Search Results

Search found 1234 results on 50 pages for 'enum'.

Page 15/50 | < Previous Page | 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22  | Next Page >

  • Is it possible to have an enum field in a class persisted with OrmLite?

    - by htf
    Hello. I'm trying to persist the following class with OrmLite: public class Field { @DatabaseField(id = true) public String name; @DatabaseField(canBeNull = false) public FieldType type; public Field() { } } The FieldType is a public enum. The field, corresponding to the type is string in SQLite (is doesn't support enums). When I try to use it, I get the following exception: INFO [main] (SingleConnectionDataSource.java:244) - Established shared JDBC Connection: [email protected] Exception in thread "main" org.springframework.beans.factory.BeanInitializationException: Initialization of DAO failed; nested exception is java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Unknown field class class enums.FieldType for field FieldType:name=type,class=class orm.Field at org.springframework.dao.support.DaoSupport.afterPropertiesSet(DaoSupport.java:51) at orm.FieldDAO.getInstance(FieldDAO.java:17) at orm.Field.fromString(Field.java:23) at orm.Field.main(Field.java:38) Caused by: java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Unknown field class class enums.FieldType for field FieldType:name=type,class=class orm.Field at com.j256.ormlite.field.FieldType.<init>(FieldType.java:54) at com.j256.ormlite.field.FieldType.createFieldType(FieldType.java:381) at com.j256.ormlite.table.DatabaseTableConfig.fromClass(DatabaseTableConfig.java:82) at com.j256.ormlite.dao.BaseJdbcDao.initDao(BaseJdbcDao.java:116) at org.springframework.dao.support.DaoSupport.afterPropertiesSet(DaoSupport.java:48) ... 3 more So how do I tell OrmLite, values on the Java side are from an enum?

    Read the article

  • How to pass an enum to Html.RadioButtonFor to get a list of radio buttons in MVC 2 RC 2, C#

    - by Matt W
    Hi, I'm trying to render a radio button list in MVC 2 RC 2 (C#) using the following line: <%= Html.RadioButtonFor(model => Enum.GetNames(typeof(DataCarry.ProtocolEnum)), null) %> but it's just giving me the following exception at runtime: Templates can be used only with field access, property access, single-dimension array index, or single-parameter custom indexer expressions. Is this possible and if so, how, please? Thanks, Matt.

    Read the article

  • How do you create a dropdownlist from an enum in ASP.NET MVC?

    - by Kevin Pang
    I'm trying to use the Html.DropDownList extension method but can't figure out how to use it with an enumeration. Let's say I have an enumeration like this: public enum ItemTypes { Movie = 1, Game = 2, Book = 3 } How do I go about creating a dropdown with these values using the Html.DropDownList extension method? Or is my best bet to simply create a for loop and create the html elements manually?

    Read the article

  • Is there anything else other than class, interface or Enum?

    - by GK
    As we know to generate a class file there should be atleast one class or interface or an Enum should be declared in the java file. So i was curious that is there anything else as well other the mentioned which can cause a class file generation. Or did anybody think that as we can declare the above mentioned, we can declare this(Which you think) as well ?

    Read the article

  • How do I override ToString in C# enums?

    - by scraimer
    In the post Enum ToString, a method is described to use the custom attribute DescriptionAttribute like this: Enum HowNice { [Description("Really Nice")] ReallyNice, [Description("Kinda Nice")] SortOfNice, [Description("Not Nice At All")] NotNice } And then, you call a function GetDescription, using syntax like: GetDescription<HowNice>(NotNice); // Returns "Not Nice At All" But that doesn't really help me when I want to simply populate a ComboBox with the values of an enum, since I cannot force the ComboBox to call GetDescription. What I want has the following requirements: Reading (HowNice)myComboBox.selectedItem will return the selected value as the enum value. The user should see the user-friendly display strings, and not just the name of the enumeration values. So instead of seeing "NotNice", the user would see "Not Nice At All". Hopefully, the solution will require minimal code changes to existing enumerations. Obviously, I could implement a new class for each enum that I create, and override its ToString(), but that's a lot of work for each enum, and I'd rather avoid that. Any ideas? Heck, I'll even throw in a hug as a bounty :-)

    Read the article

  • What is the best way to "override" enums?

    - by Tyler
    I have a number of classes which extend an abstract class. The abstract parent class defines an enum with a set of values. Some of the subclasses inherit the parent class's enum values, but some of the subclasses need the enum values to be different. Is there any way to somehow override the enum for these particular subclasses, and if not, what is a good way to achieve what I'm describing? class ParentClass { private MyEnum m_EnumVal; public virtual MyEnum EnumVal { get { return m_EnumVal; } set { m_EnumVal = value; } } public enum MyEnum { a, b, c }; } class ChildClass : ParentClass { private MyEnum m_EnumVal; public virtual MyEnum EnumVal { get { return m_EnumVal; } set { m_EnumVal = value; } } public enum MyEnum { d, e, f }; }

    Read the article

  • Best way to map/join two autogenerated enums

    - by tomlip
    What is the best C++ (not C++11) way of joining two enums from autogenerated class similar to one presented below: namespace A { namespace B { ... class CarInfo { enum State { // basically same enums defined in different classes Running, Stopped, Broken } } class BikeInfo { enum State { // basically same enums defined in different classes Running, Stopped, Broken } } } } What is needed is unified enum State for both classes that is seen to outside world alongside with safe type conversion. The best and probably most straightforward way I came up with is to create external enum: enum State { Running, Stopped, Broken } together with conversion functions State stateEnumConv(A::B::CarInfo::State aState); State stateEnumConv(A::B::BikeInfo::State aState); A::B::CarInfo::State stateEnumConv(State aState); A::B::BikeInfo::State stateEnumConv(State aState); Direction into right approach is needed. Gosh coming from C I hate those long namespaces everywhere an I wish it could be only A::B level like in presented example. Four conversion functions seem redundant note that CarInfo::State and BikeInfo::State has same enum "members".

    Read the article

  • Covariant return types in Java enums

    - by Kelvin Chung
    As mentioned in another question on this site, something like this is not legal: public enum MyEnum { FOO { public Integer doSomething() { return (Integer) super.doSomething(); } }, BAR { public String doSomething() { return (String) super.doSomething(); } }; public Object doSomething(); } This is due to covariant return types apparently not working on enum constants (again breaking the illusion that enum constants are singleton subclasses of the enum type...) So, how about we add a bit of generics: is this legal? public enum MyEnum2 { FOO { public Class<Integer> doSomething() { return Integer.class; } }, BAR { public Class<String> doSomething() { return String.class; } }; public Class<?> doSomething(); } Here, all three return Class objects, yet the individual constants are "more specific" than the enum type as a whole...

    Read the article

  • how do i use MySql ENUM type? (and is it right for a news feed)

    - by Haroldo
    I'm creating a table called news_feed, this will log all the actions a user performs. Lets say I want to store user1234 deleted article412 at midday I then need a table like so timestamp | user_id | subject_type | subject_id | method . there would be 5 potential methods to log, methods = add/edit/delete/update/report and lets say 2 possible subject_type subjects = article/comment I know i could make my own key where 0=add, 1=delete etc etc but this would make my queries cumbersome to use/write as i'd need to keep consulting the key. Is there a MySql type which can read lots of identially values quickly? is this ENUM? how do i use it?!!

    Read the article

  • How do I use an enum with custom values for a Sharepoint Web part?

    - by Jeff
    I'm trying to design a Web Part that has a drop-down list for the user to choose from. Eventually, these values will be automatically generated based on some kind of outside data source, so they're going to have somewhat arbitrary numeric values associated with them. This is the code I have now: public enum filterChoice { All=0, BOCC=12, Sustainability=15, Clerk=4, DA=13, Emergency=7, Highlights=3, POS=6, PR=1, PH=5, SHPR=2, Test=8, Transportation=14, Volunteer=16 }; These are different categories I want the user to choose from. When I choose one and save the settings for my Web Part, Sharepoint is only saving the values in numeric order; that is, All=0, BOCC=1, Sustainability=3 [...] so my Web Part then thinks the user chose the value with the corresponding number (PR when they chose BOCC, Highlights when they chose Sustainability, etc.) How can I make Sharepoint honor my custom values?

    Read the article

  • Anatomy of a .NET Assembly - Custom attribute encoding

    - by Simon Cooper
    In my previous post, I covered how field, method, and other types of signatures are encoded in a .NET assembly. Custom attribute signatures differ quite a bit from these, which consequently affects attribute specifications in C#. Custom attribute specifications In C#, you can apply a custom attribute to a type or type member, specifying a constructor as well as the values of fields or properties on the attribute type: public class ExampleAttribute : Attribute { public ExampleAttribute(int ctorArg1, string ctorArg2) { ... } public Type ExampleType { get; set; } } [Example(5, "6", ExampleType = typeof(string))] public class C { ... } How does this specification actually get encoded and stored in an assembly? Specification blob values Custom attribute specification signatures use the same building blocks as other types of signatures; the ELEMENT_TYPE structure. However, they significantly differ from other types of signatures, in that the actual parameter values need to be stored along with type information. There are two types of specification arguments in a signature blob; fixed args and named args. Fixed args are the arguments to the attribute type constructor, named arguments are specified after the constructor arguments to provide a value to a field or property on the constructed attribute type (PropertyName = propValue) Values in an attribute blob are limited to one of the basic types (one of the number types, character, or boolean), a reference to a type, an enum (which, in .NET, has to use one of the integer types as a base representation), or arrays of any of those. Enums and the basic types are easy to store in a blob - you simply store the binary representation. Strings are stored starting with a compressed integer indicating the length of the string, followed by the UTF8 characters. Array values start with an integer indicating the number of elements in the array, then the item values concatentated together. Rather than using a coded token, Type values are stored using a string representing the type name and fully qualified assembly name (for example, MyNs.MyType, MyAssembly, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=0123456789abcdef). If the type is in the current assembly or mscorlib then just the type name can be used. This is probably done to prevent direct references between assemblies solely because of attribute specification arguments; assemblies can be loaded in the reflection-only context and attribute arguments still processed, without loading the entire assembly. Fixed and named arguments Each entry in the CustomAttribute metadata table contains a reference to the object the attribute is applied to, the attribute constructor, and the specification blob. The number and type of arguments to the constructor (the fixed args) can be worked out by the method signature referenced by the attribute constructor, and so the fixed args can simply be concatenated together in the blob without any extra type information. Named args are different. These specify the value to assign to a field or property once the attribute type has been constructed. In the CLR, fields and properties can be overloaded just on their type; different fields and properties can have the same name. Therefore, to uniquely identify a field or property you need: Whether it's a field or property (indicated using byte values 0x53 and 0x54, respectively) The field or property type The field or property name After the fixed arg values is a 2-byte number specifying the number of named args in the blob. Each named argument has the above information concatenated together, mostly using the basic ELEMENT_TYPE values, in the same way as a method or field signature. A Type argument is represented using the byte 0x50, and an enum argument is represented using the byte 0x55 followed by a string specifying the name and assembly of the enum type. The named argument property information is followed by the argument value, using the same encoding as fixed args. Boxed objects This would be all very well, were it not for object and object[]. Arguments and properties of type object allow a value of any allowed argument type to be specified. As a result, more information needs to be specified in the blob to interpret the argument bytes as the correct type. So, the argument value is simple prepended with the type of the value by specifying the ELEMENT_TYPE or name of the enum the value represents. For named arguments, a field or property of type object is represented using the byte 0x51, with the actual type specified in the argument value. Some examples... All property signatures start with the 2-byte value 0x0001. Similar to my previous post in the series, names in capitals correspond to a particular byte value in the ELEMENT_TYPE structure. For strings, I'll simply give the string value, rather than the length and UTF8 encoding in the actual blob. I'll be using the following enum and attribute types to demonstrate specification encodings: class AttrAttribute : Attribute { public AttrAttribute() {} public AttrAttribute(Type[] tArray) {} public AttrAttribute(object o) {} public AttrAttribute(MyEnum e) {} public AttrAttribute(ushort x, int y) {} public AttrAttribute(string str, Type type1, Type type2) {} public int Prop1 { get; set; } public object Prop2 { get; set; } public object[] ObjectArray; } enum MyEnum : int { Val1 = 1, Val2 = 2 } Now, some examples: Here, the the specification binds to the (ushort, int) attribute constructor, with fixed args only. The specification blob starts off with a prolog, followed by the two constructor arguments, then the number of named arguments (zero): [Attr(42, 84)] 0x0001 0x002a 0x00000054 0x0000 An example of string and type encoding: [Attr("MyString", typeof(Array), typeof(System.Windows.Forms.Form))] 0x0001 "MyString" "System.Array" "System.Windows.Forms.Form, System.Windows.Forms, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089" 0x0000 As you can see, the full assembly specification of a type is only needed if the type isn't in the current assembly or mscorlib. Note, however, that the C# compiler currently chooses to fully-qualify mscorlib types anyway. An object argument (this binds to the object attribute constructor), and two named arguments (a null string is represented by 0xff and the empty string by 0x00) [Attr((ushort)40, Prop1 = 12, Prop2 = "")] 0x0001 U2 0x0028 0x0002 0x54 I4 "Prop1" 0x0000000c 0x54 0x51 "Prop2" STRING 0x00 Right, more complicated now. A type array as a fixed argument: [Attr(new[] { typeof(string), typeof(object) })] 0x0001 0x00000002 // the number of elements "System.String" "System.Object" 0x0000 An enum value, which is simply represented using the underlying value. The CLR works out that it's an enum using information in the attribute constructor signature: [Attr(MyEnum.Val1)] 0x0001 0x00000001 0x0000 And finally, a null array, and an object array as a named argument: [Attr((Type[])null, ObjectArray = new object[] { (byte)2, typeof(decimal), null, MyEnum.Val2 })] 0x0001 0xffffffff 0x0001 0x53 SZARRAY 0x51 "ObjectArray" 0x00000004 U1 0x02 0x50 "System.Decimal" STRING 0xff 0x55 "MyEnum" 0x00000002 As you'll notice, a null object is encoded as a null string value, and a null array is represented using a length of -1 (0xffffffff). How does this affect C#? So, we can now explain why the limits on attribute arguments are so strict in C#. Attribute specification blobs are limited to basic numbers, enums, types, and arrays. As you can see, this is because the raw CLR encoding can only accommodate those types. Special byte patterns have to be used to indicate object, string, Type, or enum values in named arguments; you can't specify an arbitary object type, as there isn't a generalised way of encoding the resulting value in the specification blob. In particular, decimal values can't be encoded, as it isn't a 'built-in' CLR type that has a native representation (you'll notice that decimal constants in C# programs are compiled as several integer arguments to DecimalConstantAttribute). Jagged arrays also aren't natively supported, although you can get around it by using an array as a value to an object argument: [Attr(new object[] { new object[] { new Type[] { typeof(string) } }, 42 })] Finally... Phew! That was a bit longer than I thought it would be. Custom attribute encodings are complicated! Hopefully this series has been an informative look at what exactly goes on inside a .NET assembly. In the next blog posts, I'll be carrying on with the 'Inside Red Gate' series.

    Read the article

  • Yet another blog about IValueConverter

    - by codingbloke
    After my previous blog on a Generic Boolean Value Converter I thought I might as well blog up another IValueConverter implementation that I use. The Generic Boolean Value Converter effectively converters an input which only has two possible values to one of two corresponding objects.  The next logical step would be to create a similar converter that can take an input which has multiple (but finite and discrete) values to one of multiple corresponding objects.  To put it more simply a Generic Enum Value Converter. Now we already have a tool that can help us in this area, the ResourceDictionary.  A simple IValueConverter implementation around it would create a StringToObjectConverter like so:- StringToObjectConverter using System; using System.Windows; using System.Windows.Data; using System.Linq; using System.Windows.Markup; namespace SilverlightApplication1 {     [ContentProperty("Items")]     public class StringToObjectConverter : IValueConverter     {         public ResourceDictionary Items { get; set; }         public string DefaultKey { get; set; }                  public StringToObjectConverter()         {             DefaultKey = "__default__";         }         public virtual object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)         {             if (value != null && Items.Contains(value.ToString()))                 return Items[value.ToString()];             else                 return Items[DefaultKey];         }         public virtual object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)         {             return Items.FirstOrDefault(kvp => value.Equals(kvp.Value)).Key;         }     } } There are some things to note here.  The bulk of managing the relationship between an object instance and the related string key is handled by the Items property being an ResourceDictionary.  Also there is a catch all “__default__” key value which allows for only a subset of the possible input values to mapped to an object with the rest falling through to the default. We can then set one of these up in Xaml:-             <local:StringToObjectConverter x:Key="StatusToBrush">                 <ResourceDictionary>                     <SolidColorBrush Color="Red" x:Key="Overdue" />                     <SolidColorBrush Color="Orange" x:Key="Urgent" />                     <SolidColorBrush Color="Silver" x:Key="__default__" />                 </ResourceDictionary>             </local:StringToObjectConverter> You could well imagine that in the model being bound these key names would actually be members of an enum.  This still works due to the use of ToString in the Convert method.  Hence the only requirement for the incoming object is that it has a ToString implementation which generates a sensible string instead of simply the type name. I can’t imagine right now a scenario where this converter would be used in a TwoWay binding but there is no reason why it can’t.  I prefer to avoid leaving the ConvertBack throwing an exception if that can be be avoided.  Hence it just enumerates the KeyValuePair entries to find a value that matches and returns the key its mapped to. Ah but now my sense of balance is assaulted again.  Whilst StringToObjectConverter is quite happy to accept an enum type via the Convert method it returns a string from the ConvertBack method not the original input enum type that arrived in the Convert.  Now I could address this by complicating the ConvertBack method and examining the targetType parameter etc.  However I prefer to a different approach, deriving a new EnumToObjectConverter class instead. EnumToObjectConverter using System; namespace SilverlightApplication1 {     public class EnumToObjectConverter : StringToObjectConverter     {         public override object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)         {             string key = Enum.GetName(value.GetType(), value);             return base.Convert(key, targetType, parameter, culture);         }         public override object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)         {             string key = (string)base.ConvertBack(value, typeof(String), parameter, culture);             return Enum.Parse(targetType, key, false);         }     } }   This is a more belts and braces solution with specific use of Enum.GetName and Enum.Parse.  Whilst its more explicit in that the a developer has to  choose to use it, it is only really necessary when using TwoWay binding, in OneWay binding the base StringToObjectConverter would serve just as well. The observant might note that there is actually no “Generic” aspect to this solution in the end.  The use of a ResourceDictionary eliminates the need for that.

    Read the article

  • DB Schema for ACL involving 3 subdomains

    - by blacktie24
    Hi, I am trying to design a database schema for a web app which has 3 subdomains: a) internal employees b) clients c) contractors. The users will be able to communicate with each other to some degree, and there may be some resources that overlap between them. Any thoughts about this schema? Really appreciate your time and thoughts on this. Cheers! -- -- Table structure for table locations CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS locations ( id bigint(20) NOT NULL, name varchar(250) NOT NULL ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1; -- -- Table structure for table privileges CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS privileges ( id int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, name varchar(255) NOT NULL, resource_id int(11) NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY (id) ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=10 ; -- -- Table structure for table resources CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS resources ( id int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, name varchar(255) NOT NULL, user_type enum('internal','client','expert') NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY (id) ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=3 ; -- -- Table structure for table roles CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS roles ( id int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, name varchar(255) NOT NULL, type enum('position','department') NOT NULL, parent_id int(11) DEFAULT NULL, user_type enum('internal','client','expert') NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY (id) ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=3 ; -- -- Table structure for table role_perms CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS role_perms ( id int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, role_id int(11) NOT NULL, privilege_id int(11) NOT NULL, mode varchar(250) NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY (id) ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=2 ; -- -- Table structure for table users CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS users ( id int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, email varchar(255) NOT NULL, password varchar(255) NOT NULL, salt varchar(255) NOT NULL, type enum('internal','client','expert') NOT NULL, first_name varchar(255) NOT NULL, last_name varchar(255) NOT NULL, location_id int(11) NOT NULL, phone varchar(255) NOT NULL, status enum('active','inactive') NOT NULL DEFAULT 'active', PRIMARY KEY (id) ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=4 ; -- -- Table structure for table user_perms CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS user_perms ( id int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, user_id int(11) NOT NULL, privilege_id int(11) NOT NULL, mode varchar(250) NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY (id) ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=2 ; -- -- Table structure for table user_roles CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS user_roles ( id int(11) NOT NULL, user_id int(11) NOT NULL, role_id int(11) NOT NULL ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

    Read the article

  • Using Enums for comparing string values in Switch

    - by kaleidoscope
    Problem Scenario: There is an enum keeping track of operations to be performed on a table Public Enum PartitionKey { Createtask, Updatetask, Deletetask } User is entering the value for the operation to be performed and the code to check the value entered in switch case. Switch (value) {           case PartitionKey.Createtask.ToString():          {          Create();          break;          }          case PartitionKey.Updatetask.ToString():          {           Update();           break;          }          case PartitionKey.Deletetask.ToString():          {           Delete();          break;          } } and it displays as error as “.” Solution: One of the possible implmentation is as below. Public Enum PartitionKey: byte { Createtask, Updatetask, Deletetask } Switch ((PartitionKey)(Int32.Parse(value))) {          case PartitionKey.Createtask:          {                   Create();                   break;          }          case PartitionKey.Updatetask:          {                    Update();                   break;          }          case PartitionKey.Deletetask:          {                    Delete();                   break;          }          default:          {                   break;          } } Technorati Tags: Enum,A Constant Value is required,Geeta,C#

    Read the article

  • Game engine lib and editor

    - by luke
    I would like to know the best way/best practice to handle the following situation. Suppose the project you are working on is split in two sub-projects: game engine lib editor gui. Now, you have a method bool Method( const MethodParams &params ) that will be called during game-level initialization. So it is a method belonging to the game engine lib. Now, the parameters of this method, passed as a reference the structure MethodParams can be decided via the editor, in the level design phase. Suppose the structure is the following: enum Enum1 { E1_VAL1, E1_VAL2, }; enum Enum2 { E2_VAL1, E2_VAL2, E2_VAL3, }; struct MethodParams { float value; Enum1 e1; Enum2 e2; // some other member } The editor should present a dialog that will let the user set the MethodParams struct. A text control for the field value. Furthermore, the editor needs to let the user set the fields e1 and e2 using, for example, two combo boxes (a combo box is a window control that has a list of choices). Obviously, every enum should be mapped to a string, so the user can make an informed selection (i have used E1_VAL1 etc.., but normally the enum would be more meaningful). One could even want to map every enum to a string more informative (E1_VAL1 to "Image union algorithm", E1_VAL2 to "Image intersection algorithm" and so on...). The editor will include all the relevant game egine lib files (.h etc...), but this mapping is not automatic and i am confused on how to handle it in a way that, if in future i add E1_VAL3 and E1_VAL4, the code change will be minimal.

    Read the article

  • What is the annoying/lacking feature in C#, in your opinion?

    - by Vimvq1987
    To be honest, I'm working with C# everyday, and I can say that I love its elegant syntax. But no language is perfect, so does C#. In my opinion, these two features are missing: Full-featured enum. I was pretty happy with enum in C#, until I know about enum in Java. Of course, we can "simulate" a full-featured enum in C# by class, but it's much better if Microsoft simplify this. Immutable keyword. We are told to let a class/struct immutable whenever possible. But to do that, we have to add readonly keyword to every field, and then if we add setter by a mistake, our class will be mutable, and nobody knows. By immutable keyword, every field will be automatically readonly, and any setter will be prohibited (error when compile). It's like static keyword added to class in C# 2.0 well. what's is your annoying/lacking feature in C#?

    Read the article

  • Is there a more efficient way to run enum values through a switch-case statement in C# than this?

    - by C Patton
    I was wondering if there was a more efficient (efficient as in simpler/cleaner code) way of making a case statement like the one below... I have a dictionary. Its key type is an Enum and its value type is a bool. If the boolean is true, I want to change the color of a label on a form. The variable names were changed for the example. Dictionary<String, CustomType> testDict = new Dictionary<String, CustomType>(); //populate testDict here... Dictionary<MyEnum, bool> enumInfo = testDict[someString].GetEnumInfo(); //GetEnumInfo is a function that iterates through a Dictionary<String, CustomType> //and returns a Dictionary<MyEnum, bool> foreach (KeyValuePair<MyEnum, bool> kvp in enumInfo) { switch (kvp.Key) { case MyEnum.Enum1: if (someDictionary[kvp.Key] == true) { Label1.ForeColor = Color.LimeGreen; } else { Label1.ForeColor = Color.Red; } break; case MyEnum.Enum2: if (someDictionary[kvp.Key] == true) { Label2.ForeColor = Color.LimeGreen; } else { Label2.ForeColor = Color.Red; } break; } } So far, MyEnum has 8 different values.. which means I have 8 different case statements.. I know there must be an easier way to do this, I just can't conceptualize it in my head. If anyone could help, I'd greatly appreciate it. I love C# and I learn new things every day.. I absorb it like a sponge :) -CP

    Read the article

  • fmod VS2008 unresolved externals in dependant project

    - by Tom J Nowell
    Im currently trying to use the latest stable fmod ex in my project. I have a main executable in a project called engine4, and a project named DX9Platform in the solution as well which ti depends on. All the fmod code is in this DX9Platform project, which generates a lib file. DX9Platform includes fmodex_vc.lib and builds fine. However buildign Engien4 results in unresolved external symbol messages referencing files that use fmod in the DX9Platform project I have tried adding fmodex_vc.lib to the Engine4 project, with no success, how do I fix this? Heres the linker output: 3>------ Build started: Project: Engine4, Configuration: Release Direct3D9 Win32 ------ 3>Linking... 3>DX9PlatformLib.lib(CFmodSound.obj) : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol _FMOD_System_Create 3>DX9PlatformLib.lib(CFmodSound.obj) : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "public: enum FMOD_RESULT __thiscall FMOD::System::createSound(char const *,unsigned int,struct FMOD_CREATESOUNDEXINFO *,class FMOD::Sound * *)" ([email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@Z) 3>DX9PlatformLib.lib(CFmodSound.obj) : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "public: enum FMOD_RESULT __thiscall FMOD::System::getVersion(unsigned int *)" ([email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]) 3>DX9PlatformLib.lib(CFmodSound.obj) : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "public: enum FMOD_RESULT __thiscall FMOD::System::init(int,unsigned int,void *)" ([email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]) 3>DX9PlatformLib.lib(CFModAudioObject.obj) : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "public: enum FMOD_RESULT __thiscall FMOD::System::playSound(enum FMOD_CHANNELINDEX,class FMOD::Sound *,bool,class FMOD::Channel * *)" ([email protected]@[email protected]@QAE?AW[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@Z) 3>DX9PlatformLib.lib(CFModAudioObject.obj) : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "public: enum FMOD_RESULT __thiscall FMOD::Channel::getPaused(bool *)" ([email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]) 3>DX9PlatformLib.lib(CFModAudioObject.obj) : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "public: enum FMOD_RESULT __thiscall FMOD::Channel::setPaused(bool)" ([email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]) 3>DX9PlatformLib.lib(CFModAudioObject.obj) : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "public: virtual class IAudioObject * __thiscall CFModAudioObject::LoadFile(char const *)" ([email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]) 3>D:\media\desktop\engine4\Engine4\Output\Release Direct3D9\Engine4.exe : fatal error LNK1120: 8 unresolved externals 3>Build log was saved at "file://d:\media\desktop\engine4\Engine4\Engine4\intermediate\Release Direct3D9\BuildLog.htm" 3>Engine4 - 9 error(s), 0 warning(s) ========== Build: 1 succeeded, 1 failed, 0 up-to-date, 1 skipped ==========

    Read the article

  • Large flags enumerations in C#

    - by LorenVS
    Hey everyone, got a quick question that I can't seem to find anything about... I'm working on a project that requires flag enumerations with a large number of flags (up to 40-ish), and I don't really feel like typing in the exact mask for each enumeration value: public enum MyEnumeration : ulong { Flag1 = 1, Flag2 = 2, Flag3 = 4, Flag4 = 8, Flag5 = 16, // ... Flag16 = 65536, Flag17 = 65536 * 2, Flag18 = 65536 * 4, Flag19 = 65536 * 8, // ... Flag32 = 65536 * 65536, Flag33 = 65536 * 65536 * 2 // right about here I start to get really pissed off } Moreover, I'm also hoping that there is an easy(ier) way for me to control the actual arrangement of bits on different endian machines, since these values will eventually be serialized over a network: public enum MyEnumeration : uint { Flag1 = 1, // BIG: 0x00000001, LITTLE:0x01000000 Flag2 = 2, // BIG: 0x00000002, LITTLE:0x02000000 Flag3 = 4, // BIG: 0x00000004, LITTLE:0x03000000 // ... Flag9 = 256, // BIG: 0x00000010, LITTLE:0x10000000 Flag10 = 512, // BIG: 0x00000011, LITTLE:0x11000000 Flag11 = 1024 // BIG: 0x00000012, LITTLE:0x12000000 } So, I'm kind of wondering if there is some cool way I can set my enumerations up like: public enum MyEnumeration : uint { Flag1 = flag(1), // BOTH: 0x80000000 Flag2 = flag(2), // BOTH: 0x40000000 Flag3 = flag(3), // BOTH: 0x20000000 // ... Flag9 = flag(9), // BOTH: 0x00800000 } What I've Tried: // this won't work because Math.Pow returns double // and because C# requires constants for enum values public enum MyEnumeration : uint { Flag1 = Math.Pow(2, 0), Flag2 = Math.Pow(2, 1) } // this won't work because C# requires constants for enum values public enum MyEnumeration : uint { Flag1 = Masks.MyCustomerBitmaskGeneratingFunction(0) } // this is my best solution so far, but is definitely // quite clunkie public struct EnumWrapper<TEnum> where TEnum { private BitVector32 vector; public bool this[TEnum index] { // returns whether the index-th bit is set in vector } // all sorts of overriding using TEnum as args } Just wondering if anyone has any cool ideas, thanks!

    Read the article

< Previous Page | 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22  | Next Page >