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  • Small Business Server 2008 - Microsoft Windows Search or Microsoft Search Server 2020 Express

    - by Christopher Edwards
    See Also - Small (Business) Server - Microsoft Windows Search or Microsoft Search Server 2008 Express Can anyone tell me if they have Search Server Express 2010 Beta working on Small Business Server 2010, or indeed if it is supported. The only reference I can find is here, but given how scant it is I'm not sure I should trust it:- http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en/sharepoint2010setup/thread/12cf9846-b940-4441-9fc1-30016ea87e5c

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  • How to Build a Tagging System For Blogs

    In this article I will cover the basics of how to create a tagging system as seen on other blogs. This system will also have the function of adjusting font size depending on the number of articles that have said tag.

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  • SEO Practices - Comments on Blogs

    I have been creating web pages for some time and have spent considerable time researching SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) techniques, and as the owner of several blogs have always wondered about one of the techniques. Quoted from the results of a recent Google search on "SEO Blog Comments":

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  • Most Popular Blogs Share 3 Common Characteristics

    Some of the most popular blogs on the internet have gained their loyal following for reason other than what you would think. No doubt the quality of content found in the blog posting of a site has a ... [Author: TJ Philpott - Computers and Internet - April 16, 2010]

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  • Books / blogs that discuss service excellence? [closed]

    - by Bogdan Gavril
    I'm looking for information about service excellence topics such as: 0 downtime deployment how to deal with versioning (backward and forward compatibility) environment strategies (how many staging envs ? etc.) performance testing testing in production monitoring I am looking at the Microsoft stack, but the concepts should be the same everywhere. Do you have any recommendations of books or blogs on the subject? PS: I have found some good articles from I.M.Wright's "Hard Code" blog. Anything else?

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  • How to Write Blogs to Improve SEO

    Writing content for a website can often feel like a bit of a chore but it is an absolute necessity to ensure that your website promotes your company in the correct manner. From a search engine optimisation point of view though, there are other elements that need to be addressed when creating and posting blogs to improve your SEO.

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  • Starting a Blog using Microsoft.Net technologies

    - by manav inder
    I want to start a blog using Microsoft technologies. My primary reason is to get more in-sync with technologies which are very much in demand. It does not matter how steep is the learning curve as long I am willing to devote all the time in the world. There are lot going on like Microsoft WebAPI, Dot net nuke MVC SPA etc. Let me tell you what i know I have very good experience in developing database driven .net application using winforms and wpf. Average experience in asp.net and asp.net mvc. Good in entity framework, ado.net and wcf rest services. Good in IoC/DI.

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  • Downloading Microsoft Security Essentials via https

    - by Marcel
    I want to download Microsoft Security Essentials on my brand new Windows 7 home PC. The official site presented to me is http://windows.microsoft.com/de-CH/windows/products/security-essentials, as I am located in Switzerland. The link to the actual package then is http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=231276 Obviously, the download is not secured with https. Why? Would this not be the first thing Microsoft should do? They could deliver the certificate already with the OS to make it really secure...

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  • The Windows Azure Software Development Kit (SDK) and the Windows Azure Training Kit (WATK)

    - by BuckWoody
    Windows Azure is a platform that allows you to write software, run software, or use software that we've already written. We provide lots of resources to help you do that - many can be found right here in this blog series. There are two primary resources you can use, and it's important to understand what they are and what they do. The Windows Azure Software Development Kit (SDK) Actually, this isn't one resource. We have SDK's for multiple development environments, such as Visual Studio and also Eclipse, along with SDK's for iOS, Android and other environments. Windows Azure is a "back end", so almost any technology or front end system can use it to solve a problem. The SDK's are primarily for development. In the case of Visual Studio, you'll get a runtime environment for Windows Azure which allows you to develop, test and even run code all locally - you do not have to be connected to Windows Azure at all, until you're ready to deploy. You'll also get a few samples and codeblocks, along with all of the libraries you need to code with Windows Azure in .NET, PHP, Ruby, Java and more. The SDK is updated frequently, so check this location to find the latest for your environment and language - just click the bar that corresponds to what you want: http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/develop/downloads/ The Windows Azure Training Kit (WATK) Whether you're writing code, using Windows Azure Virtual Machines (VM's) or working with Hadoop, you can use the WATK to get examples, code, PowerShell scripts, PowerPoint decks, training videos and much more. This should be your second download after the SDK. This is all of the training you need to get started, and even beyond. The WATK is updated frequently - and you can find the latest one here: http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/develop/net/other-resources/training-kit/     There are many other resources - again, check the http://windowsazure.com site, the community newsletter (which introduces the latest features), and my blog for more.

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  • JSR Updates - Multiple JSRs migrate to latest JCP version

    - by Heather VanCura
    As part of the JCP.Next reform effort, many JSRs have migrated to the latest version of the JCP program in the last month.  These JSRs' Spec Leads and Expert Groups are contributing to the strides the JCP has been making to enable greater community transparency, participation and agility to the working of the JSR development through the JCP program. Any other JSR Spec Leads interested in migrating to the latest JCP version, now JCP 2.9, as of 13 November, incorporating the Merged Executive Committee (EC), see the Spec Lead Guide for instructions on migrating to the latest JCP version.  For JCP 2.8 JSRs, you are effectively already operating under JCP 2.9 since there are no longer two ECs.  This is the difference for JCP 2.8 JSRs migrating to JCP 2.9 -- a merged EC.  To make the migration official, just inform your Expert Group on a public channel and email your request to admin at jcp.org. JSR 310, Date and Time API, led by Stephen Colebourne and Michael Nascimento and Oracle (Roger Riggs)  JSR 349, Bean Valirdation 1.1, led by RedHat (Emmanuel Bernard) JSR 350, Java State Management, led by Oracle (Mitch Upton) JSR 339, JAX-RS 2.0: The Java API for RESTful Web Services, led by Oracle, (Santiago Pericas-Geertsen and Marek Potociar) JSR 347, Data Grids for the Java Platform, led by RedHat (Manik Surtani)

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  • WebCenter News, Best Practices & Resources: Check Out the Latest Oracle WebCenter Newsletter

    - by Christie Flanagan
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Check out the latest edition of the Oracle Information InDepth Newsletter featuring the latest Oracle WebCenter news, best practices and resources. In this issue, you’ll find: Five best practices for application integration from Oracle expert, John Brunswick A video demonstrating how to employ the advanced segmentation and targeting features in Oracle WebCenter Sites The latest webcasts and events on how to engage your customers and empower your business with Oracle WebCenter Want to get the newsletter delivered directly to your inbox? Subscribe here.

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  • C# development with Mono and MonoDevelop

    - by developerit
    In the past two years, I have been developing .NET from my MacBook by running Windows XP into VM Ware and more recently into Virtual Box from OS X. This way, I could install Visual Studio and be able to work seamlessly. But, this way of working has a major down side: it kills the battery of my laptop… I can easiely last for 3 hours if I stay in OS X, but can only last 45 min when XP is running. Recently, I gave MonoDevelop a try for developing Developer IT‘s tools and web site. While being way less complete then Visual Studio, it provides essentials tools when it comes to developping software. It works well with solutions and projects files created from Visual Studio, it has Intellisence (word completion), it can compile your code and can even target your .NET app to linux or unix. This tools can save me a lot of time and batteries! Although I could not only work with MonoDevelop, I find it way better than a simple text editor like Smultron. Thanks to Novell, we can now bring Microsoft technology to OS X.

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  • Microsoft Tech-Ed North America 2010 - SQL Server Upgrade, 2000 - 2005 - 2008: Notes and Best Practi

    - by ssqa.net
    It is just a week to go for Tech-Ed North America 2010 in New Orleans, this time also I'm speaking at this conference on the subject - SQL Server Upgrade, 2000 - 2005 - 2008: Notes and Best Practices from the Field... more from here .. It is a coincedence that this is the 2nd time the same talk has been selected in Tech-Ed North America for the topic I have presented in SQLBits before....(read more)

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  • Getting started with Blocks and namespaces - Enterprise Library 5.0 Tutorial Part 2

    This is my second post in this series. In first blog post I explained how to install Enterprise Library 5.0 and provided links to various resources. Enterprise Library is divided into various blocks. Simply we can say, a block is a ready made solution for a particular common problem across various applications. So instead focusing on implementation of common problem across various applications, we can reuse these fully tested and extendable blocks to increase the productivity and also extendibility as these blocks are made with good design principles and patterns. Major blocks of Enterprise Library 5.0 are as follows.   Core infrastructure Functional Application Blocks Caching Data Exception Handling Logging Security Cryptography Validation Wiring Application Blocks Unity Policy Injection/Interception   Each block resides in its own assembly, and also some extra assemblies for common infrastructure. Assemblies are as follows. Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Caching.Cryptography.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Caching.Database.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Caching.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Common.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Configuration.Design.HostAdapter.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Configuration.Design.HostAdapterV5.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Configuration.DesignTime.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Configuration.EnvironmentalOverrides.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Data.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Data.SqlCe.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.Logging.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.WCF.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.Database.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.PolicyInjection.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Security.Cache.CachingStore.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Security.Cryptography.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Security.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation.Integration.AspNet.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation.Integration.WCF.dll Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation.Integration.WinForms.dll Microsoft.Practices.ServiceLocation.dll Microsoft.Practices.Unity.Configuration.dll Microsoft.Practices.Unity.dll Microsoft.Practices.Unity.Interception.dll Enterprise Library Configuration Tool In addition to these assemblies you would get configuration tool “EntLibConfig-32.exe”. If you are targeting your application to .NET 4.0 framework then you would need to use “EntLibConfig.NET4.exe”. Optionally you can install Visual Studio 2008 and Visual Studio 2010 add-ins whilst installing of Enterprise Library. So that you can invoke the enterprise Library configuration from Visual Studio by right clicking on “app.config” or “web.config” file as shown below. I would suggest you to download the documentation from Codeplex which was released on May 2010. It consists 3MB of information. you can also find issue tracker to know various issues/bugs currently people talking about enterprise library. There is also discussion link takes you to community site where you can post your questions. In my next blog post, I would cover more on each block. span.fullpost {display:none;}

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  • Microsoft SDET position

    - by Mark
    I was curious about MS's SDET position. I've heard a lot of people speak negatively and positively about this position. I was wondering if any current or previous SDETs could comment on a couple of issues. 1) Is career development in any way hurt by this position within and outside of MS? 1.5) Is it harder to get hired as a developer at another company after being an SDET? 2) Within MS culture, how is the SDET position viewed with respect to PM or SDE? Is it respected or looked down upon? 3) If you worked as an SDET, did you like it?

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  • How do I install the latest Mesa release?

    - by Nickolai Leschov
    Which is the preferred way to install the latest stable version of Mesa on Ubuntu? I believe that would be a PPA, but not the bleeding-edge one like xorg-edgers. I would like to see a PPA that contains the latest stable release. Right now 10.3 has reached Release Candidate stage and development branched to 10.4, so the latest stable version is 10.2. Soon 10.3 will become the latest stable version and I'd like a PPA that would follow that. For comparison, xorg-edgers contains 10.3.0~git20140821 and oibaf has 10.4~git1408211930.

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  • Microsoft Access 2010: How to Format Reports

    While Access 2010 provides of multitude of functionality, it is its easy to use nature that is perhaps even more impressive. It comes with an intuitive interface that allows you to take full control after playing around with the program for a bit and becoming acquainted with its features. Still, you may be completely new to the program and are looking for some guidance on how to execute certain tasks. That is what this tutorial intends to do, as we look at a few different options you have when it comes to formatting reports. So, before we jump into formatting a report, let's discuss some of...

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  • Microsoft Access 2010: How to Add, Edit, and Delete Data in Tables

    Tables are such an integral part of databases and corresponding tasks in Access 2010 because they act as the centers that hold all the data. They may be basic in format, but their role is undeniably important. So, to get you up to speed on working with tables, let's begin adding, editing, and deleting data. These are very standard tasks that you will need to employ from time to time, so it is a good idea to start learning how to execute them now. As is sometimes the case with our tutorials, we will be working with a specific sample. To learn the tasks, read over the tutorial and then apply...

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  • How to Create Forms in Microsoft Access 2010

    This tutorial will teach you how to create a form from a table in Access 2010, as well as a few added tips on how to insert additional fields and a drop-down menu into the form. The tutorial is basic, but it does lay a foundation that will increase your productivity and make life easier when it comes to Access 2010. Enough with the intro, let's get to the goods. From the navigation pane, select or highlight the table you want to use. Next, go to the Create tab and click on the Form icon. This will create a new form containing the fields from the table you originally selected. At ...

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  • Microsoft Declares the Future of ASP.NET is Web API

    - by sbwalker
    Sitting on a plane on my way home from Tech Ed 2012 in Orlando, I thought it would be a good time to jot down some key takeaways from this year’s conference. Some of these items I have known since the Microsoft MVP Summit which occurred in Redmond in late February ( but due to NDA restrictions I could not share them with the developer community at large ) and some of them are a result of insightful conversations with a wide variety of industry insiders and Microsoft employees at the conference. First, let’s travel back in time 4 years to the Microsoft MVP Summit in 2008. Microsoft was facing some heat from market newcomer Ruby on Rails and responded with a new web development framework of its own, ASP.NET MVC. At the Summit they estimated that MVC would only be applicable for ~10% of all new web development projects. Based on that prediction I questioned why they were investing such considerable resources for such a relative edge case, but my guess is that they felt it was an important edge case at the time as some of the more vocal .NET evangelists as well as some very high profile start-ups ( ie. Twitter ) had publicly announced their intent to use Rails. Microsoft made a lot of noise about MVC. In fact, they focused so much of their messaging and marketing hype around MVC that it appeared that WebForms was essentially dead. Yes, it may have been true that Microsoft continued to invest in WebForms, but from an outside perspective it really appeared that MVC was the only framework getting any real attention. As a result, MVC started to gain market share. An inside source at Microsoft told me that MVC usage has grown at a rate of about 5% per year and now sits at ~30%. Essentially by focusing so much marketing effort on MVC, Microsoft actually created a larger market demand for it.  This is because in the Microsoft ecosystem there is somewhat of a bandwagon mentality amongst developers. If Microsoft spends a lot of time talking about a specific technology, developers get the perception that it must be really important. So rather than choosing the right tool for the job, they often choose the tool with the most marketing hype and then try to sell it to the customer. In 2010, I blogged about the fact that MVC did not make any business sense for the DotNetNuke platform. This was because our ecosystem relied on third party extensions which were dependent on the WebForms model. If we migrated the core to MVC it would mean that all of the third party extensions would no longer be compatible, which would be an irresponsible business decision for us to make at the expense of our users and customers. However, this did not stop the debate from continuing to occur in our ecosystem. Clearly some developers had drunk Microsoft’s Kool-Aid about MVC and were of the mindset, to paraphrase an old Scottish saying, “If its not MVC, it’s crap”. Now, this is a rather ignorant position to take as most of the benefits of MVC can be achieved in WebForms with solid architecture and responsible coding practices. Clean separation of concerns, unit testing, and direct control over page output are all possible in the WebForms model – it just requires diligence and discipline. So over the past few years some horror stories have begun to bubble to the surface of software development projects focused on ground-up rewrites of web applications for the sole purpose of migrating from WebForms to MVC. These large scale rewrites were typically initiated by engineering teams with only a single argument driving the business decision, that Microsoft was promoting MVC as “the future”. These ill-fated rewrites offered no benefit to end users or customers and in fact resulted in a less stable, less scalable and more complicated systems – basically taking one step forward and two full steps back. A case in point is the announcement earlier this week that a popular open source .NET CMS provider has decided to pull the plug on their new MVC product which has been under active development for more than 18 months and revert back to WebForms. The availability of multiple server-side development models has deeply fragmented the Microsoft developer community. Some folks like to compare it to the age-old VB vs. C# language debate. However, the VB vs. C# language debate was ultimately more of a religious war because at least the two dominant programming languages were compatible with one another and could be used interchangeably. The issue with WebForms vs. MVC is much more challenging. This is because the messaging from Microsoft has positioned the two solutions as being incompatible with one another and as a result web developers feel like they are forced to choose one path or another. Yes, it is true that it has always been technically possible to use WebForms and MVC in the same project, but the tooling support has always made this feel “dirty”. The fragmentation has also made it difficult to attract newcomers as the perceived barrier to entry for learning ASP.NET has become higher. As a result many new software developers entering the market are gravitating to environments where the development model seems more simple and intuitive ( ie. PHP or Ruby ). At the same time that the Web Platform team was busy promoting ASP.NET MVC, the Microsoft Office team has been promoting Sharepoint as a platform for building internal enterprise web applications. Sharepoint has great penetration in the enterprise and over time has been enhanced with improved extensibility capabilities for software developers. But, like many other mature enterprise ASP.NET web applications, it is built on the WebForms development model. Similar to DotNetNuke, Sharepoint leverages a rich third party ecosystem for both generic web controls and more specialized WebParts – both of which rely on WebForms. So basically this resulted in a situation where the Web Platform group had headed off in one direction and the Office team had gone in another direction, and the end customer was stuck in the middle trying to figure out what to do with their existing investments in Microsoft technology. It really emphasized the perception that the left hand was not speaking to the right hand, as strategically speaking there did not seem to be any high level plan from Microsoft to ensure consistency and continuity across the different product lines. With the introduction of ASP.NET MVC, it also made some of the third party control vendors scratch their heads, and wonder what the heck Microsoft was thinking. The original value proposition of ASP.NET over Classic ASP was the ability for web developers to emulate the highly productive desktop development model by using abstract components for creating rich, interactive web interfaces. Web control vendors like Telerik, Infragistics, DevExpress, and ComponentArt had all built sizable businesses offering powerful user interface components to WebForms developers. And even after MVC was introduced these vendors continued to improve their products, offering greater productivity and a superior user experience via AJAX to what was possible in MVC. And since many developers were comfortable and satisfied with these third party solutions, the demand remained strong and the third party web control market continued to prosper despite the availability of MVC. While all of this was going on in the Microsoft ecosystem, there has also been a fundamental shift in the general software development industry. Driven by the explosion of Internet-enabled devices, the focus has now centered on service-oriented architecture (SOA). Service-oriented architecture is all about defining a public API for your product that any client can consume; whether it’s a native application running on a smart phone or tablet, a web browser taking advantage of HTML5 and Javascript, or a rich desktop application running on a PC. REST-based services which utilize the less verbose characteristics of JSON as a transport mechanism, have become the preferred approach over older, more bloated SOAP-based techniques. SOA also has the benefit of producing a cross-platform API, as every major technology stack is able to interact with standard REST-based web services. And for web applications, more and more developers are turning to robust Javascript libraries like JQuery and Knockout for browser-based client-side development techniques for calling web services and rendering content to end users. In fact, traditional server-side page rendering has largely fallen out of favor, resulting in decreased demand for server-side frameworks like Ruby on Rails, WebForms, and (gasp) MVC. In response to these new industry trends, Microsoft did what it always does – it immediately poured some resources into developing a solution which will ensure they remain relevant and competitive in the web space. This work culminated in a new framework which was branded as Web API. It is convention-based and designed to embrace native HTTP standards without copious layers of abstraction. This framework is designed to be the ultimate replacement for both the REST aspects of WCF and ASP.NET MVC Web Services. And since it was developed out of band with a dependency only on ASP.NET 4.0, it means that it can be used immediately in a variety of production scenarios. So at Tech Ed 2012 it was made abundantly clear in numerous sessions that Microsoft views Web API as the “Future of ASP.NET”. In fact, one Microsoft PM even went as far as to say that if we look 3-4 years into the future, that all ASP.NET web applications will be developed using the Web API approach. This is a fairly bold prediction and clearly telegraphs where Microsoft plans to allocate its resources going forward. Currently Web API is being delivered as part of the MVC4 package, but this is only temporary for the sake of convenience. It also sounds like there are still internal discussions going on in terms of how to brand the various aspects of ASP.NET going forward – perhaps the moniker of “ASP.NET Web Stack” coined a couple years ago by Scott Hanselman and utilized as part of the open source release of ASP.NET bits on Codeplex a few months back will eventually stick. Web API is being positioned as the unification of ASP.NET – the glue that is able to pull this fragmented mess back together again. The  “One ASP.NET” strategy will promote the use of all frameworks - WebForms, MVC, and Web API, even within the same web project. Basically the message is utilize the appropriate aspects of each framework to solve your business problems. Instead of navigating developers to a fork in the road, the plan is to educate them that “hybrid” applications are a great strategy for delivering solutions to customers. In addition, the service-oriented approach coupled with client-side development promoted by Web API can effectively be used in both WebForms and MVC applications. So this means it is also relevant to application platforms like DotNetNuke and Sharepoint, which means that it starts to create a unified development strategy across all ASP.NET product lines once again. And so what about MVC? There have actually been rumors floated that MVC has reached a stage of maturity where, similar to WebForms, it will be treated more as a maintenance product line going forward ( MVC4 may in fact be the last significant iteration of this framework ). This may sound alarming to some folks who have recently adopted MVC but it really shouldn’t, as both WebForms and MVC will continue to play a vital role in delivering solutions to customers. They will just not be the primary area where Microsoft is spending the majority of its R&D resources. That distinction will obviously go to Web API. And when the question comes up of why not enhance MVC to make it work with Web API, you must take a step back and look at this from the higher level to see that it really makes no sense. MVC is a server-side page compositing framework; whereas, Web API promotes client-side page compositing with a heavy focus on web services. In order to make MVC work well with Web API, would require a complete rewrite of MVC and at the end of the day, there would be no upgrade path for existing MVC applications. So it really does not make much business sense. So what does this have to do with DotNetNuke? Well, around 8-12 months ago we recognized the software industry trends towards web services and client-side development. We decided to utilize a “hybrid” model which would provide compatibility for existing modules while at the same time provide a bridge for developers who wanted to utilize more modern web techniques. Customers who like the productivity and familiarity of WebForms can continue to build custom modules using the traditional approach. However, in DotNetNuke 6.2 we also introduced a new Service Framework which is actually built on top of MVC2 ( we chose to leverage MVC because it had the most intuitive, light-weight REST implementation in the .NET stack ). The Services Framework allowed us to build some rich interactive features in DotNetNuke 6.2, including the Messaging and Notification Center and Activity Feed. But based on where we know Microsoft is heading, it makes sense for the next major version of DotNetNuke ( which is expected to be released in Q4 2012 ) to migrate from MVC2 to Web API. This will likely result in some breaking changes in the Services Framework but we feel it is the best approach for ensuring the platform remains highly modern and relevant. The fact that our development strategy is perfectly aligned with the “One ASP.NET” strategy from Microsoft means that our customers and developer community can be confident in their current and future investments in the DotNetNuke platform.

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