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  • which technology is best for a Facebook application Ruby on Rails or C# and ASP?

    - by Johnny
    hi, My friend and I want to write a Facebook application. We've narrowed down the list of possible technologies to Ruby on Rails and C# with ASP. Here are the pros and cons we've thought of. Cons: ASP - proprietary tools like Visual Studio etc. cost (lots of) money. We both don't know ASP (although we're not bad at C#). RoR - It's scripting so might be harder to maintain. My friend doesn't know RoR at all (but he's a fairly proficient programmer so will probably be able to pick it up quickly). Pros: ASP - Facebook has an official SDK for .NET. RoR - I know RoR. It's open source, free and has fast development time. What says the community? Is there something we haven't thought of?

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  • How to dump the screen programmatically?

    - by Johnny
    Is there way to dump the current screen to a bitmap in Android? And what about dump screen of other applications? For example, running a service background, the foreground app could send an intent to start the service, and capture the current screen and save as a bitmap.

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  • Is Spring hard compared to Ruby on Rails?

    - by johnny
    If I have no to little experience in either of them, but know enough Java and Ruby to be comfortable, is one framework harder to learn than the other? Is one easier to use for the beginner on these? I know it is hard to answer. Just looking for general thoughts on it.

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  • How can I get all children from a parent row in the same table?

    - by Johnny Freeman
    Let's say I have a table called my_table that looks like this: id | name | parent_id 1 | Row 1 | NULL 2 | Row 2 | NULL 3 | Row 3 | 1 4 | Row 4 | 1 5 | Row 5 | NULL 6 | Row 6 | NULL 7 | Row 7 | 8 8 | Row 8 | NULL 9 | Row 9 | 4 10 | Row 10 | 4 Basically I want my final array in PHP to look like this: Array ( [0] => Array ( [name] => Row 1 [children] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [name] => Row 3 [children] => ) [1] => Array ( [name] => Row 4 [children] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [name] => Row 9 [children] => ) [1] => Array ( [name] => Row 10 [children] => ) ) ) ) ) [1] => Array ( [name] => Row 2 [children] => ) [2] => Array ( [name] => Row 5 [children] => ) [3] => Array ( [name] => Row 6 [children] => ) [4] => Array ( [name] => Row 8 [children] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [name] => Row 7 [children] => ) ) ) ) So, I want it to get all of the rows where parent_id is null, then find all nested children recursively. Now here's the part that I'm having trouble with: How can this be done with 1 call to the database? I'm sure I could do it with a simple select statement and then have PHP make the array look like this but I'm hoping this can be done with some kind of fancy db joining or something like that. Any takers?

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  • check array against each other, to determine response

    - by Johnny
    So, I have an array that has 6 variables in it that I need to check against each other.. to determine what to return to the script calling the function.. All fields are of the datetime type from the database they are derived from. the fields: in1 out1 in2 out2 in3 out3 Array: Array( 'in1' => '2012-04-02 10:00:00), `out1` => '2012-04-02 14:00:00`, `in2` => '2012-04-02 14:30:00`, `out2` => '2012-04-02 18:00:00`, `in3` => NULL, `out3` => NULL ) the response: clocked_in or clocked_out What I need to figure out is, the best way to determine if the user is clocked in or clocked out by checking against this array.. so, if in1, out1 and in2 are not NULL then the user would be clocked in.. if in1 is not NULL but out1 is NULL then the user would be clocked out, etc.. Anyone have any ideas on the easiest way to achieve this without too many if statements? [WHAT WORKED] for ($i=1; $i <= 3; $i++) { if ($entities["in$i"] != NULL) { $ents = "clocked_in"; if ($entities["out$i"] != NULL) { $ents = "clocked_out"; } if ($entities["out3"] != NULL) { $ents = "day_done"; } } }

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  • Rails 3, Devise and custom controller action

    - by Johnny Klassy
    routes.rb match 'agencies/stub' => 'agencies#stub', :via => :get resources :agencies Here's the rake routes dump agencies_stub GET /agencies/stub(.:format) {:controller=>"agencies", :action=>"stub"} agencies GET /agencies(.:format) {:action=>"index", :controller=>"agencies"} POST /agencies(.:format) {:action=>"create", :controller=>"agencies"} new_agency GET /agencies/new(.:format) {:action=>"new", :controller=>"agencies"} edit_agency GET /agencies/:id/edit(.:format) {:action=>"edit", :controller=>"agencies"} agency GET /agencies/:id(.:format) {:action=>"show", :controller=>"agencies"} PUT /agencies/:id(.:format) {:action=>"update", :controller=>"agencies"} DELETE /agencies/:id(.:format) {:action=>"destroy", :controller=>"agencies"} Devise is setup to have all agenciesroutes only accessible as admin. The call I'm testing with is http://xyz:[email protected]:3000/agencies/stub but it doesn't authenticate properly, ie, it doesn't recognize it as admin and throws me back to the Devise login page. The creds are a valid admin account. I'm baffled and have no idea why this is happening. Any insights will be much appreciated.

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  • What do I use for a J2ee website?

    - by johnny
    Not sure if I asked this correctly. I am trying to see what I need to create an website that uses MVC and that connects to legacy multiple databases, brining back those database info into one page. I wanted the site to be MVC but am not sure where to begin. Do I use Spring? What do I use for an server? Jboss and apache? Hibernate? I'm just kind of lost on how to proceed. It's not a straight forward a asp.net mvc or a php framwork. A major concern is the collection of data from multiple legacy databases and bringing that data back into one page. Thanks.

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  • MapsActivity not beeing found

    - by Johnny Rottenweed
    I am trying to get a simple map displayed. This is what I have: package com.chance.squat; import com.chance.squat.R; import com.google.android.maps.MapActivity; import android.os.Bundle; public class Maps extends MapActivity { /** Called when the activity is first created. */ @Override public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) { super.onCreate(savedInstanceState); setContentView(R.layout.maps); } @Override protected boolean isRouteDisplayed() { return false; } } <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <com.google.android.maps.MapView xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" android:id="@+id/mapview" android:layout_width="fill_parent" android:layout_height="fill_parent" android:clickable="true" android:apiKey="A2:D9:A5:1C:21:6F:D7:44:47:23:31:EC:1A:98:EF:36" /> <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <manifest xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" package="com.chance.squat" android:versionCode="1" android:versionName="1.0"> <application android:icon="@drawable/icon" android:label="@string/app_name" android:theme="@style/CustomTheme"> <uses-library android:name="com.google.android.maps"/> <activity android:name=".MyApp" android:label="@string/app_name"> <intent-filter> <action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" /> <category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER" /> </intent-filter> </activity> <activity android:name="com.chance.squat.Search" android:label="@string/app_name"> <intent-filter> <action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" /> </intent-filter> </activity> <activity android:name="com.chance.squat.Add" android:label="@string/app_name"> <intent-filter> <action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" /> </intent-filter> </activity> <activity android:name="com.chance.squat.About" android:label="@string/app_name"> <intent-filter> <action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" /> </intent-filter> </activity> </application> <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.INTERNET"/> </manifest> I also have downloaded the Google APIs for version 8 and have set to build against them. My problem is it doesn't seem to find import com.google.android.maps.MapActivity and I don't know why or what the next step is. Can anyone help?

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  • Parsing XML file using a for loop

    - by Johnny Spintel
    I have been working on this program which inserts an XML file into a MYSQL database. I'm new to the whole .jar idea by inserting packages. Im having an issue with parse(), select(), and children(). Can someone inform me how I could fix this issue? Here is my stack trace and my program below: Exception in thread "main" java.lang.Error: Unresolved compilation problems: The method select(String) is undefined for the type Document The method children() is undefined for the type Element The method children() is undefined for the type Element The method children() is undefined for the type Element The method children() is undefined for the type Element at jdbc.parseXML.main(parseXML.java:28) import java.io.*; import java.sql.*; import org.jsoup.Jsoup; import org.w3c.dom.*; import javax.xml.parsers.*; public class parseXML{ public static void main(String xml) { try{ BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(new File("C:\\staff.xml"))); String line; StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); while((line=br.readLine())!= null){ sb.append(line.trim()); } Document doc = Jsoup.parse(line); StringBuilder queryBuilder; StringBuilder columnNames; StringBuilder values; for (Element row : doc.select("row")) { // Start the query queryBuilder = new StringBuilder("insert into customer("); columnNames = new StringBuilder(); values = new StringBuilder(); for (int x = 0; x < row.children().size(); x++) { // Append the column name and it's value columnNames.append(row.children().get(x).tagName()); values.append(row.children().get(x).text()); if (x != row.children().size() - 1) { // If this is not the last item, append a comma columnNames.append(","); values.append(","); } else { // Otherwise, add the closing paranthesis columnNames.append(")"); values.append(")"); } } // Add the column names and values to the query queryBuilder.append(columnNames); queryBuilder.append(" values("); queryBuilder.append(values); // Print the query System.out.println(queryBuilder); } }catch (Exception err) { System.out.println(" " + err.getMessage ()); } } }

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  • How do I center this form in css?

    - by johnny
    I have tried everything. I cannot get this centered on the screen. I am using ie 9 but it does the same in chrome. It just sits on the left of the webpage. Thank you for any help. <style type="text/css"> body { margin:50px 0px; padding:0px; text-align:center; align:center; } label,input { display: block; width: 150px; float: left; margin-bottom: 10px; } label { text-align: right; width: 75px; padding-right: 20px; } br { clear: left; } </style> </head> <body> <form name="Form1" action="mypage.asp" method="get"> <label for="name">Name</label> <input id="name" name="name"><br> <label for="address">Address</label> <input id="address" name="address"><br> <label for="city">City</label> <input id="city" name="city"><br> <input type="submit" name="submit" id="submit" value="submit" class="button" /> </form> </body>

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  • Silverlight Cream for February 06, 2011 -- #1042

    - by Dave Campbell
    In this Issue: Mike Taulty, Timmy Kokke, Laurent Bugnion, Arik Poznanski, Deyan Ginev, Deborah Kurata(-2-), Johnny Tordgeman, Roy Dallal, Jaime Rodriguez, Samuel Jack(-2-), James Ashley. Above the Fold: Silverlight: "Customizing Silverlight properties for Visual Designers" Timmy Kokke WP7: "Back button press when using webbrowser control in WP7" Jaime Rodriguez Expression Blend: "Blend Bits 21–Importing from Photoshop & Illustrator…" Mike Taulty From SilverlightCream.com: Blend Bits 21–Importing from Photoshop & Illustrator… Mike Taulty is up to 21 episodes on his Blend Bits sequence now, and this one is about using Blend's import capability, such as a .psd file with all the layers intact. Customizing Silverlight properties for Visual Designers Timmy Kokke has part 1 of 2 parts on making your Silverlight control properties in design surfaces such as Visual Studio designer or Expression Blend. An error when installing MVVM Light templates for VS10 Express Laurent Bugnion has released a new version of MVVMLight that resolves a problem with VS2010 Express version of the templates... no problem with anything else. Reading RSS items on Windows Phone 7 Arik Poznanski has a post up about reading RSS on a WP7, but better yet, he also has code for a helper class that you can grab, plus explanation of wiring it up. Integrating your Windows Phone unit tests with MSBuild #4: The WP7 Unit Test Application Deyan Ginev has a post up about Telerik's WP7 test app that outputs test results in XML from the emulator so they can be integrated with the MSBuild log. Accessing Data in a Silverlight Application: EF I apprently missed this post by Deborah Kurata last week on bringing data into your Silverlight app via Entity Frameworks... good detailed tutorial in VB and C#. Updating Data in a Silverlight Application: EF In Deborah Kurata's latest post, she is continuing with Entity Frameworks by demonstrating updating to the database... full source code will be produced in a later post. Fun with Silverlight and SharePoint 2010 Ribbon Control - Part 2 - An In Depth Look At The Ribbon Control Johnny Tordgeman has Part 2 of his Silverlight and Sharepoint 2010 Ribbon up... taking a deep-dive into the ribbon... great explanation of the attributes, code included. Geographic Coordinates Systems Roy Dallal has some Geo code up that's not necessarily Silverlight, but very cool if you're doing any GIS programming... ya gotta know the coordinate systems! Back button press when using webbrowser control in WP7 Jaime Rodriguez has a post up discussing the much-lamented back-button action in the certification requirements and how to deal with that in a web browser app. Multiplayer-enabling my Windows Phone 7 game: Day 1 Samuel Jack challenged himself to build a WP7 game in 3 days... now he's challenging himself to make it multiplayer in 3 days... this first hour-to-hour post is research of networking and an azure server-side solution. Multiplayer-enabling my Windows Phone 7 game: Day 2–Building a UI with XPF Day 2 for Samuel Jack getting the multiplayer portion of his game working in 3 days.. this day involves getting up-to-speed with XPF. How to Hotwire your WP7 Phone Battery Did you realize if you run your WP7 battery completely down that you can't charge it? James Ashley reports that circumstance, and how he resolved it. Stay in the 'Light! Twitter SilverlightNews | Twitter WynApse | WynApse.com | Tagged Posts | SilverlightCream Join me @ SilverlightCream | Phoenix Silverlight User Group Technorati Tags: Silverlight    Silverlight 3    Silverlight 4    Windows Phone MIX10

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  • C# HashSet<T>

    - by Ben Griswold
    I hadn’t done much (read: anything) with the C# generic HashSet until I recently needed to produce a distinct collection.  As it turns out, HashSet<T> was the perfect tool. As the following snippet demonstrates, this collection type offers a lot: // Using HashSet<T>: // http://www.albahari.com/nutshell/ch07.aspx var letters = new HashSet<char>("the quick brown fox");   Console.WriteLine(letters.Contains('t')); // true Console.WriteLine(letters.Contains('j')); // false   foreach (char c in letters) Console.Write(c); // the quickbrownfx Console.WriteLine();   letters = new HashSet<char>("the quick brown fox"); letters.IntersectWith("aeiou"); foreach (char c in letters) Console.Write(c); // euio Console.WriteLine();   letters = new HashSet<char>("the quick brown fox"); letters.ExceptWith("aeiou"); foreach (char c in letters) Console.Write(c); // th qckbrwnfx Console.WriteLine();   letters = new HashSet<char>("the quick brown fox"); letters.SymmetricExceptWith("the lazy brown fox"); foreach (char c in letters) Console.Write(c); // quicklazy Console.WriteLine(); The MSDN documentation is a bit light on HashSet<T> documentation but if you search hard enough you can find some interesting information and benchmarks. But back to that distinct list I needed… // MSDN Add // http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb353005.aspx var employeeA = new Employee {Id = 1, Name = "Employee A"}; var employeeB = new Employee {Id = 2, Name = "Employee B"}; var employeeC = new Employee {Id = 3, Name = "Employee C"}; var employeeD = new Employee {Id = 4, Name = "Employee D"};   var naughty = new List<Employee> {employeeA}; var nice = new List<Employee> {employeeB, employeeC};   var employees = new HashSet<Employee>(); naughty.ForEach(x => employees.Add(x)); nice.ForEach(x => employees.Add(x));   foreach (Employee e in employees) Console.WriteLine(e); // Returns Employee A Employee B Employee C The Add Method returns true on success and, you guessed it, false if the item couldn’t be added to the collection.  I’m using the Linq ForEach syntax to add all valid items to the employees HashSet.  It works really great.  This is just a rough sample, but you may have noticed I’m using Employee, a reference type.  Most samples demonstrate the power of the HashSet with a collection of integers which is kind of cheating.  With value types you don’t have to worry about defining your own equality members.  With reference types, you do. internal class Employee {     public int Id { get; set; }     public string Name { get; set; }       public override string ToString()     {         return Name;     }          public bool Equals(Employee other)     {         if (ReferenceEquals(null, other)) return false;         if (ReferenceEquals(this, other)) return true;         return other.Id == Id;     }       public override bool Equals(object obj)     {         if (ReferenceEquals(null, obj)) return false;         if (ReferenceEquals(this, obj)) return true;         if (obj.GetType() != typeof (Employee)) return false;         return Equals((Employee) obj);     }       public override int GetHashCode()     {         return Id;     }       public static bool operator ==(Employee left, Employee right)     {         return Equals(left, right);     }       public static bool operator !=(Employee left, Employee right)     {         return !Equals(left, right);     } } Fortunately, with Resharper, it’s a snap. Click on the class name, ALT+INS and then follow with the handy dialogues. That’s it. Try out the HashSet<T>. It’s good stuff.

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  • ASP.NET MVC Custom Profile Provider

    - by Ben Griswold
    It’s been a long while since I last used the ASP.NET Profile provider. It’s a shame, too, because it just works with very little development effort: Membership tables installed? Check. Profile enabled in web.config? Check. SqlProfileProvider connection string set? Check.  Profile properties defined in said web.config file? Check. Write code to set value, read value, build and test. Check. Check. Check.  Yep, I thought the built-in Profile stuff was pure gold until I noticed how the user-based information is persisted to the database. It’s stored as xml and, well, that was going to be trouble if I ever wanted to query the profile data.  So, I have avoided the super-easy-to-use ASP.NET Profile provider ever since, until this week, when I decided I could use it to store user-specific properties which I am 99% positive I’ll never need to query against ever.  I opened up my ASP.NET MVC application, completed steps 1-4 (above) in about 3 minutes, started writing my profile get/set code and that’s where the plan broke down.  Oh yeah. That’s right.  Visual Studio auto-generates a strongly-type Profile reference for web site projects but not for ASP.NET MVC or Web Applications.  Bummer. So, I went through the steps of getting a customer profile provider working in my ASP.NET MVC application: First, I defined a CurrentUser routine and my profile properties in a custom Profile class like so: using System.Web.Profile; using System.Web.Security; using Project.Core;   namespace Project.Web.Context {     public class MemberPreferencesProfile : ProfileBase     {         static public MemberPreferencesProfile CurrentUser         {             get             {                 return (MemberPreferencesProfile)                     Create(Membership.GetUser().UserName);             }         }           public Enums.PresenceViewModes? ViewMode         {             get { return ((Enums.PresenceViewModes)                     ( base["ViewMode"] ?? Enums.PresenceViewModes.Category)); }             set { base["ViewMode"] = value; Save(); }         }     } } And then I replaced the existing profile configuration web.config with the following: <profile enabled="true" defaultProvider="MvcSqlProfileProvider"          inherits="Project.Web.Context.MemberPreferencesProfile">        <providers>     <clear/>     <add name="MvcSqlProfileProvider"          type="System.Web.Profile.SqlProfileProvider, System.Web,          Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a"          connectionStringName="ApplicationServices" applicationName="/"/>   </providers> </profile> Notice that profile is enabled, I’ve defined the defaultProvider and profile is now inheriting from my custom MemberPreferencesProfile class.  Finally, I am now able to set and get profile property values nearly the same way as I did with website projects: viewMode = MemberPreferencesProfile.CurrentUser.ViewMode; MemberPreferencesProfile.CurrentUser.ViewMode = viewMode;

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  • Issue Creating SQL Login for AppPoolIdentity on Windows Server 2008

    - by Ben Griswold
    IIS7 introduced the option to run your application pool as AppPoolIdentity. With the release of IIS7.5, AppPoolIdentity was promoted to the default option.  You see this change if you’re running Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2.  On my Windows 7 machine, I’m able to define my Application Pool Identity and then create an associated database login via the SQL Server Management Studio interface.  No problem.  However, I ran into some troubles when recently installing my web application onto a Windows Server 2008 R2 64-bit machine.  Strange, but the same approach failed as SSMS couldn’t find the AppPoolIdentity user.  Instead of using the tools, I created and executed the login via script and it worked fine.  Here’s the script, based off of the DefaultAppPool identity, if the same happens to you: CREATE LOGIN [IIS APPPOOL\DefaultAppPool] FROM WINDOWS WITH DEFAULT_DATABASE=[master] USE [Chinook] CREATE USER [IIS APPPOOL\DefaultAppPool] FOR LOGIN [IIS APPPOOL\DefaultAppPool]

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  • Deploy ASP.NET Web Applications with Web Deployment Projects

    - by Ben Griswold
    One may quickly build and deploy an ASP.NET web application via the Publish option in Visual Studio.  This option works great for most simple deployment scenarios but it won’t always cut it.  Let’s say you need to automate your deployments. Or you have environment-specific configuration settings. Or you need to execute pre/post build operations when you do your builds.  If so, you should consider using Web Deployment Projects. The Web Deployment Project type doesn’t come out-of-the-box with Visual Studio 2008.  You’ll need to Download Visual Studio® 2008 Web Deployment Projects – RTW and install if you want to follow along with this tutorial. I’ve created a shiny new ASP.NET MVC project.  Web Deployment Projects work with websites, web applications and MVC projects so feel free to go with any web project type you’d like.  Once your web application is in place, it’s time to add the Web Deployment project.  You can hunt and peck around the File > New > New Project… dialogue as long as you’d like, but you aren’t going to find what you need.  Instead, select the web project and then choose the “Add Web Deployment Project…” hiding behind the Build menu option. I prefer to name my projects based on the environment in which I plan to deploy.  In this case, I’ll be rolling to the QA machine. Don’t expect too much to happen at this point.  A seemingly empty project with a funny icon will be added to your solution.  That’s it. I want to take a minute and talk about configuration settings before we continue.  Some of the common settings which might change from environment to environment are appSettings, connectionStrings and mailSettings.  Here’s a look at my updated web.config: <appSettings>   <add key="MvcApplication293.Url" value="http://localhost:50596/" />     </appSettings> <connectionStrings>   <add name="ApplicationServices"        connectionString="data source=.\SQLEXPRESS;Integrated Security=SSPI;AttachDBFilename=|DataDirectory|aspnetdb.mdf;User Instance=true"        providerName="System.Data.SqlClient"/> </connectionStrings>   <system.net>   <mailSettings>     <smtp from="[email protected]">         <network host="server.com" userName="username" password="password" port="587" defaultCredentials="false"/>     </smtp>   </mailSettings> </system.net> I want to update these values prior to deploying to the QA environment.  There are variations to this approach, but I like to maintain environment-specific settings for each of the web.config sections in the Config/[Environment] project folders.  I’ve provided a screenshot of the QA environment settings below. It may be obvious what one should include in each of the three files.  Basically, it is a copy of the associated web.config section with updated setting values.  For example, the AppSettings.config file may include a reference to the QA web url, the DB.config would include the QA database server and login information and the StmpSettings.config would include a QA Stmp server and user information. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?> <appSettings>   <add key="MvcApplication293.Url" value="http://qa.MvcApplicatinon293.com/" /> </appSettings> AppSettings.config  <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?> <connectionStrings>   <add name="ApplicationServices"        connectionString="server=QAServer;integrated security=SSPI;database=MvcApplication293"        providerName="System.Data.SqlClient"/>   </connectionStrings> Db.config  <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?> <smtp from="[email protected]">     <network host="qaserver.com" userName="qausername" password="qapassword" port="587" defaultCredentials="false"/> </smtp> SmtpSettings.config  I think our web project is ready to deploy.  Now, it’s time to concentrate on the Web Deployment Project itself.  Right-click on the project file and open the Property Pages. The first thing to call out is the Configuration dropdown.  I only deploy a project which is built in Release Mode so I only setup the Web Deployment Project for this mode.  (This is when you change the Configuration selection to “Release.”)  I typically keep the Output Folder default value – .\Release\.  When the application is built, all artifacts will be dropped in the .\Release\ folder relative to the Web Deployment Project root.  The final option may be up for some debate.  I like to roll out updatable websites so I select the “Allow this precompiled site to be updatable” option.  I really do like to follow standard SDLC processes when I release my software but there are those times when you just have to make a hotfix to production and I like to keep this option open if need be.  If you are strongly opposed to this idea, please, by all means, don’t check the box. The next tab is boring.  I don’t like to deploy a crazy number of DLLs so I merge all outputs to a single assembly.  Again, you may have another option and feel free to change this selection if you so wish. If you follow my lead, take care when choosing a single assembly name.  The Assembly Name can not be the same as the website or any other project in your solution otherwise you’ll receive a circular reference build error.  In other words, I can’t name the assembly MvcApplication293 or my output window would start yelling at me. Remember when we called out our QA configuration files?  Click on the Deployment tab and you’ll see how where going to use them.  Notice the Web.config file section replacements value.  All this does is swap called out web.config sections with the content of the Config\QA\* files.  You can reduce or extend this list as you deem fit.  Did you see the “Use external configuration source file” option?  You know how you can point any of your web.config sections to an external file via the configSource attribute?  This option allows you to leverage that technique and instead of replacing the content of the sections, you will replace the configSource attribute value instead. <appSettings configSource="Config\QA\AppSettings.config" /> Go ahead and Apply your changes.  I’d like to take a look at the project file we just updated.  Right-click on the Web Deployment Project and select “Open Project File.” One of the first configuration blocks reflects core Release build settings.  There are a couple of points I’d like to call out here: DebugSymbols=false ensures the compilation debug attribute in your web.config is flipped to false as part of build process.  There’s some crumby (more likely old) documentation which implies you need a ToggleDebugCompilation task to make this happen.  Nope. Just make sure the DebugSymbols is set to false.  EnableUpdateable implies a single dll for the web application rather than a dll for each object and and empty view file. I think updatable applications are cleaner and include the benefit (or risk based on your perspective) that portions of the application can be updated directly on the server.  I called this out earlier but I wanted to reiterate. <PropertyGroup Condition=" '$(Configuration)|$(Platform)' == 'Release|AnyCPU' ">     <DebugSymbols>false</DebugSymbols>     <OutputPath>.\Release</OutputPath>     <EnableUpdateable>true</EnableUpdateable>     <UseMerge>true</UseMerge>     <SingleAssemblyName>MvcApplication293</SingleAssemblyName>     <DeleteAppCodeCompiledFiles>true</DeleteAppCodeCompiledFiles>     <UseWebConfigReplacement>true</UseWebConfigReplacement>     <ValidateWebConfigReplacement>true</ValidateWebConfigReplacement>     <DeleteAppDataFolder>true</DeleteAppDataFolder>   </PropertyGroup> The next section is self-explanatory.  The content merely reflects the replacement value you provided via the Property Pages. <ItemGroup Condition="'$(Configuration)|$(Platform)' == 'Release|AnyCPU'">     <WebConfigReplacementFiles Include="Config\QA\AppSettings.config">       <Section>appSettings</Section>     </WebConfigReplacementFiles>     <WebConfigReplacementFiles Include="Config\QA\Db.config">       <Section>connectionStrings</Section>     </WebConfigReplacementFiles>     <WebConfigReplacementFiles Include="Config\QA\SmtpSettings.config">       <Section>system.net/mailSettings/smtp</Section>     </WebConfigReplacementFiles>   </ItemGroup> You’ll want to extend the ItemGroup section to include the files you wish to exclude from the build.  The sample ExcludeFromBuild nodes exclude all obj, svn, csproj, user, pdb artifacts from the build. Enough though they files aren’t included in your web project, you’ll need to exclude them or they’ll show up along with required deployment artifacts.  <ItemGroup Condition="'$(Configuration)|$(Platform)' == 'Release|AnyCPU'">     <WebConfigReplacementFiles Include="Config\QA\AppSettings.config">       <Section>appSettings</Section>     </WebConfigReplacementFiles>     <WebConfigReplacementFiles Include="Config\QA\Db.config">       <Section>connectionStrings</Section>     </WebConfigReplacementFiles>     <WebConfigReplacementFiles Include="Config\QA\SmtpSettings.config">       <Section>system.net/mailSettings/smtp</Section>     </WebConfigReplacementFiles>     <ExcludeFromBuild Include="$(SourceWebPhysicalPath)\obj\**\*.*" />     <ExcludeFromBuild Include="$(SourceWebPhysicalPath)\**\.svn\**\*.*" />     <ExcludeFromBuild Include="$(SourceWebPhysicalPath)\**\.svn\**\*" />     <ExcludeFromBuild Include="$(SourceWebPhysicalPath)\**\*.csproj" />     <ExcludeFromBuild Include="$(SourceWebPhysicalPath)\**\*.user" />     <ExcludeFromBuild Include="$(SourceWebPhysicalPath)\bin\*.pdb" />     <ExcludeFromBuild Include="$(SourceWebPhysicalPath)\Notes.txt" />   </ItemGroup> Pre/post build and Pre/post merge tasks are added to the final code block.  By default, your project file should look like the following – a completely commented out section. <!– To modify your build process, add your task inside one of        the targets below and uncomment it. Other similar extension        points exist, see Microsoft.WebDeployment.targets.   <Target Name="BeforeBuild">   </Target>   <Target Name="BeforeMerge">   </Target>   <Target Name="AfterMerge">   </Target>   <Target Name="AfterBuild">   </Target>   –> Update the section to remove all temporary Config folders and files after the build.  <!– To modify your build process, add your task inside one of        the targets below and uncomment it. Other similar extension        points exist, see Microsoft.WebDeployment.targets.     <Target Name="BeforeMerge">   </Target>   <Target Name="AfterMerge">   </Target>     <Target Name="BeforeBuild">      </Target>       –>   <Target Name="AfterBuild">     <!– WebConfigReplacement requires the Config files. Remove after build. –>     <RemoveDir Directories="$(OutputPath)\Config" />   </Target> That’s it for setup.  Save the project file, flip the solution to Release Mode and build.  If there’s an issue, consult the Output window for details.  If all went well, you will find your deployment artifacts in your Web Deployment Project folder like so. Both the code source and published application will be there. Inside the Release folder you will find your “published files” and you’ll notice the Config folder is no where to be found.  In the Source folder, all project files are found with the exception of the items which were excluded from the build. I’ll wrap up this tutorial by calling out a little Web Deployment pet peeve of mine: there doesn’t appear to be a way to add an existing web deployment project to a solution.  The best I can come up with is create a new web deployment project and then copy and paste the contents of the existing project file into the new project file.  It’s not a big deal but it bugs me. Download the Solution

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  • Render MVCContrib Grid with No Header Row

    - by Ben Griswold
    The MVCContrib Grid allows for the easy construction of HTML tables for displaying data from a collection of Model objects. I add this component to all of my ASP.NET MVC projects.  If you aren’t familiar with what the grid has to offer, it’s worth the looking into. What you may notice in the busy example below is the fact that I render my column headers independent of the grid contents.  This allows me to keep my headers fixed while the user searches through the table content which is displayed in a scrollable div*.  Thus, I needed a way to render my grid without headers. That’s where Grid Renderers come into play.  <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" class="projectHeaderTable">     <tr>         <td class="memberTableMemberHeader">             <%= Html.GridColumnHeader("Member", "Index", "MemberFullName")%>              </td>         <td class="memberTableRoleHeader">             <%= Html.GridColumnHeader("Role", "Index", "ProjectRoleTypeName")%>              </td>                <td class="memberTableActionHeader">             Action         </td>     </tr> </table> <div class="scrollContentWrapper"> <% Html.Grid(Model)     .Columns(column =>             {                 column.For(c => c.MemberFullName).Attributes(@class => "memberTableMemberCol");                 column.For(c => c.ProjectRoleTypeName).Attributes(@class => "memberTableRoleCol");                 column.For(x => Html.ActionLink("View", "Details", new { Id = x.ProjectMemberId }) + " | " +                                 Html.ActionLink("Edit", "Edit", new { Id = x.ProjectMemberId }) + " | " +                                 Html.ActionLink("Remove", "Delete", new { Id = x.ProjectMemberId }))                     .Attributes(@class => "memberTableActionCol").DoNotEncode();             })     .Empty("There are no members associated with this project.")     .Attributes(@class => "lbContent")     .RenderUsing(new GridNoHeaderRenderer<ProjectMemberDetailsViewModel>())     .Render(); %> </div> <div class="scrollContentBottom">     <!– –> </div> <%=Html.Pager(Model) %> Maybe you noticed the reference to the GridNoHeaderRenderer class above?  Yep, rendering the grid with no header is straightforward.   public class GridNoHeaderRenderer<T> :     HtmlTableGridRenderer<T> where T: class {     protected override bool RenderHeader()     {         // Explicitly returning true would suppress the header         // just fine, however, Render() will always assume that         // items exist in collection and RenderEmpty() will         // never be called.           // In other words, return ShouldRenderHeader() if you         // want to maintain the Empty text when no items exist.         return ShouldRenderHeader();     } } Well, if you read through the comments, there is one catch.  You might be tempted to have the RenderHeader method always return true.  This would work just fine but you should return the result of ShouldRenderHeader() instead so the Empty text will continue to display if there are no items in the collection. The GridRenderer feature found in the MVCContrib Grid is so well put together, I just had to share.  * Though you can find countless alternatives to the fixed headers problem online, this is the only solution that I’ve ever found to reliably work across browsers. If you know something I don’t, please share.

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  • Getting Started with ASP.NET Membership, Profile and RoleManager

    - by Ben Griswold
    A new ASP.NET MVC project includes preconfigured Membership, Profile and RoleManager providers right out of the box.  Try it yourself – create a ASP.NET MVC application, crack open the web.config file and have a look.  First, you’ll find the ApplicationServices database connection: <connectionStrings>   <add name="ApplicationServices"        connectionString="data source=.\SQLEXPRESS;Integrated Security=SSPI;AttachDBFilename=|DataDirectory|aspnetdb.mdf;User Instance=true"        providerName="System.Data.SqlClient"/> </connectionStrings>   Notice the connection string is referencing the aspnetdb.mdf database hosted by SQL Express and it’s using integrated security so it’ll just work for you without having to call out a specific database login or anything. Scroll down the file a bit and you’ll find each of the three noted sections: <membership>   <providers>     <clear/>     <add name="AspNetSqlMembershipProvider"          type="System.Web.Security.SqlMembershipProvider, System.Web, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a"          connectionStringName="ApplicationServices"          enablePasswordRetrieval="false"          enablePasswordReset="true"          requiresQuestionAndAnswer="false"          requiresUniqueEmail="false"          passwordFormat="Hashed"          maxInvalidPasswordAttempts="5"          minRequiredPasswordLength="6"          minRequiredNonalphanumericCharacters="0"          passwordAttemptWindow="10"          passwordStrengthRegularExpression=""          applicationName="/"             />   </providers> </membership>   <profile>   <providers>     <clear/>     <add name="AspNetSqlProfileProvider"          type="System.Web.Profile.SqlProfileProvider, System.Web, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a"          connectionStringName="ApplicationServices"          applicationName="/"             />   </providers> </profile>   <roleManager enabled="false">   <providers>     <clear />     <add connectionStringName="ApplicationServices" applicationName="/" name="AspNetSqlRoleProvider" type="System.Web.Security.SqlRoleProvider, System.Web, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a" />     <add applicationName="/" name="AspNetWindowsTokenRoleProvider" type="System.Web.Security.WindowsTokenRoleProvider, System.Web, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a" />   </providers> </roleManager> Really. It’s all there. Still don’t believe me.  Run the application, walk through the registration process and finally login and logout.  Completely functional – and you didn’t have to do a thing! What else?  Well, you can manage your users via the Configuration Manager which is hiding in Visual Studio behind Projects > ASP.NET Configuration. The ASP.NET Web Site Administration Tool isn’t MVC-specific (neither is the Membership, Profile or RoleManager stuff) but it’s neat and I hardly ever see anyone using it.  Here you can set up and edit users, roles, and set access permissions for your site. You can manage application settings, establish your SMTP settings, configure debugging and tracing, define default error page and even take your application offline.  The UI is rather plain-Jane but it works great. And here’s the best of all.  Let’s say you, like most of us, don’t want to run your application on top of the aspnetdb.mdf database.  Let’s suppose you want to use your own database and you’d like to add the membership stuff to it.  Well, that’s easy enough. Take a look inside your [drive:]\%windir%\Microsoft.Net\Framework\v2.0.50727\ folder.  Here you’ll find a bunch of files.  If you were to run the InstallCommon.sql, InstallMembership.sql, InstallRoles.sql and InstallProfile.sql files against the database of your choices, you’d be installing the same membership, profile and role artifacts which are found in the aspnet.db to your own database.  Too much trouble?  Okay. Run [drive:]\%windir%\Microsoft.Net\Framework\v2.0.50727\aspnet_regsql.exe from the command line instead.  This will launch the ASP.NET SQL Server Setup Wizard which walks you through the installation of those same database objects into the new or existing database of your choice. You may not always have the luxury of using this tool on your destination server, but you should use it whenever you can.  Last tip: don’t forget to update the ApplicationServices connectionstring to point to your custom database after the setup is complete. At the risk of sounding like a smarty, everything I’ve mentioned in this post has been around for quite a while. The thing is that not everyone has had the opportunity to use it.  And it makes sense. I know I’ve worked on projects which used custom membership services.  Why bother with the out-of-the-box stuff, right?   And the .NET framework is so massive, who can know it all. Well, eventually you might have a chance to architect your own solution using any implementation you’d like or you will have the time to play around with another aspect of the framework.  When you do, think back to this post.

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  • Learn Behavior-Driven Development

    - by Ben Griswold
    In this presentation, I provided a brief introduction into TDD and talked about the confusion and misconceptions around the discipline. I, of course, shared a bit about Dan North, the father of BDD and touched upon some crazy hypothesis dreamed up by Sapir and Whorf. I then gave a Behavior Driven Development overview (my impressions of the implementation and lifecycle) and then touched upon available tools, how to get started and I threw in a number of reference and reading materials which you will find below. As an added bonus, I demonstrated how easy it is to include/exclude hyphens and alter the spelling of “behavior” at will.   Introducing BDD, Dan North Oredev 2007 – Behaviour-Driven Development, Dan North Behavior-Driven Development, Scott Bellware Behavior Driven Development, Wikipedia BDD Wiki A New Look at Test-Driven Development, Dave Astels Behavior Driven Development – An Evolution in Testing, Bob Cotton The Truth about BDD, Uncle Bob Martin Language and Thought, Wikipedia Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis, Wikipedia What’s in a Story?, Dan North

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  • ASP.NET MVC HandleError Attribute

    - by Ben Griswold
    Last Wednesday, I took a whopping 15 minutes out of my day and added ELMAH (Error Logging Modules and Handlers) to my ASP.NET MVC application.  If you haven’t heard the news (I hadn’t until recently), ELMAH does a killer job of logging and reporting nearly all unhandled exceptions.  As for handled exceptions, I’ve been using NLog but since I was already playing with the ELMAH bits I thought I’d see if I couldn’t replace it. Atif Aziz provided a quick solution in his answer to a Stack Overflow question.  I’ll let you consult his answer to see how one can subclass the HandleErrorAttribute and override the OnException method in order to get the bits working.  I pretty much took rolled the recommended logic into my application and it worked like a charm.  Along the way, I did uncover a few HandleError fact to which I wasn’t already privy.  Most of my learning came from Steven Sanderson’s book, Pro ASP.NET MVC Framework.  I’ve flipped through a bunch of the book and spent time on specific sections.  It’s a really good read if you’re looking to pick up an ASP.NET MVC reference. Anyway, my notes are found a comments in the following code snippet.  I hope my notes clarify a few things for you too. public class LogAndHandleErrorAttribute : HandleErrorAttribute {     public override void OnException(ExceptionContext context)     {         // A word from our sponsors:         //      http://stackoverflow.com/questions/766610/how-to-get-elmah-to-work-with-asp-net-mvc-handleerror-attribute         //      and Pro ASP.NET MVC Framework by Steven Sanderson         //         // Invoke the base implementation first. This should mark context.ExceptionHandled = true         // which stops ASP.NET from producing a "yellow screen of death." This also sets the         // Http StatusCode to 500 (internal server error.)         //         // Assuming Custom Errors aren't off, the base implementation will trigger the application         // to ultimately render the "Error" view from one of the following locations:         //         //      1. ~/Views/Controller/Error.aspx         //      2. ~/Views/Controller/Error.ascx         //      3. ~/Views/Shared/Error.aspx         //      4. ~/Views/Shared/Error.ascx         //         // "Error" is the default view, however, a specific view may be provided as an Attribute property.         // A notable point is the Custom Errors defaultRedirect is not considered in the redirection plan.         base.OnException(context);           var e = context.Exception;                  // If the exception is unhandled, simply return and let Elmah handle the unhandled exception.         // Otherwise, try to use error signaling which involves the fully configured pipeline like logging,         // mailing, filtering and what have you). Failing that, see if the error should be filtered.         // If not, the error simply logged the exception.         if (!context.ExceptionHandled                || RaiseErrorSignal(e)                   || IsFiltered(context))                  return;           LogException(e); // FYI. Simple Elmah logging doesn't handle mail notifications.     }

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  • Learn Lean Software Development and Kanban Systems

    - by Ben Griswold
    I did an in-house presentation on Lean Software Development (LSD) and Kanban Systems this week.  Beyond what I had previously learned from various podcasts, I knew little about either topic prior to compiling my slide deck.  In the process of building my presentation, I learned a ton.  I found the concepts weren’t very difficult to grok; however, I found little detailed information was available online. Hence this post which is merely a list of valuable resources. Principles of Lean Thinking, Mary Poppendieck Lean Software Development, May Poppendieck Lean Programming, Mary Poppendieck Lean Software Development, Wikipedia Implementing Lean Software Thinking: From Concept to Cash, Poppendieck Lean Software Development Overview, Darrell Norton Lean Thinking: Banish Waste and Create Wealth in Your Corporation The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement The Toyota Way Extreme Toyota: Radical Contradictions That Drive Success at the World’s Best Manufacturer Elegant Code Cast 17 – David Laribee on Lean / Kanban Herding Code Episode 42: Scott Bellware on BDD and Lean Development Seven Principles of Lean Software Development, Przemys?aw Bielicki Kanban Boards for Agile Project Management with Zen Author Nate Kohari Herding Code 55: Nate Kohari brings Your Moment of Zen James Shore on Kanban Systems Agile Zen Product Site A Leaner Form of Agile, David Laribee Kanban as Alternative Agile Implementation, Mark Levison Lean Software Development, Dr. Christoph Steindl Glossary of Lean Manufacturing Terms Why Pull? Why Kanban?, Corey Ladas

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  • Learn Domain-Driven Design

    - by Ben Griswold
    I just wrote about how I like to present on unfamiliar topics. With this said, Domain-Driven Design (DDD) is no exception. This is yet another area I knew enough about to be dangerous but I certainly was no expert.  As it turns out, researching this topic wasn’t easy. I could be wrong, but it is as if DDD is a secret to which few are privy. If you search the Interwebs, you will likely find little information about DDD until you start rolling over rocks to find that one great write-up, a handful of podcasts and videos and the Readers’ Digest version of the Blue Book which apparently you must read if you really want to get the complete, unabridged skinny on DDD.  Even Wikipedia’s write-up is skimpy which I didn’t know was possible…   Here’s a list of valuable resources.  If you, too, are interested in DDD, this is a good starting place.  Domain-Driven Design: Tackling Complexity in the Heart of Software by Eric Evans Domain-Driven Design Quickly, by Abel Avram & Floyd Marinescu An Introduction to Domain-Driven Design by David Laribee Talking Domain-Driven Design with David Laribee Part 1, Deep Fried Bytes Talking Domain-Driven Design with David Laribee Part 2, Deep Fried Bytes Eric Evans on Domain Driven Design, .NET Rocks Domain-Driven Design Community Eric Evans on Domain Driven Design Jimmy Nilsson on Domain Driven Design Domain-Driven Design Wikipedia What I’ve Learned About DDD Since the Book, Eric Evans Domain Driven Design, Alt.Net Podcast Applying Domain-Driven Design and Patterns: With Examples in C# and .NET, Jimmy Nilsson Domain-Driven Design Discussion Group DDD: Putting the Model to Work by Eric Evans The Official DDD Site

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  • Website Vulnerabilities

    - by Ben Griswold
    The folks at the Open Web Application Security Project publish a list of the top 10 vulnerabilities. In a recent CodeBrew I provided a quick overview of them all and spent a good amount of time focusing on the most prevalent vulnerability, Cross Site Scripting (XSS).  I gave an overview of XSS, stepped through a quick demo (sorry vulnerable site), reviewed the three XSS variations and talked a bit about how to protect one’s site.  References and reading materials were also included in the presentation and, look at that, they are provided here too. Open Web Application Security Project The OWASP Top Ten Vulnerabilities (pdf) OWASP List of Vulnerabilities The 56 Geeks Project by Scott Johnson ha.ckers.org OWASP XSS Prevention Cheat Sheet Wikipedia Is XSS Solvable?, Don Ankney The Anatomy of Cross Site Scripting, Gavin Zuchlinski

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  • Learn Cloud Computing – It’s Time

    - by Ben Griswold
    Last week, I gave an in-house presentation on cloud computing.  I walked through an overview of cloud computing – characteristics (on demand, elastic, fully managed by provider), why are we interested (virtualization, distributed computing, increased access to high-speed internet, weak economy), various types (public, private, virtual private cloud) and services models (IaaS, PaaS, SaaS.)  Though numerous providers have emerged in the cloud computing space, the presentation focused on Amazon, Google and Microsoft offerings and provided an overview of their platforms, costs, data tier technologies, management and security.  One of the biggest talking points was why developers should consider the cloud as part of their deployment strategy: You only have to pay for what you consume You will be well-positioned for one time event provisioning You will reap the benefits of automated growth and scalable technologies For the record: having deployed dozens of applications on various platforms over the years, pricing tends to be the biggest customer concern.  Yes, scalability is a customer consideration, too, but it comes in distant second.  Boy do I hope you’re still reading… You may be thinking, “Cloud computing is well and good and it sounds catchy, but should I bother?  After all, it’s just another technology bundle which I’m supposed to ramp up on because it’s the latest thing, right?”  Well, my clients used to be 100% reliant upon me to find adequate hosting for them.  Now I find they are often aware of cloud services and some come to me with the “possibility” that deploying to the cloud is the best solution for them.  It’s like the patient who walks into the doctor’s office with their diagnosis and treatment already in mind thanks to the handful of Internet searches they performed earlier that day.  You know what?  The customer may be correct about the cloud. It may be a perfect fit for their app.  But maybe not…  I don’t think there’s a need to learn about every technical thing under the sun, but if you are responsible for identifying hosting solutions for your customers, it is time to get up to speed on cloud computing and the various offerings (if you haven’t already.)  Here are a few references to get you going: DZone Refcardz #82 Getting Started with Cloud Computing by Daniel Rubio Wikipedia Cloud Computing – What is it? Amazon Machine Images (AMI) Google App Engine SDK Azure SDK EC2 Spot Pricing Google App Engine Team Blog Amazon EC2 Team Blog Microsoft Azure Team Blog Amazon EC2 – Cost Calculator Google App Engine – Cost and Billing Resources Microsoft Azure – Cost Calculator Larry Ellison has stated that cloud computing has been defined as "everything that we currently do" and that it will have no effect except to "change the wording on some of our ads" Oracle launches worldwide cloud-computing tour NoSQL Movement  

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  • jQuery Context Menu Plugin and Capturing Right-Click

    - by Ben Griswold
    I was thrilled to find Cory LaViska’s jQuery Context Menu Plugin a few months ago. In very little time, I was able to integrate the context menu with the jQuery Treeview.  I quickly had a really pretty user interface which took full advantage of limited real estate.  And guess what.  As promised, the plugin worked in Chrome, Safari 3, IE 6/7/8, Firefox 2/3 and Opera 9.5.  Everything was perfect and I shipped to the Integration Environment. One thing kept bugging though – right clicks aren’t the standard in a web environment. Sure, when one hovers over the treeview node, the mouse changed from an arrow to a pointer, but without help text most users will certainly left-click rather than right. As I was already doubting the design decision, we did some Mac testing.  The context menu worked in Firefox but not Safari.  Damn.  That’s when I started digging into the Madness of Javascript Mouse Events.  Don’t tell, but it’s complicated.  About as close as one can get to capture the right-click mouse event on all major browsers on Windows and Mac is this: if (event.which == null) /* IE case */ button= (event.button < 2) ? "LEFT" : ((event.button == 4) ? "MIDDLE" : "RIGHT"); else /* All others */ button= (event.which < 2) ? "LEFT" : ((event.which == 2) ? "MIDDLE" : "RIGHT"); Yikes.  The content menu code was simply checking if event.button == 2.  No problem.  Cory offers a jQuery Right Click Plugin which I’m sure works for windows but probably not the Mac either.  (Please note I haven’t verified this.) Anyway, I decided to address my UI design concern and the Safari Mac issue in one swoop.  I decided to make the context menu respond to any mouse click event.  This didn’t take much – especially after seeing how Bill Beckelman updated the library to recognize the left click. First, I added an AnyClick option to the library defaults: // Any click may trigger the dropdown and that's okay // See Javascript Madness: Mouse Events – http: //unixpapa.com/js/mouse.html if (o.anyClick == undefined) o.anyClick = false; And then I trigger the context menu dropdown based on the following conditional: if (evt.button == 2 || o.anyClick) { Nothing tricky about that, right?  Finally, I updated my menu setup to include the AnyClick value, if true: $('.member').contextMenu({ menu: 'memberContextMenu', anyClick: true },             function (action, el, pos) {                 … Now the context menu works in “all” environments if you left, right or even middle click.  Download jQuery Context Menu Plugin for Any Click *Opera 9.5 has an option to allow scripts to detect right-clicks, but it is disabled by default. Furthermore, Opera still doesn’t allow JavaScript to disable the browser’s default context menu which causes a usability conflict.

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  • ASP.NET Membership Provider Setup

    - by Ben Griswold
    In this screencast, Noah and I show you how to quickly get started with the ASP.NET Membership Provider.  We’ll take you through basic features and setup and walk you through membership table creation with the ASP.NET SQL Server Wizard. I’ve written about the ASP.NET Membership Provider and setup before.  If you missed the post, this introductory video may be for you.     This is one of our first screencasts.  If you have feedback, I’d love to hear it.

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