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  • Table sorting & pagination with jQuery and Razor in ASP.NET MVC

    - by hajan
    Introduction jQuery enjoys living inside pages which are built on top of ASP.NET MVC Framework. The ASP.NET MVC is a place where things are organized very well and it is quite hard to make them dirty, especially because the pattern enforces you on purity (you can still make it dirty if you want so ;) ). We all know how easy is to build a HTML table with a header row, footer row and table rows showing some data. With ASP.NET MVC we can do this pretty easy, but, the result will be pure HTML table which only shows data, but does not includes sorting, pagination or some other advanced features that we were used to have in the ASP.NET WebForms GridView. Ok, there is the WebGrid MVC Helper, but what if we want to make something from pure table in our own clean style? In one of my recent projects, I’ve been using the jQuery tablesorter and tablesorter.pager plugins that go along. You don’t need to know jQuery to make this work… You need to know little CSS to create nice design for your table, but of course you can use mine from the demo… So, what you will see in this blog is how to attach this plugin to your pure html table and a div for pagination and make your table with advanced sorting and pagination features.   Demo Project Resources The resources I’m using for this demo project are shown in the following solution explorer window print screen: Content/images – folder that contains all the up/down arrow images, pagination buttons etc. You can freely replace them with your own, but keep the names the same if you don’t want to change anything in the CSS we will built later. Content/Site.css – The main css theme, where we will add the theme for our table too Controllers/HomeController.cs – The controller I’m using for this project Models/Person.cs – For this demo, I’m using Person.cs class Scripts – jquery-1.4.4.min.js, jquery.tablesorter.js, jquery.tablesorter.pager.js – required script to make the magic happens Views/Home/Index.cshtml – Index view (razor view engine) the other items are not important for the demo. ASP.NET MVC 1. Model In this demo I use only one Person class which defines Person entity with several properties. You can use your own model, maybe one which will access data from database or any other resource. Person.cs public class Person {     public string Name { get; set; }     public string Surname { get; set; }     public string Email { get; set; }     public int? Phone { get; set; }     public DateTime? DateAdded { get; set; }     public int? Age { get; set; }     public Person(string name, string surname, string email,         int? phone, DateTime? dateadded, int? age)     {         Name = name;         Surname = surname;         Email = email;         Phone = phone;         DateAdded = dateadded;         Age = age;     } } 2. View In our example, we have only one Index.chtml page where Razor View engine is used. Razor view engine is my favorite for ASP.NET MVC because it’s very intuitive, fluid and keeps your code clean. 3. Controller Since this is simple example with one page, we use one HomeController.cs where we have two methods, one of ActionResult type (Index) and another GetPeople() used to create and return list of people. HomeController.cs public class HomeController : Controller {     //     // GET: /Home/     public ActionResult Index()     {         ViewBag.People = GetPeople();         return View();     }     public List<Person> GetPeople()     {         List<Person> listPeople = new List<Person>();                  listPeople.Add(new Person("Hajan", "Selmani", "[email protected]", 070070070,DateTime.Now, 25));                     listPeople.Add(new Person("Straight", "Dean", "[email protected]", 123456789, DateTime.Now.AddDays(-5), 35));         listPeople.Add(new Person("Karsen", "Livia", "[email protected]", 46874651, DateTime.Now.AddDays(-2), 31));         listPeople.Add(new Person("Ringer", "Anne", "[email protected]", null, DateTime.Now, null));         listPeople.Add(new Person("O'Leary", "Michael", "[email protected]", 32424344, DateTime.Now, 44));         listPeople.Add(new Person("Gringlesby", "Anne", "[email protected]", null, DateTime.Now.AddDays(-9), 18));         listPeople.Add(new Person("Locksley", "Stearns", "[email protected]", 2135345, DateTime.Now, null));         listPeople.Add(new Person("DeFrance", "Michel", "[email protected]", 235325352, DateTime.Now.AddDays(-18), null));         listPeople.Add(new Person("White", "Johnson", null, null, DateTime.Now.AddDays(-22), 55));         listPeople.Add(new Person("Panteley", "Sylvia", null, 23233223, DateTime.Now.AddDays(-1), 32));         listPeople.Add(new Person("Blotchet-Halls", "Reginald", null, 323243423, DateTime.Now, 26));         listPeople.Add(new Person("Merr", "South", "[email protected]", 3232442, DateTime.Now.AddDays(-5), 85));         listPeople.Add(new Person("MacFeather", "Stearns", "[email protected]", null, DateTime.Now, null));         return listPeople;     } }   TABLE CSS/HTML DESIGN Now, lets start with the implementation. First of all, lets create the table structure and the main CSS. 1. HTML Structure @{     Layout = null;     } <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head>     <title>ASP.NET & jQuery</title>     <!-- referencing styles, scripts and writing custom js scripts will go here --> </head> <body>     <div>         <table class="tablesorter">             <thead>                 <tr>                     <th> value </th>                 </tr>             </thead>             <tbody>                 <tr>                     <td>value</td>                 </tr>             </tbody>             <tfoot>                 <tr>                     <th> value </th>                 </tr>             </tfoot>         </table>         <div id="pager">                      </div>     </div> </body> </html> So, this is the main structure you need to create for each of your tables where you want to apply the functionality we will create. Of course the scripts are referenced once ;). As you see, our table has class tablesorter and also we have a div with id pager. In the next steps we will use both these to create the needed functionalities. The complete Index.cshtml coded to get the data from controller and display in the page is: <body>     <div>         <table class="tablesorter">             <thead>                 <tr>                     <th>Name</th>                     <th>Surname</th>                     <th>Email</th>                     <th>Phone</th>                     <th>Date Added</th>                 </tr>             </thead>             <tbody>                 @{                     foreach (var p in ViewBag.People)                     {                                 <tr>                         <td>@p.Name</td>                         <td>@p.Surname</td>                         <td>@p.Email</td>                         <td>@p.Phone</td>                         <td>@p.DateAdded</td>                     </tr>                     }                 }             </tbody>             <tfoot>                 <tr>                     <th>Name</th>                     <th>Surname</th>                     <th>Email</th>                     <th>Phone</th>                     <th>Date Added</th>                 </tr>             </tfoot>         </table>         <div id="pager" style="position: none;">             <form>             <img src="@Url.Content("~/Content/images/first.png")" class="first" />             <img src="@Url.Content("~/Content/images/prev.png")" class="prev" />             <input type="text" class="pagedisplay" />             <img src="@Url.Content("~/Content/images/next.png")" class="next" />             <img src="@Url.Content("~/Content/images/last.png")" class="last" />             <select class="pagesize">                 <option selected="selected" value="5">5</option>                 <option value="10">10</option>                 <option value="20">20</option>                 <option value="30">30</option>                 <option value="40">40</option>             </select>             </form>         </div>     </div> </body> So, mainly the structure is the same. I have added @Razor code to create table with data retrieved from the ViewBag.People which has been filled with data in the home controller. 2. CSS Design The CSS code I’ve created is: /* DEMO TABLE */ body {     font-size: 75%;     font-family: Verdana, Tahoma, Arial, "Helvetica Neue", Helvetica, Sans-Serif;     color: #232323;     background-color: #fff; } table { border-spacing:0; border:1px solid gray;} table.tablesorter thead tr .header {     background-image: url(images/bg.png);     background-repeat: no-repeat;     background-position: center right;     cursor: pointer; } table.tablesorter tbody td {     color: #3D3D3D;     padding: 4px;     background-color: #FFF;     vertical-align: top; } table.tablesorter tbody tr.odd td {     background-color:#F0F0F6; } table.tablesorter thead tr .headerSortUp {     background-image: url(images/asc.png); } table.tablesorter thead tr .headerSortDown {     background-image: url(images/desc.png); } table th { width:150px;            border:1px outset gray;            background-color:#3C78B5;            color:White;            cursor:pointer; } table thead th:hover { background-color:Yellow; color:Black;} table td { width:150px; border:1px solid gray;} PAGINATION AND SORTING Now, when everything is ready and we have the data, lets make pagination and sorting functionalities 1. jQuery Scripts referencing <link href="@Url.Content("~/Content/Site.css")" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" /> <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery-1.4.4.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script> <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.tablesorter.js")" type="text/javascript"></script> <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.tablesorter.pager.js")" type="text/javascript"></script> 2. jQuery Sorting and Pagination script   <script type="text/javascript">     $(function () {         $("table.tablesorter").tablesorter({ widthFixed: true, sortList: [[0, 0]] })         .tablesorterPager({ container: $("#pager"), size: $(".pagesize option:selected").val() });     }); </script> So, with only two lines of code, I’m using both tablesorter and tablesorterPager plugins, giving some options to both these. Options added: tablesorter - widthFixed: true – gives fixed width of the columns tablesorter - sortList[[0,0]] – An array of instructions for per-column sorting and direction in the format: [[columnIndex, sortDirection], ... ] where columnIndex is a zero-based index for your columns left-to-right and sortDirection is 0 for Ascending and 1 for Descending. A valid argument that sorts ascending first by column 1 and then column 2 looks like: [[0,0],[1,0]] (source: http://tablesorter.com/docs/) tablesorterPager – container: $(“#pager”) – tells the pager container, the div with id pager in our case. tablesorterPager – size: the default size of each page, where I get the default value selected, so if you put selected to any other of the options in your select list, you will have this number of rows as default per page for the table too. END RESULTS 1. Table once the page is loaded (default results per page is 5 and is automatically sorted by 1st column as sortList is specified) 2. Sorted by Phone Descending 3. Changed pagination to 10 items per page 4. Sorted by Phone and Name (use SHIFT to sort on multiple columns) 5. Sorted by Date Added 6. Page 3, 5 items per page   ADDITIONAL ENHANCEMENTS We can do additional enhancements to the table. We can make search for each column. I will cover this in one of my next blogs. Stay tuned. DEMO PROJECT You can download demo project source code from HERE.CONCLUSION Once you finish with the demo, run your page and open the source code. You will be amazed of the purity of your code.Working with pagination in client side can be very useful. One of the benefits is performance, but if you have thousands of rows in your tables, you will get opposite result when talking about performance. Hence, sometimes it is nice idea to make pagination on back-end. So, the compromise between both approaches would be best to combine both of them. I use at most up to 500 rows on client-side and once the user reach the last page, we can trigger ajax postback which can get the next 500 rows using server-side pagination of the same data. I would like to recommend the following blog post http://weblogs.asp.net/gunnarpeipman/archive/2010/09/14/returning-paged-results-from-repositories-using-pagedresult-lt-t-gt.aspx, which will help you understand how to return page results from repository. I hope this was helpful post for you. Wait for my next posts ;). Please do let me know your feedback. Best Regards, Hajan

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  • AxCMS.net 10 with Microsoft Silverlight 4 and Microsoft Visual Studio 2010

    - by Axinom
    Axinom, European WCM vendor, today announced the next version of its WCM solution AxCMS.net 10, which streamlines the processes involved in creating, managing and distributing corporate content on the internet. The new solution helps reducing ongoing costs for managing and distributing to large audiences, while at the same time drastically reducing time-to-market and one-time setup costs. http://www.AxCMS.net Axinom’s WCM portfolio, based on the Microsoft .NET Framework 4, Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 and Microsoft Silverlight 4, allows enterprises to increase process efficiency, reduce operating costs and more effectively manage delivery of rich media assets on the Web and mobile devices. Axinom solutions are widely used by major European online brands in IT, telco, retail, media and entertainment industries such as Siemens, American Express, Microsoft Corp., ZDF, Pro7Sat1 Media, and Deutsche Post. Brand New User Interface built with Silverlight 4By using Silverlight 4, Axinom’s team created a new user interface for AxCMS.net 10 that is optimized for improved usability and speed. WYSIWYG mode, integrated image editor, extended list views, and detail views of objects allow a substantial acceleration of typical editor tasks. Axinom’s team worked with Silverlight Rough Cut Editor for video management and Silverlight Analytics Framework for extended reporting to complete the wide range of capabilities included in the new release. “Axinom’s release of AxCMS.net 10 enables developers to take advantage of the latest features in Silverlight 4,” said Brian Goldfarb, director of the developer platform group at Microsoft Corp. “Microsoft is excited about the opportunity this creates for Web developers to streamline the creating, managing and distributing of online corporate content using AxCMS.net 10 and Silverlight.” Rapid Web Development with Visual Studio 2010AxCMS.net 10 is extended by additional products that enable developers to get productive quickly and help solve typical customer scenarios. AxCMS.net template projects come with documented source code that help kick-start projects and learn best practices in all aspects of Web application development. AxCMS.net overcomes many hard-to-solve technical obstacles in an out-of-the-box manner by providing a set of ready-to-use vertical solutions such as corporate Web site, Web shop, Web campaign management, email marketing, multi-channel distribution, management of rich Internet applications, and Web business intelligence. Extended Multi-Site ManagementAxCMS.net has been supporting the management of an unlimited number of Web sites for a long time. The new version 10 of AxCMS.net will further improve multi-site management and provide features to editors and developers that will simplify and accelerate multi-site and multi-language management. Extended publication workflow will take into account additional dependencies of dynamic objects, pages, and documents. “The customer requests evolved from static html pages to dynamic Web applications content with the emergence of rich media assets seamlessly combined across many channels including Web, mobile and IPTV. With the.NET Framework 4 and Silverlight 4, we’re on the fast track to making the three screen strategy a reality for our customers,” said Damir Tomicic, CEO of Axinom Group. “Our customers enjoy substantial competitive advantages of using latest Microsoft technologies. We have a long-standing, relationship with Microsoft and are committed to continued development using Microsoft tools and technologies to deliver innovative Web solutions in the future.”  

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  • ASP.NET Load unmanaged dll from bin folder

    - by Quandary
    Question: I use an embedded Firebird database in ASP.NET. Now, Firebird has a .NET wrapper around native dlls. The problem is, with the .NET compilation and execution process, the dlls get shadow copied to a temporary folder. Unfortunately, only the .NET dlls, and not the native dll. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms366723.aspx for details. Now, this makes it necessary to put the unmanaged dll somewhere into the system32 directory (or any other directory in the path environment variable). Now, I want to change the wrapper/native dll (opensource), so it loads the dll also if they are only in the bin folder. Now, my problem is, how can I, in .NET, load an unmanaged dll from an absolute path ? The absolute path is determined at runtime, not at compile-time...

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  • Validating Data Using Data Annotation Attributes in ASP.NET MVC

    - by bipinjoshi
    The data entered by the end user in various form fields must be validated before it is saved in the database. Developers often use validation HTML helpers provided by ASP.NET MVC to perform the input validations. Additionally, you can also use data annotation attributes from the System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations namespace to perform validations at the model level. Data annotation attributes are attached to the properties of the model class and enforce some validation criteria. They are capable of performing validation on the server side as well as on the client side. This article discusses the basics of using these attributes in an ASP.NET MVC application.http://www.bipinjoshi.net/articles/0a53f05f-b58c-47b1-a544-f032f5cfca58.aspx       

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  • ASP.NET MVC, Web API, Razor and Open Source

    - by ScottGu
    Microsoft has made the source code of ASP.NET MVC available under an open source license since the first V1 release. We’ve also integrated a number of great open source technologies into the product, and now ship jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, jQuery Validation, Modernizr.js, NuGet, Knockout.js and JSON.NET as part of it. I’m very excited to announce today that we will also release the source code for ASP.NET Web API and ASP.NET Web Pages (aka Razor) under an open source license (Apache 2.0), and that we will increase the development transparency of all three projects by hosting their code repositories on CodePlex (using the new Git support announced last week). Doing so will enable a more open development model where everyone in the community will be able to engage and provide feedback on code checkins, bug-fixes, new feature development, and build and test the products on a daily basis using the most up-to-date version of the source code and tests. We will also for the first time allow developers outside of Microsoft to submit patches and code contributions that the Microsoft development team will review for potential inclusion in the products. We announced a similar open development approach with the Windows Azure SDK last December, and have found it to be a great way to build an even tighter feedback loop with developers – and ultimately deliver even better products as a result. Very importantly - ASP.NET MVC, Web API and Razor will continue to be fully supported Microsoft products that ship both standalone as well as part of Visual Studio (the same as they do today). They will also continue to be staffed by the same Microsoft developers that build them today (in fact, we have more Microsoft developers working on the ASP.NET team now than ever before). Our goal with today’s announcement is to increase the feedback loop on the products even more, and allow us to deliver even better products.  We are really excited about the improvements this will bring. Learn More You can now browse, sync and build the source tree of ASP.NET MVC, Web API, and Razor on the http://aspnetwebstack.codeplex.com web-site.  The Git repository on the site is the live RC milestone development tree that the team has been working on the last several weeks, and the tree contains both the runtime sources + tests, and is buildable and testable by anyone.  Because the binaries produced are bin-deployable, this allows you to compile your own builds and try product updates out as soon as they are checked-in. You can also now contribute directly to the development of the products by reviewing and sending feedback on code checkins, submitting bugs and helping us verify fixes as they are checked in, suggesting and giving feedback on new features as they are implemented, as well as by submitting code fixes or code contributions of your own. Note that all code submissions will be rigorously reviewed and tested by the ASP.NET MVC Team, and only those that meet an extremely high bar for both quality and design/roadmap appropriateness will be merged into the source. Summary All of us on the team are really excited about today’s announcement – it has been something we’ve been working toward for many years.  The tighter feedback loop is going to enable us to build even better products, and take ASP.NET to the next level in terms of innovation and customer focus. Thanks, Scott P.S. In addition to blogging, I use Twitter to-do quick posts and share links. My Twitter handle is: @scottgu

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  • Asp.net override Membership settings at runtime (asp.net mvc)

    - by minal
    I had an application that hooked onto 1 single database. The app now needs to hook into multiple databases. What we want to do is, using the same application/domain/hostname/virtual dir give the user the option on the login screen to select the "App/Database" they want to connect into. Each database has the App tables/data/procs/etc as well as the aspnet membership/roles stuff. When the user enters the username/password and selects (select list) the application, I want to validate the user against the selected applications database. Presently the database connection string for membership services is saved in the web.config. Is there any way I can override this at login time? Also, I need the "remember me" function to work smoothly as well. How does this work when the user comes back to the app in 5 hours... This process should be able to identify the user and application and log in appropriately.

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  • Creating Wizard in ASP.NET MVC (Part 3 - jQuery)

    - by bipinjoshi
    In Part 1 and Part 2 of this article series you developed a wizard in an ASP.NET MVC application using full page postback and Ajax helper respectively. In this final part of this series you will develop a client side wizard using jQuery. The navigation between various wizard steps (Next, Previous) happens without any postback (neither full nor partial). The only step that causes form submission to the server is clicking on the Finish wizard button.http://www.binaryintellect.net/articles/d278e8aa-3f37-40c5-92a2-74e65b1b5653.aspx 

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  • How to implement Survey page using ASP.NET MVC?

    - by Aleks
    I need to implement the survey page using ASP.NET MVC (v.4) That functionality has already been implemented in our project using ASP.NET WebForms. (I really searched a lot for real examples of similar functionality implemented via MVC, but failed) Goal: staying on the same page (in webforms -'Survey.aspx') each time user clicks 'Next Page', load next bunch of questions (controls) which user is going to answer. Type of controls in questions are defined only in run-time (retrieved from Data Base). To explain better the question I manually created (rather simple) mark-up below of 'two' pages (two loads of controls): <%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeBehind="Survey.aspx.cs" Inherits="WebSite.Survey" %> <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> <head runat="server"> <title></title> </head> <body> <form id="form1" runat="server"> <div><h2>Internal Survey</h2></div> <div><h3>Page 1</h3></div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"><div><b>Did you have internet disconnections during last week?</b></div> <asp:RadioButtonList ID="RadioButtonList1" runat="server"> <asp:ListItem>Yes</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>No</asp:ListItem> </asp:RadioButtonList> </div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"><div><b>Which days of the week suit you best for meeting up ?</b></div> <asp:CheckBoxList ID="CheckBoxList1" runat="server"> <asp:ListItem>Monday</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Tuesday</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Wednesday</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Thursday</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Friday</asp:ListItem> </asp:CheckBoxList> </div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"> <div><b>How satisfied are you with your job? </b></div> <asp:RadioButtonList ID="RadioButtonList2" runat="server"> <asp:ListItem>Very Good</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Good</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Bad</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Very Bad</asp:ListItem> </asp:RadioButtonList> </div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"> <div><b>How satisfied are you with your direct supervisor ? </b></div> <asp:RadioButtonList ID="RadioButtonList3" runat="server"> <asp:ListItem>Not Satisfied</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Somewhat Satisfied</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Neutral</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Satisfied</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Very Satisfied</asp:ListItem> </asp:RadioButtonList> </div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"> <asp:Button ID="Button1" runat="server" Text="Next Page" onclick="Button1_Click" /> </div> </form> </body> </html> PAGE 2 <%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeBehind="Survey.aspx.cs" Inherits="WebSite.Survey" %> <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> <head runat="server"> <title></title> </head> <body> <form id="form1" runat="server"> <div><h2>Internal Survey</h2></div> <div><h3>Page 2</h3></div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"><div><b>Did admininstators fix your internet connection in time ?</b></div> <asp:RadioButtonList ID="RadioButtonList1" runat="server"> <asp:ListItem>Yes</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>No</asp:ListItem> </asp:RadioButtonList> </div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"><div><b>What's your overal impression about the job ?</b></div> <asp:TextBox ID="TextBox1" runat="server" Height="88px" Width="322px"></asp:TextBox> </div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"> <div><b>Select day which best suits you for admin support ? </b></div> <asp:DropDownList ID="DropDownList1" runat="server"> <asp:ListItem>Select day</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Monday</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Wednesday</asp:ListItem> <asp:ListItem>Friday</asp:ListItem> </asp:DropDownList> </div> <div style="padding-bottom: 10px"> <asp:Button ID="Button1" runat="server" Text="Next Page" onclick="Button1_Click" /> </div> </form> </body> </html>

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  • Cannot get net 4.5rc to work

    - by ThomasD
    I have installed .net 4.5rc from http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/netframework/hh854779.aspx because I would like to use the new spatial features when developing with visual visual web developer 2010 express. But when I want to change the target framework to .net 4.5 in the project properties it is not there. I have checked the directory in C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework64 and can see that there is no v4.5 folder but the v4.0 directory has been updated with a timestamp corresponding to when I installed v4.5. The version of the v4.0 directory is v4.0.30319. I am running windows 7 on my computer. Any ideas why I cannot find v4.5 ? thanks Thomas *UPDATE Based on the comment below I have found out that I am running 4.5. For others reading this post, .net 4.5 replaces the files in the .net 4.0 directory but without renaming the directory to .net 4.5 (a bit confusing). To check whether your assemblies have been updated check the product version of eg. system.dll (right click - details). According to this post http://www.west-wind.com/weblog/posts/2012/Mar/13/NET-45-is-an-inplace-replacement-for-NET-40 if the product version is above 17000 it is running 4.5.

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  • ASP.NET MVC ModelCopier

    - by shiju
     In my earlier post ViewModel patten and AutoMapper in ASP.NET MVC application, We have discussed the need for  View Model objects and how to map values between View Model objects and Domain model objects using AutoMapper. ASP.NET MVC futures assembly provides a static class ModelCopier that can also use for copying values between View Model objects and Domain model objects. ModelCopier class has two static methods - CopyCollection and CopyModel.CopyCollection method would copy values between two collection objects and CopyModel would copy values between two model objects. <PRE class="c#" name="code"> var expense=new Expense(); ModelCopier.CopyModel(expenseViewModel, expense);</PRE>The above code copying values from expenseViewModel object to  expense object.                For simple mapping between model objects, you can use ModelCopier but for complex scenarios, I highly recommending to using AutoMapper for mapping between model objects.

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  • Integrate BING API for Search inside ASP.Net web application

    - by sreejukg
    As you might already know, Bing is the Microsoft Search engine and is getting popular day by day. Bing offers APIs that can be integrated into your website to increase your website functionality. At this moment, there are two important APIs available. They are Bing Search API Bing Maps The Search API enables you to build applications that utilize Bing’s technology. The API allows you to search multiple source types such as web; images, video etc. and supports various output prototypes such as JSON, XML, and SOAP. Also you will be able to customize the search results as you wish for your public facing website. Bing Maps API allows you to build robust applications that use Bing Maps. In this article I am going to describe, how you can integrate Bing search into your website. In order to start using Bing, First you need to sign in to http://www.bing.com/toolbox/bingdeveloper/ using your windows live credentials. Click on the Sign in button, you will be asked to enter your windows live credentials. Once signed in you will be redirected to the Developer page. Here you can create applications and get AppID for each application. Since I am a first time user, I don’t have any applications added. Click on the Add button to add a new application. You will be asked to enter certain details about your application. The fields are straight forward, only thing you need to note is the website field, here you need to enter the website address from where you are going to use this application, and this field is optional too. Of course you need to agree on the terms and conditions and then click Save. Once you click on save, the application will be created and application ID will be available for your use. Now we got the APP Id. Basically Bing supports three protocols. They are JSON, XML and SOAP. JSON is useful if you want to call the search requests directly from the browser and use JavaScript to parse the results, thus JSON is the favorite choice for AJAX application. XML is the alternative for applications that does not support SOAP, e.g. flash/ Silverlight etc. SOAP is ideal for strongly typed languages and gives a request/response object model. In this article I am going to demonstrate how to search BING API using SOAP protocol from an ASP.Net application. For the purpose of this demonstration, I am going to create an ASP.Net project and implement the search functionality in an aspx page. Open Visual Studio, navigate to File-> New Project, select ASP.Net empty web application, I named the project as “BingSearchSample”. Add a Search.aspx page to the project, once added the solution explorer will looks similar to the following. Now you need to add a web reference to the SOAP service available from Bing. To do this, from the solution explorer, right click your project, select Add Service Reference. Now the new service reference dialog will appear. In the left bottom of the dialog, you can find advanced button, click on it. Now the service reference settings dialog will appear. In the bottom left, you can find Add Web Reference button, click on it. The add web reference dialog will appear now. Enter the URL as http://api.bing.net/search.wsdl?AppID=<YourAppIDHere>&version=2.2 (replace <yourAppIDHere> with the appID you have generated previously) and click on the button next to it. This will find the web service methods available. You can change the namespace suggested by Bing, but for the purpose of this demonstration I have accepted all the default settings. Click on the Add reference button once you are done. Now the web reference to Search service will be added your project. You can find this under solution explorer of your project. Now in the Search.aspx, that you previously created, place one textbox, button and a grid view. For the purpose of this demonstration, I have given the identifiers (ID) as txtSearch, btnSearch, gvSearch respectively. The idea is to search the text entered in the text box using Bing service and show the results in the grid view. In the design view, the search.aspx looks as follows. In the search.aspx.cs page, add a using statement that points to net.bing.api. I have added the following code for button click event handler. The code is very straight forward. It just calls the service with your AppID, a query to search and a source for searching. Let us run this page and see the output when I enter Microsoft in my textbox. If you want to search a specific site, you can include the site name in the query parameter. For e.g. the following query will search the word Microsoft from www.microsoft.com website. searchRequest.Query = “site:www.microsoft.com Microsoft”; The output of this query is as follows. Integrating BING search API to your website is easy and there is no limit on the customization of the interface you can do. There is no Bing branding required so I believe this is a great option for web developers when they plan for site search.

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  • Compress session state in ASP.Net 4.0

    - by nikolaosk
    Hello folks, In this post I would like to talk about a new feature of ASP.NET 4.0 - easy state compression . When we create web-asp.net applications the user must feel that whenever he interacts with the website, he actually interacts with something that can be safely described as an application. What I mean by this is that is that during a postback the whole page is re-created and is sent back to the client in a fraction of a second. The server has no idea what the user does with the page. If we...(read more)

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  • Data binding in an ASP.Net application with Entity Framework

    - by nikolaosk
    This is going to be the eighth post of a series of posts regarding ASP.Net and the Entity Framework and how we can use Entity Framework to access our datastore. You can find the first one here , the second one here , the third one here , the fourth one here , the fifth one here ,the sixth one here and the seventh one here . I have a post regarding ASP.Net and EntityDataSource . You can read it here .I have 3 more posts on Profiling Entity Framework applications. You can have a look at them here ...(read more)

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  • Using stored procedures with Entity Framework in an ASP.Net application

    - by nikolaosk
    This is going to be the third post of a series of posts regarding ASP.Net and the Entity Framework and how we can use Entity Framework to access our datastore. You can find the first one here and the second one here . I have a post regarding ASP.Net and EntityDataSource. You can read it here .I have 3 more posts on Profiling Entity Framework applications. You can have a look at them here , here and here . In this post I will show you how to select,insert,update,delete data in the database using EF...(read more)

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  • ASP.NET Web API - Screencast series Part 3: Delete and Update

    - by Jon Galloway
    We're continuing a six part series on ASP.NET Web API that accompanies the getting started screencast series. This is an introductory screencast series that walks through from File / New Project to some more advanced scenarios like Custom Validation and Authorization. The screencast videos are all short (3-5 minutes) and the sample code for the series is both available for download and browsable online. I did the screencasts, but the samples were written by the ASP.NET Web API team. In Part 1 we looked at what ASP.NET Web API is, why you'd care, did the File / New Project thing, and did some basic HTTP testing using browser F12 developer tools. In Part 2 we started to build up a sample that returns data from a repository in JSON format via GET methods. In Part 3, we'll start to modify data on the server using DELETE and POST methods. So far we've been looking at GET requests, and the difference between standard browsing in a web browser and navigating an HTTP API isn't quite as clear. Delete is where the difference becomes more obvious. With a "traditional" web page, to delete something'd probably have a form that POSTs a request back to a controller that needs to know that it's really supposed to be deleting something even though POST was really designed to create things, so it does the work and then returns some HTML back to the client that says whether or not the delete succeeded. There's a good amount of plumbing involved in communicating between client and server. That gets a lot easier when we just work with the standard HTTP DELETE verb. Here's how the server side code works: public Comment DeleteComment(int id) { Comment comment; if (!repository.TryGet(id, out comment)) throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.NotFound); repository.Delete(id); return comment; } If you look back at the GET /api/comments code in Part 2, you'll see that they start the exact same because the use cases are kind of similar - we're looking up an item by id and either displaying it or deleting it. So the only difference is that this method deletes the comment once it finds it. We don't need to do anything special to handle cases where the id isn't found, as the same HTTP 404 handling works fine here, too. Pretty much all "traditional" browsing uses just two HTTP verbs: GET and POST, so you might not be all that used to DELETE requests and think they're hard. Not so! Here's the jQuery method that calls the /api/comments with the DELETE verb: $(function() { $("a.delete").live('click', function () { var id = $(this).data('comment-id'); $.ajax({ url: "/api/comments/" + id, type: 'DELETE', cache: false, statusCode: { 200: function(data) { viewModel.comments.remove( function(comment) { return comment.ID == data.ID; } ); } } }); return false; }); }); So in order to use the DELETE verb instead of GET, we're just using $.ajax() and setting the type to DELETE. Not hard. But what's that statusCode business? Well, an HTTP status code of 200 is an OK response. Unless our Web API method sets another status (such as by throwing the Not Found exception we saw earlier), the default response status code is HTTP 200 - OK. That makes the jQuery code pretty simple - it calls the Delete action, and if it gets back an HTTP 200, the server-side delete was successful so the comment can be deleted. Adding a new comment uses the POST verb. It starts out looking like an MVC controller action, using model binding to get the new comment from JSON data into a c# model object to add to repository, but there are some interesting differences. public HttpResponseMessage<Comment> PostComment(Comment comment) { comment = repository.Add(comment); var response = new HttpResponseMessage<Comment>(comment, HttpStatusCode.Created); response.Headers.Location = new Uri(Request.RequestUri, "/api/comments/" + comment.ID.ToString()); return response; } First off, the POST method is returning an HttpResponseMessage<Comment>. In the GET methods earlier, we were just returning a JSON payload with an HTTP 200 OK, so we could just return the  model object and Web API would wrap it up in an HttpResponseMessage with that HTTP 200 for us (much as ASP.NET MVC controller actions can return strings, and they'll be automatically wrapped in a ContentResult). When we're creating a new comment, though, we want to follow standard REST practices and return the URL that points to the newly created comment in the Location header, and we can do that by explicitly creating that HttpResposeMessage and then setting the header information. And here's a key point - by using HTTP standard status codes and headers, our response payload doesn't need to explain any context - the client can see from the status code that the POST succeeded, the location header tells it where to get it, and all it needs in the JSON payload is the actual content. Note: This is a simplified sample. Among other things, you'll need to consider security and authorization in your Web API's, and especially in methods that allow creating or deleting data. We'll look at authorization in Part 6. As for security, you'll want to consider things like mass assignment if binding directly to model objects, etc. In Part 4, we'll extend on our simple querying methods form Part 2, adding in support for paging and querying.

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  • ASP.NET Web API - Screencast series Part 2: Getting Data

    - by Jon Galloway
    We're continuing a six part series on ASP.NET Web API that accompanies the getting started screencast series. This is an introductory screencast series that walks through from File / New Project to some more advanced scenarios like Custom Validation and Authorization. The screencast videos are all short (3-5 minutes) and the sample code for the series is both available for download and browsable online. I did the screencasts, but the samples were written by the ASP.NET Web API team. In Part 1 we looked at what ASP.NET Web API is, why you'd care, did the File / New Project thing, and did some basic HTTP testing using browser F12 developer tools. This second screencast starts to build out the Comments example - a JSON API that's accessed via jQuery. This sample uses a simple in-memory repository. At this early stage, the GET /api/values/ just returns an IEnumerable<Comment>. In part 4 we'll add on paging and filtering, and it gets more interesting.   The get by id (e.g. GET /api/values/5) case is a little more interesting. The method just returns a Comment if the Comment ID is valid, but if it's not found we throw an HttpResponseException with the correct HTTP status code (HTTP 404 Not Found). This is an important thing to get - HTTP defines common response status codes, so there's no need to implement any custom messaging here - we tell the requestor that the resource the requested wasn't there.  public Comment GetComment(int id) { Comment comment; if (!repository.TryGet(id, out comment)) throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.NotFound); return comment; } This is great because it's standard, and any client should know how to handle it. There's no need to invent custom messaging here, and we can talk to any client that understands HTTP - not just jQuery, and not just browsers. But it's crazy easy to consume an HTTP API that returns JSON via jQuery. The example uses Knockout to bind the JSON values to HTML elements, but the thing to notice is that calling into this /api/coments is really simple, and the return from the $.get() method is just JSON data, which is really easy to work with in JavaScript (since JSON stands for JavaScript Object Notation and is the native serialization format in Javascript). $(function() { $("#getComments").click(function () { // We're using a Knockout model. This clears out the existing comments. viewModel.comments([]); $.get('/api/comments', function (data) { // Update the Knockout model (and thus the UI) with the comments received back // from the Web API call. viewModel.comments(data); }); }); }); That's it! Easy, huh? In Part 3, we'll start modifying data on the server using POST and DELETE.

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  • Entity Framework and Plain Old CLR Objects in an ASP.Net application

    - by nikolaosk
    This is going to be the sixth post of a series of posts regarding ASP.Net and the Entity Framework and how we can use Entity Framework to access our datastore. You can find the first one here , the second one here and the third one here , the fourth one here and the fifth one here . I have a post regarding ASP.Net and EntityDataSource. You can read it here .I have 3 more posts on Profiling Entity Framework applications. You can have a look at them here , here and here . In this post I will be looking...(read more)

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  • AdvancedFormatProvider: Making string.format do more

    - by plblum
    When I have an integer that I want to format within the String.Format() and ToString(format) methods, I’m always forgetting the format symbol to use with it. That’s probably because its not very intuitive. Use {0:N0} if you want it with group (thousands) separators. text = String.Format("{0:N0}", 1000); // returns "1,000"   int value1 = 1000; text = value1.ToString("N0"); Use {0:D} or {0:G} if you want it without group separators. text = String.Format("{0:D}", 1000); // returns "1000"   int value2 = 1000; text2 = value2.ToString("D"); The {0:D} is especially confusing because Microsoft gives the token the name “Decimal”. I thought it reasonable to have a new format symbol for String.Format, "I" for integer, and the ability to tell it whether it shows the group separators. Along the same lines, why not expand the format symbols for currency ({0:C}) and percent ({0:P}) to let you omit the currency or percent symbol, omit the group separator, and even to drop the decimal part when the value is equal to the whole number? My solution is an open source project called AdvancedFormatProvider, a group of classes that provide the new format symbols, continue to support the rest of the native symbols and makes it easy to plug in additional format symbols. Please visit https://github.com/plblum/AdvancedFormatProvider to learn about it in detail and explore how its implemented. The rest of this post will explore some of the concepts it takes to expand String.Format() and ToString(format). AdvancedFormatProvider benefits: Supports {0:I} token for integers. It offers the {0:I-,} option to omit the group separator. Supports {0:C} token with several options. {0:C-$} omits the currency symbol. {0:C-,} omits group separators, and {0:C-0} hides the decimal part when the value would show “.00”. For example, 1000.0 becomes “$1000” while 1000.12 becomes “$1000.12”. Supports {0:P} token with several options. {0:P-%} omits the percent symbol. {0:P-,} omits group separators, and {0:P-0} hides the decimal part when the value would show “.00”. For example, 1 becomes “100 %” while 1.1223 becomes “112.23 %”. Provides a plug in framework that lets you create new formatters to handle specific format symbols. You register them globally so you can just pass the AdvancedFormatProvider object into String.Format and ToString(format) without having to figure out which plug ins to add. text = String.Format(AdvancedFormatProvider.Current, "{0:I}", 1000); // returns "1,000" text2 = String.Format(AdvancedFormatProvider.Current, "{0:I-,}", 1000); // returns "1000" text3 = String.Format(AdvancedFormatProvider.Current, "{0:C-$-,}", 1000.0); // returns "1000.00" The IFormatProvider parameter Microsoft has made String.Format() and ToString(format) format expandable. They each take an additional parameter that takes an object that implements System.IFormatProvider. This interface has a single member, the GetFormat() method, which returns an object that knows how to convert the format symbol and value into the desired string. There are already a number of web-based resources to teach you about IFormatProvider and the companion interface ICustomFormatter. I’ll defer to them if you want to dig more into the topic. The only thing I want to point out is what I think are implementation considerations. Why GetFormat() always tests for ICustomFormatter When you see examples of implementing IFormatProviders, the GetFormat() method always tests the parameter against the ICustomFormatter type. Why is that? public object GetFormat(Type formatType) { if (formatType == typeof(ICustomFormatter)) return this; else return null; } The value of formatType is already predetermined by the .net framework. String.Format() uses the StringBuilder.AppendFormat() method to parse the string, extracting the tokens and calling GetFormat() with the ICustomFormatter type. (The .net framework also calls GetFormat() with the types of System.Globalization.NumberFormatInfo and System.Globalization.DateTimeFormatInfo but these are exclusive to how the System.Globalization.CultureInfo class handles its implementation of IFormatProvider.) Your code replaces instead of expands I would have expected the caller to pass in the format string to GetFormat() to allow your code to determine if it handles the request. My vision would be to return null when the format string is not supported. The caller would iterate through IFormatProviders until it finds one that handles the format string. Unfortunatley that is not the case. The reason you write GetFormat() as above is because the caller is expecting an object that handles all formatting cases. You are effectively supposed to write enough code in your formatter to handle your new cases and call .net functions (like String.Format() and ToString(format)) to handle the original cases. Its not hard to support the native functions from within your ICustomFormatter.Format function. Just test the format string to see if it applies to you. If not, call String.Format() with a token using the format passed in. public string Format(string format, object arg, IFormatProvider formatProvider) { if (format.StartsWith("I")) { // handle "I" formatter } else return String.Format(formatProvider, "{0:" + format + "}", arg); } Formatters are only used by explicit request Each time you write a custom formatter (implementer of ICustomFormatter), it is not used unless you explicitly passed an IFormatProvider object that supports your formatter into String.Format() or ToString(). This has several disadvantages: Suppose you have several ICustomFormatters. In order to have all available to String.Format() and ToString(format), you have to merge their code and create an IFormatProvider to return an instance of your new class. You have to remember to utilize the IFormatProvider parameter. Its easy to overlook, especially when you have existing code that calls String.Format() without using it. Some APIs may call String.Format() themselves. If those APIs do not offer an IFormatProvider parameter, your ICustomFormatter will not be available to them. The AdvancedFormatProvider solves the first two of these problems by providing a plug-in architecture.

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  • running asp.net 3.5 and asp.net 2.0 in same site

    - by cori
    We're running ASP.Net 2.0 on our corporate web site, and I'd like to get it up to ASP.Net 3.5 as smoothly as possible. The project/solution architecture in VS 2005 is an ASP.Net 2.0 web project and an .Net 2.0 data access layer project which is used by the site code. Upon opening the projects in a new VS 2008 solution they seemed to be converted to .Net 3.5 with a minimum of fuss - they built correctly out of the box, deployed successfully, and seem to work just fine, which is exactly as I would expect given that .Net 2.0 and 3.5 share a common runtime. The major difference after the conversion is that the web.config file's referenced dlls are now the 3.5 versions. What I would like to do is to update the site piecemeal; as I make modifications to a given page send the 3.5 verson of that page over to our webserver and not update the whole site at once. In testing on our dev box this approach seems to be working fine - the site code is interacting with the .Net 3.5 data access layer without difficulty, a handful of pages are running 3.5 page-behind code (by this I mean that they're running assemblies built in VS 2008 - the site is using single-page assemblies for code behind), the 3.5 web.config is in place, and the bulk of the site is running code-behind assemblies built in VS2005. Everything looks great. Which makes me worried that I'm missing something. Is this architecture workable, or is there a problem lying is wait for m that I haven't considered?

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  • HttpModule with ASP.NET MVC not being called

    - by mgroves
    I am trying to implement a session-per-request pattern in an ASP.NET MVC 2 Preview 1 application, and I've implemented an IHttpModule to help me do this: public class SessionModule : IHttpModule { public void Init(HttpApplication context) { context.Response.Write("Init!"); context.EndRequest += context_EndRequest; } // ... etc... } And I've put this into the web.config: <system.web> <httpModules> <add name="SessionModule" type="MyNamespace.SessionModule" /> </httpModules> <system.webServer> <modules runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests="true"> <remove name="SessionModule" /> <add name="SessionModule" type="MyNamespace.SessionModule" /> </modules> However, "Init!" never gets written to the page (I'm using the built-in VS web server, Cassini). Additionally, I've tried putting breakpoints in the SessionModule but they never break. What am I missing?

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  • Losing Session between Classic ASP and ASP.NET

    - by Aaron
    The company that I work for is making a transition between classic ASP programs and ASP.NET programs for our intranet software. Eventually, everything will be written in ASP.NET, but because of time constraints, there are still a number of programs that use classic ASP. To compensate we've written features that allow for redirects and autologins between classic ASP programs and ASP.NET programs. I've been starting to see a problem, though, with holding the session state for our ASP.NET software. If a user uses an ASP.NET program, then does work in a classic ASP program, then goes back to that ASP.NET program, often times, the user's authentication for the ASP.NET program is still in place, yet the user's session is lost, resulting in an error whenever a function is performed within the program. I'm trying to capture the loss of the session state in global.asax's Session_End event, which would redirect the user to the login page, but that hasn't worked. Has anyone else faced a similar issue with users moving back and forth between classic ASP and ASP.NET and losing sessions? Is that even my real issue here? It's the only thing that I can see as being a problem. Thanks for any help.

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  • List of blogs - year 2010

    - by hajan
    This is the last day of year 2010 and I would like to add links to all blogs I have posted in this year. First, I would like to mention that I started blogging in ASP.NET Community in May / June 2010 and have really enjoyed writing for my favorite technologies, such as: ASP.NET, jQuery/JavaScript, C#, LINQ, Web Services etc. I also had great feedback either through comments on my blogs or in Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn where I met many new experts just as a result of my blog posts. Thanks to the interesting topics I have in my blog, I became DZone MVB. Here is the list of blogs I made in 2010 in my ASP.NET Community Weblog: (newest to oldest) Great library of ASP.NET videos – Pluralsight! NDepend – Code Query Language (CQL) NDepend tool – Why every developer working with Visual Studio.NET must try it! jQuery Templates in ASP.NET - Blogs Series jQuery Templates - XHTML Validation jQuery Templates with ASP.NET MVC jQuery Templates - {Supported Tags} jQuery Templates – tmpl(), template() and tmplItem() Introduction to jQuery Templates ViewBag dynamic in ASP.NET MVC 3 - RC 2 Today I had a presentation on "Deep Dive into jQuery Templates in ASP.NET" jQuery Data Linking in ASP.NET How do you prefer getting bundles of technologies?? Case-insensitive XPath query search on XML Document in ASP.NET jQuery UI Accordion in ASP.NET MVC - feed with data from database (Part 3) jQuery UI Accordion in ASP.NET WebForms - feed with data from database (Part 2) jQuery UI Accordion in ASP.NET – Client side implementation (Part 1) Using Images embedded in Project’s Assembly Macedonian Code Camp 2010 event has finished successfully Tips and Tricks: Deferred execution using LINQ Using System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch class to measure the elapsed time Speaking at Macedonian Code Camp 2010 URL Routing in ASP.NET 4.0 Web Forms Conflicts between ASP.NET AJAX UpdatePanels & jQuery functions Integration of jQuery DatePicker in ASP.NET Website – Localization (part 3) Why not to use HttpResponse.Close and HttpResponse.End Calculate Business Days using LINQ Get Distinct values of an Array using LINQ Using CodeRun browser-based IDE to create ASP.NET Web Applications Using params keyword – Methods with variable number of parameters Working with Code Snippets in VS.NET  Working with System.IO.Path static class Calculating GridView total using JavaScript/JQuery The new SortedSet<T> Collection in .NET 4.0 JavaScriptSerializer – Dictionary to JSON Serialization and Deserialization Integration of jQuery DatePicker in ASP.NET Website – JS Validation Script (part 2) Integration of jQuery DatePicker in ASP.NET Website (part 1) Transferring large data when using Web Services Forums dedicated to WebMatrix Microsoft WebMatrix – Short overview & installation Working with embedded resources in Project's assembly Debugging ASP.NET Web Services Save and Display YouTube Videos on ASP.NET Website Hello ASP.NET World... In addition, I would like to mention that I have big list of blog posts in CodeASP.NET Community (total 60 blogs) and the local MKDOT.NET Community (total 61 blogs). You may find most of my weblogs.asp.net/hajan blogs posted there too, but there you can find many others. In my blog on MKDOT.NET Community you can find most of my ASP.NET Weblog posts translated in Macedonian language, some of them posted in English and some other blogs that were posted only there. By reading my blogs, I hope you have learnt something new or at least have confirmed your knowledge. And also, if you haven't, I encourage you to start blogging and share your Microsoft Tech. thoughts with all of us... Sharing and spreading knowledge is definitely one of the noblest things which we can do in our life. "Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will eat for a lifetime" HAPPY NEW 2011 YEAR!!! Best Regards, Hajan

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  • Creating dynamic breadcrumb in asp.net mvc with mvcsitemap provider

    - by Jalpesh P. Vadgama
    I have done lots breadcrumb kind of things in normal asp.net web forms I was looking for same for asp.net mvc. After searching on internet I have found one great nuget package for mvpsite map provider which can be easily implemented via site map provider. So let’s check how its works. I have create a new MVC 3 web application called breadcrumb and now I am adding a reference of site map provider via nuget package like following. You can find more information about MVC sitemap provider on following URL. https://github.com/maartenba/MvcSiteMapProvid So once you add site map provider. You will find a Mvc.SiteMap file like following. And following is content of that file. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?> <mvcSiteMap xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://mvcsitemap.codeplex.com/schemas/MvcSiteMap-File-3.0" xsi:schemaLocation="http://mvcsitemap.codeplex.com/schemas/MvcSiteMap-File-3.0 MvcSiteMapSchema.xsd" enableLocalization="true"> <mvcSiteMapNode title="Home" controller="Home" action="Index"> <mvcSiteMapNode title="About" controller="Home" action="About"/> </mvcSiteMapNode> </mvcSiteMap> So now we have added site map so now its time to make breadcrumb dynamic. So as we all know that with in the standard asp.net mvc template we have action link by default for Home and About like following. <div id="menucontainer"> <ul id="menu"> <li>@Html.ActionLink("Home", "Index", "Home")</li> <li>@Html.ActionLink("About", "About", "Home")</li> </ul> </div> Now I want to replace that with our sitemap provider and make it dynamic so I have added the following code. <div id="menucontainer"> @Html.MvcSiteMap().Menu(true) </div> That’s it. This is the magic code @Html.MvcSiteMap will dynamically create breadcrumb for you. Now let’s run this in browser. You can see that it has created breadcrumb dynamically without writing any action link code. So here you can see with MvcSiteMap provider we don’t have to write any code we just need to add menu syntax and rest it will do automatically. That’s it. Hope you liked it. Stay tuned for more till then happy programming.

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  • Dynamically creating meta tags in asp.net mvc

    - by Jalpesh P. Vadgama
    As we all know that Meta tag has very important roles in Search engine optimization and if we want to have out site listed with good ranking on search engines then we have to put meta tags. Before some time I have blogged about dynamically creating meta tags in asp.net 2.0/3.5 sites, in this blog post I am going to explain how we can create a meta tag dynamically very easily. To have meta tag dynamically we have to create a meta tag on server-side. So I have created a method like following. public string HomeMetaTags() { System.Text.StringBuilder strMetaTag = new System.Text.StringBuilder(); strMetaTag.AppendFormat(@"<meta content='{0}' name='Keywords'/>","Home Action Keyword"); strMetaTag.AppendFormat(@"<meta content='{0}' name='Descption'/>", "Home Description Keyword"); return strMetaTag.ToString(); } Here you can see that I have written a method which will return a string with meta tags. Here you can write any logic you can fetch it from the database or you can even fetch it from xml based on key passed. For the demo purpose I have written that hardcoded. So it will create a meta tag string and will return it. Now I am going to store that meta tag in ViewBag just like we have a title tag. In this post I am going to use standard template so we have our title tag there in viewbag message. Same way I am going save meta tag like following in ViewBag. public ActionResult Index() { ViewBag.Message = "Welcome to ASP.NET MVC!"; ViewBag.MetaTag = HomeMetaTags(); return View(); } Here in the above code you can see that I have stored MetaTag ViewBag. Now as I am using standard ASP.NET MVC3 template so we have our we have out head element in Shared folder _layout.cshtml file. So to render meta tag I have modified the Head tag part of _layout.cshtml like following. <head> <title>@ViewBag.Title</title> <link href="@Url.Content("~/Content/Site.css")" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" /> <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery-1.5.1.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script> @Html.Raw(ViewBag.MetaTag) </head> Here in the above code you can see I have use @Html.Raw method to embed meta tag in _layout.cshtml page. This HTML.Raw method will embed output to head tag section without encoding html. As we have already taken care of html tag in string function we don’t need the html encoding. Now it’s time to run application in browser. Now once you run your application in browser and click on view source you will find meta tag for home page as following. That’s its It’s very easy to create dynamically meta tag. Hope you liked it.. Stay tuned for more.. Till then happy programming.

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  • ASP.NET MVC 2 Released

    - by Latest Microsoft Blogs
    I’m happy to announce that the final release of ASP.NET MVC 2 is now available for VS 2008/Visual Web Developer 2008 Express with ASP.NET 3.5.  You can download and install it from the following locations: Download ASP.NET MVC 2 using the Microsoft Read More......(read more)

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