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  • Test-Drive ASP.NET MVC Review

    - by Ben Griswold
    A few years back I started dallying with test-driven development, but I never fully committed to the practice. This wasn’t because I didn’t believe in the value of TDD; it was more a matter of not completely understanding how to incorporate “test first” into my everyday development. Back in my web forms days, I could point fingers at the framework for my ignorance and laziness. After all, web forms weren’t exactly designed for testability so who could blame me for not embracing TDD in those conditions, right? But when I switched to ASP.NET MVC and quickly found myself fresh out of excuses and it became instantly clear that it was time to get my head around red-green-refactor once and for all or I would regretfully miss out on one of the biggest selling points the new framework had to offer. I have previously written about how I learned ASP.NET MVC. It was primarily hands on learning but I did read a couple of ASP.NET MVC books along the way. The books I read dedicated a chapter or two to TDD and they certainly addressed the benefits of TDD and how MVC was designed with testability in mind, but TDD was merely an afterthought compared to, well, teaching one how to code the model, view and controller. This approach made some sense, and I learned a bunch about MVC from those books, but when it came to TDD the books were just a teaser and an opportunity missed.  But then I got lucky – Jonathan McCracken contacted me and asked if I’d review his book, Test-Drive ASP.NET MVC, and it was just what I needed to get over the TDD hump. As the title suggests, Test-Drive ASP.NET MVC takes a different approach to learning MVC as it focuses on testing right from the very start. McCracken wastes no time and swiftly familiarizes us with the framework by building out a trivial Quote-O-Matic application and then dedicates the better part of his book to testing first – first by explaining TDD and then coding a full-featured Getting Organized application inspired by David Allen’s popular book, Getting Things Done. If you are a learn-by-example kind of coder (like me), you will instantly appreciate and enjoy McCracken’s style – its fast-moving, pragmatic and focused on only the most relevant information required to get you going with ASP.NET MVC and TDD. The book continues with the test-first theme but McCracken moves away from the sample application and incorporates other practical skills like persisting models with NHibernate, leveraging Inversion of Control with the IControllerFactory and building a RESTful web service. What I most appreciated about this section was McCracken’s use of and praise for open source libraries like Rhino Mocks, SQLite and StructureMap (to name just a few) and productivity tools like ReSharper, Web Platform Installer and ASP.NET SQL Server Setup Wizard.  McCracken’s emphasis on real world, pragmatic development was clearly demonstrated in every tool choice, straight-forward code block and developer tip. Whether one is already familiar with the tools/tips or not, McCracken’s thought process is easily understood and appreciated. The final section of the book walks the reader through security and deployment – everything from error handling and logging with ELMAH, to ASP.NET Health Monitoring, to using MSBuild with automated builds, to the deployment  of ASP.NET MVC to various web environments. These chapters, like those prior, offer enough information and explanation to simply help you get the job done.  Do I believe Test-Drive ASP.NET MVC will turn you into an expert MVC developer overnight?  Well, no.  I don’t think any book can make that claim.  If that were possible, I think book list prices would skyrocket!  That said, Test-Drive ASP.NET MVC provides a solid foundation and a unique (and dare I say necessary) approach to learning ASP.NET MVC.  Along the way McCracken shares loads of very practical software development tips and references numerous tools and libraries. The bottom line is it’s a great ASP.NET MVC primer – if you’re new to ASP.NET MVC it’s just what you need to get started.  Do I believe Test-Drive ASP.NET MVC will give you everything you need to start employing TDD in your everyday development?  Well, I used to think that learning TDD required a lot of practice and, if you’re lucky enough, the guidance of a mentor or coach.  I used to think that one couldn’t learn TDD from a book alone. Well, I’m still no pro, but I’m testing first now and Jonathan McCracken and his book, Test-Drive ASP.NET MVC, played a big part in making this happen.  If you are an MVC developer and a TDD newb, Test-Drive ASP.NET MVC is just the book for you.

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  • Configure SQL Server to Allow Remote Connections

    - by Ben Griswold
    Okay. This post isn’t about configuring SQL to allow remote connections, but wait, I still may be able to help you out. "A network-related or instance-specific error occurred while establishing a connection to SQL Server. The server was not found or was not accessible. Verify that the instance name is correct and that SQL Server is configured to allow remote connections. (provider: Named Pipes Provider, error: 40 – Could not open a connection to SQL Server)" I love this exception. It summarized the issue and leads you down a path to solving the problem.  I do wish the bit about allowing remote connections was left out of the message though. I can’t think of a time when having remote connections disabled caused me grief.  Heck, I can’t ever remember how to enable remote connections unless I Google for the answer. Anyway, 9 out of 10 times, SQL Server simply isn’t running.  That’s why the exception occurs.  The next time this exception pops up, open up the services console and make sure SQL Server is started.  And if that’s not the problem, only then start digging into the other possible reasons for the failure.

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  • Project Euler 18: (Iron)Python

    - by Ben Griswold
    In my attempt to learn (Iron)Python out in the open, here’s my solution for Project Euler Problem 18.  As always, any feedback is welcome. # Euler 18 # http://projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=18 # By starting at the top of the triangle below and moving # to adjacent numbers on the row below, the maximum total # from top to bottom is 23. # # 3 # 7 4 # 2 4 6 # 8 5 9 3 # # That is, 3 + 7 + 4 + 9 = 23. # Find the maximum total from top to bottom of the triangle below: # 75 # 95 64 # 17 47 82 # 18 35 87 10 # 20 04 82 47 65 # 19 01 23 75 03 34 # 88 02 77 73 07 63 67 # 99 65 04 28 06 16 70 92 # 41 41 26 56 83 40 80 70 33 # 41 48 72 33 47 32 37 16 94 29 # 53 71 44 65 25 43 91 52 97 51 14 # 70 11 33 28 77 73 17 78 39 68 17 57 # 91 71 52 38 17 14 91 43 58 50 27 29 48 # 63 66 04 68 89 53 67 30 73 16 69 87 40 31 # 04 62 98 27 23 09 70 98 73 93 38 53 60 04 23 # NOTE: As there are only 16384 routes, it is possible to solve # this problem by trying every route. However, Problem 67, is the # same challenge with a triangle containing one-hundred rows; it # cannot be solved by brute force, and requires a clever method! ;o) import time start = time.time() triangle = [ [75], [95, 64], [17, 47, 82], [18, 35, 87, 10], [20, 04, 82, 47, 65], [19, 01, 23, 75, 03, 34], [88, 02, 77, 73, 07, 63, 67], [99, 65, 04, 28, 06, 16, 70, 92], [41, 41, 26, 56, 83, 40, 80, 70, 33], [41, 48, 72, 33, 47, 32, 37, 16, 94, 29], [53, 71, 44, 65, 25, 43, 91, 52, 97, 51, 14], [70, 11, 33, 28, 77, 73, 17, 78, 39, 68, 17, 57], [91, 71, 52, 38, 17, 14, 91, 43, 58, 50, 27, 29, 48], [63, 66, 04, 68, 89, 53, 67, 30, 73, 16, 69, 87, 40, 31], [04, 62, 98, 27, 23, 9, 70, 98, 73, 93, 38, 53, 60, 04, 23]] # Loop through each row of the triangle starting at the base. for a in range(len(triangle) - 1, -1, -1): for b in range(0, a): # Get the maximum value for adjacent cells in current row. # Update the cell which would be one step prior in the path # with the new total. For example, compare the first two # elements in row 15. Add the max of 04 and 62 to the first # position of row 14.This provides the max total from row 14 # to 15 starting at the first position. Continue to work up # the triangle until the maximum total emerges at the # triangle's apex. triangle [a-1][b] += max(triangle [a][b], triangle [a][b+1]) print triangle [0][0] print "Elapsed Time:", (time.time() - start) * 1000, "millisecs" a=raw_input('Press return to continue')

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  • Project Euler 9: (Iron)Python

    - by Ben Griswold
    In my attempt to learn (Iron)Python out in the open, here’s my solution for Project Euler Problem 9.  As always, any feedback is welcome. # Euler 9 # http://projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=9 # A Pythagorean triplet is a set of three natural numbers, # a b c, for which, # a2 + b2 = c2 # For example, 32 + 42 = 9 + 16 = 25 = 52. # There exists exactly one Pythagorean triplet for which # a + b + c = 1000. Find the product abc. import time start = time.time() product = 0 def pythagorean_triplet(): for a in range(1,501): for b in xrange(a+1,501): c = 1000 - a - b if (a*a + b*b == c*c): return a*b*c print pythagorean_triplet() print "Elapsed Time:", (time.time() - start) * 1000, "millisecs" a=raw_input('Press return to continue')

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  • SVN Export or Recursively Remove .SVN Folders

    - by Ben Griswold
    I shared this script with a coworker yesterday. It doesn’t do much; it recursively deletes .svn folders from a source tree.  It comes in handy if you want to share your codebase or you get in a terrible spot with SVN and you just want to start all over. Just blow away all svn artifacts and use your mulligan. It’s true. You can nearly get the same result using the SVN export command which copies your source sans the .svn folders to an alternate location.  The catch is an export only includes those files/folders which exist under version control.  If you want a clean copy of your source – versioned or not – export just might not do. The contents of the .cmd file include the following: for /f "tokens=* delims=" %%i in (’dir /s /b /a:d *.svn’) do ( rd /s /q "%%i" ) Just download and drop the unzipped “SVN Cleanup.cmd” file into the root of the project, execute and away you go.  If you search around enough, I know you can find similar scripts and approaches elsewhere, but I’m still uploading my script for completeness and future reference. Download SVN Cleanup

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  • Database Connectivity Test with UDL File

    - by Ben Griswold
    I bounced around between projects a lot last week.  What each project had in common was the need to validate at least one SQL connection.  Whether you have SQL tools like SSMS installed or not, this is a very easy task if you are aware of the UDL (Universal Data Link) files.  Create a new file and name it anything as long as it has the .udl extension. Open the file, choose a provider: Click Next >> or navigate to the Connection Tab to provide connection information.  Once you provide server and login credentials, the database list will populate.  At this point, you know the connection is valid. but go ahead and click the Test Connection button anyway. On the final tab, you can provide extra connection information like Application Name which can come in handy.  The All tab is beneficial if you want to build a valid connection string to include in your own applications.  If you save the file and then open in Notepad, you’ll find that said connection string: Provider=SQLOLEDB.1;Integrated Security=SSPI;Persist Security Info=False;Initial Catalog=master;Data Source=(local);Application Name=TestApp I hope this tip helps save you some time.  How do you test if you don’t have SSMS installed?

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  • T4Toolbox and Visual Studio 2010

    - by Ben Griswold
    I’ve been using the T4Toolbox to help generate my ASP.NET MVC models and scaffolding for a while now.  Another developer tried using my generator project last week and ran into troubles due to a breaking change around the RenderCore() and TransformText() methods in support for VS 2010.  If you upgraded to the latest version of T4Toolbox and receive a build error similar to the following, you are probably in the same boat: GeneratedTextTransformation.[Template].RenderCore(): no suitable method found to override We took the easy way out.  I had him uninstall the latest version of T4Toolbox and install version 9.7.25.1 which my templates were initially coded against.  For now, that worked great, but it sounds like I’ll be doing some rework of the 20+ templates in my project to support Visual Studio 2010 when we migrate later this month.

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  • Language Club

    - by Ben Griswold
    We started a language club at work this week.  Thus far, we have a collective interest in a number of languages: Python, Ruby, F#, Erlang, Objective-C, Scala, Clojure, Haskell and Go. There are more but these 9 received the most votes. During the first few meetings we are going to determine which language we should tackle first. To help make our selection, each member will provide a quick overview of their favored language by answering the following set of questions: Why are you interested in learning “your” language(s). (There’s lots of work, I’m an MS shill, It’s hip and  fun, etc) What type of language is it?  (OO, dynamic, functional, procedural, declarative, etc) What types of problems is your language best suited to solve?  (Algorithms over big data, rapid application development, modeling, merely academic, etc) Can you provide examples of where/how it is being used?  If it isn’t being used, why not?  (Erlang was invented at Ericsson to provide an extremely fault tolerant, concurrent system.) Quick history – Who created/sponsored the language?  When was it created?  Is it currently active? Does the language have hardware support (an attempt was made at one point to create processor instruction sets specific to Prolog), or can it run as an interpreted language inside another language (like Ruby in the JVM)? Are there facilities for programs written in this language to communicate with other languages?  How does this affect its utility? Does the language have a IDE tool support?  (Think Eclipse or Visual Studio) How well is the language supported in terms of books, community and documentation? What’s the number one things which differentiates the language from others?  (i.e. Why is it cool?) How is the language applicability to us as consultants?  What would the impact be of using the language in terms of cost, maintainability, personnel costs, etc.? What’s the number one things which differentiates the language from others?  (i.e. Why is it cool?) This should provide an decent introduction into nearly a dozen languages and give us enough context to decide which single language deserves our undivided attention for the weeks to come.  Stay tuned for the winner…

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  • Project Euler 15: (Iron)Python

    - by Ben Griswold
    In my attempt to learn (Iron)Python out in the open, here’s my solution for Project Euler Problem 15.  As always, any feedback is welcome. # Euler 15 # http://projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=15 # Starting in the top left corner of a 2x2 grid, there # are 6 routes (without backtracking) to the bottom right # corner. How many routes are their in a 20x20 grid? import time start = time.time() def factorial(n): if n == 0: return 1 else: return n * factorial(n-1) rows, cols = 20, 20 print factorial(rows+cols) / (factorial(rows) * factorial(cols)) print "Elapsed Time:", (time.time() - start) * 1000, "millisecs" a=raw_input('Press return to continue')

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  • Introduction to Lean Software Development and Kanban Systems

    - by Ben Griswold
    Last year I took myself through a crash course on Lean Software Development and Kanban Systems in preparation for an in-house presentation.  I learned a bunch.  In this series, I’ll be sharing what I learned with you.   If your career looks anything like mine, you have probably been affiliated with a company or two which pushed requirements gathering and documentation to the nth degree. To add insult to injury, they probably added planning process (documentation, requirements, policies, meetings, committees) to the extent that it possibly retarded any progress. In my opinion, the typical company resembles the quote from Tom DeMarco. It isn’t enough just to do things right – we also had to say in advance exactly what we intended to do and then do exactly that. In the 1980s, Toyota turned the tables and revolutionize the automobile industry with their approach of “Lean Manufacturing.” A massive paradigm shift hit factories throughout the US and Europe. Mass production and scientific management techniques from the early 1900’s were questioned as Japanese manufacturing companies demonstrated that ‘Just-in-Time’ was a better paradigm. The widely adopted Japanese manufacturing concepts came to be known as ‘lean production’. Lean Thinking capitalizes on the intelligence of frontline workers, believing that they are the ones who should determine and continually improve the way they do their jobs. Lean puts main focus on people and communication – if people who produce the software are respected and they communicate efficiently, it is more likely that they will deliver good product and the final customer will be satisfied. In time, the abstractions behind lean production spread to logistics, and from there to the military, to construction, and to the service industry. As it turns out, principles of lean thinking are universal and have been applied successfully across many disciplines. Lean has been adopted by companies including Dell, FedEx, Lens Crafters, LLBean, SW Airlines, Digital River and eBay. Lean thinking got its name from a 1990’s best seller called The Machine That Changed the World : The Story of Lean Production. This book chronicles the movement of automobile manufacturing from craft production to mass production to lean production. Tom and Mary Poppendieck, that is.  Here’s one of their books: Implementing Lean Software Thinking: From Concept to Cash Our in-house presentations are supposed to run no more than 45 minutes.  I really cranked and got through my 87 slides in just under an hour. Of course, I had to cheat a little – I only covered the 7 principles and a single practice. In the next part of the series, we’ll dive into Principle #1: Eliminate Waste. And I am going to be a little obnoxious about listing my Lean and Kanban references with every series post.  The references are great and they deserve this sort of attention. 

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  • Forced Learning

    - by Ben Griswold
    If you ask me, it can be a little intimidating to stand in front of a group and walkthrough anything remotely technical. Even if you know “Technical Thingy #52” inside and out, public speaking can be unsettling.  And if you don’t have your stuff together, well, it can be downright horrifying. With that said, if given the choice, I still like to schedule myself to present on unfamiliar topics. Over the past few months, I’ve talked about Aspect-Oriented Programming, Functional Programming, Lean Software Development and Kanban Systems, Domain-Driven Design and Behavior Driven Development.  What do these topics have in common? You guessed it: I was truly interested in them. I had only a superficial understanding of each. Huh?  Why in the world would I ever want to to put myself in that intimidating situation? Actually, I rarely want to put myself into that situation but I often do as I like the results.  There’s nothing remotely clever going on here.  All I’m doing is putting myself into a compromising situation knowing that I’ll likely work myself out of it by learning the topic prior to the presentation.  I’m simply time-boxing myself to learn something new while knowing there are negative repercussions if I fall short. So, I end up doing tons of research and I learn bunches to ensure I have my head firmly wrap around the material before my talk. I’m not saying I become an expert overnight (or over a couple of weeks) but I’ll definitely know enough to be confident and comfortable and I’ll know more than enough to ensure the audience will learn a thing or two from me. It’s forced learning and though it might sound a little scary to some, it works for me. Now I could very easily rename this post to something like Fear Is My Motivator because, in a sense, fear of failure and embarrassment is what’s driving my learning. However, I’m the guy signing up for the presentation and since the entire process is self-imposed I’m not sure Fear deserves too much credit.  Anyway…

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  • Project Euler 5: (Iron)Python

    - by Ben Griswold
    In my attempt to learn (Iron)Python out in the open, here’s my solution for Project Euler Problem 5.  As always, any feedback is welcome. # Euler 5 # http://projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=5 # 2520 is the smallest number that can be divided by each # of the numbers from 1 to 10 without any remainder. # What is the smallest positive number that is evenly # divisible by all of the numbers from 1 to 20? import time start = time.time() def gcd(a, b): while b: a, b = b, a % b return a def lcm(a, b): return a * b // gcd(a, b) print reduce(lcm, range(1, 20)) print "Elapsed Time:", (time.time() - start) * 1000, "millisecs" a=raw_input('Press return to continue')

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  • Project Euler 14: (Iron)Python

    - by Ben Griswold
    In my attempt to learn (Iron)Python out in the open, here’s my solution for Project Euler Problem 14.  As always, any feedback is welcome. # Euler 14 # http://projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=14 # The following iterative sequence is defined for the set # of positive integers: # n -> n/2 (n is even) # n -> 3n + 1 (n is odd) # Using the rule above and starting with 13, we generate # the following sequence: # 13 40 20 10 5 16 8 4 2 1 # It can be seen that this sequence (starting at 13 and # finishing at 1) contains 10 terms. Although it has not # been proved yet (Collatz Problem), it is thought that all # starting numbers finish at 1. Which starting number, # under one million, produces the longest chain? # NOTE: Once the chain starts the terms are allowed to go # above one million. import time start = time.time() def collatz_length(n): # 0 and 1 return self as length if n <= 1: return n length = 1 while (n != 1): if (n % 2 == 0): n /= 2 else: n = 3*n + 1 length += 1 return length starting_number, longest_chain = 1, 0 for x in xrange(1, 1000001): l = collatz_length(x) if l > longest_chain: starting_number, longest_chain = x, l print starting_number print longest_chain # Slow 31 seconds print "Elapsed Time:", (time.time() - start) * 1000, "millisecs" a=raw_input('Press return to continue')

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  • Dell Docking Station Doesn’t Detect USB Mouse and Keyboard

    - by Ben Griswold
    I’ve found myself in this situation with multiple Dell docking stations and multiple Dell laptops running various Windows operating systems.  I don’t know why the docking station stops recognizing my USB mouse and keyboard – it just does.  It’s black magic.  The last time around I just starting plugging the mouse and keyboard into the docked laptop directly and went about my business (as if I wasn’t completing missing out on a couple of the core benefits of using a docking station.)  I guess that’s what happens when you forget how you got yourself out of the mess the last time around.  I had been in this half-assed state for a couple of weeks now, but a coworker fortunately got themselves in and out of the same pickle this morning.  Procrastinate long enough and the solution will just come to you, right? Here’s how to get yourself out of this mess: Undock your computer Unplug your docking station Count to an arbitrary number greater than 12.  (Not sure this is really required, but…) Plug your docking station back in Redock your machine I put my machine to sleep before taking the aforementioned actions.  My coworker completely shutdown his laptop instead.  The steps worked on both of our Win 7 machines this morning and, who knows, it might just work for you too. 

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  • Project Euler 8: (Iron)Python

    - by Ben Griswold
    In my attempt to learn (Iron)Python out in the open, here’s my solution for Project Euler Problem 8.  As always, any feedback is welcome. # Euler 8 # http://projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=8 # Find the greatest product of five consecutive digits # in the following 1000-digit number import time start = time.time() number = '\ 73167176531330624919225119674426574742355349194934\ 96983520312774506326239578318016984801869478851843\ 85861560789112949495459501737958331952853208805511\ 12540698747158523863050715693290963295227443043557\ 66896648950445244523161731856403098711121722383113\ 62229893423380308135336276614282806444486645238749\ 30358907296290491560440772390713810515859307960866\ 70172427121883998797908792274921901699720888093776\ 65727333001053367881220235421809751254540594752243\ 52584907711670556013604839586446706324415722155397\ 53697817977846174064955149290862569321978468622482\ 83972241375657056057490261407972968652414535100474\ 82166370484403199890008895243450658541227588666881\ 16427171479924442928230863465674813919123162824586\ 17866458359124566529476545682848912883142607690042\ 24219022671055626321111109370544217506941658960408\ 07198403850962455444362981230987879927244284909188\ 84580156166097919133875499200524063689912560717606\ 05886116467109405077541002256983155200055935729725\ 71636269561882670428252483600823257530420752963450' max = 0 for i in xrange(0, len(number) - 5): nums = [int(x) for x in number[i:i+5]] val = reduce(lambda agg, x: agg*x, nums) if val > max: max = val print max print "Elapsed Time:", (time.time() - start) * 1000, "millisecs" a=raw_input('Press return to continue')

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  • Why’s (Poignant) Guide to Ruby

    - by Ben Griswold
    You’re familiar with O’Reilly’s brilliant Head First Series, right?  Great.  Then you know how every book begins with an explanation of the Head First teaching style and you know the teaching format which Kathy Sierra and Bert Bates developed is based on research in cognitive science, neurobiology and educational psychology and it’s all about making learning visual and conversational and attractive and emotional and it’s highly effective.  Anyway, it’s a great series and you should read every last one of the books. Moving on… I’ve been wanting to learn more about Ruby and Why’s (Poignant) Guide to Ruby has been on my reading list for a while and there was talk about cartoon foxes and other silliness and I figured Why’s (Poignant) Guide to Ruby probably takes the same unorthodox teaching style as the Head First books – and that’s great – so I read the book, in piecemeal, over the last couple of weeks and, well, I figured wrong. Now having read the book, here’s my take on Why’s (Poignant) Guide – it’s very creative and clever and it does a darn good job of introducing one to Ruby.  If you’re interested in Ruby or simply interested, the online book is worth your time.  If you’re thinking (like me) that cartoon foxes will be doing the teaching, that’s simple not the case.  However, the cartoons and the random stories in the sidebar may serve a purpose. Unlike the Head First books where images and captions are used to further explain the teachings, the cartoons and stories in Why’s Guide serve as intermission and offer your brain a brief moment of rest before the next Ruby concept is explained.  It’s not a bad strategy, but definitely not as effective as the Head First techniques.  

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  • Managing .NET External Dependencies

    - by Ben Griswold
    Noah and I continue our screencast series by sharing our approach to managing external dependencies referenced within a .NET solution.  This is another introductory episode but you might find a hidden gem in the short 4-minute clip.  ELMAH (Error Logging Modules and Handlers) is the external dependencies we are focusing on in the presentation.  If you are not familiar with ELMAH, this episode may be worth your time.   YouTube - Managing .NET External Dependencies This is one of our first screencasts.  If you have feedback, I’d love to hear it.

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  • Project Euler 12: (Iron)Python

    - by Ben Griswold
    In my attempt to learn (Iron)Python out in the open, here’s my solution for Project Euler Problem 12.  As always, any feedback is welcome. # Euler 12 # http://projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=12 # The sequence of triangle numbers is generated by adding # the natural numbers. So the 7th triangle number would be # 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 + 7 = 28. The first ten terms # would be: # 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 21, 28, 36, 45, 55, ... # Let us list the factors of the first seven triangle # numbers: # 1: 1 # 3: 1,3 # 6: 1,2,3,6 # 10: 1,2,5,10 # 15: 1,3,5,15 # 21: 1,3,7,21 # 28: 1,2,4,7,14,28 # We can see that 28 is the first triangle number to have # over five divisors. What is the value of the first # triangle number to have over five hundred divisors? import time start = time.time() from math import sqrt def divisor_count(x): count = 2 # itself and 1 for i in xrange(2, int(sqrt(x)) + 1): if ((x % i) == 0): if (i != sqrt(x)): count += 2 else: count += 1 return count def triangle_generator(): i = 1 while True: yield int(0.5 * i * (i + 1)) i += 1 triangles = triangle_generator() answer = 0 while True: num = triangles.next() if (divisor_count(num) >= 501): answer = num break; print answer print "Elapsed Time:", (time.time() - start) * 1000, "millisecs" a=raw_input('Press return to continue')

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  • Project Euler 52: Ruby

    - by Ben Griswold
    In my attempt to learn Ruby out in the open, here’s my solution for Project Euler Problem 52.  Compared to Problem 51, this problem was a snap. Brute force and pretty quick… As always, any feedback is welcome. # Euler 52 # http://projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=52 # It can be seen that the number, 125874, and its double, # 251748, contain exactly the same digits, but in a # different order. # # Find the smallest positive integer, x, such that 2x, 3x, # 4x, 5x, and 6x, contain the same digits. timer_start = Time.now def contains_same_digits?(n) value = (n*2).to_s.split(//).uniq.sort.join 3.upto(6) do |i| return false if (n*i).to_s.split(//).uniq.sort.join != value end true end i = 100_000 answer = 0 while answer == 0 answer = i if contains_same_digits?(i) i+=1 end puts answer puts "Elapsed Time: #{(Time.now - timer_start)*1000} milliseconds"

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  • Project Euler 17: (Iron)Python

    - by Ben Griswold
    In my attempt to learn (Iron)Python out in the open, here’s my solution for Project Euler Problem 17.  As always, any feedback is welcome. # Euler 17 # http://projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=17 # If the numbers 1 to 5 are written out in words: # one, two, three, four, five, then there are # 3 + 3 + 5 + 4 + 4 = 19 letters used in total. # If all the numbers from 1 to 1000 (one thousand) # inclusive were written out in words, how many letters # would be used? # # NOTE: Do not count spaces or hyphens. For example, 342 # (three hundred and forty-two) contains 23 letters and # 115 (one hundred and fifteen) contains 20 letters. The # use of "and" when writing out numbers is in compliance # with British usage. import time start = time.time() def to_word(n): h = { 1 : "one", 2 : "two", 3 : "three", 4 : "four", 5 : "five", 6 : "six", 7 : "seven", 8 : "eight", 9 : "nine", 10 : "ten", 11 : "eleven", 12 : "twelve", 13 : "thirteen", 14 : "fourteen", 15 : "fifteen", 16 : "sixteen", 17 : "seventeen", 18 : "eighteen", 19 : "nineteen", 20 : "twenty", 30 : "thirty", 40 : "forty", 50 : "fifty", 60 : "sixty", 70 : "seventy", 80 : "eighty", 90 : "ninety", 100 : "hundred", 1000 : "thousand" } word = "" # Reverse the numbers so position (ones, tens, # hundreds,...) can be easily determined a = [int(x) for x in str(n)[::-1]] # Thousands position if (len(a) == 4 and a[3] != 0): # This can only be one thousand based # on the problem/method constraints word = h[a[3]] + " thousand " # Hundreds position if (len(a) >= 3 and a[2] != 0): word += h[a[2]] + " hundred" # Add "and" string if the tens or ones # position is occupied with a non-zero value. # Note: routine is broken up this way for [my] clarity. if (len(a) >= 2 and a[1] != 0): # catch 10 - 99 word += " and" elif len(a) >= 1 and a[0] != 0: # catch 1 - 9 word += " and" # Tens and ones position tens_position_value = 99 if (len(a) >= 2 and a[1] != 0): # Calculate the tens position value per the # first and second element in array # e.g. (8 * 10) + 1 = 81 tens_position_value = int(a[1]) * 10 + a[0] if tens_position_value <= 20: # If the tens position value is 20 or less # there's an entry in the hash. Use it and there's # no need to consider the ones position word += " " + h[tens_position_value] else: # Determine the tens position word by # dividing by 10 first. E.g. 8 * 10 = h[80] # We will pick up the ones position word later in # the next part of the routine word += " " + h[(a[1] * 10)] if (len(a) >= 1 and a[0] != 0 and tens_position_value > 20): # Deal with ones position where tens position is # greater than 20 or we have a single digit number word += " " + h[a[0]] # Trim the empty spaces off both ends of the string return word.replace(" ","") def to_word_length(n): return len(to_word(n)) print sum([to_word_length(i) for i in xrange(1,1001)]) print "Elapsed Time:", (time.time() - start) * 1000, "millisecs" a=raw_input('Press return to continue')

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  • RUN 2012 Buenos Aires - Desarrollando para dispositivos móviles con HTML5 y ASP.NET

    - by MarianoS
    El próximo Viernes 23 de Marzo a las 8:30 hs en la Universidad Católica Argentina se realizará una nueva edición del Run en Buenos Aires, el evento Microsoft más importante del año. Particularmente, voy a estar junto con Rodolfo Finochietti e Ignacio Lopez presentando nuestra charla “Desarrollando para dispositivos móviles con HTML5 y ASP.NET” donde voy a presentar algunas novedades de ASP.NET MVC 4. Esta es la agenda completa de sesiones para Desarrolladores: Keynote: Un mundo de dispositivos conectados. Aplicaciones al alcance de tu mano: Windows Phone – Ariel Schapiro, Miguel Saez. Desarrollando para dispositivos móviles con HTML5 y ASP.NET – Ignacio Lopez, Rodolfo Finochietti, Mariano Sánchez. Servicios en la Nube con Windows Azure – Matias Woloski, Johnny Halife. Desarrollo Estilo Metro en Windows 8 – Martin Salias, Miguel Saez, Adrian Eidelman, Rubén Altman, Damian Martinez Gelabert. El evento es gratuito, con registro previo: http://bit.ly/registracionrunargdev

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  • Project Euler 11: (Iron)Python

    - by Ben Griswold
    In my attempt to learn (Iron)Python out in the open, here’s my solution for Project Euler Problem 11.  As always, any feedback is welcome. # Euler 11 # http://projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=11 # What is the greatest product # of four adjacent numbers in any direction (up, down, left, # right, or diagonally) in the 20 x 20 grid? import time start = time.time() grid = [\ [8,02,22,97,38,15,00,40,00,75,04,05,07,78,52,12,50,77,91,8],\ [49,49,99,40,17,81,18,57,60,87,17,40,98,43,69,48,04,56,62,00],\ [81,49,31,73,55,79,14,29,93,71,40,67,53,88,30,03,49,13,36,65],\ [52,70,95,23,04,60,11,42,69,24,68,56,01,32,56,71,37,02,36,91],\ [22,31,16,71,51,67,63,89,41,92,36,54,22,40,40,28,66,33,13,80],\ [24,47,32,60,99,03,45,02,44,75,33,53,78,36,84,20,35,17,12,50],\ [32,98,81,28,64,23,67,10,26,38,40,67,59,54,70,66,18,38,64,70],\ [67,26,20,68,02,62,12,20,95,63,94,39,63,8,40,91,66,49,94,21],\ [24,55,58,05,66,73,99,26,97,17,78,78,96,83,14,88,34,89,63,72],\ [21,36,23,9,75,00,76,44,20,45,35,14,00,61,33,97,34,31,33,95],\ [78,17,53,28,22,75,31,67,15,94,03,80,04,62,16,14,9,53,56,92],\ [16,39,05,42,96,35,31,47,55,58,88,24,00,17,54,24,36,29,85,57],\ [86,56,00,48,35,71,89,07,05,44,44,37,44,60,21,58,51,54,17,58],\ [19,80,81,68,05,94,47,69,28,73,92,13,86,52,17,77,04,89,55,40],\ [04,52,8,83,97,35,99,16,07,97,57,32,16,26,26,79,33,27,98,66],\ [88,36,68,87,57,62,20,72,03,46,33,67,46,55,12,32,63,93,53,69],\ [04,42,16,73,38,25,39,11,24,94,72,18,8,46,29,32,40,62,76,36],\ [20,69,36,41,72,30,23,88,34,62,99,69,82,67,59,85,74,04,36,16],\ [20,73,35,29,78,31,90,01,74,31,49,71,48,86,81,16,23,57,05,54],\ [01,70,54,71,83,51,54,69,16,92,33,48,61,43,52,01,89,19,67,48]] # left and right max, product = 0, 0 for x in range(0,17): for y in xrange(0,20): product = grid[y][x] * grid[y][x+1] * \ grid[y][x+2] * grid[y][x+3] if product > max : max = product # up and down for x in range(0,20): for y in xrange(0,17): product = grid[y][x] * grid[y+1][x] * \ grid[y+2][x] * grid[y+3][x] if product > max : max = product # diagonal right for x in range(0,17): for y in xrange(0,17): product = grid[y][x] * grid[y+1][x+1] * \ grid[y+2][x+2] * grid[y+3][x+3] if product > max: max = product # diagonal left for x in range(0,17): for y in xrange(0,17): product = grid[y][x+3] * grid[y+1][x+2] * \ grid[y+2][x+1] * grid[y+3][x] if product > max : max = product print max print "Elapsed Time:", (time.time() - start) * 1000, "millisecs" a=raw_input('Press return to continue')

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  • Project Euler 2: (Iron)Python

    - by Ben Griswold
    In my attempt to learn (Iron)Python out in the open, here’s my solution for Project Euler Problem 2.  As always, any feedback is welcome. # Euler 2 # http://projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=2 # Find the sum of all the even-valued terms in the # Fibonacci sequence which do not exceed four million. # Each new term in the Fibonacci sequence is generated # by adding the previous two terms. By starting with 1 # and 2, the first 10 terms will be: # 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, ... # Find the sum of all the even-valued terms in the # sequence which do not exceed four million. import time start = time.time() total = 0 previous = 0 i = 1 while i <= 4000000: if i % 2 == 0: total +=i # variable swapping removes the need for a temp variable i, previous = previous, previous + i print total print "Elapsed Time:", (time.time() - start) * 1000, "millisecs" a=raw_input('Press return to continue')

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  • Project Euler 19: (Iron)Python

    - by Ben Griswold
    In my attempt to learn (Iron)Python out in the open, here’s my solution for Project Euler Problem 19.  As always, any feedback is welcome. # Euler 19 # http://projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=19 # You are given the following information, but you may # prefer to do some research for yourself. # # - 1 Jan 1900 was a Monday. # - Thirty days has September, # April, June and November. # All the rest have thirty-one, # Saving February alone, # Which has twenty-eight, rain or shine. # And on leap years, twenty-nine. # - A leap year occurs on any year evenly divisible by 4, # but not on a century unless it is divisible by 400. # # How many Sundays fell on the first of the month during # the twentieth century (1 Jan 1901 to 31 Dec 2000)? import time start = time.time() import datetime sundays = 0 for y in range(1901,2001): for m in range(1,13): # monday == 0, sunday == 6 if datetime.datetime(y,m,1).weekday() == 6: sundays += 1 print sundays print "Elapsed Time:", (time.time() - start) * 1000, "millisecs" a=raw_input('Press return to continue')

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  • Project Euler 16: (Iron)Python

    - by Ben Griswold
    In my attempt to learn (Iron)Python out in the open, here’s my solution for Project Euler Problem 16.  As always, any feedback is welcome. # Euler 16 # http://projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=16 # 2^15 = 32768 and the sum of its digits is # 3 + 2 + 7 + 6 + 8 = 26. # What is the sum of the digits of the number 2^1000? import time start = time.time() print sum([int(i) for i in str(2**1000)]) print "Elapsed Time:", (time.time() - start) * 1000, "millisecs" a=raw_input('Press return to continue')

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