ståhl - Java 7 adoption at 23% JavaOne Kicks Off with Sunday Keynotes at Masonic Auditorium Jersey 2.0 M4 JSF 2.2 Latest Snapshot NetBeans IDE 7.2 - Deploy to Cloud Events May 30, OTN Java Developer Day, Redwood Shores June 11-14, Cloud Computing Expo, New York City June 12, Boulder JUG June 13, Denver JUG June 13, Eclipse Juno DemoCamp, Redwoood Shore June 13, JUG Münster June 14, Java Klassentreffen, Vienna, Austria June 18-20, QCon, New York City June 26-28, Jazoon, Zurich, Switzerland July 5, Java Forum, Stuttgart, Germany July 30-August 1, JVM Language Summit, Santa Clara Feature InterviewAnil Gaur is the Vice President of Java Platform, Enterprise Edition, and GlassFish Server at Oracle in the Fusion Middleware Group. Is responsible for creation of Java EE Specifications, Reference Implementation, and Compatibility Test Suites. Leading the evolution on Java EE into Cloud and PaaS environment through the Java EE 7 standard. Prior to that, managed the delivery of Java EE 6 Platform and SDK which quickly gained momentum in enterprise application development and deployments. In this episode we talk about GlassFish 3.1 release. Mail Bag What’s Cool RFR (L): Adding core file parsing on Mac OS X to SA Sergio Del Valle @swdelvalle is the 1,000 @JavaSpotlight twitter follower

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  • Session serialization in JavaEE environment

    - by Ionut
    Please consider the following scenario: We are working on a JavaEE project for which the scalability starts to become an issue. Up until now, we were able to scale up but this is no longer an option. Therefore we need to consider scaling out and preparing the App for a clustered environment. Our main concern right now is serializing the user sessions. Sadly, we did not consider from the beginning the issue and we are encountering the following excetion: java.io.WriteAbortedException: writing aborted; java.io.NotSerializableException: org.apache.catalina.session.StandardSessionFacade I did some research and this exception is thrown because there are objects stored on the session which does not implement the Serializable interface. Considering that all over the app there are quite a few custom objects which are stored on the session without implementing this interface, it would require a lot of tedious work and dedication to fix all these classes declaration. We will fix all this declarations but the main concern is that, in the future, there may be a developer which will add a non Serializable object on the session and break the session serialization & replication over multiple nodes. As a quick overview of the project, we are developing using a home grown framework based on Struts 1 with the Servlet 3.0 API. This means that at this point, we are using the standard session.getAttribute() and session.setAttribute() to work with the session and the session handling is scattered all over the code base. Besides updating the classes of the objects stored on session and making sure that they implement the Serializable interface, what other measures of precaution should we take in order to ensure a reliable Session replication capability on the Application layer? I know it is a little bit late to consider this but what would be the best practice in this case? Furthermore, are there any other issues we should consider regarding this transition? Thank you in advance!

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  • Java Spotlight Episode 85: Migrating from Spring to JavaEE 6

    - by Roger Brinkley
    Interview with Bert Ertman and Paul Bakker on migrating from Spring to JavaEE 6. Joining us this week on the Java All Star Developer Panel is Arun Gupta, Java EE Guy. Right-click or Control-click to download this MP3 file. You can also subscribe to the Java Spotlight Podcast Feed to get the latest podcast automatically. If you use iTunes you can open iTunes and subscribe with this link:  Java Spotlight Podcast in iTunes. Show Notes News Transactional Interceptors in Java EE 7 Larry Ellison and Mark Hurd on Oracle Cloud Duke’s Choice Award submissions open until June 15 Registration for the 2012 JVM Lanugage Summit now open Events June 11-14, Cloud Computing Expo, New York City June 12, Boulder JUG June 13, Denver JUG June 13, Eclipse Juno DemoCamp, Redwoood Shore June 13, JUG Münster June 14, Java Klassentreffen, Vienna, Austria June 18-20, QCon, New York City June 20, 1871, Chicago June 26-28, Jazoon, Zurich, Switzerland July 5, Java Forum, Stuttgart, Germany July 30-August 1, JVM Language Summit, Santa Clara Feature InterviewBert Ertman is a Fellow at Luminis in the Netherlands. Next to his customer assignments he is responsible for stimulating innovation, knowledge sharing, coaching, technology choices and presales activities. Besides his day job he is a Java User Group leader for NLJUG, the Dutch Java User Group. A frequent speaker on Enterprise Java and Software Architecture related topics at international conferences (e.g. Devoxx, JavaOne, etc) as well as an author and member of the editorial advisory board for Dutch software development magazine: Java Magazine. In 2008, Bert was honored by being awarded the coveted title of Java Champion by an international panel of Java leaders and luminaries. Paul Bakker is senior software engineer at Luminis Technologies where he works on the Amdatu platform, an open source, service-oriented application platform for web applications. He has a background as trainer where he teached various Java related subjects. Paul is also a regular speaker on conferences and author for the Dutch Java Magazine.TutorialsPart 1: http://howtojboss.com/2012/04/17/article-series-migrating-spring-applications-to-java-ee-6-part-1/Part 2: http://howtojboss.com/2012/04/17/article-series-migrating-spring-applications-to-java-ee-6-part-2/Part 3: http://howtojboss.com/2012/05/10/article-series-migrating-from-spring-to-java-ee-6-part-3/   Mail Bag What’s Cool Sang Shin in EE team @larryellison JavaOne content selection is almost complete-Notifications coming soon

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  • Java Spotlight Episode 107: Adam Bien on JavaEE Patterns and Futures @AdamBien

    - by Roger Brinkley
    Interview with Adam Bien, Java Champion and Ace Director, on his book Real World Java EE Patterns-Rethinking Best Practices and Java EE futures. Right-click or Control-click to download this MP3 file. You can also subscribe to the Java Spotlight Podcast Feed to get the latest podcast automatically. If you use iTunes you can open iTunes and subscribe with this link:  Java Spotlight Podcast in iTunes. Show Notes News NightHacking Tour Continues - Don't Miss It! JavaFX Ensemble in the Mac App Store12 Announcing the JavaFX UI controls sandbox Java EE 7 Status Update - November 2012 2012 Executive Committee (EC) Elections Events Nov 5-9, Øredev Developer Conference, Malmö, Sweden Nov 13-17, Devoxx, Antwerp, Belgium Nov 20-22, DOAG 2012, Nuremberg, Germany Dec 3-5, jDays, Göteborg, Sweden Dec 4-6, JavaOne Latin America, Sao Paolo, Brazil Dec 14-15, IndicThreads, Pune, India Feature InterviewAdam Bien is a Java Champion, NetBeans Dream Team Founding Member, Oracle ACE Director, Java Developer of the Year 2010. He has worked with Java since JDK 1.0, with Servlets/EJB since 1.0. He participates in the JCP as an Expert Group member for the Java EE 6 and 7, EJB 3.X, JAX-RS, CDI, and JPA 2.X JSRs. The author of several books about JavaFX, J2EE, and Java EE, including Real World Java EE Patterns—Rethinking Best Practices and Real World Java EE Night Hacks—Dissecting the Business Tier.The Kindle version of Real World Java EE Patterns-Rethinking Best Practices was released October 31. It’s only $9.99, but if you are an Amazon Prime members you can “borrow” the book for free. What’s Cool Building OpenJFX 2.2 Again

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  • NetBeans 7.1 RC1 now available - JavaFX 2, Enhanced Java Editor, Improved JavaEE, WebLogic 12 support

    - by arungupta
    NetBeans 7.1 RC1 is now available! What's new in NetBeans 7.1 ? Support for JavaFX 2 Full compile/debug/profile development cycle Many editor enhancements Deployment tools  Customized UI controls using CSS3 Enhanced Java editor Upgrade projects completely to JDK 7 Import statement organizer Rectangular block selection Getters/Setters included in refactoring Java EE  50+ CDI improvements RichFaces4 and ICEFaces2 component libraries EJB Timer creation wizard Code completion for table, column, and PU names CSS3, GUI Builder, Git, Maven3, and several other features listed at New and Noteworthy Download and give us your feedback using NetBeans Community Acceptance Testing by Dec 7th. Check out the latest tutorials. To me the best part was creating a Java EE 6 application, deploying on GlassFish, and then re-deploying the same application by changing the target to Oracle WebLogic Server 12c (internal build). And now see the same application deployed to both the servers: Don't miss the Oracle WebLogic Server 12c Launch Event on Dec 1. You can provide additional feedback about NetBeans on mailing lists and forums, file reports, and contact us via Twitter. The final release of NetBeans IDE 7.1 is planned for December.

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  • GlassFish and JavaEE Roadmap Update

    - by Tori Wieldt
    As announced at JavaOne, GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 4.1 is scheduled for 2014. ?Oracle is planning updates as needed to GlassFish Server Open Source Edition, which is commercially unsupported?. Oracle has announced the following updates to the GlassFish roadmap: The trunk will eventually transition to GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 5 as a Java EE 8 implementation. ?The Java EE 8 Reference Implementation will be derived from GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 5. This replicates what has been done in past Java EE and GlassFish Server releases. Oracle will no longer release future major releases of Oracle GlassFish Server with commercial support – specifically Oracle GlassFish Server 4.x with commercial Java EE 7 support will not be released.?Commercial Java EE 7 support will be provided from WebLogic Server. Oracle GlassFish Server will not be releasing a 4.x commercial version.   Oracle is committed to the future of Java EE. Java EE 7 has been released and planning for Java EE 8 has begun. GlassFish Server Open Source Edition continues to be the strategic foundation for Java EE reference implementation going forward. The primary role of GlassFish Server Open Source Edition has been, and continues to be, driving adoption of the latest release of the Java Platform, Enterprise Edition.  For more information, read Java EE and GlassFish Server Roadmap Update blog on the The Aquarium. 

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  • javaEE application layout

    - by arthurdent510
    I've been tasked with writing a new webapp in javaEE, which will be a first for me. I'm familar with the java language, but all of my previous projects have been in .net. So I've downloaded netbeans and I'll probably be using Hibernate, and started digging in. My question is, what's the best way to lay out a javaEE app? Should all data access go through netbeans? I was told to use webservices as much as possible so it's easy to pull data in and out of the system, and I've read through tutorials that create webservices in a seperate web application, as compared to the javaEE enterprise application. Is that really the way it's supposed to work? Just trying to wrap my head around this as compared to what I'm used to in .net. Thanks!

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  • Transactional Interceptors in Java EE 7 - Request for feedback

    - by arungupta
    Linda described how EJB's container-managed transactions can be applied to the Java EE 7 platform as a whole using a solution based on CDI interceptors. This can then be used by other Java EE components as well, such as Managed Beans. The plan is to add an annotation and standardized values in the javax.transaction package. For example: @Inherited @InterceptorBinding @Target({TYPE, METHOD}) @Retention(RUNTIME) public @interface Transactional { TxType value() default TxType.REQUIRED } And then this can be specified on a class or a method of a class as: public class ShoppingCart { ... @Transactional public void checkOut() {...} ... } This interceptor will be defined as part of the update to Java Transactions API spec at jta-spec.java.net. The Java EE 7 Expert Group needs your help and looking for feedback on the exact semantics. The complete discussion can be read here. Please post your feedback to [email protected] and we'll also consider comments posted to this entry.

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  • From J2EE to Java EE: what has changed?

    - by Bruno.Borges
    See original @Java_EE tweet on 29 May 2014 Yeap, it has been 8 years since the term J2EE was replaced, and still some people refer to it (mostly recruiters, luckily!). But then comes the question: what has changed besides the name? Our community friend Abhishek Gupta worked on this question and provided an excellent response titled "What's in a name? Java EE? J2EE?". But let me give you a few highlights here so you don't lose yourself with YATO (yet another tab opened): J2EE used to be an infrastructure and resources provider only, requiring developers to depend on external 3rd-party frameworks to then implement application requirements or improve productivity J2EE used to require hundreds of XML lines of codes to define just a dozen of resources like EJBs, MDBs, Servlets, and so on J2EE used to support only EAR (Enterprise Archives) with a bunch of other archives like JARs and WARs just to run a simple Web application And so on, and so on! It was a great technology but still required a lot of work to get something up and running. Remember xDoclet? Remember Struts? The old days of pure Hibernate code? Or when Ajax became a trending topic and we were all implementing it with DWR Servlet? Still, we J2EE developers survived, and learned, and helped evolve the platform to a whole new level of DX (Developer Experience). A new DX for J2EE suggested a new name. One that referred to the platform as the Enterprise Edition of Java, because "Java is why we're here" quoting Bill Shannon. The release of Java EE 5 included so many features that clearly showed developers the platform was going after all those DX gaps. Radical simplification of the persistence model with the introduction of JPA Support of Annotations following the launch of Java SE 5.0 Updated XML APIs with the introduction of StAX Drastic simplification of the EJB component model (with annotations!) Convention over Configuration and Dependency Injection A few bullets you may say but that represented a whole new DX and a vision for upcoming versions. Clearly, the release of Java EE 5 helped drive the future of the platform by reducing the number of XMLs, Java Interfaces, simplified configurations, provided convention-over-configuration, etc! We then saw the release of Java EE 6 with even more great features like Managed Beans, CDI, Bean Validation, improved JSP and Servlets APIs, JASPIC, the posisbility to deploy plain WARs and so many other improvements it is difficult to list in one sentence. And we've gotta give Spring Framework some credit here: thanks to Rod Johnson and team, concepts like Dependency Injection fit perfectly into the Java EE Platform. Clearly, Spring used to be one of the most inspiring frameworks for the Java EE platform, and it is great to see things like Pivotal and Spring supporting JSR 352 Batch API standard! Cooperation to keep improving DX at maximum in the server-side Java landscape.  The master piece result of these previous releases is seen and called today as Java EE 7, which by providing a newly and improved JavaServer Faces release, with new features for Web Development like WebSockets API, improved JAX-RS, and JSON-P, but also including Batch API and so many other great improvements, has increased developer productivity and brought innovation to server-side Java developers. Java EE is not just a new name (which was introduced back in May 2006!) but a new Developer Experience for server-side Java developers. To show you why we are here and where we are going (see the Java EE 8 update), we wanted to share with you a draft of the new Java EE logos that the evangelist team created, to help you spread the word about Java EE. You can get access to these images at the Java EE Platform Facebook Album, or the Google+ Java EE Platform Album whichever is better for you, but don't forget to like and/or +1 those social network profiles :-) A message to all job recruiters: stop using J2EE and start using Java EE if you want to find great Java EE 5, Java EE 6, or Java EE 7 developers To not only save you recruiter valuable characters when tweeting that job opportunity but to also match the correct term, we invite you to replace long terms like "Java/J2EE" or even worse "#Java #J2EE #JEE" or all these awkward combinations with the only acceptable hashtag: #JavaEE. And to prove that Java EE is catching among developers and even recruiters, and that J2EE is past, let me highlight here how are the jobs trends! The image below is from Indeed.com trends page, for the following keywords: J2EE, Java/J2EE, Java/JEE, JEE. As you can see, J2EE is indeed going away, while JEE saw some increase. Perhaps because some people are just lazy to type "Java" but at the same time they are aware that J2EE (the '2') is past. We shall forgive that for a while :-) Another proof that J2EE is going away is by looking at its trending statistics at Google. People have been showing less and less interest in the term J2EE. See the chart below:  Recruiter, if you still need proof that J2EE is past, that Java EE is trending, and that other job recruiters are seeking for Java EE developers, and that the developer community is aware of the new term, perhaps these other charts can show you what term you should be using. See for example the Job Trends for Java EE at Indeed.com and notice where it started... 2006! 8 years ago :-) Last but not least, the Google Trends for Java EE term (including the still wrong but forgivable JavaEE term) shows us that the new term is catching up very well. J2EE is past. Oh, and don't worry about the curves going down. We developers like to be hipsters sometimes and today only AngularJS, NodeJS, BigData are going up. Java EE and other traditional server-side technologies such as Spring, or even from other platforms such as Ruby on Rails, PHP, Grails, are pretty much consolidated and the curves... well, they are consolidated too. So If you are a Java EE developer, drop that J2EE from your résumé, and let recruiters also know that this term is past. Embrace Java EE, and enjoy a new developer experience for server-side Java developers. Java EE on TwitterJava EE on Google+Java EE on Facebook

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  • Is JavaEE really portable?

    - by Bozho
    I'm just implementing a JavaEE assignment I was given on an interview. I have some prior experience with EJB, but nothing related to JMS and MDBs. So here's what I find through the numerous examples: application servers bind their topics and queues to different JNDI names - for example topic/queue, jms the activationConfig property is required on JBoss, while in the Sun tutorial it is not. after starting my application, jboss warns me that my topic isn't bound (it isn't actually - I haven't bound it, but I expect it to be bound automatically - in fact, in an example for JBoss 4.0 automatic binding does seem to happen). A suggested solution is to map it in some jboss files or even use jboss-specific annotations. This might be just JBoss, but since it is certified to implement to spec, it appears the spec doesn't specify these these things. And there all the alleged portability vanishes. So I wonder - how come it is claimed that JavaEE is portable and you can take an ear and deploy it on another application server and it magically runs, if such extremely basic things don't appear to be portable at all. P.S. sorry for the rant, but I'm assume I might be doing/getting something wrong, so state your opinions.

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  • mirror link for JavaEE 6 tutorial Example

    - by ManWard
    hi Oracle [Sun] don't let downloading anything from their websites for people from iran.[sad story for us because we are students and Researcher...] i need to samples of this tutorial : http://java.sun.com/javaee/6/docs/tutorial/doc/gexaj.html#gexba anybody can help me for finding mirror link for these samples or uploading samples ? I appreciate you. thanks

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  • Article: Interceptors 1.1 in Java EE 6

    - by OracleTechnologyNetwork
    This Tip Of The Day (TOTD) attempts to explain the basics of Interceptors 1.1 - a "new" specification introduced in the Java EE 6. Interceptors do what they say - they intercept on invocations and lifecycle events on an associated target class. The specification is not entirely new as the concept is borrowed from the EJB 3.0 specification.

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  • Java EE talks at JAX Conf

    - by arungupta
    JAX Conf is starting in San Jose today and there are several talks on Java EE there. Java EE Wednesday and Thursday Java Persistence API 2.0 with Eclipse Link RESTful Services with Java EE Cast Study: Functional programming in Scala with CDI GlassFish 3.1: Deploying your Java EE 6 Applications The future of Java Enterprise Testing Forge new ground in Rapid Enterprise Development The Java EE 7 Platform: Developing for the Cloud (Keynote) Exploring Java EE 6 for the Enterprise Developer JBoss Day JSF Summit CDI Tutorial And many more ... Check out the complete schedule and see ya there!

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  • Bert Ertman and Paul Bakker on Spring to Java EE 6 Migration Podcast

    - by arungupta
    NLJUG leader and Java Champion Bert Ertman and Paul Bakker talk about migrating Spring applications to Java EE 6 in the latest issue of Java Spotlight Podcast, episode #85. Bert and Paul talk about how to migrate your legacy Spring applications to use modern and lightweight Java EE 6 in five steps. The complete podcast is always fun but feel free to jump to 3:49 minutes into the show if you're in a hurry. They authored a series of article on the exact same topic starting here. There is an extensive set of articles available that help you migrate from Spring to Java EE 6. Subscribe to the podcast for future content.

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  • Pivotal Announces JSR-352 Compliance for Spring Batch

    - by reza_rahman
    Pivotal, the company currently funding development of the popular Spring Framework, recently announced JSR 352 (aka Batch Applications for the Java Platform) compliance for the Spring Batch project. More specifically, Spring Batch targets JSR-352 Java SE runtime compatibility rather than Java EE runtime compatibility. If you are surprised that APIs included in Java EE can pass TCKs targeted for Java SE, you should not be. Many other Java EE APIs target compatibility in Java SE environments such as JMS and JPA. You can read about Spring Batch's support for JSR-352 here as well as the Spring configuration to get JSR-352 working in Spring (typically a very low level implementation concern intended to be completely transparent to most JSR-352 users). JSR 352 is one of the few very encouraging cases of major active contribution to the Java EE standard from the Spring development team (the other major effort being Rod Johnson's co-leadership of JSR 330 along with Bob Lee). While IBM's Christopher Vignola led the spec and contributed IBM's years of highly mission critical batch processing experience from products like WebSphere Compute Grid and z/OS batch, the Spring team provided major influences to the API in particular for the chunk processing, listeners, splits and operational interfaces. The GlassFish team's own Mahesh Kannan also contributed, in particular by implementing much of the Java EE integration work for the reference implementation. This was an excellent example of multilateral engineering collaboration through the standards process. For many complex reasons it is not too hard to find evidence of less than amicable interaction between the Spring ecosystem and the Java EE standard over the years if one cares to dig deep enough. In reality most developers see Spring and Java EE as two sides of the same server-side Java coin. At the core Spring and Java EE ecosystems have always shared deep undercurrents of common user bases, bi-directional flows of ideas and perhaps genuine if not begrudging mutual respect. We can all hope for continued strength for both ecosystems and graceful high notes of collaboration via efforts like JSR 352.

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  • Anil Gaur on Java EE 7 in the Java Spotlight Podcast

    - by arungupta
    The latest issue of Java Spotlight Podcast, your weekly shot of Java from Oracle, has Anil Gaur on the show for an interview in episode #84. Anil Gaur the VP of Development at Oracle responsible for WebLogic, GlassFish, and Java EE. Anil talks about automatic service provisioning, elasticity, and multi-tenancy in Java EE 7. He also explains the benefits of vendor-neutrality and portable applications. The complete podcast is always fun but feel free to jump to 6:25 minutes into the show if you're in a hurry. Subscribe to the podcast for future content.

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  • Java Developer Days India Trip Report

    - by reza_rahman
    October 21st through October 25th I spoke at Java Developer Days India. This was three separate but identical one-day events in the cities of Pune (October 21st), Chennai (October 24th) and Bangalore (October 25th). For those with some familiarity with India, other than Hyderabad these cities are India's IT powerhouses. The events were focused on Java EE. I delivered five sessions on Java EE 7, WebSocket, JAX-RS 2, JMS 2 and EclipeLink/NoSQL. The events went extremely well and was packed in all three cities. More details on the sessions and Java Developer Days India, including the slide decks, posted on my personal blog.

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  • Servlet 3.1, Expression Language 3.0, Bean Validation 1.1, Admin Console Replay: Java EE 7 Launch Webinar Technical Breakouts on YouTube

    - by arungupta
    As stated previously (here, here, here, and here), the On-Demand Replay of Java EE 7 Launch Webinar is already available. You can watch the entire Strategy and Technical Keynote there, and all other Technical Breakout sessions as well. We are releasing the final set of Technical Breakout sessions on GlassFishVideos YouTube channel as well. In this series, we are releasing Servlet 3.1, Expression Language 3.0, Bean Validation 1.1, and Admin Console. Here's the Servlet 3.1 session: Here's the Expression Language 3.0 session: Here's the Bean Validation 1.1 session: And finally the Admin Console session: Enjoy watching all of them together in a consolidated playlist: And don't forget to download Java EE 7 SDK and try the numerous bundled samples.

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  • JSF 2.2 Update from Ed Burns

    - by arungupta
    In a recent interview the JavaServer Faces specification lead, Ed Burns, gave an update on JSF 2.2. This is a required component of the Java EE 7 platform. The work is expected to wrap up by CY 2012 and the schedule is publicly available. The interview provide an update on how Tenant Scope from CDI and multi-templating will be included. It also provide details on which HTML 5 content categories will be addressed. The EG discussions are mirrored at [email protected] You can also participate in the discussion by posting a message to [email protected] All the mailing lists are open for subscription anyway and JIRA for spec provide more details about features targeted for the upcoming release. A blog at J-Development provide complete details about the new features coming in this version. And an Early Draft of the specification is available for some time now.

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  • JSF 2.2, Interceptors 1.2, and JPA 2.1 Replay: Java EE 7 Launch Webinar Technical Breakouts on YouTube

    - by arungupta
    As stated previously (here, here, and here), the On-Demand Replay of Java EE 7 Launch Webinar is already available. You can watch the entire Strategy and Technical Keynote there, and all other Technical Breakout sessions as well. We are releasing the next set of Technical Breakout sessions on GlassFishVideos YouTube channel as well. In this series, we are releasing JSF 2.2, Interceptors 1.2, and JPA 2.1. Here's the JSF 2.2 session: Here's the Interceptors 1.1 session: Here's the JPA 2.1 session: Enjoy watching them over the next few days before we release the next set of videos! And don't forget to download Java EE 7 SDK and try numerous bundled samples.

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