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  • Ivar definitions show 'long' type encoding as 'long long' type encoding

    - by Frank C.
    I've found what I think may be a bug with Ivar and Objective-C runtime. I'm using XCode 3.2.1 and associated libraries, developing a 64 bit app on X86_64 (MacBook Pro). Where I would expect the type encoding for the following "longVal" to be 'l', the Ivar encoding is showing a 'q' (which is a 'long long'). Anyone else seeing this? Simplified code and output follows: Code: #import <Foundation/Foundation.h> #import <objc/runtime.h> @interface Bug : NSObject { long longVal; long long longerVal; } @property (nonatomic,assign) long longVal; @property (nonatomic,assign) long long longerVal; @end @implementation Bug @synthesize longVal,longerVal; @end int main (int argc, const char * argv[]) { NSAutoreleasePool * pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init]; unsigned int ivarCount=0; Ivar *ivars= class_copyIvarList([Bug class], &ivarCount); for(unsigned int x=0;x<ivarCount;x++) { NSLog(@"Name [%@] encoding [%@]", [NSString stringWithCString:ivar_getName(ivars[x]) encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding], [NSString stringWithCString:ivar_getTypeEncoding(ivars[x]) encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding]); } [pool drain]; return 0; } And here is output from debug console: This GDB was configured as "x86_64-apple-darwin".tty /dev/ttys000 Loading program into debugger… sharedlibrary apply-load-rules all Program loaded. run [Switching to process 6048] Running… 2010-03-17 22:16:29.138 ivarbug[6048:a0f] Name [longVal] encoding [q] 2010-03-17 22:16:29.146 ivarbug[6048:a0f] Name [longerVal] encoding [q] (gdb) continue Not a pretty picture! -- Frank

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  • Is it possible to add -pedantic to GCC command line, yet have it not warn about 'long long'

    - by doublep
    I'm using mostly GCC to develop my library, but I'd like to ensure cross-compiler compatibility and especially standard conformance as much as possible. For this, I have add several -W... flags to command line. I'd also add -pedantic, but I have a problem with its warning about long long type. The latter is important for my library and is properly guarded with #if code, i.e. is not compiled on compilers that don't know it anyway. In short: can I have GCC in -pedantic mode warn about any extension except long long?

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  • Need help implementing an Android service that does http long polling

    - by Erdal
    I've seen persistent TCP connections implemented (http://devtcg.blogspot.com/2009/01/push-services-implementing-persistent.html), but my needs are a little different. I need an Android service that always runs in the background and keeps a long polling connection to an HTTP server and communicates with it using JSON over POST method. Does anyone have anything similar to this?

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  • Twice as long and half as long

    - by PointsToShare
    We are in a project and we hit some snags. What’s a snag? An activity that takes longer than expected. Actually it takes longer than the time assigned to it by an over pressed PM who accepts an impossible time table and tries his best to make it possible, but I digress (again!).  So we have snags and we also have the opposite. Let’s call these “cinches”. The question is: how does a combination of snags and cinches affect the project timeline? Well, there is no simple answer. It depends on the projects dependencies as we see in the PERT chart. If all the snags are in the critical path and all the cinches are elsewhere then the cinches don’t help at all. In fact any snag in the critical path will delay the project.  Conversely, a cinch in the critical path will expedite it. A snag outside the critical path might be serious enough to even change the critical path. Thus without the PERT chart, we cannot really tell. Still there is a principle involved – Time and speed are non-linear! Twice as long adds a full unit, half as long only takes ½ unit away. Let’s just investigate a simple project. It consists of two activities – S and C - each estimated to take a week. Alas, S is a snag and really needs twice the time allotted and – a sigh of relief – C is a cinch and will take half the time allotted, so everything is Hun-key-dory, or is it?  Even here the PERT chart is important. We have 2 cases: 1: S depends on C (or vice versa) as in when the two activities are assigned to one employee. Here the estimated time was 1 + 1 and the actual time was 2 + ½ and we are ½ week late or 25% late. 2: S and C are done in parallel. Here the estimated time was 1, but the actual time is 2 – we are a whole week or 100% late. Let’s change the equation a little. S need 1.5 and C needs .5 so in case 1, we have the loss fully compensated by the gain, but in case 2 we are still behind. There are cases where this really makes no difference. This is when the critical path is not affected and we have enough slack in the other paths to counteract the difference between its snags and cinches – Let’s call this difference DSC. So if the slack is greater than DSC the project will not suffer. Conclusion: There is no general rule about snags and cinches. We need to examine each case within its project, still as we saw in the 4 examples above; the snag is generally more powerful than the cinch. Long live Murphy! That’s All Folks

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  • It's a Long, Long Way to Tipperary but not that Far to Yak about Apps

    - by linda.fishman.hoyle
    I wanted to let everyone know that my blog URL will be moving to http://blogs.oracle.com/lindafishman/. I will focus my future writings to be about the upgrade and adoption strategies of Oracle E-Business Suite customers. To give you a little preview, here is a link to a book of 60 customers who are live on E-Business Suite Release 12 and 12.1. We have thousands of customers live on Release 12.x and are feverishly trying to write as many stories as we can so those of you who are thinking about upgrading, putting a business case together to move from another ERP application to E-Business Suite or for small and midsize companies who want a better understanding of the benefits E-Business Suite provides organizations of your size, this will be the place to go. See you at the new site! Linda

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  • Interop c# using a "long" from c++

    - by Daniel
    On my System: sizeof(long) in c++ is 4 aka 32bits sizeof(long) in c# is 8 aka 64 bits So in my Interop method declarations I've been substituting c++ longs with c# int's however I get the feeling this isn't safe? Why is a long the same size as an int in c++? And long long is 64bits? What's next a long long long long??

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  • How long does it take to iterate through a long loop?

    - by Carl Rosenberger
    On a modern 64-Bit machine, how long do you think it takes to iterate through all the positive long numbers? Below is a code snippet in Java to demonstrate the idea. Without running the code yourself, how long do you think this code is going to run? How long will similar code run in other programming languages? public class LongLoop { public static void main(String[] args) { long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis(); for (long i = 0; i < Long.MAX_VALUE; i++) { // do nothing, just loop } long stopTime = System.currentTimeMillis(); long duration = stopTime - startTime; System.out.println("Time taken: " + duration + " milliseconds"); } }

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  • C++ long long manipulation

    - by Krakkos
    Given 2 32bit ints iMSB and iLSB int iMSB = 12345678; // Most Significant Bits of file size in Bytes int iLSB = 87654321; // Least Significant Bits of file size in Bytes the long long form would be... // Always positive so use 31 bts long long full_size = ((long long)iMSB << 31); full_size += (long long)(iLSB); Now.. I don't need that much precision (that exact number of bytes), so, how can I convert the file size to MiBytes to 3 decimal places and convert to a string... tried this... long double file_size_megs = file_size_bytes / (1024 * 1024); char strNumber[20]; sprintf(strNumber, "%ld", file_size_megs); ... but dosen't seem to work. i.e. 1234567899878Bytes = 1177375.698MiB ??

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  • Should I redesign my code when my colleague says so?

    - by Kirill V. Lyadvinsky
    I wrote a function recently (with help of one guy from SO) that finds maximum of two ints. Here is the code: long get_max (long(*a)(long(*)(long(*)()),long(*)(long(*)(long**))), long(*b)(long(*) (long(*)()),long*,long(*)(long(*)()))){return (long)((((long(*)(long(*)(long(*)()),long( *)(long(*)())))a)> ((long(*)(long(*)(long(*)()),long(*)(long(*)())))b))?((long(*)( long(*)(long(*)()),long(*)(long(*)())))a):((long(*)(long(*)(long(*)()),long(*)(long(*)( ))))b));} int main() { long x = get_max( (long(*)(long(*)(long(*)()),long(*)(long(*)(long**)))) 500, (long(*)(long(*)(long(*)()),long*,long(*)(long(*)()))) 100 ); cout << x << endl; // print 500 as expected return 0; } It works fine, but my colleague says that I shouldn't use C style casts. But I think that all that modern static_cast's and reinterpret_cast's will make my code too cumbersome. Who's right? Should I redesign my code using C++ style casts or is original code OK? EDIT: For those who marks this question as not a question I'll try to be more clear: should I use C++ style cast instead of C style cast in the code above?

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  • How to initialize an unsigned long long type?

    - by Sujay
    Hello all, I'm trying to initialize an unsigned long long int type. But the compiler is throwing an error "error: integer constant is too large for "long" type ". The initialization is shown below : unsigned long long temp = 1298307964911120440; Can anybody please let me know what the problem is and suggest a solution for the same. With Regards Sujay

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  • close long poll connection, jQuery-ajax

    - by MyGGaN
    Background I use a Tornado-like server with support for long-polls. Each web pages a user clicks around to sets up a long poll to the server like this: $.ajax({ type: 'GET', url: "/mylongpollurl/", dataType: 'application/json', success: function(json) { // I do stuff here }, error: function(xhr, errText, ex) { // If timeout I send a new long-poll request } }); Problem I will now rely on data that I get from Fiddler monitoring all requests made from my browser (FF at the moment). Page 1 is loaded and the long poll request is made, now idling at server side. I click a link to page 2 and that page is loaded and setting up a long poll request, BUT the long poll request from page 1 is still idling at server side (according to Fiddler). This means that I will stack all long poll calls when clicking around the page, thus end up with lots of active connections on the server (or are they maybe sharing connection?) My thoughts - As it's a Tornado-like server (using epoll) it can handle quite a lot of connections. But this fact is not to exploit in my opinion. What I mean is that I prefer not to have a timeout on the server for this case (were the client disappears). - I know those stand alone pages better uses a common head and only swap content via ajax calls but this design we use today was not my call... - The best way to solve this would probably be to have the connection reused (hard to pull off I think) or closed as soon as the browser leaves the page (you click to another page). Thanks -- MyGGaN

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  • Programs minimized for long time takes long time to "wake up"

    - by bart
    I'm working in Photoshop CS6 and multiple browsers a lot. I'm not using them all at once, so sometimes some applications are minimized to taskbar for hours or days. The problem is, when I try to maximize them from the taskbar - it sometimes takes longer than starting them! Especially Photoshop feels really weird for many seconds after finally showing up, it's slow, unresponsive and even sometimes totally freezes for minute or two. It's not a hardware problem as it's been like that since always on all on my PCs. Would I also notice it after upgrading my HDD to SDD and adding RAM (my main PC holds 4 GB currently)? Could guys with powerful pcs / macs tell me - does it also happen to you? I guess OSes somehow "focus" on active software and move all the resources away from the ones that run, but are not used. Is it possible to somehow set RAM / CPU / HDD priorities or something, for let's say, Photoshop, so it won't slow down after long period of inactivity?

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  • Copying windows 8 Users folder having long long paths

    - by bilal.haider
    I was trying to move my "Users" folder in Windows 8 as described here and here. But when I try to copy the folder using "xcopy" in Windows Installation Disk Repair Mode, after some files are copied, I get "insufficient memory". The files on which the error is given are like C:\Users\Bilal\Application Data\Application Data\Application Data.........Application Data\Application Data..... What is the point in such directories within directories? I also tried copying them using Mini Windows XP, but the problem was there too.. Also tried copying using Parted Magic Live CD... but still.. So now, how can I move them? Another Question. Is moving such/ system files using Linux a good idea? Does it do anything to permissions?

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  • Converting long value to unichar* in objective-c

    - by conmulligan
    I'm storing large unicode characters (0x10000+) as long types which eventually need to be converted to NSStrings. Smaller unicode characters can be created as a unichar, and an NSString can be created using [NSString stringWithCharacters:(const unichar *)characters length:(NSUInteger)length] So, I imagine the best way to get an NSString from the unicode long value would be to first get a unichar* from the long value. Any idea on how I might go about doing this?

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  • ListView Long Click Animation

    - by spaceboy2000
    I would like to capture long click events in a ListView, which was easily done using a OnItemLongClickListener. However, that lacks the fading animation of the selector transitioning to a long press that is seen when the long click is handled by onCreateContextMenu. How can I get that animation using OnItemLongClickListener?

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  • Long-running transactions structured approach

    - by disown
    I'm looking for a structured approach to long-running (hours or more) transactions. As mentioned here, these type of interactions are usually handled by optimistic locking and manual merge strategies. It would be very handy to have some more structured approach to this type of problem using standard transactions. Various long-running interactions such as user registration, order confirmation etc. all have transaction-like semantics, and it is both error-prone and tedious to invent your own fragile manual roll-back and/or time-out/clean-up strategies. Taking a RDBMS as an example, I realize that it would be a major performance cost associated with keeping all the transactions open. As an alternative, I could imagine having a database supporting two isolation levels/strategies simultaneously, one for short-running and one for long-running conversations. Long-running conversations could then for instance have more strict limitations on data access to facilitate them taking more time (read-only semantics on some data, optimistic locking semantics etc). Are there any solutions which could do something similar?

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  • Improving long-polling Ajax performance

    - by Bears will eat you
    I'm writing a webapp (Firefox-compatible only) which uses long polling (via jQuery's ajax abilities) to send more-or-less constant updates from the server to the client. I'm concerned about the effects of leaving this running for long periods of time, say, all day or overnight. The basic code skeleton is this: function processResults(xml) { // do stuff with the xml from the server } function fetch() { setTimeout(function () { $.ajax({ type: 'GET', url: 'foo/bar/baz', dataType: 'xml', success: function (xml) { processResults(xml); fetch(); }, error: function (xhr, type, exception) { if (xhr.status === 0) { console.log('XMLHttpRequest cancelled'); } else { console.debug(xhr); fetch(); } } }); }, 500); } (The half-second "sleep" is so that the client doesn't hammer the server if the updates are coming back to the client quickly - which they usually are.) After leaving this running overnight, it tends to make Firefox crawl. I'd been thinking that this could be partially caused by a large stack depth since I've basically written an infinitely recursive function. However, if I use Firebug and throw a breakpoint into fetch, it looks like this is not the case. The stack that Firebug shows me is only about 4 or 5 frames deep, even after an hour. One of the solutions I'm considering is changing my recursive function to an iterative one, but I can't figure out how I would insert the delay in between Ajax requests without spinning. I've looked at the JS 1.7 "yield" keyword but I can't quite wrap my head around it, to figure out if it's what I need here. Is the best solution just to do a hard refresh on the page periodically, say, once every hour? Is there a better/leaner long-polling design pattern that won't put a hurt on the browser even after running for 8 or 12 hours? Or should I just skip the long polling altogether and use a different "constant update" pattern since I usually know how frequently the server will have a response for me?

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  • Actual long double precision does not agree with std::numeric_limits

    - by dmb
    Working on Mac OS X 10.6.2, Intel, with i686-apple-darwin10-g++-4.2.1, and compiling with the -arch x86_64 flag, I just noticed that while... std::numeric_limits<long double>::max_exponent10 = 4932 ...as is expected, when a long double is actually set to a value with exponent greater than 308, it becomes inf--ie in reality it only has 64bit precision instead of 80bit. Also, sizeof() is showing long doubles to be 16 bytes, which they should be. Finally, using gives the same results as . Does anyone know where the discrepancy might be? long double x = 1e308, y = 1e309; cout << std::numeric_limits::max_exponent10 << endl; cout << x << '\t' << y << endl; cout << sizeof(x) << endl; gives 4932 1e+308 inf 16

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  • Using long polling with WinForms Clients in .NET

    - by user544538
    Hi We need to develop a .NET application, basically a WinForms client, which needs to be notified of changes only from the server to update the UI only in case of necessity and not every time. We initially thought of NetTCPBinding but understood that it has problems with firewalls across domains and secure networks. We now consider long-polling as a viable option but we could only find this being used with WPF and XAML clients. For example, http://code.msdn.microsoft.com/duplexhttp But we could not find anything with WinForms. My opinion is that long-polling has to do with WCF and does not matter what UI technology is used (within .NET). Do you think it is possible to use long-polling with a custom WCF channel for WinForms? I am on the way to develop a POC but dont have much time. Any help in the right direction is much appreciated. Thanks much Charles

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  • Long-running ASP.NET tasks

    - by John Leidegren
    I know there's a bunch of APIs out there that do this, but I also know that the hosting environment (being ASP.NET) puts restrictions on what you can reliably do in a separate thread. I could be completely wrong, so please correct me if I am, this is however what I think I know. A request typically timeouts after 120 seconds (this is configurable) but eventually the ASP.NET runtime will kill a request that's taking too long to complete. The hosting environment, typically IIS, employs process recycling and can at any point decide to recycle your app. When this happens all threads are aborted and the app restarts. I'm however not sure how aggressive it is, it would be kind of stupid to assume that it would abort a normal ongoing HTTP request but I would expect it to abort a thread because it doesn't know anything about the unit of work of a thread. If you had to create a programming model that easily and reliably and theoretically put a long running task, that would have to run for days, how would you accomplish this from within an ASP.NET application? The following are my thoughts on the issue: I've been thinking a long the line of hosting a WCF service in a win32 service. And talk to the service through WCF. This is however not very practical, because the only reason I would choose to do so, is to send tasks (units of work) from several different web apps. I'd then eventually ask the service for status updates and act accordingly. My biggest concern with this is that it would NOT be a particular great experience if I had to deploy every task to the service for it to be able to execute some instructions. There's also this issue of input, how would I feed this service with data if I had a large data set and needed to chew through it? What I typically do right now is this SELECT TOP 10 * FROM WorkItem WITH (ROWLOCK, UPDLOCK, READPAST) WHERE WorkCompleted IS NULL It allows me to use a SQL Server database as a work queue and periodically poll the database with this query for work. If the work item completed with success, I mark it as done and proceed until there's nothing more to do. What I don't like is that I could theoretically be interrupted at any point and if I'm in-between success and marking it as done, I could end up processing the same work item twice. I might be a bit paranoid and this might be all fine but as I understand it there's no guarantee that that won't happen... I know there's been similar questions on SO before but non really answers with a definitive answer. This is a really common thing, yet the ASP.NET hosting environment is ill equipped to handle long-running work. Please share your thoughts.

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