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  • What is the safest way to subtract two System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME objects

    - by Anindya Chatterjee
    I wonder what is the safest way to subtract two System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME objects? I used the following code but sometimes it gives me ArithmaticOverflow exception due to the negative number in Low 32-bit values. I am not sure enclosing the body with unchecked will serve the purpose or not. Please give me some suggestion on how to do it safely without getting any runtime exception or CS0675 warning message. private static UInt64 SubtractTimes(FILETIME a, FILETIME b) { UInt64 aInt = ((UInt64)(a.dwHighDateTime << 32)) | (UInt32)a.dwLowDateTime; UInt64 bInt = ((UInt64)(b.dwHighDateTime << 32)) | (UInt32)b.dwLowDateTime; return aInt - bInt; }

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  • Using operator+ without leaking memory?

    - by xokmzxoo
    So the code in question is this: const String String::operator+ (const String& rhs) { String tmp; tmp.Set(this->mString); tmp.Append(rhs.mString); return tmp; } This of course places the String on the stack and it gets removed and returns garbage. And placing it on the heap would leak memory. So how should I do this?

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  • Understanding Incrementing

    - by Chad
    For example this: var a = 123; var b = a++; now a contains 124 and b contains 123 I understand that b is taking the value of a and then a is being incremented. However, I don't understand why this is so. The principal reason for why the creators of JavaScript would want this. Is this really more useful than doing it the PHP way? What is the advantage to this other than confusing newbies?

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  • Logical value of an assignment in C

    - by Andy Shulman
    while (curr_data[1] != (unsigned int)NULL && ((curr_ptr = (void*)curr_data[1]) || 1)) Two part question. What will (curr_ptr = (void*)curr_data[1]) evaluate to, logically. TRUE? Also, I know its rather hack-ish, but is the while statement legal C? I would have to go through great contortions to put the assignment elsewhere in the code, so I'd be really nice if I could leave it there, but if it's so egregious that it makes everyone's eyeballs burst into flames, I'll change it.

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  • Does this language feature already exist?

    - by Pindatjuh
    I'm currently developing a new language for programming in a continuous environment (compare it to electrical engineering), and I've got some ideas on a certain language construction. Let me explain the feature by explanation and then by definition: x = a U b; Where x is a variable and a and b are other variables (or static values). This works like a union between a and b; no duplicates and no specific order. with(x) { // regular 'with' usage; using the global interpretation of "x" x = 5; // will replace the original definition of "x = a U b;" } with(x = a) { // this code block is executed when the "x" variable // has the "a" variable assigned. All references in // this code-block to "x" are references to "a". So saying: x = 5; // would only change the variable "a". If the variable "a" // later on changes, x still equals to 5, in this fashion: // 'x = a U b U 5;' // '[currentscope] = 5;' // thus, 'a = 5;' } with(x = b) { // same but with "b" } with(x != a) { // here the "x" variable refers to any variable // but "a"; thus saying x = 5; // is equal to the rewriting of // 'x = a U b U 5;' // 'b = 5;' (since it was the scope of this block) } with(x = (a U b)) { // guaranteed that "x" is 'a U b'; interacting with "x" // will interact with both "a" and "b". x = 5; // makes both "a" and "b" equal to 5; also the "x" variable // is updated to contain: // 'x = a U b U 5;' // '[currentscope] = 5;' // 'a U b = 5;' // and thus: 'a = 5; b = 5;'. } // etc. In the above, all code-blocks are executed, but the "scope" changes in each block how x is interpreted. In the first block, x is guaranteed to be a: thus interacting with x inside that block will interact on a. The second and the third code-block are only equal in this situation (because not a: then there only remains b). The last block guarantees that x is at least a or b. Further more; U is not the "bitwise or operator", but I've called it the "and/or"-operator. Its definition is: "U" = "and" U "or" (On my blog, http://cplang.wordpress.com/2009/12/19/binop-and-or/, there is more (mathematical) background information on this operator. It's loosely based on sets. Using different syntax, changed it in this question.) Update: more examples. print = "Hello world!" U "How are you?"; // this will print // both values, but the // order doesn't matter. // 'userkey' is a variable containing a key. with(userkey = "a") { print = userkey; // will only print "a". } with(userkey = ("shift" U "a")) { // pressed both "shift" and the "a" key. print = userkey; // will "print" shift and "a", even // if the user also pressed "ctrl": // the interpretation of "userkey" is changed, // such that it only contains the matched cases. } with((userkey = "shift") U (userkey = "a")) { // same as if-statement above this one, showing the distributivity. } x = 5 U 6 U 7; y = x + x; // will be: // y = (5 U 6 U 7) + (5 U 6 U 7) // = 10 U 11 U 12 U 13 U 14 somewantedkey = "ctrl" U "alt" U "space" with(userkey = somewantedkey) { // must match all elements of "somewantedkey" // (distributed the Boolean equals operated) // thus only executed when all the defined keys are pressed } with(somewantedkey = userkey) { // matches only one of the provided "somewantedkey" // thus when only "space" is pressed, this block is executed. } Update2: more examples and some more context. with(x = (a U b)) { // this } // can be written as with((x = a) U (x = b)) { // this: changing the variable like x = 5; // will be rewritten as: // a = 5 and b = 5 } Some background information: I'm building a language which is "time-independent", like Java is "platform-independant". Everything stated in the language is "as is", and is continuously actively executed. This means; the programmer does not know in which order (unless explicitly stated using constructions) elements are, nor when statements are executed. The language is completely separated from the "time"-concept, i.e. it's continuously executed: with(a < 5) { a++; } // this is a loop-structure; // how and when it's executed isn't known however. with(a) { // everytime the "a" variable changes, this code-block is executed. b = 4; with(b < 3) { // runs only three times. } with(b > 0) { b = b - 1; // runs four times } } Update 3: After pondering on the type of this language feature; it closely resemblances Netbeans Platform's Lookup, where each "with"-statement a synchronized agent is, working on it's specific "filter" of objects. Instead of type-based, this is variable-based (fundamentally quite the same; just a different way of identifiying objects). I greatly thank all of you for providing me with very insightful information and links/hints to great topics I can research. Thanks. I do not know if this construction already exists, so that's my question: does this language feature already exist?

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  • C++ [] array operator with multiple arguments?

    - by genesys
    Can I define in C++ an array operator that takes multiple arguments? I tried it like this: const T& operator[](const int i, const int j, const int k) const{ return m_cells[k*m_resSqr+j*m_res+i]; } T& operator[](const int i, const int j, const int k){ return m_cells[k*m_resSqr+j*m_res+i]; } But I'm getting this error: error C2804 binary operator '[' has too many parameters

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  • Php plugin to replace '->' with '.' as the member access operator ? Or even better: alternative synt

    - by Gigi
    Present day usable solution: Note that if you use an ide or an advanced editor, you could make a code template, or record a macro that inserts '->' when you press Ctrl and '.' or something. Netbeans has macros, and I have recorded a macro for this, and I like it a lot :) (just click the red circle toolbar button (start record macro),then type -> into the editor (thats all the macro will do, insert the arrow into the editor), then click the gray square (stop record macro) and assign the 'Ctrl dot' shortcut to it, or whatever shortcut you like) The php plugin: The php plugin, would also have to have a different string concatenation operator than the dot. Maybe a double dot ? Yea... why not. All it has to do is set an activation tag so that it doesnt replace / interpreter '.' as '->' for old scripts and scripts that dont intent do use this. Something like this: <php+ $obj.i = 5 ?> (notice the modified '<?php' tag to '<?php+' ) This way it wouldnt break old code. (and you can just add the '<?php+' code template to your editor and then type 'php tab' (for netbeans) and it would insert '<?php+' ) With the alternative syntax method you could even have old and new syntax cohabitating on the same page like this (I am illustrating this to show the great compatibility of this method, not because you would want to do this): <?php+ $obj.i = 5; ?> <?php $obj->str = 'a' . 'b'; ?> You could change the tag to something more explanatory, in case somebody who doesnt know about the plugin reads the script and thinks its a syntax error <?php-dot.com $obj.i = 5; ?> This is easy because most editors have code templates, so its easy to assign a shortcut to it. And whoever doesnt want the dot replacement, doesnt have to use it. These are NOT ultimate solutions, they are ONLY examples to show that solutions exist, and that arguments against replacing '->' with '.' are only excuses. (Just admit you like the arrow, its ok : ) With this potential method, nobody who doesnt want to use it would have to use it, and it wouldnt break old code. And if other problems (ahem... excuses) arise, they could be fixed too. So who can, and who will do such a thing ?

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  • Simple question about operator ||

    - by Tristan
    HEllo, i try to do that in FlashBuilder (FlexProject) protected function btn_detail_view_clickHandler(event:MouseEvent):void { CurrentState="Statistiques" || "PartMarche"; } But it's not working, i guess this is not the right syntax but what's the right syntax ? Thanks

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  • why i^=j^=i^=j isn't equal to *i^=*j^=*i^=*j

    - by klvoek
    In c , when there is variables (assume both as int) i less than j , we can use the equation i^=j^=i^=j to exchange the value of the two variables. For example, let int i = 3, j = 5; after computed i^=j^=i^=j, I got i = 5, j = 3 . What is so amazing to me. But, if i use two int pointers to re-do this , with *i^=*j^=*i^=*j , use the example above what i got will be i = 0 and j = 3. Then, describe it simply: In C 1 int i=3, j=5; i^=j^=i^=j; // after this i = 5, j=3 2 int i = 3, j= 5; int *pi = &i, *pj = &j; *pi^=*pj^=*pi^=*pj; // after this, $pi = 0, *pj = 5 In JavaScript var i=3, j=5; i^=j^=i^=j; // after this, i = 0, j= 3 the result in JavaScript makes this more interesting to me my sample code , on ubuntu server 11.0 & gcc #include <stdio.h> int main(){ int i=7, j=9; int *pi=&i, *pj=&j; i^=j^=i^=j; printf("i=%d j=%d\n", i, j); i=7, j==9; *pi^=*pj^=*pi^=*pj printf("i=%d j=%d\n", *pi, *pj); } however, i had spent hours to test and find out why, but nothing means. So, please help me. Or, just only i made some mistake???

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  • Why isn't our c# graphics code working any more?

    - by Jared
    Here's the situation: We have some generic graphics code that we use for one of our projects. After doing some clean-up of the code, it seems like something isn't working anymore (The graphics output looks completely wrong). I ran a diff against the last version of the code that gave the correct output, and it looks like we changed one of our functions as follows: static public Rectangle FitRectangleOld(Rectangle rect, Size targetSize) { if (rect.Width <= 0 || rect.Height <= 0) { rect.Width = targetSize.Width; rect.Height = targetSize.Height; } else if (targetSize.Width * rect.Height > rect.Width * targetSize.Height) { rect.Width = rect.Width * targetSize.Height / rect.Height; rect.Height = targetSize.Height; } else { rect.Height = rect.Height * targetSize.Width / rect.Width; rect.Width = targetSize.Width; } return rect; } to static public Rectangle FitRectangle(Rectangle rect, Size targetSize) { if (rect.Width <= 0 || rect.Height <= 0) { rect.Width = targetSize.Width; rect.Height = targetSize.Height; } else if (targetSize.Width * rect.Height > rect.Width * targetSize.Height) { rect.Width *= targetSize.Height / rect.Height; rect.Height = targetSize.Height; } else { rect.Height *= targetSize.Width / rect.Width; rect.Width = targetSize.Width; } return rect; } All of our unit tests are all passing, and nothing in the code has changed except for some syntactic shortcuts. But like I said, the output is wrong. We'll probably just revert back to the old code, but I'm curious if anyone has any idea what's going on here. Thanks.

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  • C++ vector<T>::iterator operator +

    - by Tom
    Hi, Im holding an iterator that points to an element of a vector, and I would like to compare it to the next element of the vector. Here is what I have Class Point{ public: float x,y; } //Somewhere in my code I do this vector<Point> points = line.getPoints(); foo (points.begin(),points.end()); where foo is: void foo (Vector<Point>::iterator begin,Vector<Point>::iterator end) { std::Vector<Point>::iterator current = begin; for(;current!=end-1;++current) { std::Vector<Point>::iterator next = current + 1; //Compare between current and next. } } I thought that this would work, but current + 1 is not giving me the next element of the vector. I though operator+ was the way to go, but doesnt seem so. Is there a workaround on this? THanks

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  • What does the C# operator => mean?

    - by Mr. Mark
    Answers to a recent post (Any chances to imitate times() Ruby method in C#?) use the = operator in the usage examples. What does this operator do? I can't locate it in my C# book, and it is hard to search for symbols like this online. (I couldn't find it.)

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  • Operator as and generic classes

    - by abatishchev
    I'm writing .NET On-the-Fly compiler for CLR scripting and want execution method make generic acceptable: object Execute() { return type.InvokeMember(..); } T Execute<T>() { return Execute() as T; /* doesn't work: The type parameter 'T' cannot be used with the 'as' operator because it does not have a class type constraint nor a 'class' constraint */ // also neither typeof(T) not T.GetType(), so on are possible return (T) Execute(); // ok } But I think operator as will be very useful: if result type isn't T method will return null, instead of an exception! Is it possible to do?

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  • Using the AND and NOT Operator in Python

    - by NoahClark
    Here is my custom class that I have that represents a triangle. I'm trying to write code that checks to see if self.a, self.b, and self.c are greater than 0, which would mean that I have Angle, Angle, Angle. Below you will see the code that checks for A and B, however when I use just self.a != 0 then it works fine. I believe I'm not using & correctly. Any ideas? Here is how I am calling it: print myTri.detType() class Triangle: # Angle A To Angle C Connects Side F # Angle C to Angle B Connects Side D # Angle B to Angle A Connects Side E def __init__(self, a, b, c, d, e, f): self.a = a self.b = b self.c = c self.d = d self.e = e self.f = f def detType(self): #Triangle Type AAA if self.a != 0 & self.b != 0: return self.a #If self.a > 10: #return AAA #Triangle Type AAS #elif self.a = 0: #return AAS #Triangle Type ASA #Triangle Type SAS #Triangle Type SSS #else: #return unknown

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  • What is operator<< <> in C++?

    - by Austin Hyde
    I have seen this in a few places, and to confirm I wasn't crazy, I looked for other examples. Apparently this can come in other flavors as well, eg operator+ <>. However, nothing I have seen anywhere mentions what it is, so I thought I'd ask. It's not the easiest thing to google operator<< <>( :-)

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  • Is return an operator or a function?

    - by eSKay
    This is too basic I think, but how do both of these work? return true; // 1 and return (true); // 2 Similar: sizeof, exit My guess: If return was a function, 1 would be erroneous. So, return should be a unary operator that can also take in brackets... pretty much like unary minus: -5 and -(5), both are okay. Is that what it is - a unary operator?

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  • C++: ptr->hello(); /* VERSUS */ (*ptr).hello();

    - by Joey
    i was learning about c++ pointers... so the "-" operator seemed strange to me... instead of ptr-hello(); one could write (*ptr).hello(); because it also seems to work, so i thought the former is just a more convenient way is that the case or is there any difference?

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  • STL: how to overload operator= for <vector> ?

    - by MBes
    There's simple example: #include <vector> int main() { vector<int> veci; vector<double> vecd; for(int i = 0;i<10;++i){ veci.push_back(i); vecd.push_back(i); } vecd = veci; // <- THE PROBLEM } The thing I need to know is how to overload operator = so that I could make assignment like this: vector<double> = vector<int>; I've just tried a lot of ways, but always compiler has been returning errors... Is there any option to make this code work without changing it? I can write some additional lines, but can't edit or delete the existing ones. Ty.

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  • Oracle: What does `(+)` do in a WHERE clause?

    - by Jonathan Lonowski
    Found the following in an Oracle-based application that we're migrating (generalized): SELECT Table1.Category1, Table1.Category2, count(*) as Total, count(Tab2.Stat) AS Stat FROM Table1, Table2 WHERE (Table1.PrimaryKey = Table2.ForeignKey(+)) GROUP BY Table1.Category1, Table1.Category2 What does (+) do in a WHERE clause? I've never seen it used like that before.

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  • Operator + for matrices in C++

    - by cibercitizen1
    I suppose the naive implementation of a + operator for matrices (2D for instance) in C++ would be: class Matrix { Matrix operator+ (Matrix other) const { Matrix result; // fill result with *this.data plus other.data return result; } } so we could use it like Matrix a; Matrix b; Matrix c; c = a + b; Right? But if matrices are big this is not efficient as we are doing one not-necessary copy (return result). Therefore, If we wan't to be efficient we have to forget the clean call: c = a + b; Right? What would you suggest / prefer ? Thanks.

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  • What does the '&' operator do in C++?

    - by rascher
    n00b question. I am a C guy and I'm trying to understand some C++ code. I have the following function declaration: int foo(const string &myname) { cout << "called foo for: " << myname << endl; return 0; } How does the function signature differ from the equivalent C: int foo(const char *myname) Is there a difference between using string *myname vs string &myname? What is the difference between & in C++ and * in C to indicate pointers? Similarly: const string &GetMethodName() { ... } What is the & doing here? Is there some website that explains how & is used differently in C vs C++?

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