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  • Objective-C : Trouble with file download

    - by Holli
    I ran in a bit of trouble downloading files with Objective-C. I use the download decideDestinationWithSuggestedFilename from Apples documentation page. http://developer.apple.com/mac/library/documentation/cocoa/conceptual/URLLoadingSystem/Tasks/UsingNSURLDownload.html As long as I want to download just one file it works fine but I want to download an array for files one by one. The problem starts with the second file. Right now my code will trigger the next download itself from the downloadDidFinish Method. Then I will get an unrecognized selector sent to instance error. For me it looks like the NSURLDownload that just finished the download is still in use somehow. Release is called but the must be a problem. If I just put an NSBeep in the downloadDidFinished Method and trigger the next file download manually it works fine. Looks like I have to wait a while till I can start the next download. I know this question is a bit vague but maybe someone got an idea.

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  • Objective-C Memory Management: When do I [release]?

    - by Sahat
    I am still new to this Memory Management stuff (Garbage Collector took care of everything in Java), but as far as I understand if you allocate memory for an object then you have to release that memory back to the computer as soon as you are finished with your object. myObject = [Object alloc]; and [myObject release]; Right now I just have 3 parts in my Objective-C .m file: @Interface, @Implementation and main. I released my object at the end of the program next to these guys: [pool drain]; return 0; But what if this program were to be a lot more complicated, would it be okay to release myObject at the end of the program? I guess a better question would be when do I release an object's allocated memory? How do I know where to place [myObject release];?

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  • Trouble using opaque pointers in Objective C++

    - by morgancodes
    The answer to this quesion explains that opaque pointers are a good way to include C++ member variables in an Objective C++ header. I'm getting compile errors when trying to follow the example. Here's the relevant code from my header, with the corresponding compiler errors shown as comments: struct ADSR_opaque; // error: forward declaration of 'struct ADSR_opaque' @interface LoopyPulser : NSObject{ float _pulseRate; UInt32 tickInterval; UInt32 step; InMemoryAudioFile * audioFilePlayer; ADSR_opaque* env; // error: expected specifier-qualifier-list before 'ADSR_opaque' Pattern * pattern; float loopLengthRatio; float volume; } Is there something simple I'm doing wrong here?

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  • Objective-C method implementation nuances

    - by altdotnetgeek
    I have just started to develop for the iPhone and am in the process of learning Objective-C. I have seen some code that implements a method in the @implementation side of a class like this: -(void)myMethod; { // method body } What makes this interesting is that there is no mention of myMethod in the @interface for the class. I tried a sample project with this and when I compile I get a warning from XCode that myMethod may not be seen by the calling code. Can anyone tell me what is going on? Thanks!

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  • Wanting a simple overview on how to connect to a SQLite database in Cocoa/Objective-C

    - by Jesse
    Hi, everyone. I've been experimenting with Cocoa and Objective-C programming on the Mac for a few months now, and I am wanting to start developing applications that manage large amounts of data. The trouble is, I'm not really sure where to start with databases. I have a good background in Java programming with SQLite. I've read a bit about CoreData and I haven't been able to find any good resources for just manually connecting to the database. I'm looking for recommendations. Should I try CoreData, and if so, can anyone recommend a good tutorial for someone new to the language? Or, should I try to manually connect and query an SQLite database somehow, and, if so, any tutorials? Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

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  • Using malloc/free in Objective-C object

    - by Itamar Katz
    I have a class AudioManager with a member of type AudioBufferList *. (This is a struct declared in the CoreAudio framework). Since AudioBufferList is not a NSObject, I cannot retain it, so I have to alloc/free it (correct me if I'm wrong). My question is, where is the 'right' place to free it? Currently I am doing it in the dealloc method of AudioManager. If I understand correctly, this method is invoked automatically once the release message is sent to the instance of AudioManager --- is that true? Is there any other recommended practice regarding using alloc/free on non-objects members of Objective-C objects? Edit: From Apples documentation: Subclasses must implement their own versions of dealloc to allow the release of any additional memory consumed by the object—such as dynamically allocated storage for data or object instance variables owned by the deallocated object. After performing the class-specific deallocation, the subclass method should incorporate superclass versions of dealloc through a message to super: Which makes things a little bit clearer - but more insights are appreciated.

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  • Can somebody explain this Objective C method declaration syntax

    - by Doug R
    I'm working through an iPhone development book* without really knowing Objective C. For the most part I'm able to follow what's going on, but there are a few method declarations like the one below that I'm having a bit of trouble parsing. For example: - (NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView numberOfRowsInSection:(NSInteger) section { return [self.controllers count]; //controllers is an instance variable of type NSArray in this class } It looks this is a method called numberOfRowsInSection, and it returns an NSInteger, and takes an NSInteger as a parameter which is locally called 'section'. But I don't understand all the references to tableView, or why this takes a parameter when it is not used within the method. Can somebody clarify this? Thanks. *p. 258, Beginning iPhone 3 Development, by Mark and LaMarche, published by Apress

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  • Sharing classes between projects in xcode/objective-c

    - by Allyn
    Hey folks, I've got a client<=server app I'm building for Mac OS X, using Objective-c/Cocoa and xCode. I've created a different project for both the apps I have, and I'm wondering the best way to share classes between them. There are several classes I've made that would be useful to both. This far I've been copying them around, but I feel like this isn't the best solution. How do I share classes effectively? Should I redo it as 1 project and just have two build targets? How do I do this? Any other info? Thanks.

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  • Objective-C getter/ setter question

    - by pic-o-matic
    Hi, im trying to works my way trough an Objective-C tutorial. In the book there is this example: @interface { int width; int height; XYPoint *origin; } @property int width, height; I though, hey there's no getter/setter for the XYPoint object. The code does work though. Now i'm going maybe to answer my own question :). I thinks its because "origin" is a pointer already, and whats happening under the hood with "width" and "height", is that there is going te be created a pointer to them.. Am i right, or am i talking BS :) ??

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  • Objective-C initial values of created C-array

    - by kpower
    I create an array, similar to classic C (not NSArray or one of it's children) - something like BOOL i[5];. And I want to make all its values to be equal to NO. First of all, I didn't found any information about initial values of such arrays (I know that in classic C they will be undefined, but don't know exactly about Objective-C. I found info about classes and its inner data [after allocation, without initialization], but not about simple data types). And the second, if I should set array values manually - should I use memset(...); or something different? To prevent possible questions... I want to use this construction as array of temporary boolean flags and don't think that it is proved to use something like NSArray here.

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  • differing methods of alloc / init / retaining an object in objective-c

    - by taber
    In several pieces of sample objective-c code I've seen people create new objects like this: RootViewController *viewController = [[RootViewController alloc] init]; self.rootViewController = viewController; // self.rootViewController is a (nonatomic,retain) synthesized property [viewController release]; [window addSubview: [self.rootViewController view]]; Is that any different "behind the scenes" than doing it like this instead? self.rootViewController = [[RootViewController alloc] init]; [window addSubview: [self.rootViewController view]]; Seems a bit more straightforward/streamlined that way so I'm wondering why anyone would opt for the first method. Thanks!

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  • Simple Properties in Objective-C Classes

    - by tarnfeld
    Hey, I've bene working with Objective-C for a while now, and so far I have never really needed to craft my own classes, properly. I am a bit confused with the two arguments you can give the @property(a, b) declaration in a header file. When creating outlets to Interface Builder I usually do @property(nonatomic, retain) but I have no idea what this means. I'm writing a simple class which has a set of properties which will be set from the outside, like [instance setName:@"Bla Bla Bla"]; or I guess like instance.name = @"[email protected]" but I would rather the first option. How would I declare this kind of property on a class? Thanks in advanced! Sorry for the n00bish question :-)

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  • Objective C Array and Object Release

    - by david
    Hi, I have a newbie question regarding when to release the elements of a NSArray. See following pseudo code: NSMutalbeArray *2DArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithCapacity:10]; for (int i=0;i<10;i++) { NSMutableArray *array = [[MSMutableArray alloc] initWithCapacity:5]; for (int j=0;j<5;j++) { MyObject *obj = [[MyObject alloc] init]; [array addObject:obj]; [obj release]; } [2DArray addObject:array]; [array release]; } // use 2DArray to do something [2DArray release] My question here is, when I release 2DArray, do I need to explicitly release each of its element (array) first? Also, before I release the "array" object, do I need to release each of its element (MyObject) first? I am new to Objective C. Please help. thanks.

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  • Functions as pointers in Objective-C

    - by richman0829
    This is a question from Learn Objective-C on the Mac... Functions as pointers What I typed in, as per the recipe, was: NSString *boolString (BOOL yesNo) { if (yesNo) { return (@"YES"); } else { return (@"NO"); } } // boolString The pointer asterisk in the first line doesn't seem necessary, yet deleting it results in an error message. But what does it do? In NSString * boolString (yesNo); what seems to be going on is a function is defined as a pointer to an NSString. The function without the asterisk NSLog (@"are %d and %d different? %@", 5, 5, boolString(areTheyDifferent)); returns an NSString of YES or NO. But how can it return an NSString when it's a pointer? It might return the ADDRESS of an NSString; or if dereferenced it could return the CONTENTS of that address (an NSString such as YES or NO). Yet I see no place where it is dereferenced.

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  • Reading Stacktrace in Objective-C?

    - by yar
    I don't like real-time debugging much, but if it's necessary I'll do it. Is there any way to figure out what line of code a StackTrace in Objective-C refers to? What about the variable it refers to? For instance: 2010-05-13 19:39:11.673 Thingers[21003:207] *** -[NSCFString count]: unrecognized selector sent to instance 0x3b0ebb0 2010-05-13 19:39:11.674 Thingers[21003:207] *** Terminating app due to uncaught exception 'NSInvalidArgumentException', reason: '*** -[NSCFString count]: unrecognized selector sent to instance 0x3b0ebb0' 2010-05-13 19:39:11.675 Thingers[21003:207] Stack: ( 29303899 ... 11130 ) I see that we're talking about sending a count message to something that doesn't have it (maybe it's a NSCFString?), but is there any way to figure out what a/the named reference to that instance (0x3b0ebb0) refers to?

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  • Memory cleanup on returned array from static method (objective-c)

    - by Michael Bordelon
    In objective-c, I have a utility class with a bunch of static methods that I call for various tasks. As an example, I have one method that returns an NSArray that I allocate in the static method. If I set the NSArray to autorelease, then some time later, the NSArray in my calling method (that is assigned to the returned pointer) losses it's reference because the original form the static method is cleaned up. I can't release the NSArray object in the static method because it needs to be around for the return and assignment. What is the right way to return an object (like the NSArray) from a static class, and have it hang around for the calling class, but then get cleaned up later when it is no longer needed? Do I have to create the object first in the caller and pass in a pointer to the object and then return that same object form the static method? I know this is a basic O-O problem, I just never had this issue in Java and I do not do much C/C++. Thanks for your help.

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  • Create a template mechanism in Objective-C for iPad applications

    - by Flex_Addicted
    I'm looking for a solution to create a sort of template in Objective C. I'll try to explain my problem. I would create a sort of main view which has 1 side bar that remain always visible. This side bar have controls. The main view is responsible to load a Navigation Controller (UINavigationController seems to be ok) that manages other views. When switching a view to another, the sidebar always remain visible under the Navigation Controller and its views. Through the controls of the sidebar, it's possible to send event to a specific view loaded by the Navigation Controller. Any idea to create a similar template? Thank you. Best regards.

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  • Static string variable in Objective C on iphone

    - by Prajakta
    Hi, How to create & access static string in iPhone (objective c)? I declare static NSString *str = @"OldValue" in class A. If i assign some value to this in class B as str = @"NewValue". This value persists for all methods in class B. But if I access it in class C (after assignment in B) I am getting it as OldValue. Am I missing something? Should i use extern in other classes? Thanks & Regards, Yogini

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  • How to send JSON request to service with parameters in Objective-C

    - by user1323884
    I'm creating a iPhone app, and im trying to figure out how to create a JSON request to the webservice that contains parameters. In Java this would look like this HashMap<String, String> headers = new HashMap<String, String>(); JSONObject json = new JSONObject(); json.put("nid", null); json.put("vocab", null); json.put("inturl", testoverview); json.put("mail", username); // [email protected] json.put("md5pw", password); // donkeykong headers.put("X-FBR-App", json.toString()); The header has to contain a JSON object and "X-FBR-App" before the service recognizes the request. How would this be implemented in Objective-C ?

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  • Sorting array containing strings in objective c

    - by jakob
    Hello experts! I have an array named 'names' with strings looking like this: ["name_23_something", "name_25_something", "name_2_something"]; Now I would like to sort this array in ascending order so it looks like this: ["name_25_something", "name_23_something", "name_2_something"]; I guess that should start of with extracting the numbers since I want that the sorting is done by them: for(NSString *name in arr) { NSArray *nameSegments = [name componentsSeparatedByString:@"_"]; NSLog("number: %@", (NSString*)[nameSegments objectAtIndex:1]); } I'm thinking of creating a dictionary with the keys but I'm not sure if that is the correct objective-c way, maybe there some some methods I could use instead? Could you please me with some tips or example code how this sorting should be done in a proper way. Thank you

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  • Objective-C Plugin Architecture Security (Mac, not iphone)

    - by Tom Dalling
    I'm possibly writing a plugin system for a Cocoa application (Mac, not iphone). A common approach is the make each plugin a bundle, then inject the bundle into the main application. I'm concerned with the security implications of doing this, as the bundle will have complete access to the Objective-C runtime. I am especially concerned with a plugin having access to the code that handles registration and serial keys. Another plugin system we are considering is based on distributed notifications. Basically, each plugin will be a separate process, and they will communicate via distributed notifications only. Is there a way to load bundles securely (e.g. sandboxing)? If not, do you see any problems with using distributed notifications? Are there any other plugin architectures that would be better?

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  • [Objective-C] Primitive question, (void) init method.

    - by user354289
    Hi, I have a question in Objective-C. I'm using init method Apple recommended style. - (id)initMyClass: (int)a { if (self = [super init]) { // a... } return self; } Init method returns own object pointer. Then, if the object will not be refered from any objects, can empty return method(void) be better? - (void)initMyClass: (int)a { if ([super init] != nil) { // a... } } I want to know about that, if init method doesn't return self, what problem will occur?

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  • Objective C - RegexKitLite - Parsing inner contents of a string, ie: start(.*?)end

    - by Stu
    Please consider the following: NSString *myText = @"mary had a little lamb"; NSString *regexString = @"mary(.*?)little"; for)NSString *match in [myText captureComponentsMatchedByRegex:regexString]){ NSLog(@"%@",match); } This will output to the console two things: 1) "mary had a little" 2) "had a" What I want is just the 2nd bit of information "had a". Is there is a way of matching a string and returning just the inner part? I'm fairly new to Objective C, this feels a rather trivial question yet I can't find a less messy way of doing this than incrementing an integer in the for loop and on the second iteration storing the "had a" in an NSString.

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  • Call a macro every time any method is called - Objective C

    - by Jacob Relkin
    Hi, I wrote a debug macro that prints to the console the passed-in string whenever the global kDebug flag == YES. I need to print out the name of a method and it's classname whenever any method is called. That works fine when i painstakingly go through every method and write the name of the class and the method in a string. Is there any special handler that gets called when any method in Objective-C is called, and if so, is there a way i can somehow override it to call my debug macro?? The entire purpose of this is so that I don't have to go through every method in my code and hand-code the method signature in the debug macro call. Thanks

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  • Objective-C : enum like Java (int values and many others for each enum)

    - by Oliver
    In Java, you can make an enum having multiples values. In objective-C, this cannot be done easily. I've read many pages about this but I didn't found anything satisfying that would allow me to use enums by a simple way and to keep the enum declaration and their different values in the same file. I would like to write something like this in a enums.h : // ======================================== typedef enum {eRED, eGREEN, eBLUE} ColorEnum; int colorValues[] = { 0xFF0000, 0x00FF00, 0x0000FF }; NSArray *colorNames = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"Red color", @"light green", @"Deep blue", nil]; // ======================================== and be able to use thoses global variables to manage my stuff anywhere like : int color = colorValues[eRED]; But I don't know how to write this. I have compile errors like "ColorValues" is defines many times. Or if I just use "static", I have many "ColorValues" not used in .m file... Could you help me ?

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