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  • asp.NET Dynamic Data Site and asp.NET MVC-2 site together

    - by loviji
    Hi, I have created firstly ASP.NET MVC 2. and write more functionality. After I create asp.NET Dynamic Data Site. now, when I click on run button in Visual Studio, mvc app. opened in browser as http://localhost:50062. and asp.NET Dynamic Data Site as http://localhost:58395/cms/. but i want to merge this app. in one. can I use asp.NET Dynamic Data Site and asp.NET MVC-2 at the same time?

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  • ModalPopupExtender + ASP.NET AJAX: Can't page grid

    - by Alex
    I'm trying to page and sort my datagrid wich is inside a modalpopupextender but I can't page it in any way, already tried with , put the updatepanel inside, outside, in the middle (loL) and it does NOT work. modal popup does not get closed but the grid just dissapear. Code: Protected Sub Page_Load(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles Me.Load If Not Page.IsPostBack Then BindData() End If End Sub Private Sub btnSearch_Click(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles btnSearch.Click SqlServerDS.SelectCommand = "SELECT * FROM emp WHERE name LIKE '%" & txtSearchName.Text & "%'" BindData() End Sub Private Sub BindData() grdSearch.DataSource = SqlServerDS grdSearch.DataBind() End Sub Private Sub grdBuscaPaciente_PageIndexChanging(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As System.Web.UI.WebControls.GridViewPageEventArgs) Handles grdSearch.PageIndexChanging grdSearch.PageIndex = e.NewPageIndex BindData() End Sub Inside the Designer, this is the code h: <modalpopupextender> </modalpopupextender> <panel> <updatepanel> <gridview> </gridview> </updatepanel> </panel>

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  • Upgrading ASP.NET AJAX 1.0 Websites to .NET 4.5

    - by Lijo
    I have an existing website in ASP.Net 2.0 that uses ASP.Net Ajax 1.0. This is developed using Visual Studio 2005. Now, we are planning to upgrade this to .Net 4.5 and VS2013. When I made a search, I could see that there are blogs about upgrading projects with Ajax 1.0 to .Net 3.5 version. However I could not find useful links for upgrading to .Net 4.5. Do we have any useful links for that? Or is it an unworkable approach? Note: As of now we have not purchased VS2013 and servers for this. Purchase depends on the feasibility study. Hence I cannot test it myself, at present. Upgrading ASP.NET AJAX 1.0 Websites and Web Applications to .NET Framework 3.5 How To: Upgrade an ASP.NET AJAX 1.0 Web Project to .NET Framework 3.5

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  • Does 'Web Pages' use the same syntax as 'MVC'?

    - by Laberto
    I see that there is a new model in ASP.NET development which called 'ASP.NET Web Pages'. I would like to know if this model resembles the ASP.NET MVC Model. The point is that I found it difficult to learn ASP.NET MVC and someone told me: OK, if you learn ASP.NET Web Pages at first then learning ASP.NET MVC will be easier because of the Razor syntax in both models. Could you please tell me the truth if you have tried both?

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  • What’s new in ASP.NET 4.0: Core Features

    - by Rick Strahl
    Microsoft released the .NET Runtime 4.0 and with it comes a brand spanking new version of ASP.NET – version 4.0 – which provides an incremental set of improvements to an already powerful platform. .NET 4.0 is a full release of the .NET Framework, unlike version 3.5, which was merely a set of library updates on top of the .NET Framework version 2.0. Because of this full framework revision, there has been a welcome bit of consolidation of assemblies and configuration settings. The full runtime version change to 4.0 also means that you have to explicitly pick version 4.0 of the runtime when you create a new Application Pool in IIS, unlike .NET 3.5, which actually requires version 2.0 of the runtime. In this first of two parts I'll take a look at some of the changes in the core ASP.NET runtime. In the next edition I'll go over improvements in Web Forms and Visual Studio. Core Engine Features Most of the high profile improvements in ASP.NET have to do with Web Forms, but there are a few gems in the core runtime that should make life easier for ASP.NET developers. The following list describes some of the things I've found useful among the new features. Clean web.config Files Are Back! If you've been using ASP.NET 3.5, you probably have noticed that the web.config file has turned into quite a mess of configuration settings between all the custom handler and module mappings for the various web server versions. Part of the reason for this mess is that .NET 3.5 is a collection of add-on components running on top of the .NET Runtime 2.0 and so almost all of the new features of .NET 3.5 where essentially introduced as custom modules and handlers that had to be explicitly configured in the config file. Because the core runtime didn't rev with 3.5, all those configuration options couldn't be moved up to other configuration files in the system chain. With version 4.0 a consolidation was possible, and the result is a much simpler web.config file by default. A default empty ASP.NET 4.0 Web Forms project looks like this: <?xml version="1.0"?> <configuration> <system.web> <compilation debug="true" targetFramework="4.0" /> </system.web> </configuration> Need I say more? Configuration Transformation Files to Manage Configurations and Application Packaging ASP.NET 4.0 introduces the ability to create multi-target configuration files. This means it's possible to create a single configuration file that can be transformed based on relatively simple replacement rules using a Visual Studio and WebDeploy provided XSLT syntax. The idea is that you can create a 'master' configuration file and then create customized versions of this master configuration file by applying some relatively simplistic search and replace, add or remove logic to specific elements and attributes in the original file. To give you an idea, here's the example code that Visual Studio creates for a default web.Release.config file, which replaces a connection string, removes the debug attribute and replaces the CustomErrors section: <?xml version="1.0"?> <configuration xmlns:xdt="http://schemas.microsoft.com/XML-Document-Transform"> <connectionStrings> <add name="MyDB" connectionString="Data Source=ReleaseSQLServer;Initial Catalog=MyReleaseDB;Integrated Security=True" xdt:Transform="SetAttributes" xdt:Locator="Match(name)"/> </connectionStrings> <system.web> <compilation xdt:Transform="RemoveAttributes(debug)" /> <customErrors defaultRedirect="GenericError.htm" mode="RemoteOnly" xdt:Transform="Replace"> <error statusCode="500" redirect="InternalError.htm"/> </customErrors> </system.web> </configuration> You can see the XSL transform syntax that drives this functionality. Basically, only the elements listed in the override file are matched and updated – all the rest of the original web.config file stays intact. Visual Studio 2010 supports this functionality directly in the project system so it's easy to create and maintain these customized configurations in the project tree. Once you're ready to publish your application, you can then use the Publish <yourWebApplication> option on the Build menu which allows publishing to disk, via FTP or to a Web Server using Web Deploy. You can also create a deployment package as a .zip file which can be used by the WebDeploy tool to configure and install the application. You can manually run the Web Deploy tool or use the IIS Manager to install the package on the server or other machine. You can find out more about WebDeploy and Packaging here: http://tinyurl.com/2anxcje. Improved Routing Routing provides a relatively simple way to create clean URLs with ASP.NET by associating a template URL path and routing it to a specific ASP.NET HttpHandler. Microsoft first introduced routing with ASP.NET MVC and then they integrated routing with a basic implementation in the core ASP.NET engine via a separate ASP.NET routing assembly. In ASP.NET 4.0, the process of using routing functionality gets a bit easier. First, routing is now rolled directly into System.Web, so no extra assembly reference is required in your projects to use routing. The RouteCollection class now includes a MapPageRoute() method that makes it easy to route to any ASP.NET Page requests without first having to implement an IRouteHandler implementation. It would have been nice if this could have been extended to serve *any* handler implementation, but unfortunately for anything but a Page derived handlers you still will have to implement a custom IRouteHandler implementation. ASP.NET Pages now include a RouteData collection that will contain route information. Retrieving route data is now a lot easier by simply using this.RouteData.Values["routeKey"] where the routeKey is the value specified in the route template (i.e., "users/{userId}" would use Values["userId"]). The Page class also has a GetRouteUrl() method that you can use to create URLs with route data values rather than hardcoding the URL: <%= this.GetRouteUrl("users",new { userId="ricks" }) %> You can also use the new Expression syntax using <%$RouteUrl %> to accomplish something similar, which can be easier to embed into Page or MVC View code: <a runat="server" href='<%$RouteUrl:RouteName=user, id=ricks %>'>Visit User</a> Finally, the Response object also includes a new RedirectToRoute() method to build a route url for redirection without hardcoding the URL. Response.RedirectToRoute("users", new { userId = "ricks" }); All of these routines are helpers that have been integrated into the core ASP.NET engine to make it easier to create routes and retrieve route data, which hopefully will result in more people taking advantage of routing in ASP.NET. To find out more about the routing improvements you can check out Dan Maharry's blog which has a couple of nice blog entries on this subject: http://tinyurl.com/37trutj and http://tinyurl.com/39tt5w5. Session State Improvements Session state is an often used and abused feature in ASP.NET and version 4.0 introduces a few enhancements geared towards making session state more efficient and to minimize at least some of the ill effects of overuse. The first improvement affects out of process session state, which is typically used in web farm environments or for sites that store application sensitive data that must survive AppDomain restarts (which in my opinion is just about any application). When using OutOfProc session state, ASP.NET serializes all the data in the session statebag into a blob that gets carried over the network and stored either in the State server or SQL Server via the Session provider. Version 4.0 provides some improvement in this serialization of the session data by offering an enableCompression option on the web.Config <Session> section, which forces the serialized session state to be compressed. Depending on the type of data that is being serialized, this compression can reduce the size of the data travelling over the wire by as much as a third. It works best on string data, but can also reduce the size of binary data. In addition, ASP.NET 4.0 now offers a way to programmatically turn session state on or off as part of the request processing queue. In prior versions, the only way to specify whether session state is available is by implementing a marker interface on the HTTP handler implementation. In ASP.NET 4.0, you can now turn session state on and off programmatically via HttpContext.Current.SetSessionStateBehavior() as part of the ASP.NET module pipeline processing as long as it occurs before the AquireRequestState pipeline event. Output Cache Provider Output caching in ASP.NET has been a very useful but potentially memory intensive feature. The default OutputCache mechanism works through in-memory storage that persists generated output based on various lifetime related parameters. While this works well enough for many intended scenarios, it also can quickly cause runaway memory consumption as the cache fills up and serves many variations of pages on your site. ASP.NET 4.0 introduces a provider model for the OutputCache module so it becomes possible to plug-in custom storage strategies for cached pages. One of the goals also appears to be to consolidate some of the different cache storage mechanisms used in .NET in general to a generic Windows AppFabric framework in the future, so various different mechanisms like OutputCache, the non-Page specific ASP.NET cache and possibly even session state eventually can use the same caching engine for storage of persisted data both in memory and out of process scenarios. For developers, the OutputCache provider feature means that you can now extend caching on your own by implementing a custom Cache provider based on the System.Web.Caching.OutputCacheProvider class. You can find more info on creating an Output Cache provider in Gunnar Peipman's blog at: http://tinyurl.com/2vt6g7l. Response.RedirectPermanent ASP.NET 4.0 includes features to issue a permanent redirect that issues as an HTTP 301 Moved Permanently response rather than the standard 302 Redirect respond. In pre-4.0 versions you had to manually create your permanent redirect by setting the Status and Status code properties – Response.RedirectPermanent() makes this operation more obvious and discoverable. There's also a Response.RedirectToRoutePermanent() which provides permanent redirection of route Urls. Preloading of Applications ASP.NET 4.0 provides a new feature to preload ASP.NET applications on startup, which is meant to provide a more consistent startup experience. If your application has a lengthy startup cycle it can appear very slow to serve data to clients while the application is warming up and loading initial resources. So rather than serve these startup requests slowly in ASP.NET 4.0, you can force the application to initialize itself first before even accepting requests for processing. This feature works only on IIS 7.5 (Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2) and works in combination with IIS. You can set up a worker process in IIS 7.5 to always be running, which starts the Application Pool worker process immediately. ASP.NET 4.0 then allows you to specify site-specific settings by setting the serverAutoStartEnabled on a particular site along with an optional serviceAutoStartProvider class that can be used to receive "startup events" when the application starts up. This event in turn can be used to configure the application and optionally pre-load cache data and other information required by the app on startup.  The configuration settings need to be made in applicationhost.config: <sites> <site name="WebApplication2" id="1"> <application path="/" serviceAutoStartEnabled="true" serviceAutoStartProvider="PreWarmup" /> </site> </sites> <serviceAutoStartProviders> <add name="PreWarmup" type="PreWarmupProvider,MyAssembly" /> </serviceAutoStartProviders> Hooking up a warm up provider is optional so you can omit the provider definition and reference. If you do define it here's what it looks like: public class PreWarmupProvider System.Web.Hosting.IProcessHostPreloadClient { public void Preload(string[] parameters) { // initialization for app } } This code fires and while it's running, ASP.NET/IIS will hold requests from hitting the pipeline. So until this code completes the application will not start taking requests. The idea is that you can perform any pre-loading of resources and cache values so that the first request will be ready to perform at optimal performance level without lag. Runtime Performance Improvements According to Microsoft, there have also been a number of invisible performance improvements in the internals of the ASP.NET runtime that should make ASP.NET 4.0 applications run more efficiently and use less resources. These features come without any change requirements in applications and are virtually transparent, except that you get the benefits by updating to ASP.NET 4.0. Summary The core feature set changes are minimal which continues a tradition of small incremental changes to the ASP.NET runtime. ASP.NET has been proven as a solid platform and I'm actually rather happy to see that most of the effort in this release went into stability, performance and usability improvements rather than a massive amount of new features. The new functionality added in 4.0 is minimal but very useful. A lot of people are still running pure .NET 2.0 applications these days and have stayed off of .NET 3.5 for some time now. I think that version 4.0 with its full .NET runtime rev and assembly and configuration consolidation will make an attractive platform for developers to update to. If you're a Web Forms developer in particular, ASP.NET 4.0 includes a host of new features in the Web Forms engine that are significant enough to warrant a quick move to .NET 4.0. I'll cover those changes in my next column. Until then, I suggest you give ASP.NET 4.0 a spin and see for yourself how the new features can help you out. © Rick Strahl, West Wind Technologies, 2005-2010Posted in ASP.NET  

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  • Just released: a new SEO extension for the ASP.NET MVC routing engine

    - by efran.cobisi
    Dear users,after several months of hard work, we are proud to announce to the world that Cobisi's new SEO routing engine for ASP.NET MVC has been officially released! We even provide a free edition which comes at no cost, so this is something you can't really miss if you are a serious ASP.NET developer. ;)SEO routes for ASP.NET MVCCobisi SEO Extensions - this is the name of the product - is an advanced tool for software developers that allows to optimize ASP.NET MVC web applications and sites for search engines. It comes with a powerful routing engine, which extends the standard ASP.NET routing module to provide a much more flexible way to define search optimized routes, and a complete set of classes that make customizing the entire routing infrastructure very easy and cool.In its simplest form, defining a route for an MVC action is just a matter of decorating the method with the [Route("...")] attribute and specifying the desired URL. The library will take care of the rest and set up the route accordingly; while coding routes this way, Cobisi SEO Extensions also shows how the final routes will be, without leaving the Visual Studio IDE!Manage MVC routes with easeIn fact, Cobisi SEO Extensions integrates with the Visual Studio IDE to offer a large set of time-saving improvements targeted at ASP.NET developers. A new tool window, for example, allows to easily browse among the routes exposed by your applications, being them standard ASP.NET routes, MVC specific routes or SEO routes. The routes can be easily filtered on the fly, to ease finding the ones you are interested in. Double clicking a SEO route will even open the related ASP.NET MVC controller, at the beginning of the specified action method.In addition to that, Cobisi SEO Extensions allows to easily understand how each SEO route is composed by showing the routing model details directly in the IDE, beneath each MVC action route.Furthermore, Cobisi SEO Extensions helps developers to easily recognize which class is an MVC controller and which methods is an MVC action by drawing a special dashed underline mark under each items of these categories.Developers, developers, developers, ...We are really eager to receive your feedback and suggestions - please feel free to ping us with your comments! Thank you! Cheers! -- Efran Cobisi Cobisi lead developer Microsoft MVP, MCSD, MCAD, MCTS: SQL Server 2005, MCP

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  • Writing Unit Tests for an ASP.NET MVC Action Method that handles Ajax Request and Normal Request

    - by shiju
    In this blog post, I will demonstrate how to write unit tests for an ASP.NET MVC action method, which handles both Ajax request and normal HTTP Request. I will write a unit test for specifying the behavior of an Ajax request and will write another unit test for specifying the behavior of a normal HTTP request. Both Ajax request and normal request will be handled by a single action method. So the ASP.NET MVC action method will be execute HTTP Request object’s IsAjaxRequest method for identifying whether it is an Ajax request or not. So we have to create mock object for Request object and also have to make as a Ajax request from the unit test for verifying the behavior of an Ajax request. I have used NUnit and Moq for writing unit tests. Let me write a unit test for a Ajax request Code Snippet [Test] public void Index_AjaxRequest_Returns_Partial_With_Expense_List() {     // Arrange       Mock<HttpRequestBase> request = new Mock<HttpRequestBase>();     Mock<HttpResponseBase> response = new Mock<HttpResponseBase>();     Mock<HttpContextBase> context = new Mock<HttpContextBase>();       context.Setup(c => c.Request).Returns(request.Object);     context.Setup(c => c.Response).Returns(response.Object);     //Add XMLHttpRequest request header     request.Setup(req => req["X-Requested-With"]).         Returns("XMLHttpRequest");       IEnumerable<Expense> fakeExpenses = GetMockExpenses();     expenseRepository.Setup(x => x.GetMany(It.         IsAny<Expression<Func<Expense, bool>>>())).         Returns(fakeExpenses);     ExpenseController controller = new ExpenseController(         commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object,         expenseRepository.Object);     controller.ControllerContext = new ControllerContext(         context.Object, new RouteData(), controller);     // Act     var result = controller.Index(null, null) as PartialViewResult;     // Assert     Assert.AreEqual("_ExpenseList", result.ViewName);     Assert.IsNotNull(result, "View Result is null");     Assert.IsInstanceOf(typeof(IEnumerable<Expense>),             result.ViewData.Model, "Wrong View Model");     var expenses = result.ViewData.Model as IEnumerable<Expense>;     Assert.AreEqual(3, expenses.Count(),         "Got wrong number of Categories");         }   In the above unit test, we are calling Index action method of a controller named ExpenseController, which will returns a PartialView named _ExpenseList, if it is an Ajax request. We have created mock object for HTTPContextBase and setup XMLHttpRequest request header for Request object’s X-Requested-With for making it as a Ajax request. We have specified the ControllerContext property of the controller with mocked object HTTPContextBase. Code Snippet controller.ControllerContext = new ControllerContext(         context.Object, new RouteData(), controller); Let me write a unit test for a normal HTTP method Code Snippet [Test] public void Index_NormalRequest_Returns_Index_With_Expense_List() {     // Arrange               Mock<HttpRequestBase> request = new Mock<HttpRequestBase>();     Mock<HttpResponseBase> response = new Mock<HttpResponseBase>();     Mock<HttpContextBase> context = new Mock<HttpContextBase>();       context.Setup(c => c.Request).Returns(request.Object);     context.Setup(c => c.Response).Returns(response.Object);       IEnumerable<Expense> fakeExpenses = GetMockExpenses();       expenseRepository.Setup(x => x.GetMany(It.         IsAny<Expression<Func<Expense, bool>>>())).         Returns(fakeExpenses);     ExpenseController controller = new ExpenseController(         commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object,         expenseRepository.Object);     controller.ControllerContext = new ControllerContext(         context.Object, new RouteData(), controller);     // Act     var result = controller.Index(null, null) as ViewResult;     // Assert     Assert.AreEqual("Index", result.ViewName);     Assert.IsNotNull(result, "View Result is null");     Assert.IsInstanceOf(typeof(IEnumerable<Expense>),             result.ViewData.Model, "Wrong View Model");     var expenses = result.ViewData.Model         as IEnumerable<Expense>;     Assert.AreEqual(3, expenses.Count(),         "Got wrong number of Categories"); }   In the above unit test, we are not specifying the XMLHttpRequest request header for Request object’s X-Requested-With, so that it will be normal HTTP Request. If this is a normal request, the action method will return a ViewResult with a view template named Index. The below is the implementation of Index action method Code Snippet public ActionResult Index(DateTime? startDate, DateTime? endDate) {     //If date is not passed, take current month's first and last date     DateTime dtNow;     dtNow = DateTime.Today;     if (!startDate.HasValue)     {         startDate = new DateTime(dtNow.Year, dtNow.Month, 1);         endDate = startDate.Value.AddMonths(1).AddDays(-1);     }     //take last date of start date's month, if end date is not passed     if (startDate.HasValue && !endDate.HasValue)     {         endDate = (new DateTime(startDate.Value.Year,             startDate.Value.Month, 1)).AddMonths(1).AddDays(-1);     }     var expenses = expenseRepository.GetMany(         exp => exp.Date >= startDate && exp.Date <= endDate);     //if request is Ajax will return partial view     if (Request.IsAjaxRequest())     {         return PartialView("_ExpenseList", expenses);     }     //set start date and end date to ViewBag dictionary     ViewBag.StartDate = startDate.Value.ToShortDateString();     ViewBag.EndDate = endDate.Value.ToShortDateString();     //if request is not ajax     return View("Index",expenses); }   The index action method will returns a PartialView named _ExpenseList, if it is an Ajax request and will returns a View named Index if it is a normal request. Source Code The source code has been taken from my EFMVC app which can download from here

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  • How to learn ASP.NET MVC without learning ASP.NET Web forms

    - by Naif
    First of all, I am not a web developer but I can say that I understand in general the difference between PHP, ASP.NET, etc. I have played a little with ASP.NET and C# as well, however, I didn't continue the learning path. Now I'd like to learn ASP.NET MVC but there is no a book for a beginner in ASP.NET MVC so I had a look at the tutorials but it seems that I need to learn C# first and SQL Server and HTML, am I right? So please tell me how can I learn ASP.NET MVC directly (I mean without learning ASP.NET Web forms). What do I need to learn (You can assume that I am an absolute beginner). Update: It is true that i can find ASP.NET MVC tutorial that explain ASP.NET MVC, but I used to find ASP.NET web forms books that explain SQL and C# at the same time and take you step by step. In ASP.NET MVC I don't know how can I start! How can I learn SQL in its own and C# in its own and then combine them with ASP.NET MVC!

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  • Strong Naming an assembly using command line compile

    - by David
    I am trying to use NAnt in order to compile and sign an assembly using the vbc compiler. I have a project set up and am able to successfully sign the assembly compiling with VS2010. When I try to sign it using the command line I get this error: vbc : error BC30140: Error creating assembly manifest: Error signing assembly -- The parameter is incorrect. I even created a trivially simple app (just an assemblyinfo.vb file) that will not compile and sign using vbc.exe What am I doing wrong? here is my assemblyinfo.vb: Option Strict Off Option Explicit On Imports System Imports System.Reflection <Assembly: AssemblyVersionAttribute("2010.05.18.0918"), _ Assembly: AssemblyCopyrightAttribute("Copyright © Patient First 2007"), _ Assembly: AssemblyCompanyAttribute("Patient First, Inc."), _ Assembly: AssemblyProductAttribute("Patient First Framework"), _ Assembly: AssemblyDelaySign(false), _ Assembly: AssemblyKeyFile("test.pfx"), _ Assembly: AssemblyTitleAttribute("PatientFirst.Framework")> test.pfx is located in the same folder as assemblyinfo.vb Here is how I am trying to compile it: vbc /target:library /verbose assemblyinfo.vb I also tried using vbc /target:library /verbose assemblyinfo.vb /keyfile:test.pfx and tried using /keyfile parameter without the AssemblyDelaySign and AssemblyKeyFile attributes If I remove the AssemblyDelaySign and AssemblyKeyFile attributes and leave off the /keyfile command line parameter it compiles fine. What is the correct way to do this with vbc? --EDIT: I have found that MSBuild also does not like having the AssemblyKeyFile attribute as I have defined it in the AssemblyInfo.vb, it gives the same failure message. So the only way I can currently get this to build correctly is to set properties on the project to tell it which key file to use and to sign the assembly.

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  • How to structure VB.NET windows forms applications

    - by Jon
    What is the best way to structure a VB.NET windows forms application so that code can be reused and the app can be extended easily. I used to create lots of new forms. This lead to lots of repeated code and forms which did similar things. Now, for forms which do similar jobs, such as view/edit/delete items from a specific db table, I create a form with the required controls, have the form create an instance of a class with params such as a collection of the controls and a string containing the db table name. Then the individual controls call functions of the class. Advanced forms will inherit and extend this basic form class. 1) Has there already been work done in this area? 2) Are there books / articles available which discuss the options available on this topic? Thanks!

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  • Implementing google dashboard type interface in asp.net

    - by Sam_Cogan
    I'm looking at implementing a Google IG type dashboard in a .net app. There are a number of options I've found to do this, and i'm trying to establish what is going to be the best to use, in terms of speed, versatility etc. So far the options I am looking at are either to use asp.net webparts and .net Ajax, this would make it quicker to build, but I'm concerned this is going to make the application bulky and slow, or using JQuery, and either .net MVC or Webforms, to custom build an interface. Does anyone have any thoughts on what the best option may be, or any options I may have missed? All I want to do here is to allow users to customise a dashboard with a number of components (which will be user controls). I do also have access to Telerik controls, but I'm not sure if they would be any use here.

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  • C# to VB question

    - by Jim
    Hi, I can achieve in VB what the following C# snippet does but it seems very clunky since I perform a Linq query to obtain the events for the relevant user. Is there a neat way? ctx.FetchEventsForWhichCurrentUserIsRegistered((op) => { if (!op.HasError) { var items = op.Value; _currentUserRegisteredEventIds = new HashSet<int>(items); UpdateRegistrationButtons(); } }, null); } else { _currentUserRegisteredEventIds = null; UpdateRegistrationButtons(); }

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  • Why doesn't this (translated) VB.NET code work?

    - by ropstah
    I had a piece of C# code converted, but the translated code isn't valid... Can somebody help out? C# <table> <% Html.Repeater<Hobby>("Hobbies", "row", "row-alt", (hobby, css) => { %> <tr class="<%= css %>"> <td><%= hobby.Title%></td> </tr> <% }); %> </table> VB <% Html.Repeater(of Jrc3.BLL.Product)(Model.ProductCollectionByPrcAutoKey, "row", "row-alt", Function(product, css) Do %> <tr class="<%= css %>"> <td><%= hobby.Title%></td> </tr> <% End Function)%>

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  • How to explain pointers to a Java/VB programmer

    - by Skeith
    I am writing a game and my friend has offered to help me as it is a RPG and will take a long time to do the "scripting" bit of the game. The problem is IMO he's not that good a programmer :( (add flame war here). He has only programmed in Java and VB and keeps saying really stupid things to me like "Why don't you drag and drop an onClick event" to design my UI when I'm using DirectX. I tried explaining pointers to him but his response was, if it's just a variable that holds a memory address, why don't you just use an int? I create an instance of an attack class and give the creature a pointer to it so if several creatures use the same attack there is only one instance of it. He keeps saying why not put if statements in the creature class for every attack class and set true for the ones that are there. He has programmed mainly in VB and a little in Java just to learn OOP. How can I explain advanced C++ concepts like pointers and memory management to him? He just doesn't understand there are no super functions like form.show in C++.

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  • .NET Reflector 7.2 Early Access Build 2 Released: Performance Critical

    - by Bart Read
    I've just posted a write-up of some of the performance tuning I've done to improve .NET Reflector 7.2's start-up time here: http://www.reflector.net/2011/05/net-reflector-7-start-up-time-running-out-of-gas-or-pedal-to-the-metal/ You can get the new build from the .NET Reflector homepage at http://www.reflector.net/. Please remember to give us your feedback in the forum, at http://forums.reflector.net/, using the tags #7.2 and #eap. Technorati Tags: reflector,early access,7.2

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  • .NET Reflector 7.2 Early Access Build 1 Released

    - by Bart Read
    I've just posted up full details of this release on the .NET Reflector blog at http://www.reflector.net/2011/05/life-is-a-journey-not-a-destination-net-reflector-7-2-ea-1-has-been-released/ and, breaking with previous tradition, this includes a fairly extensive changelog. You can download this EA build from the .NET Reflector homepage at http://www.reflector.net/. Enjoy! (And please don't forget to tell us what you think on the forum, http://forums.reflector.net/, using the tags #7.2 and #eap.)...(read more)

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  • VB.NET invalid cast exception

    - by user127147
    Hi there, I have a simple application to store address details and edit them. I have been away from VB for a few years now and need to refreash my knowledge while working to a tight deadline. I have a general Sub responsible for displaying a form where user can add contact details (by pressing button add) and edit them (by pressing button edit). This sub is stored in a class Contact. The way it is supposed to work is that there is a list with all the contacts and when new contact is added a new entry is displayed. If user wants to edit given entry he or she selects it and presses edit button Public Sub Display() Dim C As New Contact C.Cont = InputBox("Enter a title for this contact.") C.Fname = frmAddCont.txtFName.Text C.Surname = frmAddCont.txtSName.Text C.Address = frmAddCont.txtAddress.Text frmStart.lstContact.Items.Add(C.Cont.ToString) End Sub I call it from the form responsible for adding new contacts by Dim C As New Contact C.Display() and it works just fine. However when I try to do something similar using the edit button I get errors - "Unable to cast object of type 'System.String' to type 'AddressBook.Contact'." Dim C As Contact If lstContact.SelectedItem IsNot Nothing Then C = lstContact.SelectedItem() C.Display() End If I think it may be something simple however I wasn't able to fix it and given short time I have I decided to ask for help here. Thank you

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  • C# To VB.Net Conversion - array of class objects with initialisation

    - by mattryan
    can someone help me pls, im new to vb.net and im trying to work through the nhibernate firstsolkution sample (written in c#) and im struggling to convert this one bit. ive tried numerous convertors; telerik, developerfusion and a several others but none of the code produced will compile and i cant see the why... private readonly Product[] _products = new[] { new Product {Name = "Melon", Category = "Fruits"}, new Product {Name = "Pear", Category = "Fruits"}, new Product {Name = "Milk", Category = "Beverages"}, new Product {Name = "Coca Cola", Category = "Beverages"}, new Product {Name = "Pepsi Cola", Category = "Beverages"}, }; developer fusion gives Private ReadOnly _products As Product() = New () {New Product(), New Product(), New Product(), New Product(), New Product()} telerik gives Private ReadOnly _products As Product() = New () {New Product() With { _ .Name = "Melon", _ .Category = "Fruits" _ }, New Product() With { _ .Name = "Pear", _ .Category = "Fruits" _ }, New Product() With { _ .Name = "Milk", _ .Category = "Beverages" _ }, Nw Product() With { _ .Name = "Coca Cola", _ .Category = "Beverages" _ }, New Product() With { _ .Name = "Pepsi Cola", _ .Category = "Beverages" _ }} which seems the most useful except it complains about a type expected here "New () {..." ive tried various things just cant figure it out... what am i missing? am i just being dumb? or isnt there and equivilent? Cheers all

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  • Using SocialCounter.NET with ASP.NET MVC

    - by DigiMortal
    I found small library called SocialCounter.NET that is able to display some data from popular social sites. Although it is possible to use widgets offered by social networks there are also scenarios when you don’t want or can’t use these JavaScript based widgets. In this posting I will show you how to use SocialCounter.NET. Start with downloading SocialCounter.NET. You can also use NuGet package manager to download SocialCounter.NET. Using SocialCounter.NET is very easy as you can see from this example view: @using SocialCounter.NET; @{      ViewBag.Title = "Home Page"; } <h2>Social</h2> <p>     Twitter followers: @Counter.GetTwitterFollowersCount("gpeipman")<br />     Facebook friends: @Counter.GetFacebookFriendsCount("gpeipman")<br />     Facebook likes: @Counter.GetFacebookLikes("http://www.eindhovenmetalmeeting.nl/")<br />     Delicious saves count: @Counter.GetDeliciousSaveCount("http://youreffectiveleadership.com/")<br /> </p> And the result is shown on image on right. You can use SocialCounter.NET by example on user profile pages and on your content pages where you want to show how many people have saved current page as bookmark. SocialCounter.NET supports also LinkedIn, RSS-feeds and Google Plus accounts. In future – I hope – they will add support for more social networks to their library.

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  • ASP.NET Charting Control no longer working with .NET 4

    - by Moose Factory
    I've just upgraded to .NET 4 and my ASP.NET Chart Control no longer displays. For .NET 3.5, the HTML produced by the control used to look like this: <img id="20_Chart" src="/ChartImg.axd?i=chart_5f6a8fd179a246a5a0f4f44fcd7d5e03_0.png&amp;g=16eb7881335e47dcba16fdfd8339ba1a" alt="" style="height:300px;width:300px;border-width:0px;" /> and now, for .NET 4, it looks like this (note the change in the source path): <img id="20_Chart" src="/Statistics/Summary/ChartImg.axd?i=chart_5f6a8fd179a246a5a0f4f44fcd7d5e03_0.png&amp;g=16eb7881335e47dcba16fdfd8339ba1a" alt="" style="height:300px;width:300px;border-width:0px;" /> The chart is in an MVC partial view that is in an MVC Area folder called "Statistics" and a MVC Views folder called "Summary" (i.e. "/Areas/Statistics/Views/Summary"), so this is obviously where the change of path is coming from. All I've done is to switch the System.Web.DataVisualization assembly from, 3.5 to 4.0. Any help greatly appreciated.

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  • Could not Upload file in network mapped drive using asp.net/vb.net

    - by Hasan
    I have tried several times to upload file remotely to a mapped network drive, but it is raising an exception: Could not find a part of the path 'X:\test\testing.wav'. I read through various internet /blog/ Microsoft help sites, but I still don't know what is wrong. Does anyone know what is causing this problem and how I can correct it? It works fine when I am uploading to a local drive as a test. It is also working When I am running the code from the development server, but if I try with published code, then it fails. :(

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  • Looking into ASP.Net MVC 4.0 Mobile Development - part 1

    - by nikolaosk
    In this post I will be looking how ASP.Net MVC 4.0 helps us to create web solutions that target mobile devices.We all experience the magic that is the World Wide Web through mobile devices. Millions of people around the world, use tablets and smartphones to view the contents of websites,e-shops and portals.ASP.Net MVC 4.0 includes a new mobile project template and the ability to render a different set of views for different types of devices.There is a new feature that is called browser overriding which allows us to control exactly what a user is going to see from your web application regardless of what type of device he is using.In order to follow along this post you must have Visual Studio 2012 and .Net Framework 4.5 installed in your machine.Download and install VS 2012 using this link.My machine runs on Windows 8 and Visual Studio 2012 works just fine.It will work fine in Windows 7 as well so do not worry if you do not have the latest Microsoft operating system.1) Launch VS 2012 and create a new Web Forms application by going to File - >New Project - > ASP.Net MVC 4 Web Application and then click OKHave a look at the picture below  2) From the available templates select Mobile Application and then click OK.Have a look at the picture below 3) When I run the application I get the mobile view of the page. I would like to show you what a typical ASP.Net MVC 4.0 application looks like. So I will create a new simple ASP.Net MVC 4.0 Web Application. When I run the application I get the normal page view.Have a look at the picture below.On the left is the mobile view and on the right the normal view. As you can see we have more or less the same content in our mobile application (log in,register) compared with the normal ASP.Net MVC 4.0 application but it is optimised for mobile devices. 4) Let me explain how and when the mobile view is selected and finally rendered.There is a feature in MVC 4.0 that is called Display Modes and with this feature the runtime will select a view.If we have 2 views e.g contact.mobile.cshtml and contact.cshtml in our application the Controller at some point will instruct the runtime to select and render a view named contact.The runtime will look at the browser making the request and will determine if it is a mobile browser or a desktop browser. So if there is a request from my IPhone Safari browser for a particular site, if there is a mobile view the MVC 4.0 will select it and render it. If there is not a mobile view, the normal view will be rendered.5) In the  ASP.Net MVC 4.0 (Internet application) I created earlier (not the first project which was a mobile one) I can run it once more and see how it looks on the browser. If I want to view it with a mobile browser I must download one emulator like Opera Mobile.You can download Opera Mobile hereWhen I run the application I get the same view in both the desktop and the mobile browser. That was to be expected. Have a look at the picture below 6) Then I create another version of the _Layout.mobile.cshtml view in the Shared folder.I simply copy and paste the _Layout.cshtml  into the same folder and then rename it to _Layout.mobile.cshtml and then just alter the contents of the _Layout.mobile.cshtml.When I run again the application I get a different view on the desktop browser and a different one on the Opera mobile browser.Have a look at the picture below ?he Controller will instruct the ASP.Net runtime to select and render a view named _Layout.mobile.cshtml when the request will come from a mobile browser.?he runtime knows that a browser is a mobile one through the ASP.Net browser capability provider. Hope it helps!!!

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  • ASP.NET Web API - Screencast series with downloadable sample code - Part 1

    - by Jon Galloway
    There's a lot of great ASP.NET Web API content on the ASP.NET website at http://asp.net/web-api. I mentioned my screencast series in original announcement post, but we've since added the sample code so I thought it was worth pointing the series out specifically. This is an introductory screencast series that walks through from File / New Project to some more advanced scenarios like Custom Validation and Authorization. The screencast videos are all short (3-5 minutes) and the sample code for the series is both available for download and browsable online. I did the screencasts, but the samples were written by the ASP.NET Web API team. So - let's watch them together! Grab some popcorn and pay attention, because these are short. After each video, I'll talk about what I thought was important. I'm embedding the videos using HTML5 (MP4) with Silverlight fallback, but if something goes wrong or your browser / device / whatever doesn't support them, I'll include the link to where the videos are more professionally hosted on the ASP.NET site. Note also if you're following along with the samples that, since Part 1 just looks at the File / New Project step, the screencast part numbers are one ahead of the sample part numbers - so screencast 4 matches with sample code demo 3. Note: I started this as one long post for all 6 parts, but as it grew over 2000 words I figured it'd be better to break it up. Part 1: Your First Web API [Video and code on the ASP.NET site] This screencast starts with an overview of why you'd want to use ASP.NET Web API: Reach more clients (thinking beyond the browser to mobile clients, other applications, etc.) Scale (who doesn't love the cloud?!) Embrace HTTP (a focus on HTTP both on client and server really simplifies and focuses service interactions) Next, I start a new ASP.NET Web API application and show some of the basics of the ApiController. We don't write any new code in this first step, just look at the example controller that's created by File / New Project. using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Linq; using System.Net.Http; using System.Web.Http; namespace NewProject_Mvc4BetaWebApi.Controllers { public class ValuesController : ApiController { // GET /api/values public IEnumerable<string> Get() { return new string[] { "value1", "value2" }; } // GET /api/values/5 public string Get(int id) { return "value"; } // POST /api/values public void Post(string value) { } // PUT /api/values/5 public void Put(int id, string value) { } // DELETE /api/values/5 public void Delete(int id) { } } } Finally, we walk through testing the output of this API controller using browser tools. There are several ways you can test API output, including Fiddler (as described by Scott Hanselman in this post) and built-in developer tools available in all modern browsers. For simplicity I used Internet Explorer 9 F12 developer tools, but you're of course welcome to use whatever you'd like. A few important things to note: This class derives from an ApiController base class, not the standard ASP.NET MVC Controller base class. They're similar in places where API's and HTML returning controller uses are similar, and different where API and HTML use differ. A good example of where those things are different is in the routing conventions. In an HTTP controller, there's no need for an "action" to be specified, since the HTTP verbs are the actions. We don't need to do anything to map verbs to actions; when a request comes in to /api/values/5 with the DELETE HTTP verb, it'll automatically be handled by the Delete method in an ApiController. The comments above the API methods show sample URL's and HTTP verbs, so we can test out the first two GET methods by browsing to the site in IE9, hitting F12 to bring up the tools, and entering /api/values in the URL: That sample action returns a list of values. To get just one value back, we'd browse to /values/5: That's it for Part 1. In Part 2 we'll look at getting data (beyond hardcoded strings) and start building out a sample application.

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  • Közkívánatra VB tippjáték újra

    - by Lajos Sárecz
    Dimitri Gielis kiváló APEX fejleszto újra beindította APEX alapon készült népszeru online tippjátékát, így már lehet fogadni az idei foci VB mérkozéseire! 4 éve indult a rendszer, mi kollégákkal rendszeresen meg szoktunk mérkozni ennek keretében. Jó szurkolást, és izgalmas tippjátékot mindenkinek. Ja, és APEX forever! :-)

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