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  • We Found 100 Manufacturing Heros That Focus on Innovation!

    - by Stephen Slade
    There’s a good piece written by Ann Grackin of ChainLink Research on the Manufacturing Leadership 100 Awards program held recently in Palm Beach Fl, Apr 30-May 3, 2012.  This article (link below) highlights the summary of the Summit with specific focus on manufacturing innovation.  There were several informative keynotes and sessions from industrial leaders who are leveraging the latest tools and technologies to make better decisions. Ann writes that she was a panelist with Cindy Reese, SVP, Worldwide Operations, Oracle; and Steven Tungate, VP/GM, Supply Chain & Innovation, Toshiba America Business Solutions about Factories and Supply Networks of the Future. Ann writes “So what are these manufacturers doing? Significant rationalization of the supply base (Toshiba, especially, has this issue since they have a long history of many acquisitions), streamlining production to increase productivity, and looking for lower-cost countries for manufacturing….  No doubt firms have global customer bases, so they need to be present in these markets. However, a low-cost-country manufacturing source does introduce more risk in the supply chain. And that was discussed. Quality, security, and intellectual property protection were the critical global manufacturing issues also discussed. “Cindy (Reese) told a fascinating story about Oracle’s acquisition of Sun and the supply chain that was subsequently created. Here was one of the key points: Although Oracle sells on a global basis, they now do their own factory-installed software. This keeps potential ‘factory-installed malware’ from getting into the servers at contract manufacturers, and prevents pirated software. In this way, Oracle ensures that they deliver the quality and security people expect”. Learn more about the Manufacturing Leadership 100 program from Manufacturing Executive at: http://www.mlsummit.com/ Full Article Link:  http://www.clresearch.com/research/detail.cfm?guid=52327213-3048-79ED-99D4-E433DA64D4F0

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  • Farseer Physics Engine and the Ms-PL License

    - by Stephen Tierney
    Am I able to produce code for a game which uses the Farseer engine and release my code under an open source license other than the Ms-PL? My concern is with the following section from the license: If you distribute any portion of the software in source code form, you may do so only under this license by including a complete copy of this license with your distribution. If you distribute any portion of the software in compiled or object code form, you may only do so under a license that complies with this license. If I do not include Farseer in my source code distribution does this give me an exemption from this clause as I am not distributing the software? My code merely uses its functions. No where in the license does it force you to provide source code for derivative works or linking works, it simply gives you the option of "if you distribute".

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  • How many of you *really* surf around without JavaScript enabled? [closed]

    - by Stephen
    I've decided to rephrase the question. After some deliberation on Meta, I've realized that my question needs to be a bit more focused. The question: Should we (web developers) continue to spend effort progressively enhancing our web applications with JavaScript, ensuring that features gracefully degrade, thereby ensuring accessibility? Or should we spend that time focused on new features or other areas of development? The subtext of that question would be: How many of our customers/clients/users utilize our websites or applications with JavaScript disabled? Do you have any projects with requirements that specifically demand JavaScript functionality (almost all of mine do), and do those requirements also demand graceful degradation? For the sake of asking this question, I pulled up programmers.stackexchange.com without JavaScript enabled, and I was greeted with this message: "Programmers - Stack Exchange works best with JavaScript enabled". It was difficult to log in, albeit the site seemed to generally work okay. (I wasn't able to vote up any questions.) I think this is a satisfactory approach to development. Imagine the effort involved in making all of the site's features work with plain old HTML and server-side logic. OTOH, I wonder how many users have been alienated by this approach. We've all been trained (at least the good developers among us) to use progressive enhancement and to ensure our web applications' dynamic features degrade gracefully. Is this progressive enhancement just pissing into the wind, or do some of our customers actually utilize certain web services without JavaScript enabled? I mean, like really, not figuratively or presumptuously.

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  • How important is graceful degradation of JavaScript? [closed]

    - by Stephen
    Should web developers continue to spend effort progressively enhancing our web applications with JavaScript, ensuring that features gracefully degrade, thereby ensuring accessibility? Or should we spend that time focused on new features or other areas of development? The subtext of that question would be: How many of our customers/clients/users utilize our websites or applications with JavaScript disabled? Do you have any projects with requirements that specifically demand JavaScript functionality (almost all of mine do), and do those requirements also demand graceful degradation? For the sake of asking this question, I pulled up programmers.stackexchange.com without JavaScript enabled, and I was greeted with this message: "Programmers - Stack Exchange works best with JavaScript enabled". It was difficult to log in, albeit the site seemed to generally work okay. (I wasn't able to vote up any questions.) I think this is a satisfactory approach to development. Imagine the effort involved in making all of the site's features work with plain old HTML and server-side logic. On the other hand, I wonder how many users have been alienated by this approach. We've all been trained (at least the good developers among us) to use progressive enhancement and to ensure our web applications' dynamic features degrade gracefully. Is this progressive enhancement just pissing into the wind, or do some of our customers actually utilize certain web services without JavaScript enabled?

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  • Hear about Oracle Supply Chain at Pella, Apr 27-29 '10

    - by [email protected]
    Oracle Customer Showcase - Apr 27-29'10 Featuring Pella Corp. Delivering Greater Customer Value "Discovering the Lean Value Chain" Pella is once again hosting Oracle customers at a mega-reference event in Pella, Iowa, on April 27-29. The agenda features a cross-stack set of topics and issues, including strategies for delivering customer value, improving the customer experience, Value Chain Planning / Manufacturing / Enterprise Performance Management, and Lean practices. Several executives will keynote, including Pella CIO Steve Printz. The event includes a demo grounds, round-table discussion groups, plant tours, and networking opportunities. !  

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  • Asset and Work Management in Utilities: An Integrated Enterprise Success Story

    - by stephen.slade(at)oracle.com
    Jan 11 '11 Webcast: Utilities are turning to Oracle to deliver an integrated EAM platform that manages all of their assets from fleet to facilities and distribution to generation. Hear from solutions experts and from Sunflower Electric Power Corporation about how an integrated enterprise asset and work management system helped them deliver bottom line results Do you have different work management systems for generation, distribution, and transmission? Fleet maintenance? Facilities? Are you on the latest release of these products? Have you considered your options when the product is no longer supported? Do you struggle with integration and keeping the various systems "in balance"? Do you have trouble retrieving data from these disparate systems and getting an enterprise view of asset and work management operations? Utilities are challenged to better manage information on generation, transmission and distribution assets. Point solutions for Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) and Computerized Maintenance Management Systems (CMMS) are often effective as departmental solutions but have limited ability to deliver an enterprise solution with accessible business intelligence. Date:  January 11, 2011 @ 10am PT/1pm ET EVITE:  http://www.oracle.com/us/dm/h2fy11/63025-wwmk10040611mpp054c003-se-197386.html Register: HERE

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  • F# open source project hosting using SVN

    - by Stephen Swensen
    Hi all, I'm looking to choose open source project hosting site for an F# project using SVN. CodePlex is where the .NET community in general and most F# projects are hosted, but I'm worried TFS + SvnBridge is going to give me headaches. So I'm looking elsewhere and seeking advice here. Or if you think CodePlex is still the best choice in my scenario, I'd like to hear that too. So far, Google Code is looking appealing to me. They have a clean interface and true SVN hosting. But there are close to no F# projects currently hosted (it's not even in their search by programming language list), so I'm wondering if there are any notable downsides besides the lack of community I might encounter. If there is yet another option, I'd like to hear that too. Thanks!

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  • Running an a single action on multiple sprites at the same time

    - by Stephen
    Ok so I have created a spiraling animation for a football and I want to be able to run it on 2 sprites at the same time. This is what I have done. CCAnimation* footballAnim = [CCAnimation animationWithFrame:@"Football" frameCount:60 delay:0.005f]; spiral = [CCAnimate actionWithAnimation:footballAnim]; CCRepeatForever* repeat = [CCRepeatForever actionWithAction:spiral]; [Sprite1 runAction: repeat]; [Sprite2 runAction: repeat]; but it only runs the action on the first sprite. What am I doing wrong?

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  • I don't know C. And why should I learn it?

    - by Stephen
    My first programming language was PHP (gasp). After that I started working with JavaScript. I've recently done work in C#. I've never once looked at low or mid level languages like C. The general consensus in the programming-community-at-large is that "a programmer who hasn't learned something like C, frankly, just can't handle programming concepts like pointers, data types, passing values by reference, etc." I do not agree. I argue that: Because high level languages are easily accessible, more "non-programmers" dive in and make a mess, and In order to really get anything done in a high level language, one needs to understand the same similar concepts that most proponents of "learn-low-level-first" evangelize about. Some people need to know C. Those people have jobs that require them to write low to mid-level code. I'm sure C is awesome. I'm sure there are a few bad programmers who know C. My question is, why the bias? As a good, honest, hungry programmer, if I had to learn C (for some unforeseen reason), I would learn C. Considering the multitude of languages out there, shouldn't good programmers focus on learning what advances us? Shouldn't we learn what interests us? Should we not utilize our finite time moving forward? Why do some programmers disagree with this? I believe that striving for excellence in what you do is the fundamental deterministic trait between good programmers and bad ones. Does anyone have any real world examples of how something written in a high level language--say Java, Pascal, PHP, or Javascript--truely benefitted from a prior knowledge of C? Examples would be most appreciated. (revised to better coincide with the six guidelines.)

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  • Need help deciding if Joomla! experience as a good metric for hiring a particular prospective employee.

    - by Stephen
    My company has been looking to hire a PHP developer. Some of the requirements for the job include: an understanding of design patterns, particularly MVC. some knowledge of PHP 5.3's new features. experience working with a PHP framework (it doesn't matter which one). I interviewed a man today who's primary work experience involved working with Joomla!. As an employee, he will be required to work on existing and new web applications that use Zend Framework, CakePHP and/or CodeIgniter. It is my opinion that we shouldn't dismiss hiring a developer just because he has not used the same technologies that he'll be using on the job. So, I'd like to know about the kind of coding experience working with Joomla! can provide. I've never bothered to take more than a brief look (if that) at the Joomla! package, so I'm hoping to lean on the knowledge of my peers. Would you consider Joomla! to contain a professional code-base? Is the package well organized, and/or OO in general, or is it more like WordPress where logic and presentation are commingled? When working with Joomla!, is the developer encouraged to use best practices? In your opinion, would experience working with Joomla! garner the skills needed to get up to speed with Zend or CakePHP quickly, or will there be a steep learning curve ahead of the developer? I'm not saying that Joomla! is a bad technology, or even that it is lower on the totem pole when compared to the frameworks I've mentioned. Maybe it's awesome, I dunno. I simply have no idea!

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  • Force SSL and WWW in .htaccess

    - by Stephen
    I'm looking for a way to force SSL and WWW. I've been able to force both separately but together I keep running into redirection issues. The following code works when handling a url in this format: "http://domain.com" and properly redirects to "https://www.domain.com" but when the incoming url is "https://domain.com" it will not forward to "https://www.domain.com" -- Any suggestions? EDIT: it should also send "http://www.domain.com" to ""https://www.domain.com" RewriteCond %{REMOTE_ADDR} !127\.0\.0\.0 RewriteCond %{SERVER_PORT} 80 RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !^www.domain\.com$ RewriteRule ^(.*)$ https://www.domain.com/$1 [R,L]

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  • Whats after the iPAD?? check out the new Augmented Reality Glasses

    - by Stephen Slade
    Everyone loves their new iPad! The rich features, portability, plethora of apps and ease of use make this the new clipboard on the factory floor or electronic notebook for meetings. But how many business people walk into an hours meeting and really start typing notes on their PC?..yes some do, but for the general business public there are new technologies coming down the road. The iPad is the latest holla-hoop; and the next gen device I feel is the Augmented Reality Glasses. Your glasses will be your screen, have an earpiece, be wireless enabled, your smart watch be your electronics and maybe your belt can be an extended battery pack.  I'm anxious to test one of these. The TELEGRAPH writes:  "Android software is believed to power the gadget, enabling similar features to its smartphone and tablets. A 3G /4G data connection, motion sensors and GPS navigation are believed to be included in the device's capabilities. The augmented-reality glasses are the culmination of a two-year initiative called Project Glass, developed in the clandestine Google X lab, ..in Mountain View, ...The New York Times suggested they could cost between $250-$500 " http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/news/9187547/Google-unveils-augmented-reality-glasses.html

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  • Meta description not displaying in custom site search results page

    - by Stephen Connolly
    We have Google Custom Site Search implemented on our company website. When I'm looking at the results page, I noticed that the Meta Description is not being displayed. It just seems to be reading the links titles from our drop down menu and using this as a description. When I search for the same page via google.com, the meta description is pulled in correctly. Any thoughts why this might be happening. I can't see anything in the Custom Site Search settings.

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  • What is the correct way to install ATI Catalyst Video Drivers?

    - by Stephen Myall
    I am planning on doing a fresh install of 12.04 LTS and want to know what is the correct way to install ATI Catalyst Video Drivers in 12.04 LTS? In a previous AU question relating to 11.10 (here) NOT 12.04 the accepted response stated that ia32-libs was a dependency (even for 64bit machines). I studied other Q&A on AU and the reason for asking this specific question is that I wasn't sure about some of the dependencies needed. I was also receiving conflicting advice on other reputable websites which put doubts in my mind on what the correct approach was.

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  • Where should SQL/DB Queries be encapsulated in a software system?

    - by Stephen Bennet
    I frequently write small applications (either web based or otherwise) that require heavy database usage. i've attempted various ways of handling where to put the actual sql queries (sort of ad-hoc ORM systems). These include: Models that build themselves up - and only allowing SQL to be inside of a model. A sort of factory style method where the models are built by a factory class that is allowed to know about SQL. A third entity that maps models based on their fields/keys into the database and generates SQL code on the fly based on this. Is there a common knowledge of which method is best? Or another way I have missed? Clearly a lot of it will be based on the context of the system itself, which for me is usually to produce lightweight tools or utility frameworks. In experimenting, I've never found any of them that feel intuitively "right" and not clunky, but I also do not want to go for a full framework such as Django or Ruby - both because the tools I create are in a variety of languages and because they usually do not warrant that level of surrounding footprint.

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  • Dangers of two Jobs? Violating Company Policy?

    - by Stephen Furlani
    Hey, I'm working for a company full-time and myself part-time. I started learning the Mac OS/Cocoa/Objective-C at work, and then I got the "Brilliant Idea" that I'd like to program for the iPhone. The iPhone stuff is going well, but I'm earning money there because I'm applying skills I learned on the job. What is commonly considered violating company policy on things like this? Is there any danger of the company claiming 'ownership' of my side-job? If I leave the company, could they ask me to stop working at my side business? The company and my iphone stuff are in completely different "areas" but I'm still concerned. What can I do to make sure? What else should I be wary of? Has anyone run into bad stuff like this before? Thanks,

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  • What is the version numbering logic for open source developers managing software releases?

    - by Stephen Myall
    I guess this is more of a general question that I cant find the the answer to anywhere. What is the version numbering logic for open source developers managing software releases and is there any governance or guidance I can read up on. The origins of this question comes from me reviewing and researching software on countless websites that I would like to use on my Ubuntu OS. Through experience, I am learning some sites are much better than others explaining if a release is a stable, experimental or maintenance release but these explanations are not consistent with any version numbering logic I am familiar with.

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  • Can Near Field Communications (NFC) Benefit your Supply Chain?

    - by Stephen Slade
    Leading firms continue to leverage the latest tools and technologies to drive performance especially around minimizing transaction costs. With razor thin margins in manufacturing and distribution, the leading producers are resorting to Near Field Communications to gain efficiencies.  In this week’s CIO magazine (Apr1, 2012, pg.30, see http://www.cio.com)  Lauren Brousell talks of the things you need to know to make a more informed decision with NFC.  Sandy Shen of Gartner says NFC appeals because "it supports any services that requires data transfer and authentication' 1. NFC is Cheap and Easy - short range transmitting technology connecting smartphones to data transfer. 2. Adoption Seems Inevitable - more merchants will use NCF for payments in the futures. Wallets are becoming obsolete. 3. It's a Hot Potato for Enterprise - Business with credit card companies and cell phone providers are debating who handles the billing process. 4. It's in use Overseas. Japan uses FeliCa to pay by smartphone. In the US, billing agreements are causing territorial conflict. 5. Security Risks Come Standard. As people lose HH devices, security will be an ongoing concern. Credentials and timeout features and alleviate to some extent. My prediction: In 5 years, we won't have wallets in our pockets.  Our secure and all-powerful smart phones will be our electronic portable banks and execute the transaction for us based on our preferences and propensities and electronically execute the transaction for the supply chain.

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  • Hardware and Software Working Together - What Does LJE say?

    - by Stephen Slade
     IDG News Service - Oracle CEO Larry Ellison said Oracle will continue to bet on selling high-end custom hardware for its software products, even amidst a growing trend toward roomfuls of cheap, generic servers. "You have to be in the hardware business and the software business, to get the best possible system," he said during a keynote speech at Oracle's OpenWorld conference in Tokyo. "We believe it's the right idea, we believe it's the next generation of computing, we believe all the pieces have to fit together." Ellison, as he has often done in the past, repeatedly referred to Apple as his "favorite example" of such tight integration. He was a close friend of Apple's co-founder Steve Jobs and previously served on Apple's board of directors.He said sales of Oracle's advanced servers were booming and generating around a billion dollars a year in revenue for the company, which has until recent years focused almost exclusively on its software offerings. With the explosion of popular online services and the increasing number of mobile devices that access them, demand is high for databases that can quickly respond to high numbers of relatively simple queries. While Oracle is pitching its expensive, finely-tuned machines to meet this requirement, Internet behemoths like Google, Facebook and Microsoft increasingly rely on armies of low-cost, easily replaceable servers. Ellison emphasized the high specifications of Oracle's servers, which come packed with multiple terabytes of RAM and flash-based storage for speed. Such machines are superior to large server farms, he said, because they require far less electricity and floor space, and are also cost competitive. When asked about whether purchasing such products would lock customers in to expensive hardware from Oracle, he promised that the company's software would always run on "multiple hardware sources."  Ellison, who spoke from Kyoto, Japan's ancient capital, was shown live online via webcast. The Oracle founder has a fondness for Japanese architecture and is staying in his large garden residence in the city Source: Ellison: Hardware-software integration key, Apple is best example. Oracle's founder and CEO reaffirmed his commitment to custom hardware for its software products  LINK to Computerworld article Apr 5, 2012 http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9225858/Ellison_Hardware_software_integration_key_Apple_is_best_example?source=CTWNLE_nlt_entsoft_2012-04-09&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+computerworld%2Fs%2Ffeed%2Ftopic%2F173+%28Computerworld+Databases+News%29#disqus_thread

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  • The Recovery: New Challenges for your Supply Chain!

    - by [email protected]
    Nearly half of CFOs are planning to reduce their inventory during the first half of 2010 in part due to supply chain improvements that allow them to hold less product, but also because of reduced demand according to Kate O'Sullivan, Sr Editor at CFO Magazine. Her view is based on this quarter's Duke University Global Business Outlook Survey. Highlights: Employment will be a drag on the economy- full-time employment to increase by 1%. Temp hiring to grow <1%, Outsourcing 4%.  70% of CFOs at SMEs say credit conditions are worse then 12 mos ago - placing strains on inventory growth Asia and China finance execs are more optimistic than their EMEA or US counterparts and expect stronger growth in capital spending with a 16% gain Source: "Slouching Towards Recovery", CFO Magazine, April 2010, pgs 19-20    

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  • How can I locate empty space next to polygon regions?

    - by Stephen
    Let's say I have the following area in a top-down map: The circle is the player, the black square is an obstacle, and the grey polygons with red borders are walk-able areas that will be used as a navigation mesh for enemies. Obstacles and grey polygons are always convex. The grey regions were defined using an algorithm when the world was generated at runtime. Notice the little white column. I need to figure out where any empty space like this is, if at all, after the algorithm builds the grey regions, so that I can fill the space with another region. Basically what I'm hoping for is an algorithm that can detect empty space next to a polygon.

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  • Oracle Industrial Manufacturing Forum, Nov 8, W Hotel-Chicago

    - by Stephen Slade
    As global markets mature and new customer segments emerge, top industrial manufacturers are restructuring their businesses for growth. Oracle's annual Industrial Manufacturing Forum was created to help these companies focus on revolutionizing product and service innovation, maximize organizational performance, and deliver exceptional customer experiences. Key themes of this year's event are redefining "Lean," transforming service, and modernizing the manufacturing enterprise.  This informative forum will be held at the W Hotel and include a Keynote from Eaton's VP of IT who led the firm through a dramatic supply chain transformation. This jouney led Eaton to win the Manufacturer of the Year award in 2011 from Managing Automation/Manufacturing Executive publication. Other featured presentations include:  Value of BI Applications & EAM Analytics for Industrial Manufacturing: Regal Beloit,  Sales & Operating Planning: GE Healthcare,   Advanced Financial Controls/Leveraging Change Controls: Eaton,   Customer Experience (CX): Pella,  Creating The Strategic Service Chain: Entercoms Register today at: MANUFACTURING_FORUM Oracle Industrial Manufacturing ForumThursday, November 8, 2012 9:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. W Hotel City Center172 West Adams Street, Chicago, IL 60603 Click here to register now or call 1.800.820.5592 ext. 10954.

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  • Can I use VirtualBox as a sandbox for 12.04?

    - by Stephen Myall
    I am quite a cautious person though not afraid to experiment. I currently have 11.10 Unity and 12.04 Beta 2 running on different partitions (no problems). I have learned here that Unity can run in VirtuaBox. When I upgrade to 12.04 LTS later this month, I am curious to understand if I could also run 12.04 in Virtual Box for experimentation and test some things before I implement them into my system? Maybe there is a better way to achieve this, without partitioning my hard drive.

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  • Are you ready for the needed changes to your Supply Chain for 2013?

    - by Stephen Slade
    With the initiation of the Dodd-Frank Act, companies need to determine if their products contain 'conflict materials' from certain global markets as the Rep of Congo. The materials include metals such as gold, tin, tungsten and tantalum. Compaines with global sourcing face new disclosure requirements in Feb'13 related to business being done in Iran. Public companies are required to disclose to U.S. security regulators if they or their affiliates are engaged in business in Iran either directly or indirectly.  Is your supply chain compliant?  Do you have sourcing reports to validate?  Where are the materials in your chips & circuit boards coming from? In the next few weeks, responsible companies will be scrutinizing their supply chains, subs, JVs, and affiliates to search for exposure. Source: Brian Lane, Atty at Gibson Dunn Crutcher, as printed in the WSJ Tues, Dec 11, 2012 p.B8

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  • How can I move a polygon edge 1 unit away from the center?

    - by Stephen
    Let's say I have a polygon class that is represented by a list of vector classes as vertices, like so: var Vector = function(x, y) { this.x = x; this.y = y; }, Polygon = function(vectors) { this.vertices = vectors; }; Now I make a polygon (in this case, a square) like so: var poly = new Polygon([ new Vector(2, 2), new Vector(5, 2), new Vector(5, 5), new Vector(2, 5) ]); So, the top edge would be [poly.vertices[0], poly.vertices[1]]. I need to stretch this polygon by moving each edge away from the center of the polygon by one unit, along that edge's normal. The following example shows the first edge, the top, moved one unit up: The final polygon should look like this new one: var finalPoly = new Polygon([ new Vector(1, 1), new Vector(6, 1), new Vector(6, 6), new Vector(1, 6) ]); It is important that I iterate, moving one edge at a time, because I will be doing some collision tests after moving each edge. Here is what I tried so far (simplified for clarity), which fails triumphantly: for(var i = 0; i < vertices.length; i++) { var a = vertices[i], b = vertices[i + 1] || vertices[0]; // in case of final vertex var ax = a.x, ay = a.y, bx = b.x, by = b.y; // get some new perpendicular vectors var a2 = new Vector(-ay, ax), b2 = new Vector(-by, bx); // make into unit vectors a2.convertToUnitVector(); b2.convertToUnitVector(); // add the new vectors to the original ones a.add(a2); b.add(b2); // the rest of the code, collision tests, etc. } This makes my polygon start slowly rotating and sliding to the left, instead of what I need. Finally, the example shows a square, but the polygons in question could be anything. They will always be convex, and always with vertices in clockwise order.

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