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  • Silverlight Cream for April 12, 2010 -- #837

    - by Dave Campbell
    In this Issue: Michael Washington, Joe McBride, Kirupa, Maurice de Beijer, Brad Abrams, Phil Middlemiss, and CorrinaB. Shoutout: Charlie Kindel has a post up about the incompatibility between VS2010RTM and what we currently have for WP7: Visual Studio 2010 RTM and the Windows Phone Developer Tools CTP and if you want to be notified when that changes, submit your email here. Erik Mork and Co. have their latest This Week in Silverlight 4.9.2010 posted. From SilverlightCream.com: Simplified MVVM: Silverlight Video Player Michael Washington created a 'designable' video player using MVVM that allows any set of controls to implement the player. Great tutorial and all the code. Windows Phone 7 Panorama Behaviors Joe McBride posted a link to a couple WP7 gesture behaviors and a link out to some more by smartyP. Event Bubbling and Tunneling Kirupa has a great article up on Event Bubbling and Tunneling... showing the route that events take through your WPF or Silverlight app. Using dynamic objects in Silverlight 4 Maurice de Beijer has a blog up about binding to indexed properties in Silverlight 4... in other words, you don't have to know what you're binging to at design time. Silverlight 4 + RIA Services - Ready for Business: Ajax Endpoint Brad Abrams is still continuing his RIA series. His latest is on exposing your RIA Services in JSON. Changing Data-Templates at run-time from the VM Looks like I missed Phil Middlemiss' latest post on Changing DataTemplates at run-time. He has a visual of why you might need this right up-front, and is a very common issue. Check out the solution he provides us. Windows System Color Theme for Silverlight - Part Three CorrinaB blogged screenshots and discussion of 3 new themes that are going to be coming up, and what they've done to the controls in general. Stay in the 'Light! Twitter SilverlightNews | Twitter WynApse | WynApse.com | Tagged Posts | SilverlightCream Join me @ SilverlightCream | Phoenix Silverlight User Group Technorati Tags: Silverlight    Silverlight 3    Silverlight 4    Windows Phone MIX10

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  • Help with Boost Spirit ASTs

    - by Decmac04
    I am writing a small tool for analyzing simple B Machine substitutions as part of a college research work. The code successfully parse test inputs of the form mySubst := var1 + var2. However, I get a pop-up error message saying "This application has requested the Runtime to terminate it in an unusual way. " In the command prompt window, I get an "Assertion failed message". The main program is given below: // BMachineTree.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application. // /*============================================================================= Copyright (c) 2010 Temitope Onunkun =============================================================================*/ /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// // // UUsing Boost Spririt Trees (AST) to parse B Machine Substitutions. // /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// #define BOOST_SPIRIT_DUMP_PARSETREE_AS_XML #include <boost/spirit/core.hpp> #include <boost/spirit/tree/ast.hpp> #include <boost/spirit/tree/tree_to_xml.hpp> #include "BMachineTreeGrammar.hpp" #include <iostream> #include <stack> #include <functional> #include <string> #include <cassert> #include <vector> #if defined(BOOST_SPIRIT_DUMP_PARSETREE_AS_XML) #include <map> #endif // Using AST to parse B Machine substitutions //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// using namespace std; using namespace boost::spirit; typedef char const* iterator_t; typedef tree_match<iterator_t> parse_tree_match_t; typedef parse_tree_match_t::tree_iterator iter_t; //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// string evaluate(parse_tree_match_t hit); string eval_machine(iter_t const& i); vector<string> dx; string evaluate(tree_parse_info<> info) { return eval_machine(info.trees.begin()); } string eval_machine(iter_t const& i) { cout << "In eval_machine. i->value = " << string(i->value.begin(), i->value.end()) << " i->children.size() = " << i->children.size() << endl; if (i->value.id() == substitution::leafValueID) { assert(i->children.size() == 0); // extract string tokens string leafValue(i->value.begin(), i->value.end()); dx.push_back(leafValue.c_str()); return leafValue.c_str(); } // else if (i->value.id() == substitution::termID) { if ( (*i->value.begin() == '*') || (*i->value.begin() == '/') ) { assert(i->children.size() == 2); dx.push_back( eval_machine(i->children.begin()) ); dx.push_back( eval_machine(i->children.begin()+1) ); return eval_machine(i->children.begin()) + " " + eval_machine(i->children.begin()+1); } // else assert(0); } else if (i->value.id() == substitution::expressionID) { if ( (*i->value.begin() == '+') || (*i->value.begin() == '-') ) { assert(i->children.size() == 2); dx.push_back( eval_machine(i->children.begin()) ); dx.push_back( eval_machine(i->children.begin()+1) ); return eval_machine(i->children.begin()) + " " + eval_machine(i->children.begin()+1); } else assert(0); } // else if (i->value.id() == substitution::simple_substID) { if (*i->value.begin() == (':' >> '=') ) { assert(i->children.size() == 2); dx.push_back( eval_machine(i->children.begin()) ); dx.push_back( eval_machine(i->children.begin()+1) ); return eval_machine(i->children.begin()) + "|->" + eval_machine(i->children.begin()+1); } else assert(0); } else { assert(0); // error } return 0; } //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// int main() { // look in BMachineTreeGrammar for the definition of BMachine substitution BMach_subst; cout << "/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////\n\n"; cout << "\t\tB Machine Substitution...\n\n"; cout << "/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////\n\n"; cout << "Type an expression...or [q or Q] to quit\n\n"; string str; while (getline(cin, str)) { if (str.empty() || str[0] == 'q' || str[0] == 'Q') break; tree_parse_info<> info = ast_parse(str.c_str(), BMach_subst, space_p); if (info.full) { #if defined(BOOST_SPIRIT_DUMP_PARSETREE_AS_XML) // dump parse tree as XML std::map<parser_id, std::string> rule_names; rule_names[substitution::identifierID] = "identifier"; rule_names[substitution::leafValueID] = "leafValue"; rule_names[substitution::factorID] = "factor"; rule_names[substitution::termID] = "term"; rule_names[substitution::expressionID] = "expression"; rule_names[substitution::simple_substID] = "simple_subst"; tree_to_xml(cout, info.trees, str.c_str(), rule_names); #endif // print the result cout << "Variables in Vector dx: " << endl; for(vector<string>::iterator idx = dx.begin(); idx < dx.end(); ++idx) cout << *idx << endl; cout << "parsing succeeded\n"; cout << "result = " << evaluate(info) << "\n\n"; } else { cout << "parsing failed\n"; } } cout << "Bye... :-) \n\n"; return 0; } The grammar, defined in BMachineTreeGrammar.hpp file is given below: /*============================================================================= Copyright (c) 2010 Temitope Onunkun http://www.dcs.kcl.ac.uk/pg/onun Use, modification and distribution is subject to the Boost Software License, Version 1.0. (See accompanying file LICENSE_1_0.txt or copy at http://www.boost.org/LICENSE_1_0.txt) =============================================================================*/ #ifndef BOOST_SPIRIT_BMachineTreeGrammar_HPP_ #define BOOST_SPIRIT_BMachineTreeGrammar_HPP_ using namespace boost::spirit; /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// // // Using Boost Spririt Trees (AST) to parse B Machine Substitutions. // /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// // // B Machine Grammar // //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// struct substitution : public grammar<substitution> { static const int identifierID = 1; static const int leafValueID = 2; static const int factorID = 3; static const int termID = 4; static const int expressionID = 5; static const int simple_substID = 6; template <typename ScannerT> struct definition { definition(substitution const& ) { // Start grammar definition identifier = alpha_p >> (+alnum_p | ch_p('_') ) ; leafValue = leaf_node_d[ lexeme_d[ identifier | +digit_p ] ] ; factor = leafValue | inner_node_d[ ch_p( '(' ) >> expression >> ch_p(')' ) ] ; term = factor >> *( (root_node_d[ch_p('*') ] >> factor ) | (root_node_d[ch_p('/') ] >> factor ) ); expression = term >> *( (root_node_d[ch_p('+') ] >> term ) | (root_node_d[ch_p('-') ] >> term ) ); simple_subst= leaf_node_d[ lexeme_d[ identifier ] ] >> root_node_d[str_p(":=")] >> expression ; // End grammar definition // turn on the debugging info. BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_RULE(identifier); BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_RULE(leafValue); BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_RULE(factor); BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_RULE(term); BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_RULE(expression); BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_RULE(simple_subst); } rule<ScannerT, parser_context<>, parser_tag<simple_substID> > simple_subst; rule<ScannerT, parser_context<>, parser_tag<expressionID> > expression; rule<ScannerT, parser_context<>, parser_tag<termID> > term; rule<ScannerT, parser_context<>, parser_tag<factorID> > factor; rule<ScannerT, parser_context<>, parser_tag<leafValueID> > leafValue; rule<ScannerT, parser_context<>, parser_tag<identifierID> > identifier; rule<ScannerT, parser_context<>, parser_tag<simple_substID> > const& start() const { return simple_subst; } }; }; #endif The output I get on running the program is: ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////// B Machine Substitution... ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Type an expression...or [q or Q] to quit mySubst := var1 - var2 parsing succeeded In eval_machine. i->value = := i->children.size() = 2 Assertion failed: 0, file c:\redmound\bmachinetree\bmachinetree\bmachinetree.cpp , line 114 I will appreciate any help in resolving this problem.

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  • SSIS Reporting Pack – a performance tip

    - by jamiet
    SSIS Reporting Pack is a suite of open source SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS) reports that provide additional insight into the SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) 2012 Catalog. You can read more about SSIS Reporting Pack here on my blog or had over to the home page for the project at http://ssisreportingpack.codeplex.com/. After having used SSRS Reporting Pack on a real project for a few months now I have come to realise that if you have any sizeable data volumes in [SSISDB] then the reports in SSIS Reporting Pack will suffer from chronic performance problems – I have seen the “execution” report take upwards of 30minutes to return data. To combat this I highly recommend that you create an index on the [SSISDB].[internal].[event_messages].[operation_id] & [SSISDB].[internal].[operation_messages].[operation_id] fields. Phil Brammer has experienced similar problems himself and has since made it easy for the rest of us by preparing some scripts to create the indexes that he recommends and he has shared those scripts via his blog at http://www.ssistalk.com/SSIS_2012_Missing_Indexes.zip. If you are using SSIS Reporting Pack, or even if you are simply querying [SSISDB], I highly recommend that you download Phil’s scripts and test them out on your own SSIS Catalog(s). Those indexes will not solve all problems but they will make some of your reports run quicker. I am working on some further enhancements that should further improve the performance of the reports. Watch this space. @Jamiet

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  • Silverlight Cream for May 25, 2010 -- #869

    - by Dave Campbell
    In this Issue: Miroslav Miroslavov, Victor Gaudioso, Phil Middlemiss, Jonathan van de Veen, Lee, and Domagoj Pavlešic. From SilverlightCream.com: Book Folding effect using Pixel Shader On the new CompleteIT site, did you know the page-folding was done using PixelShaders? I hadn't put much thought into it, but that's pretty cool, and Miroslav Miroslavov has a blog post up discussing it, and the code behind it. New Silverlight Video Tutorial: How to create a Slider with a ToolTip that shows the Value of the Slider This is pretty cool... Victor Gaudioso's latest video tutorial shows how to put the slider position in the slider tooltip... code and video tutorial included. Backlighting a ListBox Put this in the cool category as well... Phil Middlemiss worked out a ListBox styling that makes the selected item be 'backlit' ... check out the screenshot on the post... and then grab the code :) Adventures while building a Silverlight Enterprise application part #33 Jonathan van de Veen is discussing changes to his project/team and how that has affected development. Read about what they did right and some of their struggles. RIA Services and Storedprocedures Lee's discussing Stored Procs and RIA Services ... he begins with one that just works, then moves on to demonstrate the kernel of the problem he's attacking and the solution of it. DoubleClick in Silverlight Domagoj Pavlešic got inspiration from one of Mike Snow's Tips of the Day and took off on the double-click idea... project source included. Stay in the 'Light! Twitter SilverlightNews | Twitter WynApse | WynApse.com | Tagged Posts | SilverlightCream Join me @ SilverlightCream | Phoenix Silverlight User Group Technorati Tags: Silverlight    Silverlight 3    Silverlight 4    Windows Phone MIX10

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  • Optimizing Disk I/O & RAID on Windows SQL Server 2005

    - by David
    I've been monitoring our SQL server for a while, and have noticed that I/O hits 100% every so often using Task Manager and Perfmon. I have normally been able to correlate this spike with SUSPENDED processes in SQL Server Management when I execute "exec sp_who2". The RAID controller is controlled by LSI MegaRAID Storage Manager. We have the following setup: System Drive (Windows) on RAID 1 with two 280GB drives SQL is on a RAID 10 (2 mirroed drives of 280GB in two different spans) This is a database that is hammered during the day, but is pretty inactive at night. The DB size is currently about 13GB, and is used by approximately 200 (and growing) users a day. I have a couple of ideas I'm toying around with: Checking for Indexes & reindexing some tables Adding an additional RAID 1 (with 2 new, smaller, HDs) and moving the SQL's Log Data File (LDF) onto the new RAID. For #2, my question is this: Would we really be increasing disk performance (IO) by moving data off of the RAID 10 onto a RAID 1? RAID 10 obviously has better performance than RAID 1. Furthermore, SQL must write to the transaction logs before writing to the database. But on the flip side, we'll be reducing both the size of the disks as well as the amount of data written to the RAID 10, which is where all of the "meat" is - thereby increasing that RAID's performance for read requests. Is there any way to find out what our current limiting factor is? (The drives vs. the RAID Controller)? If the limiting factor is the drives, then maybe adding the additional RAID 1 makes sense. But if the limiting factor is the Controller itself, then I think we're approaching this thing wrong. Finally, are we just wasting our time? Should we instead be focusing our efforts towards #1 (reindexing tables, reducing network latency where possible, etc...)?

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  • Which type RAM support Our Servers?

    - by Mikunos
    I need to increase the RAM in our DELL servers but with the lshw I cannot see if the RAM installed is a UDIMM or RDIMM. Handle 0x1100, DMI type 17, 28 bytes Memory Device Array Handle: 0x1000 Error Information Handle: Not Provided Total Width: 72 bits Data Width: 64 bits Size: 2048 MB Form Factor: DIMM Set: 1 Locator: DIMM_A1 Bank Locator: Not Specified Type: <OUT OF SPEC> Type Detail: Synchronous Speed: 1333 MHz (0.8 ns) Manufacturer: 00CE00B380CE Serial Number: 8244850B Asset Tag: 02103961 Part Number: M393B5773CH0-CH9 Handle 0x1101, DMI type 17, 28 bytes Memory Device Array Handle: 0x1000 Error Information Handle: Not Provided Total Width: 72 bits Data Width: 64 bits Size: 2048 MB Form Factor: DIMM Set: 1 Locator: DIMM_A2 Bank Locator: Not Specified Type: <OUT OF SPEC> Type Detail: Synchronous Speed: 1333 MHz (0.8 ns) Manufacturer: 00CE00B380CE Serial Number: 8244855D Asset Tag: 02103961 Part Number: M393B5773CH0-CH9 Handle 0x1102, DMI type 17, 28 bytes Memory Device Array Handle: 0x1000 Error Information Handle: Not Provided Total Width: 72 bits Data Width: 64 bits Size: 2048 MB Form Factor: DIMM Set: 2 Locator: DIMM_A3 Bank Locator: Not Specified Type: <OUT OF SPEC> Type Detail: Synchronous Speed: 1333 MHz (0.8 ns) Manufacturer: 00CE00B380CE Serial Number: 8244853E Asset Tag: 02103961 Part Number: M393B5773CH0-CH9 how have we do to know which is the right RAM memory to buy? thanks

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  • Why is piping dd through gzip so much faster than a direct copy?

    - by Foo Bar
    I wanted to backup a path from a computer in my network to another computer in the same network over a 100MBit/s line. For this I did dd if=/local/path of=/remote/path/in/local/network/backup.img which gave me a very low network transfer speed of something about 50 to 100 kB/s, which would have taken forever. So I stopped it and decided to try gzipping it on the fly to make it much smaller so that the amount to transfer is less. So I did dd if=/local/folder | gzip > /remote/path/in/local/network/backup.img.gz But now I get something like 1 MB/s network transfer speed, so a factor of 10 to 20 faster. After noticing this, I tested this on several paths and files and it was always the same. Why does piping dd through gzip also increase the transfer rates by a large factor instead of only reducing the bytelength of the stream by a large factor? I'd expected even a small decrease in transfer rates instead, due to the higher CPU consumption while compressing, but now I get a double plus. Not that I'm not happy, but just wondering. ;)

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  • How can i estimate memory usage of stl::map?

    - by Drakosha
    For example, I have a std::map with known sizeof(A) and sizefo(B), while map has N entries inside. How would you estimate its memory usage? I'd say it's something like (sizeof(A) + sizeof(B)) * N * factor But what is the factor? Different formula maybe? Update: Maybe it's easier to ask for upper bound?

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  • My first Lisp macro; is it leaky?

    - by Tom Martin
    I've been working through Practical Common Lisp and as an exercise decided to write a macro to determine if a number is a multiple of another number: (defmacro multp (value factor) `(= (rem ,value ,factor) 0)) so that : (multp 40 10) evaluates to true whilst (multp 40 13) does not The question is does this macro leak in some way? Also is this "good" Lisp? Is there already an existing function/macro that I could have used?

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  • Fractional y-var in ggplot

    - by Misha
    How can I easily create a fractional y-value when using ggplot? t <- as.factor(test=sample(seq(0,100,10),1000,rep=T)) d <- as.factor(sample(c(0,1),1000,rep=T) p <- data.frame(t,d) My best shot was: ggplot(p,aes(x=t,y=prop.table(table(t,d),1)[,1])) + geom_point() However this doesnt work and I guess there is an easier way around this...

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  • Silverlight Cream for December 05, 2010 -- #1003

    - by Dave Campbell
    In this (Almost) All-Submittal Issue: John Papa(-2-), Jesse Liberty, Tim Heuer, Dan Wahlin, Markus Egger, Phil Middlemiss, Coding4Fun, Michael Washington, Gill Cleeren, MichaelD!, Colin Eberhardt, Kunal Chowdhury, and Rabeeh Abla. Above the Fold: Silverlight: "Two-Way Binding on TreeView.SelectedItem" Phil Middlemiss WP7: "Taking Screen Shots of Windows Phone 7 Panorama Apps" Markus Egger Training: "Beginners Guide to Visual Studio LightSwitch (Part - 4)" Kunal Chowdhury Shoutouts: Don't let the fire go out... check out the Firestarter Labs Bart Czernicki discusses the need for 64-bit Silverlight: Why a 64-bit runtime for Silverlight 5 Matters Laurent Duveau is interviewed by the SilverlightShow folks to discuss his WP7 app: Laurent Duveau on Morse Code Flash Light WP7 Application From SilverlightCream.com: John Papa: Silverlight 5 Features John Papa has a post up highlighting his take on what's cool in the new featureset for Silverlight 5... including an external link to the keynote. Silverlight Firestarter Keynote and Sessions John Papa also has posted links to all the individual session videos... what a great resource! Yet Another Podcast #17 – Scott Guthrie Jesse Liberty went big with his latest Yet Another Podcast ... he is interviewing Scott Guthrie about the Firestarter, Silverlight, WP7. and more. Silverlight 5 Plans Revealed With this post from Tim Heuer, I find myself adding a Silverlight 5 tag... so bring on the fun! ... unless you've been overloaded like I have since last Thursday, you've probably seen this, but what the heck... Silverlight Firestarter Wrap Up and WCF RIA Services Talk Sample Code Phoenix's own Dan Wahlin had a great WCF RIA Services presentation at the Firestarter last week, and his material and lots of other good links are up on his blog, and I'd say that even if he didn't have a couple shoutouts to me in it :) Thanks Dan!! Taking Screen Shots of Windows Phone 7 Panorama Apps Markus Egger helps us all out with a post on how to get screenshots of your WP7 Panorama app... in case you haven't tried it ... it's not as easy as it sounds! Two-Way Binding on TreeView.SelectedItem Phil Middlemiss is back with a post taking some of the mystery out of the TreeView control bound to a data context and dealing with the SelectedItem property... oh yeah, and throw all that into MVVM! Great tutorial as usual, a cool behavior, and all the source. Native Extensions for Microsoft Silverlight Alan Cobb pointed me to a quick post up on the Coding4Fun site about the NESL (Native Extensions for SilverLight) from Microsoft that give access to some cool features of Windows 7 from Silverlight... I added an NESL tag in case other posts appear on this subject. Silverlight Simple Drag And Drop / Or Browse View Model / MVVM File Upload Control Michael Washington has another great tutorial up at CodeProject that expands on prior work he'd done with drag/drop file upload with this post on integrating an updated browse/upload into ViewModel/MVVM projects, all of which is Blendable. The validation story in Silverlight (Part 1) In good news for all of us, Gill Cleeren has started a tutorial series at SilverlightShow on Silverlight Validation. The first one is up discussing the basics... The Common Framework MichaelD! has a WPF/Silverlight framework up with Facebook Authentication, Xaml-driven IOC, T4 synchronous WCF proxies, and WP7 on the roadmap... source on CodePlex, check it out and give him some feedback. Exploring Reactive Extensions (Rx) through Twitter and Bing Maps Mashups If you've been waiting around to learn Rx, Colin Eberhardt has the post up for you (and me)... great tutorial up on Twitter and Bing Maps Mashups ... and all the code... for the twitter immediate app, and also the UKSnow one we showed last week... check out the demo page, and grab the source! Beginners Guide to Visual Studio LightSwitch (Part - 4) Kunal Chowdhury has the 4th part of his Lightswitch tutorial series up at SilverlightShow. In this one, he shows how to integrate multiple tables into a screen. It is here Take Your Silverlight Application Full Screen & intercept all windows keys !! Rabeeh Abla sent me this link to the blog describing a COM exposed library that intercepts all keys when Silverlight is full-screen. There are a few I hit when I'm going through blogs that Ctrl-W (FF) just won't take down and that annoys me... so this might be a solution if you have that problem... worth a look anyway! Stay in the 'Light! Twitter SilverlightNews | Twitter WynApse | WynApse.com | Tagged Posts | SilverlightCream Join me @ SilverlightCream | Phoenix Silverlight User Group Technorati Tags: Silverlight    Silverlight 3    Silverlight 4    Windows Phone MIX10

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  • SQLAuthority News – Job Interviewing the Right Way (and for the Right Reasons) – Guest Post by Feodor Georgiev

    - by pinaldave
    Feodor Georgiev is a SQL Server database specialist with extensive experience of thinking both within and outside the box. He has wide experience of different systems and solutions in the fields of architecture, scalability, performance, etc. Feodor has experience with SQL Server 2000 and later versions, and is certified in SQL Server 2008. Feodor has written excellent article on Job Interviewing the Right Way. Here is his article in his own language. A while back I was thinking to start a blog post series on interviewing and employing IT personnel. At that time I had just read the ‘Smart and gets things done’ book (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/items/2007/06/05.html) and I was hyped up on some debatable topics regarding finding and employing the best people in the branch. I have no problem with hiring the best of the best; it’s just the definition of ‘the best of the best’ that makes things a bit more complicated. One of the fundamental books one can read on the topic of interviewing is the one mentioned above. If you have not read it, then you must do so; not because it contains the ultimate truth, and not because it gives the answers to most questions on the subject, but because the book contains an extensive set of questions about interviewing and employing people. Of course, a big part of these questions have different answers, depending on location, culture, available funds and so on. (What works in the US may not necessarily work in the Nordic countries or India, or it may work in a different way). The only thing that is valid regardless of any external factor is this: curiosity. In my belief there are two kinds of people – curious and not-so-curious; regardless of profession. Think about it – professional success is directly proportional to the individual’s curiosity + time of active experience in the field. (I say ‘active experience’ because vacations and any distractions do not count as experience :)  ) So, curiosity is the factor which will distinguish a good employee from the not-so-good one. But let’s shift our attention to something else for now: a few tips and tricks for successful interviews. Tip and trick #1: get your priorities straight. Your status usually dictates your priorities; for example, if the person looking for a job has just relocated to a new country, they might tend to ignore some of their priorities and overload others. In other words, setting priorities straight means to define the personal criteria by which the interview process is lead. For example, similar to the following questions can help define the criteria for someone looking for a job: How badly do I need a (any) job? Is it more important to work in a clean and quiet environment or is it important to get paid well (or both, if possible)? And so on… Furthermore, before going to the interview, the candidate should have a list of priorities, sorted by the most importance: e.g. I want a quiet environment, x amount of money, great helping boss, a desk next to a window and so on. Also it is a good idea to be prepared and know which factors can be compromised and to what extent. Tip and trick #2: the interview is a two-way street. A job candidate should not forget that the interview process is not a one-way street. What I mean by this is that while the employer is interviewing the potential candidate, the job seeker should not miss the chance to interview the employer. Usually, the employer and the candidate will meet for an interview and talk about a variety of topics. In a quality interview the candidate will be presented to key members of the team and will have the opportunity to ask them questions. By asking the right questions both parties will define their opinion about each other. For example, if the candidate talks to one of the potential bosses during the interview process and they notice that the potential manager has a hard time formulating a question, then it is up to the candidate to decide whether working with such person is a red flag for them. There are as many interview processes out there as there are companies and each one is different. Some bigger companies and corporates can afford pre-selection processes, 3 or even 4 stages of interviews, small companies usually settle with one interview. Some companies even give cognitive tests on the interview. Why not? In his book Joel suggests that a good candidate should be pampered and spoiled beyond belief with a week-long vacation in New York, fancy hotels, food and who knows what. For all I can imagine, an interview might even take place at the top of the Eifel tower (right, Mr. Joel, right?) I doubt, however, that this is the optimal way to capture the attention of a good employee. The ‘curiosity’ topic What I have learned so far in my professional experience is that opinions can be subjective. Plus, opinions on technology subjects can also be subjective. According to Joel, only hiring the best of the best is worth it. If you ask me, there is no such thing as best of the best, simply because human nature (well, aside from some physical limitations, like putting your pants on through your head :) ) has no boundaries. And why would it have boundaries? I have seen many curious and interesting people, naturally good at technology, though uninterested in it as one  can possibly be; I have also seen plenty of people interested in technology, who (in an ideal world) should have stayed far from it. At any rate, all of this sums up at the end to the ‘supply and demand’ factor. The interview process big-bang boils down to this: If there is a mutual benefit for both the employer and the potential employee to work together, then it all sorts out nicely. If there is no benefit, then it is much harder to get to a common place. Tip and trick #3: word-of-mouth is worth a thousand words Here I would just mention that the best thing a job candidate can get during the interview process is access to future team members or other employees of the new company. Nowadays the world has become quite small and everyone knows everyone. Look at LinkedIn, look at other professional networks and you will realize how small the world really is. Knowing people is a good way to become more approachable and to approach them. Tip and trick #4: Be confident. It is true that for some people confidence is as natural as breathing and others have to work hard to express it. Confidence is, however, a key factor in convincing the other side (potential employer or employee) that there is a great chance for success by working together. But it cannot get you very far if it’s not backed up by talent, curiosity and knowledge. Tip and trick #5: The right reasons What really bothers me in Sweden (and I am sure that there are similar situations in other countries) is that there is a tendency to fill quotas and to filter out candidates by criteria different from their skill and knowledge. In job ads I see quite often the phrases ‘positive thinker’, ‘team player’ and many similar hints about personality features. So my guess here is that discrimination has evolved to a new level. Let me clear up the definition of discrimination: ‘unfair treatment of a person or group on the basis of prejudice’. And prejudice is the ‘partiality that prevents objective consideration of an issue or situation’. In other words, there is not much difference whether a job candidate is filtered out by race, gender or by personality features – it is all a bad habit. And in reality, there is no proven correlation between the technology knowledge paired with skills and the personal features (gender, race, age, optimism). It is true that a significantly greater number of Darwin awards were given to men than to women, but I am sure that somewhere there is a paper or theory explaining the genetics behind this. J This topic actually brings to mind one of my favorite work related stories. A while back I was working for a big company with many teams involved in their processes. One of the teams was occupying 2 rooms – one had the team members and was full of light, colorful posters, chit-chats and giggles, whereas the other room was dark, lighted only by a single monitor with a quiet person in front of it. Later on I realized that the ‘dark room’ person was the guru and the ultimate problem-solving-brain who did not like the chats and giggles and hence was in a separate room. In reality, all severe problems which the chatty and cheerful team members could not solve and all emergencies were directed to ‘the dark room’. And thus all worked out well. The moral of the story: Personality has nothing to do with technology knowledge and skills. End of story. Summary: I’d like to stress the fact that there is no ultimately perfect candidate for a job, and there is no such thing as ‘best-of-the-best’. From my personal experience, the main criteria by which I measure people (co-workers and bosses) is the curiosity factor; I know from experience that the more curious and inventive a person is, the better chances there are for great achievements in their field. Related stories: (for extra credit) 1) Get your priorities straight. A while back as a consultant I was working for a few days at a time at different offices and for different clients, and so I was able to compare and analyze the work environments. There were two different places which I compared and recently I asked a friend of mine the following question: “Which one would you prefer as a work environment: a noisy office full of people, or a quiet office full of faulty smells because the office is rarely cleaned?” My friend was puzzled for a while, thought about it and said: “Hmm, you are talking about two different kinds of pollution… I will probably choose the second, since I can clean the workplace myself a bit…” 2) The interview is a two-way street. One time, during a job interview, I met a potential boss that had a hard time phrasing a question. At that particular time it was clear to me that I would not have liked to work under this person. According to my work religion, the properly asked question contains at least half of the answer. And if I work with someone who cannot ask a question… then I’d be doing double or triple work. At another interview, after the technical part with the team leader of the department, I was introduced to one of the team members and we were left alone for 5 minutes. I immediately jumped on the occasion and asked the blunt question: ‘What have you learned here for the past year and how do you like your job?’ The team member looked at me and said ‘Nothing really. I like playing with my cats at home, so I am out of here at 5pm and I don’t have time for much.’ I was disappointed at the time and I did not take the job offer. I wasn’t that shocked a few months later when the company went bankrupt. 3) The right reasons to take a job: personality check. A while back I was asked to serve as a job reference for a coworker. I agreed, and after some weeks I got a phone call from the company where my colleague was applying for a job. The conversation started with the manager’s question about my colleague’s personality and about their social skills. (You can probably guess what my internal reaction was… J ) So, after 30 minutes of pouring common sense into the interviewer’s head, we finally agreed on the fact that a shy or quiet personality has nothing to do with work skills and knowledge. Some years down the road my former colleague is taking the manager’s position as the manager is demoted to a different department. Reference: Feodor Georgiev, Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: PostADay, Readers Contribution, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • Simplex Noise Help

    - by Alex Larsen
    Im Making A Minecraft Like Gae In XNA C# And I Need To Generate Land With Caves This Is The Code For Simplex I Have /// <summary> /// 1D simplex noise /// </summary> /// <param name="x"></param> /// <returns></returns> public static float Generate(float x) { int i0 = FastFloor(x); int i1 = i0 + 1; float x0 = x - i0; float x1 = x0 - 1.0f; float n0, n1; float t0 = 1.0f - x0 * x0; t0 *= t0; n0 = t0 * t0 * grad(perm[i0 & 0xff], x0); float t1 = 1.0f - x1 * x1; t1 *= t1; n1 = t1 * t1 * grad(perm[i1 & 0xff], x1); // The maximum value of this noise is 8*(3/4)^4 = 2.53125 // A factor of 0.395 scales to fit exactly within [-1,1] return 0.395f * (n0 + n1); } /// <summary> /// 2D simplex noise /// </summary> /// <param name="x"></param> /// <param name="y"></param> /// <returns></returns> public static float Generate(float x, float y) { const float F2 = 0.366025403f; // F2 = 0.5*(sqrt(3.0)-1.0) const float G2 = 0.211324865f; // G2 = (3.0-Math.sqrt(3.0))/6.0 float n0, n1, n2; // Noise contributions from the three corners // Skew the input space to determine which simplex cell we're in float s = (x + y) * F2; // Hairy factor for 2D float xs = x + s; float ys = y + s; int i = FastFloor(xs); int j = FastFloor(ys); float t = (float)(i + j) * G2; float X0 = i - t; // Unskew the cell origin back to (x,y) space float Y0 = j - t; float x0 = x - X0; // The x,y distances from the cell origin float y0 = y - Y0; // For the 2D case, the simplex shape is an equilateral triangle. // Determine which simplex we are in. int i1, j1; // Offsets for second (middle) corner of simplex in (i,j) coords if (x0 > y0) { i1 = 1; j1 = 0; } // lower triangle, XY order: (0,0)->(1,0)->(1,1) else { i1 = 0; j1 = 1; } // upper triangle, YX order: (0,0)->(0,1)->(1,1) // A step of (1,0) in (i,j) means a step of (1-c,-c) in (x,y), and // a step of (0,1) in (i,j) means a step of (-c,1-c) in (x,y), where // c = (3-sqrt(3))/6 float x1 = x0 - i1 + G2; // Offsets for middle corner in (x,y) unskewed coords float y1 = y0 - j1 + G2; float x2 = x0 - 1.0f + 2.0f * G2; // Offsets for last corner in (x,y) unskewed coords float y2 = y0 - 1.0f + 2.0f * G2; // Wrap the integer indices at 256, to avoid indexing perm[] out of bounds int ii = i % 256; int jj = j % 256; // Calculate the contribution from the three corners float t0 = 0.5f - x0 * x0 - y0 * y0; if (t0 < 0.0f) n0 = 0.0f; else { t0 *= t0; n0 = t0 * t0 * grad(perm[ii + perm[jj]], x0, y0); } float t1 = 0.5f - x1 * x1 - y1 * y1; if (t1 < 0.0f) n1 = 0.0f; else { t1 *= t1; n1 = t1 * t1 * grad(perm[ii + i1 + perm[jj + j1]], x1, y1); } float t2 = 0.5f - x2 * x2 - y2 * y2; if (t2 < 0.0f) n2 = 0.0f; else { t2 *= t2; n2 = t2 * t2 * grad(perm[ii + 1 + perm[jj + 1]], x2, y2); } // Add contributions from each corner to get the final noise value. // The result is scaled to return values in the interval [-1,1]. return 40.0f * (n0 + n1 + n2); // TODO: The scale factor is preliminary! } public static float Generate(float x, float y, float z) { // Simple skewing factors for the 3D case const float F3 = 0.333333333f; const float G3 = 0.166666667f; float n0, n1, n2, n3; // Noise contributions from the four corners // Skew the input space to determine which simplex cell we're in float s = (x + y + z) * F3; // Very nice and simple skew factor for 3D float xs = x + s; float ys = y + s; float zs = z + s; int i = FastFloor(xs); int j = FastFloor(ys); int k = FastFloor(zs); float t = (float)(i + j + k) * G3; float X0 = i - t; // Unskew the cell origin back to (x,y,z) space float Y0 = j - t; float Z0 = k - t; float x0 = x - X0; // The x,y,z distances from the cell origin float y0 = y - Y0; float z0 = z - Z0; // For the 3D case, the simplex shape is a slightly irregular tetrahedron. // Determine which simplex we are in. int i1, j1, k1; // Offsets for second corner of simplex in (i,j,k) coords int i2, j2, k2; // Offsets for third corner of simplex in (i,j,k) coords /* This code would benefit from a backport from the GLSL version! */ if (x0 >= y0) { if (y0 >= z0) { i1 = 1; j1 = 0; k1 = 0; i2 = 1; j2 = 1; k2 = 0; } // X Y Z order else if (x0 >= z0) { i1 = 1; j1 = 0; k1 = 0; i2 = 1; j2 = 0; k2 = 1; } // X Z Y order else { i1 = 0; j1 = 0; k1 = 1; i2 = 1; j2 = 0; k2 = 1; } // Z X Y order } else { // x0<y0 if (y0 < z0) { i1 = 0; j1 = 0; k1 = 1; i2 = 0; j2 = 1; k2 = 1; } // Z Y X order else if (x0 < z0) { i1 = 0; j1 = 1; k1 = 0; i2 = 0; j2 = 1; k2 = 1; } // Y Z X order else { i1 = 0; j1 = 1; k1 = 0; i2 = 1; j2 = 1; k2 = 0; } // Y X Z order } // A step of (1,0,0) in (i,j,k) means a step of (1-c,-c,-c) in (x,y,z), // a step of (0,1,0) in (i,j,k) means a step of (-c,1-c,-c) in (x,y,z), and // a step of (0,0,1) in (i,j,k) means a step of (-c,-c,1-c) in (x,y,z), where // c = 1/6. float x1 = x0 - i1 + G3; // Offsets for second corner in (x,y,z) coords float y1 = y0 - j1 + G3; float z1 = z0 - k1 + G3; float x2 = x0 - i2 + 2.0f * G3; // Offsets for third corner in (x,y,z) coords float y2 = y0 - j2 + 2.0f * G3; float z2 = z0 - k2 + 2.0f * G3; float x3 = x0 - 1.0f + 3.0f * G3; // Offsets for last corner in (x,y,z) coords float y3 = y0 - 1.0f + 3.0f * G3; float z3 = z0 - 1.0f + 3.0f * G3; // Wrap the integer indices at 256, to avoid indexing perm[] out of bounds int ii = i % 256; int jj = j % 256; int kk = k % 256; // Calculate the contribution from the four corners float t0 = 0.6f - x0 * x0 - y0 * y0 - z0 * z0; if (t0 < 0.0f) n0 = 0.0f; else { t0 *= t0; n0 = t0 * t0 * grad(perm[ii + perm[jj + perm[kk]]], x0, y0, z0); } float t1 = 0.6f - x1 * x1 - y1 * y1 - z1 * z1; if (t1 < 0.0f) n1 = 0.0f; else { t1 *= t1; n1 = t1 * t1 * grad(perm[ii + i1 + perm[jj + j1 + perm[kk + k1]]], x1, y1, z1); } float t2 = 0.6f - x2 * x2 - y2 * y2 - z2 * z2; if (t2 < 0.0f) n2 = 0.0f; else { t2 *= t2; n2 = t2 * t2 * grad(perm[ii + i2 + perm[jj + j2 + perm[kk + k2]]], x2, y2, z2); } float t3 = 0.6f - x3 * x3 - y3 * y3 - z3 * z3; if (t3 < 0.0f) n3 = 0.0f; else { t3 *= t3; n3 = t3 * t3 * grad(perm[ii + 1 + perm[jj + 1 + perm[kk + 1]]], x3, y3, z3); } // Add contributions from each corner to get the final noise value. // The result is scaled to stay just inside [-1,1] return 32.0f * (n0 + n1 + n2 + n3); // TODO: The scale factor is preliminary! } private static byte[] perm = new byte[512] { 151,160,137,91,90,15, 131,13,201,95,96,53,194,233,7,225,140,36,103,30,69,142,8,99,37,240,21,10,23, 190, 6,148,247,120,234,75,0,26,197,62,94,252,219,203,117,35,11,32,57,177,33, 88,237,149,56,87,174,20,125,136,171,168, 68,175,74,165,71,134,139,48,27,166, 77,146,158,231,83,111,229,122,60,211,133,230,220,105,92,41,55,46,245,40,244, 102,143,54, 65,25,63,161, 1,216,80,73,209,76,132,187,208, 89,18,169,200,196, 135,130,116,188,159,86,164,100,109,198,173,186, 3,64,52,217,226,250,124,123, 5,202,38,147,118,126,255,82,85,212,207,206,59,227,47,16,58,17,182,189,28,42, 223,183,170,213,119,248,152, 2,44,154,163, 70,221,153,101,155,167, 43,172,9, 129,22,39,253, 19,98,108,110,79,113,224,232,178,185, 112,104,218,246,97,228, 251,34,242,193,238,210,144,12,191,179,162,241, 81,51,145,235,249,14,239,107, 49,192,214, 31,181,199,106,157,184, 84,204,176,115,121,50,45,127, 4,150,254, 138,236,205,93,222,114,67,29,24,72,243,141,128,195,78,66,215,61,156,180, 151,160,137,91,90,15, 131,13,201,95,96,53,194,233,7,225,140,36,103,30,69,142,8,99,37,240,21,10,23, 190, 6,148,247,120,234,75,0,26,197,62,94,252,219,203,117,35,11,32,57,177,33, 88,237,149,56,87,174,20,125,136,171,168, 68,175,74,165,71,134,139,48,27,166, 77,146,158,231,83,111,229,122,60,211,133,230,220,105,92,41,55,46,245,40,244, 102,143,54, 65,25,63,161, 1,216,80,73,209,76,132,187,208, 89,18,169,200,196, 135,130,116,188,159,86,164,100,109,198,173,186, 3,64,52,217,226,250,124,123, 5,202,38,147,118,126,255,82,85,212,207,206,59,227,47,16,58,17,182,189,28,42, 223,183,170,213,119,248,152, 2,44,154,163, 70,221,153,101,155,167, 43,172,9, 129,22,39,253, 19,98,108,110,79,113,224,232,178,185, 112,104,218,246,97,228, 251,34,242,193,238,210,144,12,191,179,162,241, 81,51,145,235,249,14,239,107, 49,192,214, 31,181,199,106,157,184, 84,204,176,115,121,50,45,127, 4,150,254, 138,236,205,93,222,114,67,29,24,72,243,141,128,195,78,66,215,61,156,180 }; private static int FastFloor(float x) { return (x > 0) ? ((int)x) : (((int)x) - 1); } private static float grad(int hash, float x) { int h = hash & 15; float grad = 1.0f + (h & 7); // Gradient value 1.0, 2.0, ..., 8.0 if ((h & 8) != 0) grad = -grad; // Set a random sign for the gradient return (grad * x); // Multiply the gradient with the distance } private static float grad(int hash, float x, float y) { int h = hash & 7; // Convert low 3 bits of hash code float u = h < 4 ? x : y; // into 8 simple gradient directions, float v = h < 4 ? y : x; // and compute the dot product with (x,y). return ((h & 1) != 0 ? -u : u) + ((h & 2) != 0 ? -2.0f * v : 2.0f * v); } private static float grad(int hash, float x, float y, float z) { int h = hash & 15; // Convert low 4 bits of hash code into 12 simple float u = h < 8 ? x : y; // gradient directions, and compute dot product. float v = h < 4 ? y : h == 12 || h == 14 ? x : z; // Fix repeats at h = 12 to 15 return ((h & 1) != 0 ? -u : u) + ((h & 2) != 0 ? -v : v); } private static float grad(int hash, float x, float y, float z, float t) { int h = hash & 31; // Convert low 5 bits of hash code into 32 simple float u = h < 24 ? x : y; // gradient directions, and compute dot product. float v = h < 16 ? y : z; float w = h < 8 ? z : t; return ((h & 1) != 0 ? -u : u) + ((h & 2) != 0 ? -v : v) + ((h & 4) != 0 ? -w : w); } This Is My World Generation Code Block[,] BlocksInMap = new Block[1024, 256]; public bool IsWorldGenerated = false; Random r = new Random(); private void RunThread() { for (int BH = 0; BH <= 256; BH++) { for (int BW = 0; BW <= 1024; BW++) { Block b = new Block(); if (BH >= 192) { } BlocksInMap[BW, BH] = b; } } IsWorldGenerated = true; } public void GenWorld() { new Thread(new ThreadStart(RunThread)).Start(); } And This Is A Example Of How I Set Blocks Block b = new Block(); b.BlockType = = Block.BlockTypes.Air; This Is A Example Of How I Set Models foreach (Block b in MyWorld) { switch(b.BlockType) { case Block.BlockTypes.Dirt: b.Model = DirtModel; break; ect. } } How Would I Use These To Generate To World (The Block Array) And If Possible Thread It More? btw It's 1024 Wide And 256 Tall

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  • SMB2 traffic crashes network?

    - by Phil Cross
    We've been having significant network slowdown issues over the past few weeks, primarily on a Friday morning. We run Windows 7 client machines, with Windows Server 2008 R2 servers. What generally happens is the network starts to slow down massively at 08:55 and resumes normal speeds at around 09:20 This affects everything on the network from logging on, resetting passwords, opening programs and files etc. On my client machine, Physical Memory usage remains at around 40% (normal) and CPU usage hovers around 0-10% idle. The servers show memory usage spikes massively and remains quite intense during the times mentioned above. I have taken several wireshark captures, both during the slowdown and when the network operates fine. One of the main things I noticed is the increase in SMB2 entries in the wireshark log during the slowdown. Record Time Source Destination Protocol Length Info 382 3.976460000 10.47.35.11 10.47.32.3 SMB2 362 Create Request File: pcross\My Documents 413 4.525047000 10.47.35.11 10.47.32.3 SMB2 146 Close Request File: pcross\My Documents 441 5.235927000 10.47.32.3 10.47.35.11 SMB2 298 Create Response File: pcross\My Documents\Downloads 442 5.236199000 10.47.35.11 10.47.32.3 SMB2 260 Find Request File: pcross\My Documents\Downloads SMB2_FIND_ID_BOTH_DIRECTORY_INFO Pattern: *;Find Request File: pcross\My Documents\Downloads SMB2_FIND_ID_BOTH_DIRECTORY_INFO Pattern: * 573 6.327634000 10.47.35.11 10.47.32.3 SMB2 146 Close Request File: pcross\My Documents\Downloads 703 7.664186000 10.47.35.11 10.47.32.3 SMB2 394 Create Request File: pcross\My Documents\Downloads\WestlandsProspectus\P24 __ P21.pdf These are some of the SMB2 records from a list of a couple of hundred which original from my computer with a destination of the fileserver. One of the interesting things to note is the last entry in the examples above is for a PDF file. That file was not open anywhere on my computer, or on anyone elses. No folders with the files in were open either. When I took another capture when the network was running fine, there were hardly any SMB2 entries, and the ones that were displayed were mainly from Wireshark. We currently have around 800 computers, 90 Macs and 200 Laptops and Netbooks. Our concern is if this traffic is happening on my computer, is it happening on other computers, and if so, would those computers be adding to the slow network issues? Again, this only happens during certain times. We're pretty sure its not the our antivirus. Is there anything to narrow down whats initializing this SMB traffic during the particular times? Or if anyone has any extra advice, or links to resources it would be appreciate.

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  • Ad-hoc connection between iPhone and Macbook Pro

    - by Phil Nash
    I sometimes find it useful to connect my iPhone to my Macbook Pro by creating an ad-hoc wireless network from the MBP and connecting to that from the iPhone. However, what I find is that sometimes this works and sometimes it doesn't. When it's not working the symptoms are usually that I see the ad-hoc SSID in the list of available networks on the iPhone, can connect to it from there (including entering my WEP key), and it shows up as the wifi network in use. However I don't get the wifi symbol in the taskbar (it remains as 3G) and attempting to use the connection (e.g. trying to connect to iTunes or Keynote using their respective Remote apps) fails saying that there is so wifi connection. I've tried rebooting both the iPhone and the MBP, recreating networks with different SSIDs and tried different channels - all to no avail! I'm especially puzzled that (a) sometimes it works just fine first time and (b) the Settings app seems to think its all connected fine. Is there anything else I should be trying?

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  • What causes style corruption in MS Word?

    - by Phil.Wheeler
    I've had a few documents across my desk that appear to have a corrupted or recursive style for much of the body text: Char char char char char char Does anyone know what causes this and how to permanently delete this style? When I try to delete it, it disappears from the Styles and Formatting pane of Word, only to reappear later when different text is selected. Input or guidance much appreciated.

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  • SPARC T4-4 Beats 8-CPU IBM POWER7 on TPC-H @3000GB Benchmark

    - by Brian
    Oracle's SPARC T4-4 server delivered a world record TPC-H @3000GB benchmark result for systems with four processors. This result beats eight processor results from IBM (POWER7) and HP (x86). The SPARC T4-4 server also delivered better performance per core than these eight processor systems from IBM and HP. Comparisons below are based upon system to system comparisons, highlighting Oracle's complete software and hardware solution. This database world record result used Oracle's Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays (rotating disk) connected to a SPARC T4-4 server running Oracle Solaris 11 and Oracle Database 11g Release 2 demonstrating the power of Oracle's integrated hardware and software solution. The SPARC T4-4 server based configuration achieved a TPC-H scale factor 3000 world record for four processor systems of 205,792 [email protected] with price/performance of $4.10/[email protected] The SPARC T4-4 server with four SPARC T4 processors (total of 32 cores) is 7% faster than the IBM Power 780 server with eight POWER7 processors (total of 32 cores) on the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark. The SPARC T4-4 server is 36% better in price performance compared to the IBM Power 780 server on the TPC-H @3000GB Benchmark. The SPARC T4-4 server is 29% faster than the IBM Power 780 for data loading. The SPARC T4-4 server is up to 3.4 times faster than the IBM Power 780 server for the Refresh Function. The SPARC T4-4 server with four SPARC T4 processors is 27% faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server with eight x86 processors on the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark. The SPARC T4-4 server is 52% faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server for data loading. The SPARC T4-4 server is up to 3.2 times faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 for the Refresh Function. The SPARC T4-4 server achieved a peak IO rate from the Oracle database of 17 GB/sec. This rate was independent of the storage used, as demonstrated by the TPC-H @3000TB benchmark which used twelve Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays (rotating disk) and the TPC-H @1000TB benchmark which used four Sun Storage F5100 Flash Array devices (flash storage). [*] The SPARC T4-4 server showed linear scaling from TPC-H @1000GB to TPC-H @3000GB. This demonstrates that the SPARC T4-4 server can handle the increasingly larger databases required of DSS systems. [*] The SPARC T4-4 server benchmark results demonstrate a complete solution of building Decision Support Systems including data loading, business questions and refreshing data. Each phase usually has a time constraint and the SPARC T4-4 server shows superior performance during each phase. [*] The TPC believes that comparisons of results published with different scale factors are misleading and discourages such comparisons. Performance Landscape The table lists the leading TPC-H @3000GB results for non-clustered systems. TPC-H @3000GB, Non-Clustered Systems System Processor P/C/T – Memory Composite(QphH) $/perf($/QphH) Power(QppH) Throughput(QthH) Database Available SPARC Enterprise M9000 3.0 GHz SPARC64 VII+ 64/256/256 – 1024 GB 386,478.3 $18.19 316,835.8 471,428.6 Oracle 11g R2 09/22/11 SPARC T4-4 3.0 GHz SPARC T4 4/32/256 – 1024 GB 205,792.0 $4.10 190,325.1 222,515.9 Oracle 11g R2 05/31/12 SPARC Enterprise M9000 2.88 GHz SPARC64 VII 32/128/256 – 512 GB 198,907.5 $15.27 182,350.7 216,967.7 Oracle 11g R2 12/09/10 IBM Power 780 4.1 GHz POWER7 8/32/128 – 1024 GB 192,001.1 $6.37 210,368.4 175,237.4 Sybase 15.4 11/30/11 HP ProLiant DL980 G7 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon X7560 8/64/128 – 512 GB 162,601.7 $2.68 185,297.7 142,685.6 SQL Server 2008 10/13/10 P/C/T = Processors, Cores, Threads QphH = the Composite Metric (bigger is better) $/QphH = the Price/Performance metric in USD (smaller is better) QppH = the Power Numerical Quantity QthH = the Throughput Numerical Quantity The following table lists data load times and refresh function times during the power run. TPC-H @3000GB, Non-Clustered Systems Database Load & Database Refresh System Processor Data Loading(h:m:s) T4Advan RF1(sec) T4Advan RF2(sec) T4Advan SPARC T4-4 3.0 GHz SPARC T4 04:08:29 1.0x 67.1 1.0x 39.5 1.0x IBM Power 780 4.1 GHz POWER7 05:51:50 1.5x 147.3 2.2x 133.2 3.4x HP ProLiant DL980 G7 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon X7560 08:35:17 2.1x 173.0 2.6x 126.3 3.2x Data Loading = database load time RF1 = power test first refresh transaction RF2 = power test second refresh transaction T4 Advan = the ratio of time to T4 time Complete benchmark results found at the TPC benchmark website http://www.tpc.org. Configuration Summary and Results Hardware Configuration: SPARC T4-4 server 4 x SPARC T4 3.0 GHz processors (total of 32 cores, 128 threads) 1024 GB memory 8 x internal SAS (8 x 300 GB) disk drives External Storage: 12 x Sun Storage 2540-M2 array storage, each with 12 x 15K RPM 300 GB drives, 2 controllers, 2 GB cache Software Configuration: Oracle Solaris 11 11/11 Oracle Database 11g Release 2 Enterprise Edition Audited Results: Database Size: 3000 GB (Scale Factor 3000) TPC-H Composite: 205,792.0 [email protected] Price/performance: $4.10/[email protected] Available: 05/31/2012 Total 3 year Cost: $843,656 TPC-H Power: 190,325.1 TPC-H Throughput: 222,515.9 Database Load Time: 4:08:29 Benchmark Description The TPC-H benchmark is a performance benchmark established by the Transaction Processing Council (TPC) to demonstrate Data Warehousing/Decision Support Systems (DSS). TPC-H measurements are produced for customers to evaluate the performance of various DSS systems. These queries and updates are executed against a standard database under controlled conditions. Performance projections and comparisons between different TPC-H Database sizes (100GB, 300GB, 1000GB, 3000GB, 10000GB, 30000GB and 100000GB) are not allowed by the TPC. TPC-H is a data warehousing-oriented, non-industry-specific benchmark that consists of a large number of complex queries typical of decision support applications. It also includes some insert and delete activity that is intended to simulate loading and purging data from a warehouse. TPC-H measures the combined performance of a particular database manager on a specific computer system. The main performance metric reported by TPC-H is called the TPC-H Composite Query-per-Hour Performance Metric ([email protected], where SF is the number of GB of raw data, referred to as the scale factor). [email protected] is intended to summarize the ability of the system to process queries in both single and multiple user modes. The benchmark requires reporting of price/performance, which is the ratio of the total HW/SW cost plus 3 years maintenance to the QphH. A secondary metric is the storage efficiency, which is the ratio of total configured disk space in GB to the scale factor. Key Points and Best Practices Twelve Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays were used for the benchmark. Each Sun Storage 2540-M2 array contains 12 15K RPM drives and is connected to a single dual port 8Gb FC HBA using 2 ports. Each Sun Storage 2540-M2 array showed 1.5 GB/sec for sequential read operations and showed linear scaling, achieving 18 GB/sec with twelve Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays. These were stand alone IO tests. The peak IO rate measured from the Oracle database was 17 GB/sec. Oracle Solaris 11 11/11 required very little system tuning. Some vendors try to make the point that storage ratios are of customer concern. However, storage ratio size has more to do with disk layout and the increasing capacities of disks – so this is not an important metric in which to compare systems. The SPARC T4-4 server and Oracle Solaris efficiently managed the system load of over one thousand Oracle Database parallel processes. Six Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays were mirrored to another six Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays on which all of the Oracle database files were placed. IO performance was high and balanced across all the arrays. The TPC-H Refresh Function (RF) simulates periodical refresh portion of Data Warehouse by adding new sales and deleting old sales data. Parallel DML (parallel insert and delete in this case) and database log performance are a key for this function and the SPARC T4-4 server outperformed both the IBM POWER7 server and HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server. (See the RF columns above.) See Also Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC) Home Page Ideas International Benchmark Page SPARC T4-4 Server oracle.com OTN Oracle Solaris oracle.com OTN Oracle Database 11g Release 2 Enterprise Edition oracle.com OTN Sun Storage 2540-M2 Array oracle.com OTN Disclosure Statement TPC-H, QphH, $/QphH are trademarks of Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC). For more information, see www.tpc.org. SPARC T4-4 205,792.0 [email protected], $4.10/[email protected], available 5/31/12, 4 processors, 32 cores, 256 threads; IBM Power 780 [email protected], 192,001.1 [email protected], $6.37/[email protected], available 11/30/11, 8 processors, 32 cores, 128 threads; HP ProLiant DL980 G7 162,601.7 [email protected], $2.68/[email protected] available 10/13/10, 8 processors, 64 cores, 128 threads.

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  • Virtual LTSP server with KVM

    - by phil
    I want to setup a kvm-based LTSP appliance with Ubuntu 10.04 (server/desktop for ltsp) on a Dell PowerEdge 2900 for ~10-15 clients. People will mostly use Firefox, Thunderbird, OpenOffice and Qcad. Does someone have any experience with this setup? I've had a similar setup with VMware Server 2 and Ubuntu 8.04. How good/bad is kvm compared to VMware for a LTSP appliance? Shall I stick with VMware or can I switch to KVM?

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  • Active Desktop cannot be restored on Win XP

    - by Phil.Wheeler
    This is more of a major annoyance than anything that's stopping me from doing my work, but I somehow seem to have had Active Desktop on my work XP machine get corrupted and now can't get it back working again. I've tried browsing to C:\Documents and Settings\%my-user-name%\Application Data\Microsoft\Internet Explorer and changing, deleting or replacing the Desktop.htt file, but it's not achieving anything. The error I was previously getting when trying to click the "Restore my active desktop" button was: Internet Explorer Script Error An error has occurred in the script on this page. Line: 65 Char: 1 Error: Object doesn't support this action Code: 0 URL: file://C:/Documents%20and%20Settings//Application %20Data/Microsoft/Internet%20Explorer/Desktop.htt Any ideas?

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  • ESXi 4 failed to find boot device

    - by phil
    I had exsi 3.5 running just fine, the upgrade to 4 failed ( i thought it would so everything is backed up ). but it did boot just could not import the data store So i did a fresh install of ESXi 4. Now it says failed to find boot device. Not sure why. i have wiped the disk, the controller is a adaptec 3405, it worked fine in 3.5 and when i upgrade to 4 it did boot. Now it just hangs at loading vfat. then the failed to find boot device. Any ideas?

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  • On Windows how can I prevent login until a software package has been installed?

    - by Phil Hannent
    I have an MSI which is configured for machine level installation because it is a device driver. I can deploy it via Active Directory and Group Policy just fine. However on a newly booted machine a user can login before the installation has a chance to complete and I get an warning in the event log saying it couldn't complete and will be tried at next reboot. How can I make the login screen wait for the installation to be completed?

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  • What's the largest message size modern email systems generally support?

    - by Phil Hollenback
    I know that Yahoo and Google mail support 25MB email attachments. I have an idea from somewhere that 10MB email messages are generally supported by modern email systems. So if I'm sending an email between two arbitrary users on the internet, what's the safe upper bound on message size? 1MB? 10MB? 25MB? I know that one answer is 'don't send big emails, use some sort of drop box'. I'm looking for a guideline if you are limited to only using regular smtp email.

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  • 24TB RAID 6 configuration

    - by Phil
    I am in charge of a new website in a niche industry that stores lots of data (10+ TB per client, growing to 2 or 3 clients soon). We are considering ordering about $5000 worth of 3TB drives (10 in a RAID 6 configuration and 10 for backup), which will give us approximately 24 TB of production storage. The data will be written once and remain unmodified for the lifetime of the website, so we only need to do a backup one time. I understand basic RAID theory, however I am not experienced with it. My question is, does this sound like a good configuration? What potential problems could this setup cause? Also, what is the best way to do a one-time backup? Have two RAID 6 arrays, one for offsite backup and one for production? Or should I backup the RAID 6 production array to a JBOD? EDIT: The data server is running Windows 2008 Server x64. EDIT 2: To reduce rebuild time, what would you think about using two RAID 5's instead of one RAID 6?

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