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  • Please recommend a good book on general IT for junior developer

    - by Rachel
    I have just got a job as a junior java developer and I am finding learning the code fine as I taught myself to pass the interview tests, trouble is I have a biology degree and know little about general IT and computer /network jargon. I don't want to be seen as a total idiot and non - techie so please can you recommend a book I can read / study to quickly increase my general background knowledge so that I can compete on a level with IT graduates!

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  • Hiring a Junior Developer, What should I ask?

    - by Jeremy
    We are currently hiring a junior developer to help me out, as I have more projects than I can currently manage. I have never hired anyone who wasn't a friend or at least an acquaintance. I have a phone interview with the only applicant that actually stood out to me (on paper), but I have never done this before. Our projects are all high scalability, data intensive web applications that process millions of transactions an hour, across multiple servers and clients. To be language/stack specific, we use ASP.Net MVC2, WebForms and C# 4, MSSQL 2008 R2, all running atop Windows Server 2008 R2 What should I ask him? How should I structure the phone call?

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  • Hiring a Junior Developer, What should I ask?

    - by Jeremy
    We are currently hiring a junior developer to help me out, as I have more projects than I can currently manage. I have never hired anyone who wasn't a friend or at least an acquaintance. I have a phone interview with the only applicant that actually stood out to me (on paper), but I have never done this before. Our projects are all high scalability, data intensive web applications that process millions of transactions an hour, across multiple servers and clients. To be language/stack specific, we use ASP.Net MVC2, WebForms and C# 4, MSSQL 2008 R2, all running atop Windows Server 2008 R2 What should I ask him? How should I structure the phone call?

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  • Junior developer introduction to job industry

    - by lady_killer
    I am a junior developer at my second working experience, the first one using PHP with WordPress and currently on Groovy on Grails. I like coding, I attend meetup to discuss technology etc but I still did not understand how to become a real professional with the "know how" attitude. I read Clean Coder, the author advises to spend 20 hours per week of my spare time to learn new technologies and to keep myself up to date. I do not find this realistic, if you want to have a bit of a social life, and I also noticed that learning at work, at least in the places where I worked, is not ideal. No support from seniors for new projects, no pair programming and code reviews, no company trainings, one hour a week tech meetings where seniors walk away after a bit because they already know the topic discussed and so on. Sometimes is quite hard to keep the motivation... My questions are: Is our industry supposed to be like this? Is there real team working in the sense of sharing knowledge and help juniors to get up to speed? Are we supposed to learn new technologies or technology features just in our spare time?Clean Coder says football players do not train during official matches and our working hours are like official matches, we should just perform and learn in other moments. Is it really like this? How can I improve my skills with no support? Is it enough to read books and try out the exercises and perhaps some katas? In almost 5 month of Groovy on Grails experience at work, I have never had the opportunity to create anything from scratch, just worked on existing issues where it was even really difficult to get the domain knowledge from senior devs.

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  • Working with a company as a Junior Developer [closed]

    - by user1601973
    We all have started our careers in some way or other. Well, I am a college student based in North America & I am doing my second internship with the same company with which I did my first internship. I came back here because people here were helpful always and supportive. But it just happened today, and I wanted to share this on SO. Well since I started I have been doing documentation and that kind of stuff only as compared to my first internship in which I actually worked along with the developers & learned so many things. Well, I was in a conversation with my Team lead, and he asked me if I completed that particular work or not? Well, That particular work had slipped from my mind. He was indeed I kind of pissed, and said "You don't have to worry about it, I will figure out". Well, I felt so bad and was about to literally cry. I stopped my lunch and then went on to complete that work. I always ask for work in office, and I always try to be an asset for whoever I am working but this was the first time that it happened. What are your thoughts on this and should I apologise or not? I think I should.

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  • Woes of a Junior Developer - is it possible to not be cut out for programming?

    - by user575158
    (Let me start off by asking - please be gentle, I know this is subjective, but it's meant to incite discussion and provide information for others. If needed it can be converted to community wiki.) I recently was hired as a junior developer at a company I really like. I started out in the field doing QA and transitioned into more and more development work, which is what I really want to end up doing. I enjoy it, but more and more I am questioning whether I am really any good at it or not. Part of this is still growing into the junior developer role, I know, but how much? What are junior developers to expect, what should they be doing and not doing? What can I do to improve and show my company I am serious about this opportunity? I hate that I am costing them time by getting up to speed. I've been told by others that companies make investments in Junior devs and don't expect them to pay off for a while, but how much of this is true? There's got to be a point when it's apparent whether the investment will pay off or not. So far I've been trying to ask as many questions I can, but I've you've been obsessing over a simple problem for some time and the others know that, there comes a time when it's pretty embarrassing to have to get help after struggling so long. I've also tried to be as open to suggestion as possible and work with others to try to refactor my code, but sometimes this can be hard clashing with various team members' personal opinions (being told by someone to write it one way, and then having someone else make you rewrite it). I often get over-stressed and judge myself too harshly, but I just don't want to have to struggle the rest of my life trying to get things work if I just don't have the talent. In your experience, is programming something that almost everyone can learn, or something that some people just don't get? Do others feel this way, or did you feel that way when starting out? It scares me that I have no other job skills should I be unsuited for having the skills necessary to code well.

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  • Junior software developer - How to understand web applications in depth?

    - by nat_gr
    I am currently a junior developer in web applications and specifically in ASP.NET MVC technology. My problem is that the C# senior developer in the company has no experience with this technology and I try to learn without any guidance. I went through all tutorials (e.g music store), codeplex projects and also read Pro ASP.NET MVC 4. However, most of the examples are about CRUD and e-commerce applications. What I don't understand is how dependency injection fits in web applications (I have realized that is not only used for facilitating unit testing) or when I should use a custom model binder or how to model the business logic when there is already a database schema in place. I read the forum quite often and it would very helpful if some experienced developer could give me an insight about how to proceed. Do I need to read some books to understand the overall idea behind web applications? And what kind of application should I start building myself - I don't think it would be useful to create similar examples with the tutorials.

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  • Five new junior developers and lots of complex tasks. What's now?

    - by mxe
    Our company has hired five new junior developers to help me to developer our product. Unfortunately the new features and incoming bug fixes usually require deeper knowledge than a recently graduated developer usually has (threading/concurrency, debugging performance bottlenecks in a complex system, etc.) Delegating (and planning) tasks which they (probably) can solve, answering their questions, mentoring/managing them, reviewing their code use up all of my time and I often feel that I could solve the issues less time than the whole delegating process takes (counting only my time). In addition I don't have time to solve the tasks which require deeper system knowledge/more advanced skills and it does not seem that it will change in the near future. So, what's now? What should I do to use their and my time effectively?

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  • Do I need a degree in Computer Science to get a junior Programming job?

    - by t84
    Do I need to go to Uni to get a job as a Junior C# coder? I'm 26 and have been working in Games (Production) for 6 years and I am thinking of a change, I've had exposure to VB6, VBA, HTML, CSS, PHP, JavaScript over the past few years and did a web design NCFE at College, but other than that, nothing else! I'm teaching myself C# at the moment with books and I was wondering 'how much' I need to learn and also how I can improve my chances of getting a programming job! Am I a late started to learn coding? (I know many people who started at a very young age!) Thanks for the help :)

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  • Is it ok to become junior at 27? [closed]

    - by Dvole
    I'm having a computer unrelated job right now, but I want to become a programmer, I have some objective-c and iOS knowledge, studying hard in my free time, etc. I'm looking into getting a junior iOS developer position. It will probably pay half what I earn in my current job, and I am not sure if I will like that. But I am really tired of my job and want to get experience in this field. Also, working as iOS developer is great position, since they are in great demand. My country is Russia. What do you think? Or Should I just do it in my free time, get some programs out in Appstore and look for better position? What would you do?

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  • Junior software developer - How to understand web aplications in depth?

    - by nat_gr
    I am currently a junior developer in web applications and specifically in asp.net mvc technology. My problem is that the c# senior developer in the company has no experience with this technology and I try to learn without any guidance. I went through all tutorials (e.g music store), codeplex projects and also read pro asp.net mvc 4. However, most of the examples are about crud and e-commerce applications. What I don't understand is how dependency injection fits in web applications (I have realized that is not only used for facilitating unit testing) or when i should use a custom model binder or how to model the business logic when there is already a database schema in place. I read the forum quite often and it would very helpful if some experienced developers could give me an insight about how to proceed. Do I need to read some books to understand the overall idea behind web applications? And what kind of application should I start building myself - I don't think it would be useful to create similar examples with the tutorials.

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  • As a Junior Software Engineer should I say that something has been done wrong if I feel so?

    - by Why123
    I recently joined a company and it is my first job. When reading the code base, I felt that the code was not well written. It seemed to me that the code had most of the problems mentioned here and also seemed to have an Anemic Domain Model. There are no unit tests and they don't employ any code quality checking tools like findbugs or pmd. The problem I have is that the code is very difficult to understand. Maybe my conclusions are wrong because I am not that experienced. I need advice on whether to communicate the above facts to a superior or not. If I am to communicate, to whom(Tech Lead, Architect, Product Manager) and how? And if I do communicate will they take it badly since I'm a Junior and has no experience?

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  • Scala for Junior Programmers?

    - by Traldin
    Hi, we are considering Scala for a new Project within our company. We have some Junior Programmers with only PHP knowledge, and we are in doubt that they can handle Scala. What are your opinions? Some say: "Scala is a complicated beast!", some say: "It's easy once you got it." Maybe someone has real-world experience?

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  • Making that move from junior > mid level

    - by dotnetdev
    Hi, Before I start, I know there is another thread about this very issue (http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2352874/moving-from-junior-developer-to-mid-level). I am in this very same situation, but of course every person and the company/employment-history is not the same. In my current company, I have not done one piece of coding from start to finish with the oversight of my manager and a Project Manager to manage the work/deadlines etc. I am basically an odd-jobs type of guy. The coding I do is on the side to whatever boring spreadsheet/word document I have to write. Very illogical that you're a coder and you're doing it in secret. In another job I had for 3 months (Was made redundant), it required 1 years experience, perhaps because of the fact I was the sole developer. It wasn't too hard, but then I was solely responsible and I learnt a lot from that. I had 2 other 3 months jobs (contracts), so I have been working for 1 year 9 months. I know found a job which I'm in the last stage for, which needs 3 years .NET experience and 2 years Sharepoint. How can I know if I am ready for this job? My current job has been going on for 1 year, but it doesn't mean squat apart from explaining how I have spent my time. It does not tell me what level I am at (apart from the huge skills gap I have opened up against my peers because I practise at home). So 1 year of doing nothing at work, but 1 year of doing loads at home. In fact, I take 1 week off and do more at home then in the company since I started. How can I know if I am ready for such a job? I am generally very confident given all I've achieved in coding, but I have no idea what a job with this sort of experience entails (what day-to-day-problems I would be facing). Is there any advice on how to handle this transition? Thanks

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  • junior / professional / senior categorization

    - by oozoo
    Hey guys, is it just me or is the categorization of developer levels highly subjective? I get the feeling that every company tries to hire experienced developers as juniors because they don't know $technology. For example my own career: I switched technologies a couple of times, while sticking to java as a programming language. For example I first worked for 3 years using JavaSE technologies, the next company I worked for hired me as junior because I didn't have JavaEE experience - while still selling me as professional level to customers (I work in consulting). The next company hired me again as junior because I didn't have SAP experience - they mostly work with SAP Java technologies which is definitely a niche. Still, they are selling all their technology consultants for exactly the same rate while paying them significantly different wages. Now when switching jobs again I feel like this whole thing is going to start all over again because I don't have Spring experience or Oracle knowledge. tl;dr = is my observation totally off base that companies are just using these categorizations as means to keep down wages?

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  • Senior Developers vs. Junior

    - by huwyss
    I like the following quote which I found on codinghorror:[As Steve points out this is one key difference between junior and senior developers:] In the old days, seeing too much code at once quite frankly exceeded my complexity threshold, and when I had to work with it I'd typically try to rewrite it or at least comment it heavily. Today, however, I just slog through it without complaining (much). When I have a specific goal in mind and a complicated piece of code to write, I spend my time making it happen rather than telling myself stories about it [in comments].

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  • What stands out on a Juniors CV

    - by DeanMc
    Hi all, I am looking for advice, hopefully from people more experienced that me. I am going to start applying for junior positions for .net development in the summer. At the moment the only thing on my CV is a project I have done for Windows Phone 7 called sprout sms. It allows the user to send webtext as provided by Irish Operators. The app is doing well and is top ten in my local marketplace (Ireland). By trade I am a salesman and that is the extent of most of my employment. I haven't been to college and due to financial commitments I would not be able to go down the road of full time education. I have kept up to date with various .net related tech in a junior capacity and am looking to now change careers. What I am look to see is what stands out on a juniors CV. My lack of education stands against me so I am looking to offset this with practical experience. I am open to all suggestions and from the end of this month I am free to pursue "notches" which will make my CV stand out. So in short if you where hiring a Junior, what would you like to see that would make you take a second look or request an interview? NOTE: I do fear this is a subjective subject, rather than debate what is the best items to have on a Juniors CV I would like to concentrate on what info you would give to a junior who is looking to apply for a job this year. Thanks to all that respond.

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  • Junior developer support

    - by lady_killer
    I am a junior developer in my first work experience after university. I joined the company as PHP developer but I ended up developing using C# and ASP.NET. Right from the start I did not receive any training in C# and I was assigned with ASP projects with quite tight deadlines scoped by Senior developers. The few project hand overs I had from other developers were brief and it looked like I had to discover the system myself, in really short time. This is my first job as web developer and I wonder whether it is normal not to have a kind of mentor to show me how to do things, especially because I am completely new to the technology. Also, do you have idea how to tackle this? As you can imagine, it gets really frustrating! Thank you!

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  • Career guidance/advice for Junior-level Software Engineer [closed]

    - by John Do
    I have quite a few questions on my mind, so please bare with me. Please don't feel obligated to answer all of them, any as you choose will do. I'd appreciate if you could share some insight on any of these. Before I begin, some context: I currently have almost two years of professional experience as a Software Engineer, mainly developing software in Java. At this point, I feel that I have reached the peak in my career growth at the current company I am at and therefore I am looking for a new job, ideally again, as a Software Engineer. I have been interviewing for the past few months casually but have not had luck with companies I have a passion for. So, in no particular order - 1) In general, what are your thoughts on having graduate degrees in CS / Software Engineering. How much does it influence a salary increase, and do you think it's beneficial when working on real-world problems? I get the sense that a graduate degree in the field is trivial unless you really have a passion for research. 2) In general, in professional practice, how often had you have to write your own data structures and "complex" algorithms from scratch? In my own work, I have found myself relying mainly on third-party frameworks and the Java standard library to implement solutions as per business requirements. What are your thoughts on this? 3) In terms of resume, I feel the most ambivalent here. I want to be able to "blemish" my resume to a certain extent so that it stands out from others', but at the same time I do not want to over-exagerate my abilities. How do you strike a balance here? For example: I say that I am proficient in Java with data structures and algorithms. This is obviously a subjective and relative statement. I've taken the classes in my undergrad, and I've applied it in my work experience. What I feel as "prociency" can be seen as junior-level to others. How do you know what to say? Most of the time, recruiters (with no technical background) will be looking for keywords that stand out. This leads me to my next question (4). 4) Just from interviewing for the past few months (and getting plenty of rejections), I've come to realize that I may not be as proficient in data structures and algorithms as I thought I was. Do you think it's a good idea to remove the "proficient in java/data structure and algorithms"? I feel that being too hoenst on the resume will impede me from scoring opportunities to even have an interview with top-notch companies. What are your thoughts? 5) What is the absolute "must-have" knowledge going into a technical interview? I've been practicing several algorithmic and data sturcture problems now, and I feel that my abilities to solve arbitrary problems efficiently has not gotten significantly better. Do you think these abilities are something innate - it's either you have in you, or you don't? How can you teach yourself to learn, if you will? 6) How easy is it to go from industry/function to the next? I work mainly with backend technologies and I'm now interested in working with the frontend, i.e javascript,jquery,php or even mobile development. In your own experience, how did you not get pidgeon holed in your career? I feel that the choices you make now ultimately decide your future. As cliche as it sounds, I think it may be true. Here's what I mean: you've worked mainly as a backend engineer, people are interested in you doing the same thing since you've already accumulated experience in that function. How do get experience in a new function if people won't accept you because you don't already have it? It's a catch 22, you see... Are side projects the only real way to help you move from one function to another that you're truly interested in? For example: I could start writing my own mobile applications, even though I've worked mainly on the backend. Thanks so much for the long read. As a relatively new engineer to the real world, I am very humble and would like those who are experienced to shed some light. Thank you so much.

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  • Gimp for the kids: Debian Junior Art

    <b>Ghacks:</b> "If you&#8217;ve ever tried your hand at The GIMP, you know that, at first, The GIMP can be a bit challenging to learn. That is coming from an adult. Imagine a younger user attempting to use The GIMP."

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  • How can I get my progress reviewed as a solo junior developer

    - by Oliver Hyde
    I am currently working for a 2 person company, as the solo primary developer. My boss gets the clients, mocks up some png design templates and hands them over to me. This system has been working fine and i'm really enjoying it. The types of projects I work on are for small - medium sized businesses and they usually want a CMS system. Developed from scratch i'll build a customised backend for the client to add/edit/remove categories, tags, products etc and then output them to the front end according to the design template handed to me. As time has gone on, the projects have increased in complexity, with shopping cart / ordering features and other common e-commerce type features. Again, this system has been working fine and i'm really enjoying it. My issue is my personal development as a programmer. I spend a lot of my spare time reading programming blogs, checking through stackexchange, reading suggested programming books (currently on 'The Pragmatic Programmer', really good so far), doing brain exercises (lumosity.com and khanacademy math problems), doing lots of physical exercise and other personal development type activities. I can't help but feel though, that I'm missing out on feedback, critique. My boss is great and never holds back on praise in regards to my work, but he unfortunately is either to busy to check my code, or to be honest, I don't think it's one of his specialties and so can't provide feedback. I want to know what i'm doing wrong and what i'm doing right. Should I be putting that much logic in the controller, am I modulating my code enough etc. So what I have done is developed a little 'Family Budgeting' app and tried to do it as cleanly and effectively as I currently know how. What i'm wanting to know is, is there somewhere I can submit this app, and have some seasoned developers provide feedback. It's not just a subsection of my code like 'codereview.stackexchange' appears to require, it's my entire workflow that I want critiqued. I know this is a lot to ask, and I expect the main advice given will be to look for a job within a team, which is certainly something I will look into later down the track, but for now I want to persist with my current employment situation, but just don't want to develop too many bad habits. Let me know if I can provide any further information to help clarify, or if this isn't the right place for this type of question I apologise in advance. Didn't want to use reddit as I felt this community fosters more well thought out responses.

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  • How to Mentor a Junior Developer

    - by Josh Johnson
    This title is a little broad but I may need to give a little background before I can ask my question properly. I know that similar questions have been asked here already. But in my case I'm not asking if I should be mentoring someone or if the person is a good fit for being a software developer. That is not my place to judge. I have not been asked outright, but it is apparent that myself and other fellow senior developers are to mentor the new developers that start here. I have no problem with this whatsoever and, in many cases, it lends me a fresh perspective on things and I end up learning in the process. Also, I remember how beneficial it was in the beginning of my career when someone would take some time to teach me something. When I say "new developer" they could be anywhere from fresh out of college to having a year or two of experience. Recently and in the past we've had people start here who seem to have an attitude toward development/programming which is different from mine and hard for me to reconcile; they seem to extract just enough information to get the task done but not really learn from it. I find myself going over and over the same issues with them. I understand that part of this could be a personality thing, but I feel it's my job to do my best and sort of push them out of the nest while they're under my wing, so to speak. How can I impart just enough information so that they will learn but not give so much as to solve the problem for them? Or perhaps: What's the proper response to questions that are designed to take the path of least resistance and, in essence, force them to learn instead of take the easy way out? These questions are probably more general teaching questions and don't have that much to do specifically with software development. Note: I do not get a say in what tasks they are working on. Management doles the task out and it could be anything from a very simple bug fix to starting an entire application by themselves. While this is not ideal by any means and obviously presents its own gauntlet of challenges, I feel it's a topic best left for another question. So the best I can do is help them with the problem at hand and try to help them break it down into simpler problems and also check their commit logs and point out mistakes that they made. My main objectives are to: Help them out and give them the tools they need to start becoming more self-reliant. Steer them in the right direction and break bad development habits early on. Lessen the amount of time I spend with them (the personality type described above seems to need much more one-on-one time and does not do well over IM or email. While that's generally fine, I can't always stop what I'm working on, break my stride, and help them debug an error on a moments notice; I have my own projects that need to get done).

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  • Interview questions for junior C and C++ developer position

    - by Ondrej Slinták
    What interview questions should people expect as a junior C and C++ developer? Code questions or more of theory? Solutions in pseudo-code or in C code? Maybe I'm misinterpreting the word "junior", but I have no idea what would anyone ask me if I have no C work experiences. I'm bit afraid of tricky questions with pointers, so I'd like to be sure what should I look up before actually going there. I'm a junior PHP developer with 1 year of experiences, if it helps the question. Hope it isn't duplicate as I'm asking particularly about junior developer job.

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  • Do I need a degree in Computer Science to get a Jr Programming job in the world? [closed]

    - by t84
    As above really, do I need to go to Uni to get a job as a Junior C# coder? I'm 26 and have been working in Games (Production) for 6 years and I am thinking of a change, I've had exposure to VB6, VBA, HTML, CSS, PHP, JavaScript over the past few years and did a web design NCFE at College, but other than that, nothing else! I'm teaching myself C# at the moment with books and I was wondering 'how much' I need to learn and also how I can improve my chances of getting a programming job! Am I a late started to learn coding? (I know many people who started at a very young age!) Thanks for the help :)

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