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  • ASP.NET MVC 2 RTM Unit Tests not compiling

    - by nmarun
    I found something weird this time when it came to ASP.NET MVC 2 release. A very handful of people ‘made noise’ about the release.. at least on the asp.net blog site, usually there’s a big ‘WOOHAA… <something> is released’, kind of a thing. Hmm… but here’s the reason I’m writing this post. I’m not sure how many of you read the release notes before downloading the version.. I did, I did, I did. Now there’s a ‘Known issues’ section in the document and I’m quoting the text as is from this section: Unit test project does not contain reference to ASP.NET MVC 2 project: If the Solution Explorer window is hidden in Visual Studio, when you create a new ASP.NET MVC 2 Web application project and you select the option Yes, create a unit test project in the Create Unit Test Project dialog box, the unit test project is created but does not have a reference to the associated ASP.NET MVC 2 project. When you build the solution, Visual Studio will display compilation errors and the unit tests will not run. There are two workarounds. The first workaround is to make sure that the Solution Explorer is displayed when you create a new ASP.NET MVC 2 Web application project. If you prefer to keep Solution Explorer hidden, the second workaround is to manually add a project reference from the unit test project to the ASP.NET MVC 2 project. This definitely looks like a bug to me and see below for a visual: At the top right corner you’ll see that the Solution Explorer is set to auto hide and there’s no reference for the TestMvc2 project and that is the reason we get compilation errors without even writing a single line of code. So thanks to <VeryBigFont>ME</VeryBigFont> and <VerySmallFont>Microsoft</VerySmallFont>) , we’ve shown the world how to resolve a major issue and to live in Peace with the rest of humanity!

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  • Teaching high school kids ASP.NET programming

    - by dotneteer
    During the 2011 Microsoft MVP Global Summit, I have been talking to people about teaching kids ASP.NET programming. I want to work with volunteer organizations to provide kids volunteer opportunities while learning technical skills that can be applied elsewhere. The goal is to teach motivated kids enough skill to be productive with no more than 6 hours of instruction. Based on my prior teaching experience of college extension courses and involvement with high school math and science competitions, I think this is quite doable with classic ASP but a challenge with ASP.NET. I don’t want to use ASP because it does not provide a good path into the future. After some considerations, I think this is possible with ASP.NET and here are my thoughts: · Create a framework within ASP.NET for kids programming. · Use existing editor. No extra compiler and intelligence work needed. · Using a subset of C# like a scripting language. Teaches data type, expression, statements, if/for/while/switch blocks and functions. Use existing classes but no class creation and OOP. · Linear rendering model. No complicated life cycle. · Bare-metal html with some MVC style helpers for widget creation; ASP.NET control is optional. I want to teach kids to understand something and avoid black boxes as much as possible. · Use SQL for CRUD with a helper class. Again, I want to teach understanding rather than black boxes. · Provide a template to encourage clean separation of concern. · Provide a conversion utility to convert the code that uses template to ASP.NET MVC. This will allow kids with AP Computer Science knowledge to step up to ASP.NET MVC. Let me know if you have thoughts or can help.

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  • Behind ASP.NET MVC Mock Objects

    - by imran_ku07
       Introduction:           I think this sentence now become very familiar to ASP.NET MVC developers that "ASP.NET MVC is designed with testability in mind". But what ASP.NET MVC team did for making applications build with ASP.NET MVC become easily testable? Understanding this is also very important because it gives you some help when designing custom classes. So in this article i will discuss some abstract classes provided by ASP.NET MVC team for the various ASP.NET intrinsic objects, including HttpContext, HttpRequest, and HttpResponse for making these objects as testable. I will also discuss that why it is hard and difficult to test ASP.NET Web Forms.      Description:           Starting from Classic ASP to ASP.NET MVC, ASP.NET Intrinsic objects is extensively used in all form of web application. They provide information about Request, Response, Server, Application and so on. But ASP.NET MVC uses these intrinsic objects in some abstract manner. The reason for this abstraction is to make your application testable. So let see the abstraction.           As we know that ASP.NET MVC uses the same runtime engine as ASP.NET Web Form uses, therefore the first receiver of the request after IIS and aspnet_filter.dll is aspnet_isapi.dll. This will start the application domain. With the application domain up and running, ASP.NET does some initialization and after some initialization it will call Application_Start if it is defined. Then the normal HTTP pipeline event handlers will be executed including both HTTP Modules and global.asax event handlers. One of the HTTP Module is registered by ASP.NET MVC is UrlRoutingModule. The purpose of this module is to match a route defined in global.asax. Every matched route must have IRouteHandler. In default case this is MvcRouteHandler which is responsible for determining the HTTP Handler which returns MvcHandler (which is derived from IHttpHandler). In simple words, Route has MvcRouteHandler which returns MvcHandler which is the IHttpHandler of current request. In between HTTP pipeline events the handler of ASP.NET MVC, MvcHandler.ProcessRequest will be executed and shown as given below,          void IHttpHandler.ProcessRequest(HttpContext context)          {                    this.ProcessRequest(context);          }          protected virtual void ProcessRequest(HttpContext context)          {                    // HttpContextWrapper inherits from HttpContextBase                    HttpContextBase ctxBase = new HttpContextWrapper(context);                    this.ProcessRequest(ctxBase);          }          protected internal virtual void ProcessRequest(HttpContextBase ctxBase)          {                    . . .          }             HttpContextBase is the base class. HttpContextWrapper inherits from HttpContextBase, which is the parent class that include information about a single HTTP request. This is what ASP.NET MVC team did, just wrap old instrinsic HttpContext into HttpContextWrapper object and provide opportunity for other framework to provide their own implementation of HttpContextBase. For example           public class MockHttpContext : HttpContextBase          {                    . . .          }                     As you can see, it is very easy to create your own HttpContext. That's what did the third party mock frameworks like TypeMock, Moq, RhinoMocks, or NMock2 to provide their own implementation of ASP.NET instrinsic objects classes.           The key point to note here is the types of ASP.NET instrinsic objects. In ASP.NET Web Form and ASP.NET MVC. For example in ASP.NET Web Form the type of Request object is HttpRequest (which is sealed) and in ASP.NET MVC the type of Request object is HttpRequestBase. This is one of the reason that makes test in ASP.NET WebForm is difficult. because their is no base class and the HttpRequest class is sealed, therefore it cannot act as a base class to others. On the other side ASP.NET MVC always uses a base class to give a chance to third parties and unit test frameworks to create thier own implementation ASP.NET instrinsic object.           Therefore we can say that in ASP.NET MVC, instrinsic objects are of type base classes (for example HttpContextBase) .Actually these base classes had it's own implementation of same interface as the intrinsic objects it abstracts. It includes only virtual members which simply throws an exception. ASP.NET MVC also provides the corresponding wrapper classes (for example, HttpRequestWrapper) which provides a concrete implementation of the base classes in the form of ASP.NET intrinsic object. Other wrapper classes may be defined by third parties in the form of a mock object for testing purpose.           So we can say that a Request object in ASP.NET MVC may be HttpRequestWrapper or may be MockRequestWrapper(assuming that MockRequestWrapper class is used for testing purpose). Here is list of ASP.NET instrinsic and their implementation in ASP.NET MVC in the form of base and wrapper classes. Base Class Wrapper Class ASP.NET Intrinsic Object Description HttpApplicationStateBase HttpApplicationStateWrapper Application HttpApplicationStateBase abstracts the intrinsic Application object HttpBrowserCapabilitiesBase HttpBrowserCapabilitiesWrapper HttpBrowserCapabilities HttpBrowserCapabilitiesBase abstracts the HttpBrowserCapabilities class HttpCachePolicyBase HttpCachePolicyWrapper HttpCachePolicy HttpCachePolicyBase abstracts the HttpCachePolicy class HttpContextBase HttpContextWrapper HttpContext HttpContextBase abstracts the intrinsic HttpContext object HttpFileCollectionBase HttpFileCollectionWrapper HttpFileCollection HttpFileCollectionBase abstracts the HttpFileCollection class HttpPostedFileBase HttpPostedFileWrapper HttpPostedFile HttpPostedFileBase abstracts the HttpPostedFile class HttpRequestBase HttpRequestWrapper Request HttpRequestBase abstracts the intrinsic Request object HttpResponseBase HttpResponseWrapper Response HttpResponseBase abstracts the intrinsic Response object HttpServerUtilityBase HttpServerUtilityWrapper Server HttpServerUtilityBase abstracts the intrinsic Server object HttpSessionStateBase HttpSessionStateWrapper Session HttpSessionStateBase abstracts the intrinsic Session object HttpStaticObjectsCollectionBase HttpStaticObjectsCollectionWrapper HttpStaticObjectsCollection HttpStaticObjectsCollectionBase abstracts the HttpStaticObjectsCollection class      Summary:           ASP.NET MVC provides a set of abstract classes for ASP.NET instrinsic objects in the form of base classes, allowing someone to create their own implementation. In addition, ASP.NET MVC also provide set of concrete classes in the form of wrapper classes. This design really makes application easier to test and even application may replace concrete implementation with thier own implementation, which makes ASP.NET MVC very flexable.

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  • .NET 3.5 Installation Problems in Windows 8

    - by Rick Strahl
    Windows 8 installs with .NET 4.5. A default installation of Windows 8 doesn't seem to include .NET 3.0 or 3.5, although .NET 2.0 does seem to be available by default (presumably because Windows has app dependencies on that). I ran into some pretty nasty compatibility issues regarding .NET 3.5 which I'll describe in this post. I'll preface this by saying that depending on how you install Windows 8 you may not run into these issues. In fact, it's probably a special case, but one that might be common with developer folks reading my blog. Specifically it's the install order that screwed things up for me -  installing Visual Studio before explicitly installing .NET 3.5 from Windows Features - in particular. If you install Visual Studio 2010 I highly recommend you install .NET 3.5 from Windows features BEFORE you install Visual Studio 2010 and save yourself the trouble I went through. So when I installed Windows 8, and then looked at the Windows Features to install after the fact in the Windows Feature dialog, I thought - .NET 3.5 - who needs it. I'd be happy to not have to install .NET 3.5, but unfortunately I found out quite a while after initial installation that one of my applications/tools (DevExpress's awesome CodeRush) depends on it and won't install without it. Enabling .NET 3.5 in Windows 8 If you want to run .NET 3.5 on Windows 8, don't download an installer - those installers don't work on Windows 8, and you don't need to do this because you can use the Windows Features dialog to enable .NET 3.5: And that *should* do the trick. If you do this before you install other apps that require .NET 3.5 and install a non-SP1 one version of it, you are going to have no problems. Unfortunately for me, even after I've installed the above, when I run the CodeRush installer I still get this lovely dialog: Now I double checked to see if .NET 3.5 is installed - it is, both for 32 bit and 64 bit. I went as far as creating a small .NET Console app and running it to verify that it actually runs. And it does… So naturally I thought the CodeRush installer is a little whacky. After some back and forth Alex Skorkin on Twitter pointed me in the right direction: He asked me to look in the registry for exact info on which version of .NET 3.5 is installed here: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\NDP where I found that .NET 3.5 SP1 was installed. This is the 64 bit key which looks all correct. However, when I looked under the 32 bit node I found: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\NDP\v3.5 Notice that the service pack number is set to 0, rather than 1 (which it was for the 64 bit install), which is what the installer requires. So to summarize: the 64 bit version is installed with SP1, the 32 bit version is not. Uhm, Ok… thanks for that! Easy to fix, you say - just install SP1. Nope, not so easy because the standalone installer doesn't work on Windows 8. I can't get either .NET 3.5 installer or the SP 1 installer to even launch. They simply start and hang (or exit immediately) without messages. I also tried to get Windows to update .NET 3.5 by checking for Windows Updates, which should pick up on the dated version of .NET 3.5 and pull down SP1, but that's also no go. Check for Updates doesn't bring down any updates for me yet. I'm sure at some random point in the future Windows will deem it necessary to update .NET 3.5 to SP1, but at this point it's not letting me coerce it to do it explicitly. How did this happen I'm not sure exactly whether this is the cause and effect, but I suspect the story goes like this: Installed Windows 8 without support for .NET 3.5 Installed Visual Studio 2010 which installs .NET 3.5 (no SP) I now had .NET 3.5 installed but without SP1. I then: Tried to install CodeRush - Error: .NET 3.5 SP1 required Enabled .NET 3.5 in Windows Features I figured enabling the .NET 3.5 Windows Features would do the trick. But still no go. Now I suspect Visual Studio installed the 32 bit version of .NET 3.5 on my machine and Windows Features detected the previous install and didn't reinstall it. This left the 32 bit install at least with no SP1 installed. How to Fix it My final solution was to completely uninstall .NET 3.5 *and* to reboot: Go to Windows Features Uncheck the .NET Framework 3.5 Restart Windows Go to Windows Features Check .NET Framework 3.5 and voila, I now have a proper installation of .NET 3.5. I tried this before but without the reboot step in between which did not work. Make sure you reboot between uninstalling and reinstalling .NET 3.5! More Problems The above fixed me right up, but in looking for a solution it seems that a lot of people are also having problems with .NET 3.5 installing properly from the Windows Features dialog. The problem there is that the feature wasn't properly loading from the installer disks or not downloading the proper components for updates. It turns out you can explicitly install Windows features using the DISM tool in Windows.dism.exe /online /enable-feature /featurename:NetFX3 /Source:f:\sources\sxs You can try this without the /Source flag first - which uses the hidden Windows installer files if you kept those. Otherwise insert the DVD or ISO and point at the path \sources\sxs path where the installer lives. This also gives you a little more information if something does go wrong.© Rick Strahl, West Wind Technologies, 2005-2012Posted in Windows  .NET   Tweet !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs"); (function() { var po = document.createElement('script'); po.type = 'text/javascript'; po.async = true; po.src = 'https://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js'; var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(po, s); })();

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  • What are the definitive guidelines for custom Error Handling in ASP.NET MVC 3?

    - by RyanW
    The process of doing custom error handling in ASP.NET MVC (3 in this case) seems to be incredibly neglected. I've read through the various questions and answers here, on the web, help pages for various tools (like Elmah), but I feel like I've gone in a complete circle and still don't have the best solution. With your help, perhaps we can set a new standard approach for error handling. I'd like to keep things simple and not over-engineer this. Here are my goals: For Server errors/exceptions: Display debugging information in dev Display friendly error page in production Log errors and email them to administrator in production Return 500 HTTP Status Code For 404 Not Found errors: Display friendly error page Log errors and email them to administrator in production Return 404 HTTP Status Code Is there a way to meet these goals with ASP.NET MVC?

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  • What are the benefits of Castle Monorail 3 over ASP.Net MVC?

    - by yorch
    I have been using Castle Monorail for some years now with great success, although I haven't bothered to update the version I'm using (2 or 3 year old). Now I'm making a decision on go to ASP.Net MVC 3 or update to the latest Castle version. I have been looking documentation on the newest version of Castle projects (specially Monorail), but there is really little or no info around (I may be wrong). Does someone knows what are the benefits/new features of version 3 over ASP.Net MVC3? Thanks!

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  • .NET Properties - Use Private Set or ReadOnly Property?

    - by tgxiii
    In what situation should I use a Private Set on a property versus making it a ReadOnly property? Take into consideration the two very simplistic examples below. First example: Public Class Person Private _name As String Public Property Name As String Get Return _name End Get Private Set(ByVal value As String) _name = value End Set End Property Public Sub WorkOnName() Dim txtInfo As TextInfo = _ Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture.TextInfo Me.Name = txtInfo.ToTitleCase(Me.Name) End Sub End Class // ---------- public class Person { private string _name; public string Name { get { return _name; } private set { _name = value; } } public void WorkOnName() { TextInfo txtInfo = System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture.TextInfo; this.Name = txtInfo.ToTitleCase(this.Name); } } Second example: Public Class AnotherPerson Private _name As String Public ReadOnly Property Name As String Get Return _name End Get End Property Public Sub WorkOnName() Dim txtInfo As TextInfo = _ Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture.TextInfo _name = txtInfo.ToTitleCase(_name) End Sub End Class // --------------- public class AnotherPerson { private string _name; public string Name { get { return _name; } } public void WorkOnName() { TextInfo txtInfo = System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture.TextInfo; _name = txtInfo.ToTitleCase(_name); } } They both yield the same results. Is this a situation where there's no right and wrong, and it's just a matter of preference?

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  • Web 2.0 Extension for ASP.NET

    - by Visual WebGui
    ASP.NET is now much extended to support line of business and data centric applications, providing Web 2.0 rich user interfaces within a native web environment. New capabilities allowed by the Visual WebGui extension turn Visual Studio into a rapid development tool for the web, leveraging the wide set of ASP.NET web infrastructures runtime and extending its paradigms to support highly interactive applications. Taking advantage of the ASP.NET infrastructures Using the native ASP.NET ISAPI filter: aspnet_isapi...(read more)

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  • ASP.NET AJAX Microsoft tutorial

    - by Yousef_Jadallah
    Many people asking about the previous link of ASP.NET AJAX 1.0 documentation that started with  http://www.asp.net/ajax/documentation/live which support .NET 2. Actually, this link has been removed but instead you can visit  http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb398874.aspx which illustrate the version that Supported for .NET  4, 3.5 . Hope this help.

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  • Daily tech links for .net and related technologies - Mar 29-31, 2010

    - by SanjeevAgarwal
    Daily tech links for .net and related technologies - Mar 29-31, 2010 Web Development Querying the Future With Reactive Extensions - Phil Haack Creating an OData API for StackOverflow including XML and JSON in 30 minutes - Scott Hanselman MVC Automatic Menu - Nuri Halperin jqGrid for ASP.NET MVC - TriRand Team Foolproof Provides Contingent Data Annotation Validation for ASP.NET MVC 2 -Nick Riggs Using FubuMVC.UI in asp.net MVC : Getting started - Cannibal Coder Building A Custom ActionResult in MVC...(read more)

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  • Daily tech links for .net and related technologies - Mar 23-25, 2010

    - by SanjeevAgarwal
    Daily tech links for .net and related technologies - Mar 23-25, 2010 Web Development Introducing Browsers Providers in ASP.NET 4 - osbornm ASP.NET 4.0 Part 14, More Control Over Session State - hmobius Editable MVC Routes (Apache Style) - nberardi ASP.NET Performance Framework - karlseguin Web Design Techniques for Squeezing Images for All They’re Worth - Walter 12 Useful and Free Downloadable Web Design Books - SpeckyBoy Getting Started with Xcode IDE for iPhone Development - keyvan Grid Accordion...(read more)

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  • New Location for .NET 4 GAC

    - by Ricardo Peres
    .NET 4 newcomers may have realised that the old GAC location (%WINDIR%\Assembly) does not contain .NET 4 global assembly cache assemblies. Indeed, they have moved to %WINDIR%\Microsoft.NET\Assembly. It is worth noting that this folder does not use the shell extension that the older one uses, which prevents us from directly looking at the folder's contents, which, IMO, is nice (I mean, the new behavior). The old folder continues to host pre-.NET 4 assemblies.

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  • Asp.net MVC: Edit html control for Admin

    - by coure06
    I have a Asp.net MVC web application, containing mostly text. I want to put a feature into it so that admin can easily edit text/html using the web. May be some double clicking on a page and converting it into editable and save able. How can i do it? any sample code? I need this to be done for Asp.net MVC. thanks

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  • ASP.NET in Moscow!

    - by Stephen Walther
    I’m traveling to Russia and speaking in Moscow next week at the DevConf. This will be the first time that I have visited Russia, and I know that there is a strong ASP.NET community in Russia, so I am very excited about the trip. I’m speaking at the DevConf (http://www.devconf.ru/). I don’t speak Russian, so the only words that I recognize off the home page of the conference website are ASP.NET and JavaScript (PHP, Perl, Python, and Ruby must be Russian words). I’m giving talks on both ASP.NET Web Forms and ASP.NET MVC: What’s New in ASP.NET 4 Web Forms Learn about the new features just released with ASP.NET 4 Web Forms and Visual Studio 2010 that enable you to be more productive and build better websites. Learn how to take control of your markup, client IDs, and view state. Learn how to take advantage of routing with Web Forms to make your websites more search engine friendly.   What’s New in ASP.NET MVC 2 Come learn about the new features being introduced with ASP.NET MVC 2. Templated helpers allow associating edit and display elements with data types automatically. Areas provide a means of dividing a large Web application into multiple projects. Data annotations allows attaching metadata attributes on a model to control validation. Client validation enables form field validation without the need to perform a roundtrip to the server. Learn how these new features enable you to be more productive when building ASP.NET MVC applications. Hope to see you at the conference next week!

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  • Referencing code in VB.NET

    - by akramnik
    I'm not at all familiar with VB.NET or ASP. I need to create a simple page which makes a call to a remote web service. I used the wsdl utility which comes with the DotNet SDK to generate a service proxy and write it to a VB file. Unfortunately I have no idea how to reference this code in either my ASPX file or the code behind VB file so I can create an instance of the proxy. Edit: I should have qualified this by noting that I'm not using visual studio. I just coded up a .aspx with a .vb behind it and dropped it into an IIS location. Is there a way to do what you're suggesting outside of VS?

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  • Class/Model Level Validation (as opposed to Property Level)? (ASP.NET MVC 2.0)

    - by Erx_VB.NExT.Coder
    Basically, what the title says. I have several properties that combine together to really make one logical answer, and i would like to run a server-side validation code (that i write) which take these multiple fields into account and hook up to only one validation output/error message that users see on the webpage. I looked at scott guthries method of extending an attribute and using it in yoru dataannotations declarations, but, as i can see, there is no way to declare a dataannotations-style attribute on multiple properties, and you can only place the declarations (such as [Email], [Range], [Required]) over one property :(. i have looked at the PropertiesMustMatchAttribute in the default mvc 2.0 project that appears when you start a new project, this example is as useful as using a pair of pins to check your motor oil - useless! i have tried this method, however, creating a class level attribute, and have no idea how to display the error from this in my aspx page. i have tried html.ValidationMessage("ClassNameWhereAttributeIsAdded") and a variety of other thing, and it has not worked. and i should mention, there is NOT ONE blog post on doing validation at this level - despite this being a common need in any project or business logic scenario! can anyone help me in having my message displayed in my aspx page, and also if possible a proper document or reference explaining validation at this level?

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  • Friend WithEvents in VB vs private in C#

    - by serhio
    Hello, friends Who knows, why in vb.net WinForm projects the designer by default use the Friend WithEvents attributes and in C# - private ones. By ex, in a form.designer. .cs private Label Label1; .vb Friend WithEvents Label1 as Label; For WithEvents is more or less clear(for using Handles, apparently). But why Friend in VB and private in C#... Thanks.

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  • ASP.NET MVC 2.0 Unused Model Property being called when posting a product to the server?

    - by Erx_VB.NExT.Coder
    i have my auto-generated linq to sql classes, and i extend this class using partial classing (instead of using inheritance), and i have properties that that i've put in later which are not part of the database model and should not be. these are things like "FinalPrice" and "DisplayFinalPrice" - in the dbase, there is only RetailPrice and WholesalePrice so FinalPrice etc are more like extensions of the dbase fields. when i submit the form with nothing filled in, "FinalPrice" gets called (the 'get' of the property) even tho i never ask for it to be, and even tho it is not needed. this happens before validation, so i don't even get the validation errors i would get. i've tried using and on the FinalPrice and FinalPriceDisplay properties - no go! why does this happen and how can i stop it from happening? is the modelstate just trying to validate everything so therefore it calls every item no matter what? for those interested, here is all the code... Partial Public Class tProduct 'Inherits tProduct Private Const CommissionMultiplier As Decimal = CDec(1.18) Private _FinalPrice As Decimal? Private _DisplayFinalPrice As String Private _DisplayNormalPrice As String Public Property CategoryComplete As Short <ScaffoldColumn(False)> Public ReadOnly Property FinalPrice As Decimal Get 'If RetailPrice IsNot Nothing OrElse WholesalePrice IsNot Nothing Then If _FinalPrice Is Nothing Then If RetailPrice IsNot Nothing Then _FinalPrice = RetailPrice Else _FinalPrice = WholesalePrice * CommissionMultiplier ' TODO: this should be rounded to the nearest 5th cent so prices don't look weird. End If Dim NormalPart = Decimal.Floor(_FinalPrice.Value) Dim DecimalPart = _FinalPrice.Value - NormalPart If DecimalPart = 0 OrElse DecimalPart = 0.5 Then Return _FinalPrice ElseIf DecimalPart > 0 AndAlso DecimalPart < 0.5 Then DecimalPart = 0.5 ' always rounded up to the nearest 50 cents. ElseIf DecimalPart > 0.5 AndAlso DecimalPart < 1 Then ' Only in this case round down if its about to be rounded up to a valeu like 20, 30 or 50 etc as we want most prices to end in 9. If NormalPart.ToString.LastChr.ToInt = 9 Then DecimalPart = 0.5 Else DecimalPart = 1 End If End If _FinalPrice = NormalPart + DecimalPart End If Return _FinalPrice 'End If End Get End Property <ScaffoldColumn(False)> Public ReadOnly Property DisplayFinalPrice As String Get If _DisplayFinalPrice.IsNullOrEmpty Then _DisplayFinalPrice = FormatCurrency(FinalPrice, 2, TriState.True) End If Return _DisplayFinalPrice End Get End Property Public ReadOnly Property DisplayNormalPrice As String Get If _DisplayNormalPrice.IsNullOrEmpty Then _DisplayNormalPrice = FormatCurrency(NormalPrice, 2, TriState.True) End If Return _DisplayNormalPrice End Get End Property Public ReadOnly Property DivID As String Get Return "pdiv" & ProductID End Get End Property End Class more... i get busted here, with a null reference exception telling me it should contain a value... Dim NormalPart = Decimal.Floor(_FinalPrice.Value)

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  • Allowing only past date and today's date in VB.net

    - by Solution
    Hi, I am using VB.net as well as Jquery Datepicker for getting dates. In my VB.net code <tr> <td> DateOfReceiving: </td> <td colspan="3"> <asp:TextBox ID="DateOfReceivingTextBox" runat="server" CssClass="pastdatepicker" Text="DateOfReceiving" /> </td> </tr> I want to allow enter user only todays date or past date with format dd/mm/yyyy. I want vb.net custom validation for that. Please help to write vb.net regular expression. Thanks!

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  • Find an asp:Button in VB.NET

    - by Andrew
    I'm trying to code a section for my website in VB but VB can't seem to find a button. Is there a way for the code to find it? I know where it is. Loginview Login LoginTemplate. How do I get VB.NET to point to that location?

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  • Multi-level inheritance with Implements on properties in VB.NET vs C#

    - by Ben McCormack
    Let's say I have 2 interfaces defined like so: public interface ISkuItem { public string SKU { get; set; } } public interface ICartItem : ISkuItem { public int Quantity { get; set; } public bool IsDiscountable { get; set; } } When I go to implement the interface in C#, VS produces the following templated code: public class CartItem : ICartItem { #region ICartItem Members public int Quantity { get {...} set {...} } public bool IsDiscountable { get {...} set {...} } #endregion #region ISkuItem Members public string SKU { get {...} set {...} } #endregion } In VB.NET, the same class is built out like so: Public Class CartItem Implements ICartItem Public Property IsDiscountable As Boolean Implements ICartItem.IsDiscountable 'GET SET' End Property Public Property Quantity As Integer Implements ICartItem.Quantity 'GET SET' End Property Public Property SKU As String Implements ISkuItem.SKU 'GET SET' End Property End Class VB.NET explicitly requires you to add Implements IInterfaceName.PropertyName after each property that gets implemented whereas C# simply uses regions to indicate which properties and methods belong to the interface. Interestingly in VB.NET, on the SKU property, I can specify either Implements ISkuItem.SKU or Implements ICartItem.SKU. Although the template built by VS defaults to ISkuItem, I can also specify ICartItem if I want. Oddly, because C# only uses regions to block out inherited properties, it seems that I can't explicitly specify the implementing interface of SKU in C# like I can in VB.NET. My question is: Is there any importance behind being able to specify one interface or another to implement properites in VB.NET, and if so, is there a way to mimic this functionality in C#?

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  • Using C# and VB.NET in one solution

    - by Younes
    I'm busy on a small project to convert an Access2003 db to .NET. I am trying to integrate my functionality in an excisting project that is being used for Administration of some kind. The code in this project is vb.net. I started by setting up my Data Access Layer, which seems to work fine. I can make new web pages that acces the data I need. However when i start to use class files to set up my Business Logic Layer i can't build my project when using C# instead of VB. I Dislike VB and like to program in C# as i know the syntax alot better etc. Is it possible to program using C# knowing that VB.NET was the language chosen to buold the entire project on? If not, what will be the smartest way to integrate my module into the project using my favorite programming language? (Make a project and reference to the dll?)

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