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  • Easy QueryBuilder - A User-Friendly Ad-Hoc Advanced Search Solution

    Constructing an easy and powerful QueryBuilder interface becomes more important for complex data grid filtering and accurate reporting services. In this article, I'll discuss how to build a query search engine using ASP.NET AJAX and dynamic SQL. The main goal is to provide an interactive interface to allow users select query attributes, operators, attribute values, and T-SQL operators so that the data context query list can be easily composed and a search engine is invoked.

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  • Stairway to T-SQL DML Level 8: Using the ROLLUP, CUBE and GROUPING SET operator in a GROUP BY Clause

    In this article I will be expanding on my discussion of the GROUP BY clause by exploring the ROLLUP, CUBE and GROUPING SETS operators. These additional GROUP BY operators make it is easy to have SQL Server create subtotals, grand totals, a superset of subtotals, as well as multiple aggregate groupings in a single SELECT statement. Local evaluation repository makes trying SQL Source Control simpleThe evaluation repository makes it easy to try SQL Source Control. Get started with the 28-day free trial.

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  • Case Study: Polystar Improves Telecom Networks Performance with Embedded MySQL

    - by Bertrand Matthelié
    Polystar delivers and supports systems that increase the quality, revenue and customer satisfaction of telecommunication services. Headquarted in Sweden, Polystar helps operators worldwide including Telia, Tele2, Telekom Malysia and T-Mobile to monitor their network performance and improve service levels. Challenges Deliver complete turnkey solutions to customers integrating a database ensuring high performance at scale, while being very easy to use, manage and optimize. Enable the implementation of distributed architectures including one database per server while maintaining a low Total Cost of Ownership (TCO). Avoid growing database complexity as the volume of mobile data to monitor and analyze drastically increases. Solution Evaluation of several databases and selection of MySQL based on its high performance, manageability, and low TCO. The MySQL databases implemented within the Polystar solutions handle on average 3,000 to 5,000 transactions per second. Up to 50 million records are inserted every day in each database. Typical installations include between 50 and 100 MySQL databases, up to 300 for the largest ones. Data is then periodically aggregated, with the original records being overwritten, as the need for detailed information becomes unnecessary to operators after a few weeks. The exponential growth in mobile data traffic driven by the proliferation of smartphones and usage of social media requires ever more powerful solutions to monitor, analyze and turn network data into actionable business intelligence. With MySQL, Polystar can deliver powerful, yet easy to manage, solutions to its customers. MySQL-based Polystar solutions enable operators to monitor, manage and improve the service levels of their telecom networks in over a dozen countries from a single location. The new and innovative MySQL features constantly delivered by Oracle help ensure Polystar that it will be able to meet its customer’s needs as they evolve. “MySQL has been a great embedded database choice for us. It delivers the high performance we need while remaining very easy to use, manage and tune. Power and simplicity at its best.” Mats Söderlindh, COO at Polystar.

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  • Print to UNC Path Permissions

    - by awilinsk
    I am running Windows Server 2008 (not R2) for a print server and I have a program that needs to write to the UNC path of the network printer. I have found that anyone in the Print Operators group is able to write to the UNC path of the network printer, but standard users are not. I have tried adding the same permissions as the Print Operators group to a user, but when I try to write to the UNC path, I get Access Denied. I cannot add users to the Print Operators group because it gives too many permissions. What permissions do I need to set to allow standard users to print to the UNC path of a network printer?

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  • Getting text position while parsing pdf with Quartz 2D

    - by Koteg
    Hi guys, another question regarding pdf parsing... Just read PDF Reference version 1.7 "5.3.1 Text-Positioning Operators" and I am a little bit confused. I wrote some code to get transformation matrix and initial text position. CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback (table, "MP", &op_MP);//Define marked-content point CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback (table, "DP", &op_DP);//Define marked-content point with property list CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback (table, "BMC", &op_BMC);//Begin marked-content sequence CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback (table, "BDC", &op_BDC);//Begin marked-content sequence with property list CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback (table, "EMC", &op_EMC);//End marked-content sequence //Text State operators CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback(table, "Tc", &op_Tc); CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback(table, "Tw", &op_Tw); CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback(table, "Tz", &op_Tz); CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback(table, "TL", &op_TL); CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback(table, "Tf", &op_Tf); CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback(table, "Tr", &op_Tr); CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback(table, "Ts", &op_Ts); //text showing operators CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback(table, "TJ", &op_TJ); CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback(table, "Tj", &op_Tj); CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback(table, "'", &op_apostrof); CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback(table, "\"", &op_double_apostrof); //text positioning operators CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback(table, "Td", &op_Td); CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback(table, "TD", &op_TD); CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback(table, "Tm", &op_Tm); CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback(table, "T*", &op_T); //text object operators CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback(table, "BT", &op_BT);//Begin text object CGPDFOperatorTableSetCallback(table, "ET", &op_ET);//End text object So this is the output after application lunch: 2010-09-02 15:09:23.041 testSearch[8251:207] op_BT begin Integer value: 0 2010-09-02 15:09:23.043 testSearch[8251:207] op_BT end 2010-09-02 15:09:23.043 testSearch[8251:207] op_Tf begin Integer value: 1 2010-09-02 15:09:23.044 testSearch[8251:207] op_Tf end 2010-09-02 15:09:23.044 testSearch[8251:207] op_Tm begin Float value: 557.364197 2010-09-02 15:09:23.045 testSearch[8251:207] op_Tm end 2010-09-02 15:09:23.045 testSearch[8251:207] op_TJ begin 2010-09-02 15:09:23.046 testSearch[8251:207] Array string value [0]: F 2010-09-02 15:09:23.046 testSearch[8251:207] Array integer value [1]: 94985208 2010-09-02 15:09:23.047 testSearch[8251:207] Array string value [2]: r 2010-09-02 15:09:23.047 testSearch[8251:207] Array integer value [3]: 94985208 2010-09-02 15:09:23.048 testSearch[8251:207] Array string value [4]: o 2010-09-02 15:09:23.048 testSearch[8251:207] Array integer value [5]: 94985208 2010-09-02 15:09:23.049 testSearch[8251:207] Array string value [6]: m s 2010-09-02 15:09:23.049 testSearch[8251:207] Array integer value [7]: 94985208 2010-09-02 15:09:23.049 testSearch[8251:207] Array string value [8]: a 2010-09-02 15:09:23.050 testSearch[8251:207] Array integer value [9]: 94985208 2010-09-02 15:09:23.050 testSearch[8251:207] Array string value [10]: m 2010-09-02 15:09:23.051 testSearch[8251:207] Array integer value [11]: 94985208 2010-09-02 15:09:23.051 testSearch[8251:207] Array string value [12]: p 2010-09-02 15:09:23.052 testSearch[8251:207] Array integer value [13]: 94985208 2010-09-02 15:09:23.053 testSearch[8251:207] Array string value [14]: l 2010-09-02 15:09:23.054 testSearch[8251:207] Array integer value [15]: 94985208 2010-09-02 15:09:23.055 testSearch[8251:207] Array string value [16]: e t 2010-09-02 15:09:23.055 testSearch[8251:207] Array integer value [17]: 94985208 2010-09-02 15:09:23.057 testSearch[8251:207] Array string value [18]: o r 2010-09-02 15:09:23.057 testSearch[8251:207] Array integer value [19]: 94985208 2010-09-02 15:09:23.058 testSearch[8251:207] Array string value [20]: e 2010-09-02 15:09:23.058 testSearch[8251:207] Array integer value [21]: 94985208 2010-09-02 15:09:23.059 testSearch[8251:207] Array string value [22]: s 2010-09-02 15:09:23.059 testSearch[8251:207] Array integer value [23]: 94985208 2010-09-02 15:09:23.060 testSearch[8251:207] Array string value [24]: u 2010-09-02 15:09:23.061 testSearch[8251:207] Array integer value [25]: 94985208 2010-09-02 15:09:23.061 testSearch[8251:207] Array string value [26]: l 2010-09-02 15:09:23.062 testSearch[8251:207] Array integer value [27]: 94985208 2010-09-02 15:09:23.062 testSearch[8251:207] Array string value [28]: t 2010-09-02 15:09:23.063 testSearch[8251:207] op_TJ end If someone is familiar with text matrix and text positioning operators it would be nice to explain how all those thing work. How to calculate text position (or glyph?) using Tm (transformation matrix and other data)?

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  • perl - universal operator overload

    - by Todd Freed
    I have an idea for perl, and I'm trying to figure out the best way to implement it. The idea is to have new versions of every operator which consider the undefined value as the identity of that operation. For example: $a = undef + 5; # undef treated as 0, so $a = 5 $a = undef . "foo"; # undef treated as '', so $a = foo $a = undef && 1; # undef treated as false, $a = true and so forth. ideally, this would be in the language as a pragma, or something. use operators::awesome; However, I would be satisfied if I could implement this special logic myself, and then invoke it where needed: use My::Operators; The problem is that if I say "use overload" inside My::Operators only affects objects blessed into My::Operators. So the question is: is there a way (with "use overoad" or otherwise) to do a "universal operator overload" - which would be called for all operations, not just operations on blessed scalars. If not - who thinks this would be a great idea !? It would save me a TON of this kind of code if($object && $object{value} && $object{value} == 15) replace with if($object{value} == 15) ## the special "is-equal-to" operator

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  • Make conversion to a native type explicit in C++

    - by Tal Pressman
    I'm trying to write a class that implements 64-bit ints for a compiler that doesn't support long long, to be used in existing code. Basically, I should be able to have a typedef somewhere that selects whether I want to use long long or my class, and everything else should compile and work. So, I obviously need conversion constructors from int, long, etc., and the respective conversion operators (casts) to those types. This seems to cause errors with arithmetic operators. With native types, the compiler "knows" that when operator*(int, char) is called, it should promote the char to int and call operator*(int, int) (rather than casting the int to char, for example). In my case it gets confused between the various built-in operators and the ones I created. It seems to me like if I could flag the conversion operators as explicit somehow, that it would solve the issue, but as far as I can tell the explicit keyword is only for constructors (and I can't make constructors for built-in types). So is there any way of marking the casts as explicit? Or am I barking up the wrong tree here and there's another way of solving this? Or maybe I'm just doing something else wrong...

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  • C++0x Smart Pointer Comparisons: Inconsistent, what's the rationale?

    - by GManNickG
    In C++0x (n3126), smart pointers can be compared, both relationally and for equality. However, the way this is done seems inconsistent to me. For example, shared_ptr defines operator< be equivalent to: template <typename T, typename U> bool operator<(const shared_ptr<T>& a, const shared_ptr<T>& b) { return std::less<void*>()(a.get(), b.get()); } Using std::less provides total ordering with respect to pointer values, unlike a vanilla relational pointer comparison, which is unspecified. However, unique_ptr defines the same operator as: template <typename T1, typename D1, typename T2, typename D2> bool operator<(const unique_ptr<T1, D1>& a, const unique_ptr<T2, D2>& b) { return a.get() < b.get(); } It also defined the other relational operators in similar fashion. Why the change in method and "completeness"? That is, why does shared_ptr use std::less while unique_ptr uses the built-in operator<? And why doesn't shared_ptr also provide the other relational operators, like unique_ptr? I can understand the rationale behind either choice: with respect to method: it represents a pointer so just use the built-in pointer operators, versus it needs to be usable within an associative container so provide total ordering (like a vanilla pointer would get with the default std::less predicate template argument) with respect to completeness: it represents a pointer so provide all the same comparisons as a pointer, versus it is a class type and only needs to be less-than comparable to be used in an associative container, so only provide that requirement But I don't see why the choice changes depending on the smart pointer type. What am I missing? Bonus/related: std::shared_ptr seems to have followed from boost::shared_ptr, and the latter omits the other relational operators "by design" (and so std::shared_ptr does too). Why is this?

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  • How does a website like Mathway work?

    - by Bob
    I recently found a website called Mathway Basically, it works by allowing you to choose your "level of math" (which it uses to determine what tools it should provide to you) and then allows you to input a math problem which it then solves for you, and gives you detailed solutions (you have to try it, it's really cool). I was wondering how it worked on two levels. First off, how would they parse the math problem (and all the sometimes foreign mathematical operators)? How do they get from text to numbers, variables, and operators? Second, how do they generate the explanations? While you have to pay for the detailed solutions (which are explanations of how they solved the problem), I've seen their preview screenshots, and it looks very detailed. The explanations are given in full, accurate sentences. How would they generate something like that?

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  • Plan Operator Tuesday round-up

    - by Rob Farley
    Eighteen posts for T-SQL Tuesday #43 this month, discussing Plan Operators. I put them together and made the following clickable plan. It’s 1000px wide, so I hope you have a monitor wide enough. Let me explain this plan for you (people’s names are the links to the articles on their blogs – the same links as in the plan above). It was clearly a SELECT statement. Wayne Sheffield (@dbawayne) wrote about that, so we start with a SELECT physical operator, leveraging the logical operator Wayne Sheffield. The SELECT operator calls the Paul White operator, discussed by Jason Brimhall (@sqlrnnr) in his post. The Paul White operator is quite remarkable, and can consume three streams of data. Let’s look at those streams. The first pulls data from a Table Scan – Boris Hristov (@borishristov)’s post – using parallel threads (Bradley Ball – @sqlballs) that pull the data eagerly through a Table Spool (Oliver Asmus – @oliverasmus). A scalar operation is also performed on it, thanks to Jeffrey Verheul (@devjef)’s Compute Scalar operator. The second stream of data applies Evil (I figured that must mean a procedural TVF, but could’ve been anything), courtesy of Jason Strate (@stratesql). It performs this Evil on the merging of parallel streams (Steve Jones – @way0utwest), which suck data out of a Switch (Paul White – @sql_kiwi). This Switch operator is consuming data from up to four lookups, thanks to Kalen Delaney (@sqlqueen), Rick Krueger (@dataogre), Mickey Stuewe (@sqlmickey) and Kathi Kellenberger (@auntkathi). Unfortunately Kathi’s name is a bit long and has been truncated, just like in real plans. The last stream performs a join of two others via a Nested Loop (Matan Yungman – @matanyungman). One pulls data from a Spool (my post – @rob_farley) populated from a Table Scan (Jon Morisi). The other applies a catchall operator (the catchall is because Tamera Clark (@tameraclark) didn’t specify any particular operator, and a catchall is what gets shown when SSMS doesn’t know what to show. Surprisingly, it’s showing the yellow one, which is about cursors. Hopefully that’s not what Tamera planned, but anyway...) to the output from an Index Seek operator (Sebastian Meine – @sqlity). Lastly, I think everyone put in 110% effort, so that’s what all the operators cost. That didn’t leave anything for me, unfortunately, but that’s okay. Also, because he decided to use the Paul White operator, Jason Brimhall gets 0%, and his 110% was given to Paul’s Switch operator post. I hope you’ve enjoyed this T-SQL Tuesday, and have learned something extra about Plan Operators. Keep your eye out for next month’s one by watching the Twitter Hashtag #tsql2sday, and why not contribute a post to the party? Big thanks to Adam Machanic as usual for starting all this. @rob_farley

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  • Easy QueryBuilder - A User-Friendly Ad-Hoc Advanced Search Solution

    Constructing an easy and powerful QueryBuilder interface becomes more important for complex data grid filtering and accurate reporting services. In this article, I'll discuss how to build a query search engine using ASP.NET AJAX and dynamic SQL. The main goal is to provide an interactive interface to allow users select query attributes, operators, attribute values, and T-SQL operators so that the data context query list can be easily composed and a search engine is invoked.Did you know that DotNetSlackers also publishes .net articles written by top known .net Authors? We already have over 80 articles in several categories including Silverlight. Take a look: here.

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  • Building a regexp to split a string

    - by Kivin
    I'm seeking a solution to splitting a string which contains text in the following format: "abcd efgh 'ijklm no pqrs' tuv" which will produce the following results: ['abcd', 'efgh', 'ijklm no pqrs', 'tuv'] In otherwords, it splits by whitespace unless inside of a single quoted string. I think it could be done with .NET regexps using "Lookaround" operators, particularly balancing operators. I'm not so sure about perl.

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  • How can I split a string by whitespace unless inside of a single quoted string?

    - by Kivin
    I'm seeking a solution to splitting a string which contains text in the following format: "abcd efgh 'ijklm no pqrs' tuv" which will produce the following results: ['abcd', 'efgh', 'ijklm no pqrs', 'tuv'] In other words, it splits by whitespace unless inside of a single quoted string. I think it could be done with .NET regexps using "Lookaround" operators, particularly balancing operators. I'm not so sure about Perl.

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  • Database model for saving random boolean expressions

    - by zarko.susnjar
    I have expressions like this: (cat OR cats OR kitten OR kitty) AND (dog OR dogs) NOT (pigeon OR firefly) Anyone having idea how to make tables to save those? Before I got request for usage of brackets, I limited usage of operators to avoid ambiguous situations. So only ANDs and NOTs or only ORs and saved those in this manner: operators id | name 1 | AND 2 | OR 3 | NOT keywords id | keyword 1 | cat 2 | dog 3 | firefly expressions id | operator | keywordId 1 | 0 | 1 1 | 1 | 2 1 | 3 | 3 which was: cat AND dog NOT firefly But now, I'm really puzzled...

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  • simplify expression k/m%n

    - by aaa
    hello. Simple question, is it possible to simplify (or replace division or modulo by less-expensive operation) (k/m)%n where variables are integers and operators are C style division and modulo operators. what about the case where m and n are constants (both or just one), not based 2? Thank you

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  • Doubt in Conditional inclusion

    - by Philando Gullible
    This is actually extracted from my module (Pre-processor in C) The conditional expression could contain any C operator except for the assignment operators,increment, and decrement operators. I am not sure if I am getting this statement or not since I tried using this and it worked.Also for other manipulation a probable work around would be to simply declare macro or function inside the conditional expression,something like this to be precise. Also I don't understand what is the rationale behind this rule. Could somebody explain? Thanks

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  • Prefix and Postfix operator's necessity

    - by Karthi prime
    What is the necessity of both prefix and postfix increment operators? Is not one enough? To the point, there exists like a similar while/do-while necessity problem, yet, there in no so much confusion (in understanding and usage) in having them, but with having both prefix and postfix (like priority of these operators, their association, usage, working). And do anyone been through a situation where you saidd "Hey, I am going to use postfix increment. Its useful here"

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  • Where namespace does operator<< (stream) go to?

    - by aaa
    If I have have some overloaded ostream operators, defined for library local objects, is its okay for them to go to std namespace? If I do not declare them in std namespace, then I must use using ns:: operator <<. As a possible follow-up question, are there any operators which should go to standard or global namespace?

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  • How to add new filters to CAML queries in SharePoint 2007

    - by uruit
      Normal 0 21 false false false ES-UY X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} One flexibility SharePoint has is CAML (Collaborative Application Markup Language). CAML it’s a markup language like html that allows developers to do queries against SharePoint lists, it’s syntax is very easy to understand and it allows to add logical conditions like Where, Contains, And, Or, etc, just like a SQL Query. For one of our projects we have the need to do a filter on SharePoint views, the problem here is that the view it’s a list containing a CAML Query with the filters the view may have, so in order to filter the view that’s already been filtered before, we need to append our filters to the existing CAML Query. That’s not a trivial task because the where statement in a CAML Query it’s like this: <Where>   <And>     <Filter1 />     <Filter2 />   </And> </Where> If we want to add a new logical operator, like an OR it’s not just as simple as to append the OR expression like the following example: <Where>   <And>     <Filter1 />     <Filter2 />   </And>   <Or>     <Filter3 />   </Or> </Where> But instead the correct query would be: <Where>   <Or>     <And>       <Filter1 />       <Filter2 />     </And>     <Filter3 />   </Or> </Where> Notice that the <Filter# /> tags are for explanation purpose only. In order to solve this problem we created a simple component, it has a method that receives the current query (could be an empty query also) and appends the expression you want to that query. Example: string currentQuery = @“ <Where>    <And>     <Contains><FieldRef Name='Title' /><Value Type='Text'>A</Value></Contains>     <Contains><FieldRef Name='Title' /><Value Type='Text'>B</Value></Contains>   </And> </Where>”; currentQuery = CAMLQueryBuilder.AppendQuery(     currentQuery,     “<Contains><FieldRef Name='Title' /><Value Type='Text'>C</Value></Contains>”,     CAMLQueryBuilder.Operators.Or); The fist parameter this function receives it’s the actual query, the second it’s the filter you want to add, and the third it’s the logical operator, so basically in this query we want all the items that the title contains: the character A and B or the ones that contains the character C. The result query is: <Where>   <Or>      <And>       <Contains><FieldRef Name='Title' /><Value Type='Text'>A</Value></Contains>       <Contains><FieldRef Name='Title' /><Value Type='Text'>B</Value></Contains>     </And>     <Contains><FieldRef Name='Title' /><Value Type='Text'>C</Value></Contains>   </Or> </Where>             The code:   First of all we have an enumerator inside the CAMLQueryBuilder class that has the two possible Options And, Or. public enum Operators { And, Or }   Then we have the main method that’s the one that performs the append of the filters. public static string AppendQuery(string containerQuery, string logicalExpression, Operators logicalOperator){   In this method the first we do is create a new XmlDocument and wrap the current query (that may be empty) with a “<Query></Query>” tag, because the query that comes with the view doesn’t have a root element and the XmlDocument must be a well formatted xml.   XmlDocument queryDoc = new XmlDocument(); queryDoc.LoadXml("<Query>" + containerQuery + "</Query>");   The next step is to create a new XmlDocument containing the logical expression that has the filter needed.   XmlDocument logicalExpressionDoc = new XmlDocument(); logicalExpressionDoc.LoadXml("<root>" + logicalExpression + "</root>"); In these next four lines we extract the expression from the recently created XmlDocument and create an XmlElement.                  XmlElement expressionElTemp = (XmlElement)logicalExpressionDoc.SelectSingleNode("/root/*"); XmlElement expressionEl = queryDoc.CreateElement(expressionElTemp.Name); expressionEl.InnerXml = expressionElTemp.InnerXml;   Below are the main steps in the component logic. The first “if” checks if the actual query doesn’t contains a “Where” clause. In case there’s no “Where” we add it and append the expression.   In case that there’s already a “Where” clause, we get the entire statement that’s inside the “Where” and reorder the query removing and appending elements to form the correct query, that will finally filter the list.   XmlElement whereEl; if (!containerQuery.Contains("Where")) { queryDoc.FirstChild.AppendChild(queryDoc.CreateElement("Where")); queryDoc.SelectSingleNode("/Query/Where").AppendChild(expressionEl); } else { whereEl = (XmlElement)queryDoc.SelectSingleNode("/Query/Where"); if (!containerQuery.Contains("<And>") &&                 !containerQuery.Contains("<Or>"))        {              XmlElement operatorEl = queryDoc.CreateElement(GetName(logicalOperator)); XmlElement existingExpression = (XmlElement)whereEl.SelectSingleNode("/Query/Where/*"); whereEl.RemoveChild(existingExpression);                 operatorEl.AppendChild(existingExpression);               operatorEl.AppendChild(expressionEl);                 whereEl.AppendChild(operatorEl);        }        else        {              XmlElement operatorEl = queryDoc.CreateElement(GetName(logicalOperator)); XmlElement existingOperator = (XmlElement)whereEl.SelectSingleNode("/Query/Where/*");                 whereEl.RemoveChild(existingOperator);               operatorEl.AppendChild(existingOperator);               operatorEl.AppendChild(expressionEl);                 whereEl.AppendChild(operatorEl);         }  }  return queryDoc.FirstChild.InnerXml }     Finally the GetName method converts the Enum option to his string equivalent.   private static string GetName(Operators logicalOperator) {       return Enum.GetName(typeof(Operators), logicalOperator); }        This component helped our team a lot using SharePoint 2007 and modifying the queries, but now in SharePoint 2010; that wouldn’t be needed because of the incorporation of LINQ to SharePoint. This new feature enables the developers to do typed queries against SharePoint lists without the need of writing any CAML code.   Normal 0 21 false false false ES-UY X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} Post written by Sebastian Rodriguez - Portals and Collaboration Solutions @ UruIT  

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  • How to add new filters to CAML queries in SharePoint 2007

    - by uruit
    Normal 0 21 false false false ES-UY X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} One flexibility SharePoint has is CAML (Collaborative Application Markup Language). CAML it’s a markup language like html that allows developers to do queries against SharePoint lists, it’s syntax is very easy to understand and it allows to add logical conditions like Where, Contains, And, Or, etc, just like a SQL Query. For one of our projects we have the need to do a filter on SharePoint views, the problem here is that the view it’s a list containing a CAML Query with the filters the view may have, so in order to filter the view that’s already been filtered before, we need to append our filters to the existing CAML Query. That’s not a trivial task because the where statement in a CAML Query it’s like this: <Where>   <And>     <Filter1 />     <Filter2 />   </And> </Where> If we want to add a new logical operator, like an OR it’s not just as simple as to append the OR expression like the following example: <Where>   <And>     <Filter1 />     <Filter2 />   </And>   <Or>     <Filter3 />   </Or> </Where> But instead the correct query would be: <Where>   <Or>     <And>       <Filter1 />       <Filter2 />     </And>     <Filter3 />   </Or> </Where> Notice that the <Filter# /> tags are for explanation purpose only. In order to solve this problem we created a simple component, it has a method that receives the current query (could be an empty query also) and appends the expression you want to that query. Example: string currentQuery = @“ <Where>    <And>     <Contains><FieldRef Name='Title' /><Value Type='Text'>A</Value></Contains>     <Contains><FieldRef Name='Title' /><Value Type='Text'>B</Value></Contains>   </And> </Where>”; currentQuery = CAMLQueryBuilder.AppendQuery(     currentQuery,     “<Contains><FieldRef Name='Title' /><Value Type='Text'>C</Value></Contains>”,     CAMLQueryBuilder.Operators.Or); The fist parameter this function receives it’s the actual query, the second it’s the filter you want to add, and the third it’s the logical operator, so basically in this query we want all the items that the title contains: the character A and B or the ones that contains the character C. The result query is: <Where>   <Or>      <And>       <Contains><FieldRef Name='Title' /><Value Type='Text'>A</Value></Contains>       <Contains><FieldRef Name='Title' /><Value Type='Text'>B</Value></Contains>     </And>     <Contains><FieldRef Name='Title' /><Value Type='Text'>C</Value></Contains>   </Or> </Where>     The code:   First of all we have an enumerator inside the CAMLQueryBuilder class that has the two possible Options And, Or. public enum Operators { And, Or }   Then we have the main method that’s the one that performs the append of the filters. public static string AppendQuery(string containerQuery, string logicalExpression, Operators logicalOperator){   In this method the first we do is create a new XmlDocument and wrap the current query (that may be empty) with a “<Query></Query>” tag, because the query that comes with the view doesn’t have a root element and the XmlDocument must be a well formatted xml.   XmlDocument queryDoc = new XmlDocument(); queryDoc.LoadXml("<Query>" + containerQuery + "</Query>");   The next step is to create a new XmlDocument containing the logical expression that has the filter needed.   XmlDocument logicalExpressionDoc = new XmlDocument(); logicalExpressionDoc.LoadXml("<root>" + logicalExpression + "</root>"); In these next four lines we extract the expression from the recently created XmlDocument and create an XmlElement.                  XmlElement expressionElTemp = (XmlElement)logicalExpressionDoc.SelectSingleNode("/root/*"); XmlElement expressionEl = queryDoc.CreateElement(expressionElTemp.Name); expressionEl.InnerXml = expressionElTemp.InnerXml;   Below are the main steps in the component logic. The first “if” checks if the actual query doesn’t contains a “Where” clause. In case there’s no “Where” we add it and append the expression.   In case that there’s already a “Where” clause, we get the entire statement that’s inside the “Where” and reorder the query removing and appending elements to form the correct query, that will finally filter the list.   XmlElement whereEl; if (!containerQuery.Contains("Where")) { queryDoc.FirstChild.AppendChild(queryDoc.CreateElement("Where")); queryDoc.SelectSingleNode("/Query/Where").AppendChild(expressionEl); } else { whereEl = (XmlElement)queryDoc.SelectSingleNode("/Query/Where"); if (!containerQuery.Contains("<And>") &&                 !containerQuery.Contains("<Or>"))        {              XmlElement operatorEl = queryDoc.CreateElement(GetName(logicalOperator)); XmlElement existingExpression = (XmlElement)whereEl.SelectSingleNode("/Query/Where/*"); whereEl.RemoveChild(existingExpression);                 operatorEl.AppendChild(existingExpression);               operatorEl.AppendChild(expressionEl);                 whereEl.AppendChild(operatorEl);        }        else        {              XmlElement operatorEl = queryDoc.CreateElement(GetName(logicalOperator)); XmlElement existingOperator = (XmlElement)whereEl.SelectSingleNode("/Query/Where/*");                 whereEl.RemoveChild(existingOperator);               operatorEl.AppendChild(existingOperator);               operatorEl.AppendChild(expressionEl);                 whereEl.AppendChild(operatorEl);         }  }  return queryDoc.FirstChild.InnerXml }     Finally the GetName method converts the Enum option to his string equivalent.   private static string GetName(Operators logicalOperator) {       return Enum.GetName(typeof(Operators), logicalOperator); }        Normal 0 21 false false false ES-UY X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Normal 0 21 false false false ES-UY X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} This component helped our team a lot using SharePoint 2007 and modifying the queries, but now in SharePoint 2010; that wouldn’t be needed because of the incorporation of LINQ to SharePoint. This new feature enables the developers to do typed queries against SharePoint lists without the need of writing any CAML code.  But there is still much development to the 2007 version, so I hope this information is useful for other members.  Post Normal 0 21 false false false ES-UY X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} written by Sebastian Rodriguez - Portals and Collaboration Solutions @ UruIT

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  • SQL SERVER – Weekly Series – Memory Lane – #032

    - by Pinal Dave
    Here is the list of selected articles of SQLAuthority.com across all these years. Instead of just listing all the articles I have selected a few of my most favorite articles and have listed them here with additional notes below it. Let me know which one of the following is your favorite article from memory lane. 2007 Complete Series of Database Coding Standards and Guidelines SQL SERVER Database Coding Standards and Guidelines – Introduction SQL SERVER – Database Coding Standards and Guidelines – Part 1 SQL SERVER – Database Coding Standards and Guidelines – Part 2 SQL SERVER Database Coding Standards and Guidelines Complete List Download Explanation and Example – SELF JOIN When all of the data you require is contained within a single table, but data needed to extract is related to each other in the table itself. Examples of this type of data relate to Employee information, where the table may have both an Employee’s ID number for each record and also a field that displays the ID number of an Employee’s supervisor or manager. To retrieve the data tables are required to relate/join to itself. Insert Multiple Records Using One Insert Statement – Use of UNION ALL This is very interesting question I have received from new developer. How can I insert multiple values in table using only one insert? Now this is interesting question. When there are multiple records are to be inserted in the table following is the common way using T-SQL. Function to Display Current Week Date and Day – Weekly Calendar Straight blog post with script to find current week date and day based on the parameters passed in the function.  2008 In my beginning years, I have almost same confusion as many of the developer had in their earlier years. Here are two of the interesting question which I have attempted to answer in my early year. Even if you are experienced developer may be you will still like to read following two questions: Order Of Column In Index Order of Conditions in WHERE Clauses Example of DISTINCT in Aggregate Functions Have you ever used DISTINCT with the Aggregation Function? Here is a simple example about how users can do it. Create a Comma Delimited List Using SELECT Clause From Table Column Straight to script example where I explained how to do something easy and quickly. Compound Assignment Operators SQL SERVER 2008 has introduced new concept of Compound Assignment Operators. Compound Assignment Operators are available in many other programming languages for quite some time. Compound Assignment Operators is operator where variables are operated upon and assigned on the same line. PIVOT and UNPIVOT Table Examples Here is a very interesting question – the answer to the question can be YES or NO both. “If we PIVOT any table and UNPIVOT that table do we get our original table?” Read the blog post to get the explanation of the question above. 2009 What is Interim Table – Simple Definition of Interim Table The interim table is a table that is generated by joining two tables and not the final result table. In other words, when two tables are joined they create an interim table as resultset but the resultset is not final yet. It may be possible that more tables are about to join on the interim table, and more operations are still to be applied on that table (e.g. Order By, Having etc). Besides, it may be possible that there is no interim table; sometimes final table is what is generated when the query is run. 2010 Stored Procedure and Transactions If Stored Procedure is transactional then, it should roll back complete transactions when it encounters any errors. Well, that does not happen in this case, which proves that Stored Procedure does not only provide just the transactional feature to a batch of T-SQL. Generate Database Script for SQL Azure When talking about SQL Azure the most common complaint I hear is that the script generated from stand-along SQL Server database is not compatible with SQL Azure. This was true for some time for sure but not any more. If you have SQL Server 2008 R2 installed you can follow the guideline below to generate a script which is compatible with SQL Azure. Convert IN to EXISTS – Performance Talk It is NOT necessary that every time when IN is replaced by EXISTS it gives better performance. However, in our case listed above it does for sure give better performance. You can read about this subject in the associated blog post. Subquery or Join – Various Options – SQL Server Engine Knows the Best Every single time whenever there is a performance tuning exercise, I hear the conversation from developer where some prefer subquery and some prefer join. In this two part blog post, I explain the same in the detail with examples. Part 1 | Part 2 Merge Operations – Insert, Update, Delete in Single Execution MERGE is a new feature that provides an efficient way to do multiple DML operations. In earlier versions of SQL Server, we had to write separate statements to INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE data based on certain conditions; however, at present, by using the MERGE statement, we can include the logic of such data changes in one statement that even checks when the data is matched and then just update it, and similarly, when the data is unmatched, it is inserted. 2011 Puzzle – Statistics are not updated but are Created Once Here is the quick scenario about my setup. Create Table Insert 1000 Records Check the Statistics Now insert 10 times more 10,000 indexes Check the Statistics – it will be NOT updated – WHY? Question to You – When to use Function and When to use Stored Procedure Personally, I believe that they are both different things - they cannot be compared. I can say, it will be like comparing apples and oranges. Each has its own unique use. However, they can be used interchangeably at many times and in real life (i.e., production environment). I have personally seen both of these being used interchangeably many times. This is the precise reason for asking this question. 2012 In year 2012 I had two interesting series ran on the blog. If there is no fun in learning, the learning becomes a burden. For the same reason, I had decided to build a three part quiz around SEQUENCE. The quiz was to identify the next value of the sequence. I encourage all of you to take part in this fun quiz. Guess the Next Value – Puzzle 1 Guess the Next Value – Puzzle 2 Guess the Next Value – Puzzle 3 Guess the Next Value – Puzzle 4 Simple Example to Configure Resource Governor – Introduction to Resource Governor Resource Governor is a feature which can manage SQL Server Workload and System Resource Consumption. We can limit the amount of CPU and memory consumption by limiting /governing /throttling on the SQL Server. If there are different workloads running on SQL Server and each of the workload needs different resources or when workloads are competing for resources with each other and affecting the performance of the whole server resource governor is a very important task. Tricks to Replace SELECT * with Column Names – SQL in Sixty Seconds #017 – Video  Retrieves unnecessary columns and increases network traffic When a new columns are added views needs to be refreshed manually Leads to usage of sub-optimal execution plan Uses clustered index in most of the cases instead of using optimal index It is difficult to debug SQL SERVER – Load Generator – Free Tool From CodePlex The best part of this SQL Server Load Generator is that users can run multiple simultaneous queries again SQL Server using different login account and different application name. The interface of the tool is extremely easy to use and very intuitive as well. A Puzzle – Swap Value of Column Without Case Statement Let us assume there is a single column in the table called Gender. The challenge is to write a single update statement which will flip or swap the value in the column. For example if the value in the gender column is ‘male’ swap it with ‘female’ and if the value is ‘female’ swap it with ‘male’. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Memory Lane, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • Take,Skip and Reverse Operator in Linq

    - by Jalpesh P. Vadgama
    I have found three more new operators in Linq which is use full in day to day programming stuff. Take,Skip and Reverse. Here are explanation of operators how it works. Take Operator: Take operator will return first N number of element from entities. Skip Operator: Skip operator will skip N number of element from entities and then return remaining elements as a result. Reverse Operator: As name suggest it will reverse order of elements of entities. Here is the examples of operators where i have taken simple string array to demonstrate that. C#, using GeSHi 1.0.8.6 using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Linq; using System.Text;     namespace ConsoleApplication1 {     class Program     {         static void Main(string[] args)         {             string[] a = { "a", "b", "c", "d" };                           Console.WriteLine("Take Example");             var TkResult = a.Take(2);             foreach (string s in TkResult)             {                 Console.WriteLine(s);             }               Console.WriteLine("Skip Example");             var SkResult = a.Skip(2);             foreach (string s in SkResult)             {                 Console.WriteLine(s);             }               Console.WriteLine("Reverse Example");             var RvResult = a.Reverse();             foreach (string s in RvResult)             {                 Console.WriteLine(s);             }                       }     } } Parsed in 0.020 seconds at 44.65 KB/s Here is the output as expected. hope this will help you.. Technorati Tags: Linq,Linq-To-Sql,ASP.NET,C#.NET

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