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  • Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260 keeps dropping wifi

    - by Rick T
    My wifi Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260 keeps dropping wificonnection drops and the network to which I was connected disappears from the list of available networks in network manager. The only way to fix it is to disable wifi and re-enable it How can I fix this. I'm using ubuntu 14.04 64bit. It mostly drops connections on the 5ghz network. My other devices don't drop connections over wifi. see logs and versions [email protected]:~$ uname -a Linux simon 3.13.0-34-generic #60-Ubuntu SMP Wed Aug 13 15:45:27 UTC 2014 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux [email protected]:~$ [email protected]:~$ dmesg | grep iwl [ 3.370777] iwlwifi 0000:03:00.0: irq 46 for MSI/MSI-X [ 3.381089] iwlwifi 0000:03:00.0: loaded firmware version 22.24.8.0 op_mode iwlmvm [ 3.414637] iwlwifi 0000:03:00.0: Detected Intel(R) Dual Band Wireless AC 7260, REV=0x144 [ 3.414695] iwlwifi 0000:03:00.0: L1 Disabled; Enabling L0S [ 3.414913] iwlwifi 0000:03:00.0: L1 Disabled; Enabling L0S [ 3.630208] ieee80211 phy0: Selected rate control algorithm 'iwl-mvm-rs' [ 9.304838] iwlwifi 0000:03:00.0: L1 Disabled; Enabling L0S [ 9.305068] iwlwifi 0000:03:00.0: L1 Disabled; Enabling L0S [ 605.483174] iwlwifi 0000:03:00.0: L1 Disabled; Enabling L0S [ 605.483396] iwlwifi 0000:03:00.0: L1 Disabled; Enabling L0S [email protected]:~$ cat /var/log/syslog | grep -e iwl -e 80211 | tail -n25 Aug 14 08:13:02 simon kernel: [ 3.452780] cfg80211: (5735000 KHz - 5835000 KHz @ 40000 KHz), (300 mBi, 2000 mBm) Aug 14 08:13:02 simon kernel: [ 3.630208] ieee80211 phy0: Selected rate control algorithm 'iwl-mvm-rs' Aug 14 08:13:06 simon NetworkManager[1125]: <info> rfkill1: found WiFi radio killswitch (at /sys/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1c.2/0000:03:00.0/ieee80211/phy0/rfkill1) (driver iwlwifi) Aug 14 08:13:06 simon NetworkManager[1125]: <info> (wlan0): using nl80211 for WiFi device control Aug 14 08:13:06 simon NetworkManager[1125]: <info> (wlan0): new 802.11 WiFi device (driver: 'iwlwifi' ifindex: 3) Aug 14 08:13:06 simon kernel: [ 9.304838] iwlwifi 0000:03:00.0: L1 Disabled; Enabling L0S Aug 14 08:13:06 simon kernel: [ 9.305068] iwlwifi 0000:03:00.0: L1 Disabled; Enabling L0S Aug 14 08:14:18 simon kernel: [ 81.230162] cfg80211: Calling CRDA to update world regulatory domain Aug 14 08:14:18 simon kernel: [ 81.232330] cfg80211: World regulatory domain updated: Aug 14 08:14:18 simon kernel: [ 81.232332] cfg80211: (start_freq - end_freq @ bandwidth), (max_antenna_gain, max_eirp) Aug 14 08:14:18 simon kernel: [ 81.232333] cfg80211: (2402000 KHz - 2472000 KHz @ 40000 KHz), (300 mBi, 2000 mBm) Aug 14 08:14:18 simon kernel: [ 81.232334] cfg80211: (2457000 KHz - 2482000 KHz @ 40000 KHz), (300 mBi, 2000 mBm) Aug 14 08:14:18 simon kernel: [ 81.232335] cfg80211: (2474000 KHz - 2494000 KHz @ 20000 KHz), (300 mBi, 2000 mBm) Aug 14 08:14:18 simon kernel: [ 81.232336] cfg80211: (5170000 KHz - 5250000 KHz @ 40000 KHz), (300 mBi, 2000 mBm) Aug 14 08:14:18 simon kernel: [ 81.232337] cfg80211: (5735000 KHz - 5835000 KHz @ 40000 KHz), (300 mBi, 2000 mBm) Aug 14 08:23:02 simon kernel: [ 605.483174] iwlwifi 0000:03:00.0: L1 Disabled; Enabling L0S Aug 14 08:23:02 simon kernel: [ 605.483396] iwlwifi 0000:03:00.0: L1 Disabled; Enabling L0S Aug 14 08:23:18 simon kernel: [ 621.223905] cfg80211: Calling CRDA to update world regulatory domain Aug 14 08:23:18 simon kernel: [ 621.228945] cfg80211: World regulatory domain updated: Aug 14 08:23:18 simon kernel: [ 621.228950] cfg80211: (start_freq - end_freq @ bandwidth), (max_antenna_gain, max_eirp) Aug 14 08:23:18 simon kernel: [ 621.228954] cfg80211: (2402000 KHz - 2472000 KHz @ 40000 KHz), (300 mBi, 2000 mBm) Aug 14 08:23:18 simon kernel: [ 621.228956] cfg80211: (2457000 KHz - 2482000 KHz @ 40000 KHz), (300 mBi, 2000 mBm) Aug 14 08:23:18 simon kernel: [ 621.228959] cfg80211: (2474000 KHz - 2494000 KHz @ 20000 KHz), (300 mBi, 2000 mBm) Aug 14 08:23:18 simon kernel: [ 621.228961] cfg80211: (5170000 KHz - 5250000 KHz @ 40000 KHz), (300 mBi, 2000 mBm) Aug 14 08:23:18 simon kernel: [ 621.228963] cfg80211: (5735000 KHz - 5835000 KHz @ 40000 KHz), (300 mBi, 2000 mBm)

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  • What happened to Alan Cooper's Unified File Model?

    - by PAUL Mansour
    For a long time Alan Cooper (in the 3 versions of his book "About Face") has been promoting a "unified file model" to, among other things, dispense with what he calls the most idiotic message box ever invented - the one the pops up when hit the close button on an app or form saying "Do you want to discard your changes?" I like the idea and his arguments, but also have the knee-jerk reaction against it that most seasoned programmers and users have. While Cooper's book seems quite popular and respected, there is remarkably little discussion of this particular issue on the Web that I can find. Petter Hesselberg, the author of "Programming Industrial Strength Windows" mentions it but that seems about it. I have an opportunity to implement this in the (desktop) project I am working on, but face resistance by customers and co-workers, who are of course familiar with the MS Word and Excel way of doing things. I'm in a position to override their objections, but am not sure if I should. My questions are: Are there any good discussions of this that I have failed to find? Is anyone doing this in their apps? Is it a good idea that it is unfortunately not practical to implement until, say, Microsoft does it?

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  • OOW 2013 Summary for Fusion Middleware Architects & Administrators by Simon Haslam

    - by JuergenKress
    OOW 2013 Summary for Fusion Middleware Architects & Administrators by Simon Haslam This September during Oracle OpenWorld 2013 the weather in San Francisco, as you see can from the photo, was exceptionally sunny. The dramatic final few days of the Americas Cup sailing competition, being held every day in the bay, coincided with the conference and meant that there was almost a holiday feel to the whole event. Here's my annual round-up of what I think was most interesting at OpenWorld 2013 for Fusion Middleware architects and administrators; I hope you find it useful and if you think I've missed something please add a comment! WebLogic and Cloud Application Foundation (CAF) The big WebLogic release of the year has already happened a few months ago with 12.1.2 so I won't duplicate that here. Will Lyons discussed the WebLogic and Coherence roadmap which essentially is that 12.1.3 will probably be released to coincide with SOA 12c next year and that 12.1.4, the next feature-rich WebLogic release, is more likely to be in 2015. This latter release will probably include full Java EE 7 support, have enhancements for multi-tenancy and further auto-scaling features to support increased density (i.e. more WebLogic usage for the same amount of hardware). There's a new Oracle Virtual Assembly Builder (OVAB) out already and an Oracle Traffic Director (OTD) 12c release round the corner too. Also of relevance to administrators is that Oracle has increased the support lifetime for Fusion Middleware 11g (e.g. WebLogic 10.3.6) so that Premier Support will now run to the end of 2018 and Extended Support until 2021 - this should remove any Oracle-driven pressure to upgrade at least. Java Mission Control Java Mission Control (JMC) is the HotSpot Java 7 version of JRockit 6 Mission Control, a very nice performance monitoring tool from Oracle's BEA acquisition. Flight Recorder is a feature built into the JVM which records diagnostic events into, typically, a circular buffer which can then be used for historical analysis, particularly in the case of a JVM crash or hang. It's been available separately for WebLogic only for perhaps a year now but, more significantly, it now includes JVM events and was bundled in with JDK7 Update 40 a few weeks ago. I attended a couple of interesting Java One sessions on JMC/Flight Recorder and have to say it's looking really good - it has all the previous JRMC features except for memory leak detector, plus some enhancements around operative sets and ECID filtering I think. Marcus also showed how you could add your own events into flight recorder by building your own event class - they are then available for graphing alongside all the other events in JMC. This uses a currently an unsupported/undocumented API, but it's also the same one that WebLogic uses for WLDF events so I imagine it is stable. I'm not sure quite whether this would be useful to custom applications, as opposed to infrastructure services or ISV packaged applications, but it was a very nice demonstration. I've been testing JMC / FR enabling on several environments recently and my confidence is growing - it feels robust and I think could very soon be part of my standard builds. Read the full article here. WebLogic Partner Community For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center. Blog Twitter LinkedIn Mix Forum Wiki Technorati Tags: OOW,Simon Haslam,Oracle OpenWorld,WebLogic,WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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  • Talking JavaOne with Rock Star Simon Ritter

    - by Janice J. Heiss
    Oracle’s Java Technology Evangelist Simon Ritter is well known at JavaOne for his quirky and fun-loving sessions, which, this year include: CON4644 -- “JavaFX Extreme GUI Makeover” (with Angela Caicedo on how to improve UIs in JavaFX) CON5352 -- “Building JavaFX Interfaces for the Real World” (Kinect gesture tracking and mind reading) CON5348 -- “Do You Like Coffee with Your Dessert?” (Some cool demos of Java of the Raspberry Pi) CON6375 -- “Custom JavaFX Charts: (How to extend JavaFX Chart controls with some interesting things) I recently asked Ritter about the significance of the Raspberry Pi, the topic of one of his sessions that consists of a credit card-sized single-board computer developed in the UK with the intention of stimulating the teaching of basic computer science in schools. “I don't think there's one definitive thing that makes the RP significant,” observed Ritter, “but a combination of things that really makes it stand out. First, it's the cost: $35 for what is effectively a completely usable computer. OK, so you have to add a power supply, SD card for storage and maybe a screen, keyboard and mouse, but this is still way cheaper than a typical PC. The choice of an ARM processor is also significant, as it avoids problems like cooling (no heat sink or fan) and can use a USB power brick.  Combine these two things with the immense groundswell of community support and it provides a fantastic platform for teaching young and old alike about computing, which is the real goal of the project.”He informed me that he’ll be at the Raspberry Pi meetup on Saturday (not part of JavaOne). Check out the details here.JavaFX InterfacesWhen I asked about how JavaFX can interface with the real world, he said that there are many ways. “JavaFX provides you with a simple set of programming interfaces that can create complex, cool and compelling user interfaces,” explained Ritter. “Because it's just Java code you can combine JavaFX with any other Java library to provide data to display and control the interface. What I've done for my session is look at some of the possible ways of doing this using some of the amazing hardware that's available today at very low cost. The Kinect sensor has added a new dimension to gaming in terms of interaction; there's a Java API to access this so you can easily collect skeleton tracking data from it. Some clever people have also written libraries that can track gestures like swipes, circles, pushes, and so on. We use these to control parts of the UI. I've also experimented with a Neurosky EEG sensor that can in some ways ‘read your mind’ (well, at least measure some of the brain functions like attention and meditation).  I've written a Java library for this that I include as a way of controlling the UI. We're not quite at the stage of just thinking a command though!” Here Comes Java EmbeddedAnd what, from Ritter’s perspective, is the most exciting thing happening in the world of Java today? “I think it's seeing just how Java continues to become more and more pervasive,” he said. “One of the areas that is growing rapidly is embedded systems.  We've talked about the ‘Internet of things’ for many years; now it's finally becoming a reality. With the ability of more and more devices to include processing, storage and networking we need an easy way to write code for them that's reliable, has high performance, and is secure. Java fits all these requirements. With Java Embedded being a conference within a conference, I'm very excited about the possibilities of Java in this space.”Check out Ritter’s sessions or say hi if you run into him. Originally published on blogs.oracle.com/javaone.

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  • Talking JavaOne with Rock Star Simon Ritter

    - by Janice J. Heiss
    Oracle’s Java Technology Evangelist Simon Ritter is well known at JavaOne for his quirky and fun-loving sessions, which, this year include: CON4644 -- “JavaFX Extreme GUI Makeover” (with Angela Caicedo on how to improve UIs in JavaFX) CON5352 -- “Building JavaFX Interfaces for the Real World” (Kinect gesture tracking and mind reading) CON5348 -- “Do You Like Coffee with Your Dessert?” (Some cool demos of Java of the Raspberry Pi) CON6375 -- “Custom JavaFX Charts: (How to extend JavaFX Chart controls with some interesting things) I recently asked Ritter about the significance of the Raspberry Pi, the topic of one of his sessions that consists of a credit card-sized single-board computer developed in the UK with the intention of stimulating the teaching of basic computer science in schools. “I don't think there's one definitive thing that makes the RP significant,” observed Ritter, “but a combination of things that really makes it stand out. First, it's the cost: $35 for what is effectively a completely usable computer. OK, so you have to add a power supply, SD card for storage and maybe a screen, keyboard and mouse, but this is still way cheaper than a typical PC. The choice of an ARM processor is also significant, as it avoids problems like cooling (no heat sink or fan) and can use a USB power brick.  Combine these two things with the immense groundswell of community support and it provides a fantastic platform for teaching young and old alike about computing, which is the real goal of the project.”He informed me that he’ll be at the Raspberry Pi meetup on Saturday (not part of JavaOne). Check out the details here.JavaFX InterfacesWhen I asked about how JavaFX can interface with the real world, he said that there are many ways. “JavaFX provides you with a simple set of programming interfaces that can create complex, cool and compelling user interfaces,” explained Ritter. “Because it's just Java code you can combine JavaFX with any other Java library to provide data to display and control the interface. What I've done for my session is look at some of the possible ways of doing this using some of the amazing hardware that's available today at very low cost. The Kinect sensor has added a new dimension to gaming in terms of interaction; there's a Java API to access this so you can easily collect skeleton tracking data from it. Some clever people have also written libraries that can track gestures like swipes, circles, pushes, and so on. We use these to control parts of the UI. I've also experimented with a Neurosky EEG sensor that can in some ways ‘read your mind’ (well, at least measure some of the brain functions like attention and meditation).  I've written a Java library for this that I include as a way of controlling the UI. We're not quite at the stage of just thinking a command though!” Here Comes Java EmbeddedAnd what, from Ritter’s perspective, is the most exciting thing happening in the world of Java today? “I think it's seeing just how Java continues to become more and more pervasive,” he said. “One of the areas that is growing rapidly is embedded systems.  We've talked about the ‘Internet of things’ for many years; now it's finally becoming a reality. With the ability of more and more devices to include processing, storage and networking we need an easy way to write code for them that's reliable, has high performance, and is secure. Java fits all these requirements. With Java Embedded being a conference within a conference, I'm very excited about the possibilities of Java in this space.”Check out Ritter’s sessions or say hi if you run into him.

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  • JavaOne Afterglow by Simon Ritter

    - by JuergenKress
    Last week was the eighteenth JavaOne conference and I thought it would be a good idea to write up my thoughts about how things went. Firstly thanks to Yoshio Terada for the photos, I didn't bother bringing a camera with me so it's good to have some pictures to add to the words. Things kicked off full-throttle on Sunday.  We had the Java Champions and JUG leaders breakfast, which was a great way to meet up with a lot of familiar faces and start talking all things Java.  At midday the show really started with the Strategy and Technical Keynotes.  This was always going to be tougher job than some years because there was no big shiny ball to reveal to the audience.  With the Java EE 7 spec being finalised a few months ago and Java SE 8, Java ME 8 and JDK8 not due until the start of next year there was not going to be any big announcement.  I thought both keynotes worked really well each focusing on the things most important to Java developers: Strategy One of the things that is becoming more and more prominent in many companies marketing is the Internet of Things (IoT).  We've moved from the conventional desktop/laptop environment to much more mobile connected computing with smart phones and tablets.  The next wave of the internet is not just billions of people connected, but 10s or 100s of billions of devices connected to the network, all generating data and providing much more precise control of almost any process you can imagine.  This ties into the ideas of Big Data and Cloud Computing, but implementation is certainly not without its challenges.  As Peter Utzschneider explained it's about three Vs: Volume, Velocity and Value.  All these devices will create huge volumes of data at very high speed; to avoid being overloaded these devices will need some sort of processing capabilities that can filter the useful data from the redundant.  The raw data then needs to be turned into useful information that has value.  To make this happen will require applications on devices, at gateways and on the back-end servers, all very tightly integrated.  This is where Java plays a pivotal role, write once, run everywhere becomes essential, having nine million developers fluent in the language makes it the defacto lingua franca of IoT.  There will be lots more information on how this will become a reality, so watch this space. Technical How do we make the IoT a reality, technically?  Using the game of chess Mark Reinhold, with the help of people like John Ceccarelli, Jasper Potts and Richard Bair, showed what you could do.  Using Java EE on the back end, Java SE and JavaFX on the desktop and Java ME Embedded and JavaFX on devices they showed a complete end-to-end demo. This was really impressive, using 3D features from JavaFX 8 (that's included with JDK8) to make a 3D animated Duke chess board.  Jasper also unveiled the "DukePad" a home made tablet using a Raspberry Pi, touch screen and accelerometer. Although the Raspberry Pi doesn't have earth shattering CPU performance (about the same level as a mid 1990s Pentium), it does have really quite good GPU performance so the GUI works really well.  The plans are all open sourced and available here.  One small, but very significant announcement was that Java SE will now be included with the NOOB and Raspbian Linux distros provided by the Raspberry Pi foundation (these can be found here).  No more hassle having to download and install the JDK after you've flashed your SD card OS image.  The finale was the Raspberry Pi powered chess playing robot.  Really very, very cool.  I talked to Jasper about this and he told me each of the chess pieces had been 3D printed and then he had to use acetone to give them a glossy finish (not sure what his wife thought of him spending hours in the kitchen in a gas mask!)  The way the robot arm worked was very impressive as it did not have any positioning data (like a potentiometer connected to each motor), but relied purely on carefully calibrated timings to get the arm to the right place.  Having done things like this myself in the past I know how easy it is to find a small error gets magnified into very big mistakes. Here's some pictures from the keynote: The "Dukepad" architecture Nice clear perspex case so you can see the innards. The very nice 3D chess set.  Maya's obviously a great tool. Read the full article here. WebLogic Partner Community For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center. Blog Twitter LinkedIn Mix Forum Wiki Technorati Tags: Simon Ritter,Java One,OOW,Oracle OpenWorld,WebLogic,WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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  • Simon Sabin has a great discount for the SQL Server Masterclass

    - by Testas
    Check out Simons blog post to get a discount of £100 for this event http://sqlblogcasts.com/blogs/simons/archive/2010/05/14/paul-and-kimberly-are-coming-the-uk.aspx   Remember as well  Pencil the 17th June in your diary, send an email [email protected] with the title of Masterclass in the subject line. On Friday 25th May we will draw out a name and the winner will have free entrance to a must see seminar on SQL Server from two of the industry’s leading experts. Thanks Chris

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  • Apprende à analyser un rapport de type RIST (Random System Information Tool), par Simon-Sayce

    Bonjour, Sayce, l'un des membres de l'équipe de rédaction souhaite vous inviter à la lecture de l'article suivant: Random System Information Tool . Cet article est à destination de toutes les personnes souhaitant vérifier l'intégrité de leur PC en utilisant le logiciel RSIT Ce cours explique ligne par ligne le rapport généré part l'outil. N'hésitez pas à partager vos remarques Nous vous souhaitons une bonne lecture

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  • A Nondeterministic Engine written in VB.NET 2010

    - by neil chen
    When I'm reading SICP (Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs) recently, I'm very interested in the concept of an "Nondeterministic Algorithm". According to wikipedia:  In computer science, a nondeterministic algorithm is an algorithm with one or more choice points where multiple different continuations are possible, without any specification of which one will be taken. For example, here is an puzzle came from the SICP: Baker, Cooper, Fletcher, Miller, and Smith live on different floors of an apartment housethat contains only five floors. Baker does not live on the top floor. Cooper does not live onthe bottom floor. Fletcher does not live on either the top or the bottom floor. Miller lives ona higher floor than does Cooper. Smith does not live on a floor adjacent to Fletcher's.Fletcher does not live on a floor adjacent to Cooper's. Where does everyone live? After reading this I decided to build a simple nondeterministic calculation engine with .NET. The rough idea is that we can use an iterator to track each set of possible values of the parameters, and then we implement some logic inside the engine to automate the statemachine, so that we can try one combination of the values, then test it, and then move to the next. We also used a backtracking algorithm to go back when we are running out of choices at some point. Following is the core code of the engine itself: Code highlighting produced by Actipro CodeHighlighter (freeware)http://www.CodeHighlighter.com/--Public Class NonDeterministicEngine Private _paramDict As New List(Of Tuple(Of String, IEnumerator)) 'Private _predicateDict As New List(Of Tuple(Of Func(Of Object, Boolean), IEnumerable(Of String))) Private _predicateDict As New List(Of Tuple(Of Object, IList(Of String))) Public Sub AddParam(ByVal name As String, ByVal values As IEnumerable) _paramDict.Add(New Tuple(Of String, IEnumerator)(name, values.GetEnumerator())) End Sub Public Sub AddRequire(ByVal predicate As Func(Of Object, Boolean), ByVal paramNames As IList(Of String)) CheckParamCount(1, paramNames) _predicateDict.Add(New Tuple(Of Object, IList(Of String))(predicate, paramNames)) End Sub Public Sub AddRequire(ByVal predicate As Func(Of Object, Object, Boolean), ByVal paramNames As IList(Of String)) CheckParamCount(2, paramNames) _predicateDict.Add(New Tuple(Of Object, IList(Of String))(predicate, paramNames)) End Sub Public Sub AddRequire(ByVal predicate As Func(Of Object, Object, Object, Boolean), ByVal paramNames As IList(Of String)) CheckParamCount(3, paramNames) _predicateDict.Add(New Tuple(Of Object, IList(Of String))(predicate, paramNames)) End Sub Public Sub AddRequire(ByVal predicate As Func(Of Object, Object, Object, Object, Boolean), ByVal paramNames As IList(Of String)) CheckParamCount(4, paramNames) _predicateDict.Add(New Tuple(Of Object, IList(Of String))(predicate, paramNames)) End Sub Public Sub AddRequire(ByVal predicate As Func(Of Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Boolean), ByVal paramNames As IList(Of String)) CheckParamCount(5, paramNames) _predicateDict.Add(New Tuple(Of Object, IList(Of String))(predicate, paramNames)) End Sub Public Sub AddRequire(ByVal predicate As Func(Of Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Boolean), ByVal paramNames As IList(Of String)) CheckParamCount(6, paramNames) _predicateDict.Add(New Tuple(Of Object, IList(Of String))(predicate, paramNames)) End Sub Public Sub AddRequire(ByVal predicate As Func(Of Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Boolean), ByVal paramNames As IList(Of String)) CheckParamCount(7, paramNames) _predicateDict.Add(New Tuple(Of Object, IList(Of String))(predicate, paramNames)) End Sub Public Sub AddRequire(ByVal predicate As Func(Of Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Boolean), ByVal paramNames As IList(Of String)) CheckParamCount(8, paramNames) _predicateDict.Add(New Tuple(Of Object, IList(Of String))(predicate, paramNames)) End Sub Sub CheckParamCount(ByVal count As Integer, ByVal paramNames As IList(Of String)) If paramNames.Count <> count Then Throw New Exception("Parameter count does not match.") End If End Sub Public Property IterationOver As Boolean Private _firstTime As Boolean = True Public ReadOnly Property Current As Dictionary(Of String, Object) Get If IterationOver Then Return Nothing Else Dim _nextResult = New Dictionary(Of String, Object) For Each item In _paramDict Dim iter = item.Item2 _nextResult.Add(item.Item1, iter.Current) Next Return _nextResult End If End Get End Property Function MoveNext() As Boolean If IterationOver Then Return False End If If _firstTime Then For Each item In _paramDict Dim iter = item.Item2 iter.MoveNext() Next _firstTime = False Return True Else Dim canMoveNext = False Dim iterIndex = _paramDict.Count - 1 canMoveNext = _paramDict(iterIndex).Item2.MoveNext If canMoveNext Then Return True End If Do While Not canMoveNext iterIndex = iterIndex - 1 If iterIndex = -1 Then Return False IterationOver = True End If canMoveNext = _paramDict(iterIndex).Item2.MoveNext If canMoveNext Then For i = iterIndex + 1 To _paramDict.Count - 1 Dim iter = _paramDict(i).Item2 iter.Reset() iter.MoveNext() Next Return True End If Loop End If End Function Function GetNextResult() As Dictionary(Of String, Object) While MoveNext() Dim result = Current If Satisfy(result) Then Return result End If End While Return Nothing End Function Function Satisfy(ByVal result As Dictionary(Of String, Object)) As Boolean For Each item In _predicateDict Dim pred = item.Item1 Select Case item.Item2.Count Case 1 Dim p1 = DirectCast(pred, Func(Of Object, Boolean)) Dim v1 = result(item.Item2(0)) If Not p1(v1) Then Return False End If Case 2 Dim p2 = DirectCast(pred, Func(Of Object, Object, Boolean)) Dim v1 = result(item.Item2(0)) Dim v2 = result(item.Item2(1)) If Not p2(v1, v2) Then Return False End If Case 3 Dim p3 = DirectCast(pred, Func(Of Object, Object, Object, Boolean)) Dim v1 = result(item.Item2(0)) Dim v2 = result(item.Item2(1)) Dim v3 = result(item.Item2(2)) If Not p3(v1, v2, v3) Then Return False End If Case 4 Dim p4 = DirectCast(pred, Func(Of Object, Object, Object, Object, Boolean)) Dim v1 = result(item.Item2(0)) Dim v2 = result(item.Item2(1)) Dim v3 = result(item.Item2(2)) Dim v4 = result(item.Item2(3)) If Not p4(v1, v2, v3, v4) Then Return False End If Case 5 Dim p5 = DirectCast(pred, Func(Of Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Boolean)) Dim v1 = result(item.Item2(0)) Dim v2 = result(item.Item2(1)) Dim v3 = result(item.Item2(2)) Dim v4 = result(item.Item2(3)) Dim v5 = result(item.Item2(4)) If Not p5(v1, v2, v3, v4, v5) Then Return False End If Case 6 Dim p6 = DirectCast(pred, Func(Of Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Boolean)) Dim v1 = result(item.Item2(0)) Dim v2 = result(item.Item2(1)) Dim v3 = result(item.Item2(2)) Dim v4 = result(item.Item2(3)) Dim v5 = result(item.Item2(4)) Dim v6 = result(item.Item2(5)) If Not p6(v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6) Then Return False End If Case 7 Dim p7 = DirectCast(pred, Func(Of Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Boolean)) Dim v1 = result(item.Item2(0)) Dim v2 = result(item.Item2(1)) Dim v3 = result(item.Item2(2)) Dim v4 = result(item.Item2(3)) Dim v5 = result(item.Item2(4)) Dim v6 = result(item.Item2(5)) Dim v7 = result(item.Item2(6)) If Not p7(v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7) Then Return False End If Case 8 Dim p8 = DirectCast(pred, Func(Of Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Object, Boolean)) Dim v1 = result(item.Item2(0)) Dim v2 = result(item.Item2(1)) Dim v3 = result(item.Item2(2)) Dim v4 = result(item.Item2(3)) Dim v5 = result(item.Item2(4)) Dim v6 = result(item.Item2(5)) Dim v7 = result(item.Item2(6)) Dim v8 = result(item.Item2(7)) If Not p8(v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7, v8) Then Return False End If Case Else Throw New NotSupportedException End Select Next Return True End FunctionEnd Class    And now we can use the engine to solve the problem we mentioned above:   Code highlighting produced by Actipro CodeHighlighter (freeware)http://www.CodeHighlighter.com/--Sub Test2() Dim engine = New NonDeterministicEngine() engine.AddParam("baker", {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}) engine.AddParam("cooper", {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}) engine.AddParam("fletcher", {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}) engine.AddParam("miller", {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}) engine.AddParam("smith", {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}) engine.AddRequire(Function(baker) As Boolean Return baker <> 5 End Function, {"baker"}) engine.AddRequire(Function(cooper) As Boolean Return cooper <> 1 End Function, {"cooper"}) engine.AddRequire(Function(fletcher) As Boolean Return fletcher <> 1 And fletcher <> 5 End Function, {"fletcher"}) engine.AddRequire(Function(miller, cooper) As Boolean 'Return miller = cooper + 1 Return miller > cooper End Function, {"miller", "cooper"}) engine.AddRequire(Function(smith, fletcher) As Boolean Return smith <> fletcher + 1 And smith <> fletcher - 1 End Function, {"smith", "fletcher"}) engine.AddRequire(Function(fletcher, cooper) As Boolean Return fletcher <> cooper + 1 And fletcher <> cooper - 1 End Function, {"fletcher", "cooper"}) engine.AddRequire(Function(a, b, c, d, e) As Boolean Return a <> b And a <> c And a <> d And a <> e And b <> c And b <> d And b <> e And c <> d And c <> e And d <> e End Function, {"baker", "cooper", "fletcher", "miller", "smith"}) Dim result = engine.GetNextResult() While Not result Is Nothing Console.WriteLine(String.Format("baker: {0}, cooper: {1}, fletcher: {2}, miller: {3}, smith: {4}", result("baker"), result("cooper"), result("fletcher"), result("miller"), result("smith"))) result = engine.GetNextResult() End While Console.WriteLine("Calculation ended.")End Sub   Also, this engine can solve the classic 8 queens puzzle and find out all 92 results for me.   Code highlighting produced by Actipro CodeHighlighter (freeware)http://www.CodeHighlighter.com/--Sub Test3() ' The 8-Queens problem. Dim engine = New NonDeterministicEngine() ' Let's assume that a - h represents the queens in row 1 to 8, then we just need to find out the column number for each of them. engine.AddParam("a", {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8}) engine.AddParam("b", {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8}) engine.AddParam("c", {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8}) engine.AddParam("d", {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8}) engine.AddParam("e", {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8}) engine.AddParam("f", {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8}) engine.AddParam("g", {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8}) engine.AddParam("h", {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8}) Dim NotInTheSameDiagonalLine = Function(cols As IList) As Boolean For i = 0 To cols.Count - 2 For j = i + 1 To cols.Count - 1 If j - i = Math.Abs(cols(j) - cols(i)) Then Return False End If Next Next Return True End Function engine.AddRequire(Function(a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h) As Boolean Return a <> b AndAlso a <> c AndAlso a <> d AndAlso a <> e AndAlso a <> f AndAlso a <> g AndAlso a <> h AndAlso b <> c AndAlso b <> d AndAlso b <> e AndAlso b <> f AndAlso b <> g AndAlso b <> h AndAlso c <> d AndAlso c <> e AndAlso c <> f AndAlso c <> g AndAlso c <> h AndAlso d <> e AndAlso d <> f AndAlso d <> g AndAlso d <> h AndAlso e <> f AndAlso e <> g AndAlso e <> h AndAlso f <> g AndAlso f <> h AndAlso g <> h AndAlso NotInTheSameDiagonalLine({a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h}) End Function, {"a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g", "h"}) Dim result = engine.GetNextResult() While Not result Is Nothing Console.WriteLine("(1,{0}), (2,{1}), (3,{2}), (4,{3}), (5,{4}), (6,{5}), (7,{6}), (8,{7})", result("a"), result("b"), result("c"), result("d"), result("e"), result("f"), result("g"), result("h")) result = engine.GetNextResult() End While Console.WriteLine("Calculation ended.")End Sub (Chinese version of the post: http://www.cnblogs.com/RChen/archive/2010/05/17/1737587.html) Cheers,  

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  • Adding an user to samba

    - by JustMaximumPower
    I'm trying to setup some samba shares in my home network on an Ubuntu 12.04 machine. Everything works fine for my user account (max) but I can not add any new user. Every time I try to add new user they can not use the shares. It's likely that the error is very basic to the concept of samba but please don't just tell me to read the docs. I've been trying that for about 2 weeks now. I've set up the server with my user max who can mount transfer and the share max. Than I added the user simon with sudo adduser --no-create-home --disabled-login --shell /bin/false simon because the user should not be able to ssh into the machine. I did an sudo smbpasswd -a simon and set an (samba) password for simon and added an share for simon. I also added simon to transferusers to give him access to the share transfer. But simon can't connect to transfer or simons. ---- output of testparam: ------- Load smb config files from /etc/samba/smb.conf rlimit_max: increasing rlimit_max (1024) to minimum Windows limit (16384) Processing section "[printers]" Processing section "[print$]" Processing section "[max]" Processing section "[simons]" Processing section "[transfer]" Loaded services file OK. Server role: ROLE_STANDALONE Press enter to see a dump of your service definitions [global] server string = %h server (Samba, Ubuntu) map to guest = Bad User obey pam restrictions = Yes pam password change = Yes passwd program = /usr/bin/passwd %u passwd chat = *Enter\snew\s*\spassword:* %n\n *Retype\snew\s*\spassword:* %n\n *password\supdated\ssuccessfully* . unix password sync = Yes syslog = 0 log file = /var/log/samba/log.%m max log size = 1000 dns proxy = No usershare allow guests = Yes panic action = /usr/share/samba/panic-action %d idmap config * : backend = tdb [printers] comment = All Printers path = /var/spool/samba create mask = 0700 printable = Yes print ok = Yes browseable = No [print$] comment = Printer Drivers path = /var/lib/samba/printers [max] comment = Privater share von Max path = /media/Main/max read only = No create mask = 0700 [simons] comment = Privater share von Simon path = /media/Main/simon read only = No create mask = 0700 [transfer] comment = Transferlaufwerk path = /media/Main/transfer read only = No create mask = 0755 ---- The files in /media/Main: ------ drwxrwxr-x 17 max max 4096 Oct 4 19:13 max/ drwx------ 5 simon max 4096 Aug 4 15:18 simon/ drwxrwxr-x 7 max transferusers 258048 Oct 1 22:55 transfer/

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  • Assessing elements in plist iphone sdk

    - by quky
    ok i have a plist like this ` <dict> <key>Rows</key> <array> <dict> <key>WireSize</key> <string>16 AWG</string> <key>Children</key> <array> <dict> <key>Cooper 60°C (140°F)</key> <string>0</string> </dict> <dict> <key>Cooper 75°C (167°F)</key> <string>0</string> </dict> <dict> <key>Cooper 90°C (194°F)</key> <string>14</string> </dict> <dict> <key>Aluminum 60°C (140°F)</key> <string>0</string> </dict> <dict> <key>Aluminum 75°C (167°F)</key> <string>0</string> </dict> <dict> <key>Aluminum 90°C (194°F)</key> <string>0</string> </dict> </array> </dict> <dict> <key>WireSize</key> <string>16 AWG</string> <key>Children</key> <array> <dict> <key>Cooper 60°C (140°F)</key> <string>0</string> </dict> <dict> <key>Cooper 75°C (167°F)</key> <string>0</string> </dict> <dict> <key>Cooper 90°C (194°F)</key> <string>14</string> </dict> <dict> <key>Aluminum 60°C (140°F)</key> <string>0</string> </dict> <dict> <key>Aluminum 75°C (167°F)</key> <string>0</string> </dict> <dict> <key>Aluminum 90°C (194°F)</key> <string>0</string> </dict> </array> </dict> </array> ` and been trying to read the values from it but not success i am using this code enter NSBundle *bundle = [NSBundle mainBundle]; NSString *plistPath = [bundle pathForResource:@"Table 310-16" ofType:@"plist"]; NSDictionary *dictionary = [[NSDictionary alloc] initWithContentsOfFile:plistPath]; for (id key in dictionary) { NSArray *array = [dictionary objectForKey:key]; NSLog(@"key: %@, value: %@", key, [array objectAtIndex:0]); } here and the results are key: Rows, value: { Children = ( { "Cooper 60\U00b0C (140\U00b0F)" = 0; }, { "Cooper 75\U00b0C (167\U00b0F)" = 0; }, { "Cooper 90\U00b0C (194\U00b0F)" = 14; }, { "Aluminum 60\U00b0C (140\U00b0F)" = 0; }, { "Aluminum 75\U00b0C (167\U00b0F)" = 0; }, { "Aluminum 90\U00b0C (194\U00b0F)" = 0; } ); WireSize = "16 AWG"; } but still don't know how to get and specific value for example Aluminum 60°C (140°F) or 14 or 16 AWG any help would be appresiated HP

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  • Ubuntu 14.04: After login, top- and sidepanel don't load and system settings don't open

    - by Löwe Simon
    I have Ubuntu 14.04 on a Medion Erazer with the Nvidia GTX570M card. At first, while I had not installed the last nvidia driver, each time I would try to suspend my pc it would freeze frame on the login. Once I managed to install the nvidia drivers, everything seemed to work up until I noticed that suddenly the system settings would not open anymore. I then rebooted my pc, but when I logged in I just end up with my cursor but no top panel or side pannel. Thankfully, I had installed the gnome desktops which works, except for the fact the system settings do not open also in the gnome desktop. I have tried following: Problems after upgrading to 14.04 (only background and pointer after login) except for reinstalling nvidia, since then I would be back at square one with suspend not working. When I try to launch system settings through the terminal, I get: [email protected]:~$ unity-control-center libGL error: No matching fbConfigs or visuals found libGL error: failed to load driver: swrast (unity-control-center:2806): Gdk-ERROR **: The program 'unity-control-center' received an X Window System error. This probably reflects a bug in the program. The error was 'BadLength (poly request too large or internal Xlib length erro'. (Details: serial 229 error_code 16 request_code 155 (GLX) minor_code 1) (Note to programmers: normally, X errors are reported asynchronously; that is, you will receive the error a while after causing it. To debug your program, run it with the GDK_SYNCHRONIZE environment variable to change this behavior. You can then get a meaningful backtrace from your debugger if you break on the gdk_x_error() function.) Trace/breakpoint trap (core dumped) I know the 2 problems seem unrelated, but since they occured together, I am wondering if that is really the case. Your help is much appreciated, Simon

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  • One to many too much data returned - MySQL

    - by Evan McPeters
    I have 2 related MySQL tables in a one to many relationship. Customers: cust_id, cust_name, cust_notes Orders: order_id, cust_id, order_comments So, if I do a standard join to get all customers and their orders via PHP, I return something like: Jack Black, jack's notes, comments about jack's 1st order Jack Black, jack's notes, comments about jack's 2nd order Simon Smith, simon's notes, comments about simon's 1st order Simon Smith, simon's notes, comments about simon's 2nd order The problem is that *cust_notes* is a text field and can be quite large (a couple of thousand words). So, it seems like returning that field for every order is inneficient. I could use *GROUP_CONCAT* and JOINS to return all *order_comments* on a single row BUT order_comments is a large text field too, so it seems like that could create a problem. Should I just use two separate queries, one for the customers table and one for the orders table? Is there a better way?

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  • Error creating Rails DB using rake db:create

    - by Simon
    Hi- I'm attempting to get my first "hello world" rails example going using the rails' getting started guide on my OSX 10.6.3 box. When I go to execute the first rake db:create command (I'm using mysql) I get: [email protected]/Users/simon/source/rails/blog/config: rake db:create (in /Users/simon/source/rails/blog) Couldn't create database for {"reconnect"=>false, "encoding"=>"utf8", "username"=>"root", "adapter"=>"mysql", "database"=>"blog_development", "pool"=>5, "password"=>nil, "socket"=>"/opt/local/var/run/mysql5/mysqld.sock"}, charset: utf8, collation: utf8_unicode_ci (if you set the charset manually, make sure you have a matching collation) I found plenty of stackoverflow questions addressing this problem with the following advice: Verify that user and password are correct (I'm running w/ no password for root on my dev box) Verify that the socket is correct - I can cat the socket, so I assume it's correct Verify that the user can create a DB (As you can see root can connect and create a this DB no problem) [email protected]/Users/simon/source/rails/blog/config: mysql -uroot -hlocalhost Welcome to the MySQL monitor. Commands end with ; or \g. Your MySQL connection id is 16 Server version: 5.1.45 Source distribution Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement. mysql create database blog_development; Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec) Any idea on what might be going on here?

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  • posting php variable that contains apostrophe

    - by user1658170
    I am having trouble posting a php variable to another page. The variable is retrieved from a dropdown selected by the user and if it contains an apostrophe, I only get the part prior to the apostrophe posted. I.E. If I want to post "Cooper's Hawk" I am only receiving "Cooper". How do I escape this properly so that I can post the entire string? This is what I have: echo '<form method="POST" action="advanced_search2.php">'; $dropdown_english_name = "<select class = 'dropdown' name='english_name'> <option>ALL</option>"; $posted_value = ($_POST['english_name']); echo;$posted_value;die; So, to clarify from the above code, the posted string is "cooper's hawk" but the echoed output is "Cooper". Thanks in advance for any tips.

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  • compare two windows paths, one containing tilde, in python

    - by Steve Cooper
    I'm trying to use the TMP environment variable in a program. When I ask for tmp = os.path.expandvars("$TMP") I get C:\Users\STEVE~1.COO\AppData\Local\Temp Which contains the old-school, tilde form. A function I have no control over returns paths like C:\Users\steve.cooper\AppData\Local\Temp\file.txt My problem is this; I'd like to check if the file is in my temp drive, but I can't find a way to compare them. How do you tell if these two Windows directories; C:\Users\STEVE~1.COO\AppData\Local\Temp C:\Users\steve.cooper\AppData\Local\Temp are the same?

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  • unmet dependencies and broken count>0 problem

    - by Simon
    I tried installing fbreader, following all the steps, but ended up with unmet dependencies, i also think a file is referenced in two locations at once and hence killing it.. any ideas how I can fix it? i've done alot of research and tried: [email protected]:~$ sudo apt-get -f install Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state information... Done Correcting dependencies... Done The following packages were automatically installed and are no longer required: dkms patch Use 'apt-get autoremove' to remove them. The following extra packages will be installed: libzlcore0.12 The following NEW packages will be installed: libzlcore0.12 0 upgraded, 1 newly installed, 0 to remove and 61 not upgraded. 6 not fully installed or removed. Need to get 0 B/270 kB of archives. After this operation, 811 kB of additional disk space will be used. Do you want to continue [Y/n]? y (Reading database ... 179860 files and directories currently installed.) Unpacking libzlcore0.12 (from .../libzlcore0.12_0.12.10dfsg-4_i386.deb) ... dpkg: error processing /var/cache/apt/archives/libzlcore0.12_0.12.10dfsg-4_i386.deb (--unpack): trying to overwrite '/usr/lib/libzlcore.so.0.12.10', which is also in package libzlcore 0.12.10-1 No apport report written because MaxReports is reached already dpkg-deb: error: subprocess paste was killed by signal (Broken pipe) Errors were encountered while processing: /var/cache/apt/archives/libzlcore0.12_0.12.10dfsg-4_i386.deb E: Sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (1) sorry for the formatting, but it basically isn't liking: dpkg: error processing /var/cache/apt/archives/libzlcore0.12_0.12.10dfsg-4_i386.deb (--unpack): trying to overwrite '/usr/lib/libzlcore.so.0.12.10', which is also in package libzlcore 0.12.10-1 Any ideas? Also I don't care about keeping the program, but the error is stopping sudo apt-get remove fbreader from working too.

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  • NetBeans Podcast 69

    - by TinuA
    Podcast Guests: Terrence Barr, Simon Ritter, Jaroslav Tulach (It's an all-Oracle lineup!) Download mp3: 47 Minutes – 39.5 mb Subscribe on iTunes NetBeans Community News with Geertjan and Tinu If you missed the first two Java Virtual Developer Day events in early May, there's still one more LIVE training left on May 28th. Sign up here to participate live in the APAC time zone or watch later ON DEMAND. Video: Get started with Vaadin development using NetBeans IDE NetBeans IDE was at JavaCro 2014 and at Hippo Get-together 2014 Another great lineup is in the works for NetBeans Day at JavaOne 2014. More details coming soon! NetBeans' Facebook page is almost at 40,000 Likes! Help us crack that milestone in the next few weeks! Other great ways to stay updated about NetBeans? Twitter and Google+. 09:28 / Terrence Barr - What to Know about Java Embedded Terrence Barr, a Senior Technologist and Principal Product Manager for Embedded and Mobile technologies at Oracle, discusses new features of the Java SE Embedded and Java ME Embedded platforms, and sheds some light on the differences between them and what they have to offer to developers. Learn more about Java SE Embedded Tutorial: Using Oracle Java SE Embedded Support in NetBeans IDE Learn more about Java ME Embedded Video: NetBeans IDE Support for Java ME 8 Video: Installing and Using Java ME SDK 8.0 Plugins in NetBeans IDE Follow Terrence Barr to keep up with news in the Embedded space: Blog and Twitter 26:02 / Simon Ritter - A Massive Serving of Raspberry Pi Oracle's Raspberry Pi virtual course is back by popular demand! Simon Ritter, the head of Oracle's Java Technology Evangelism team, chats about the second run of the free Java Embedded course (starting May 30th), what participants can expect to learn, NetBeans' support for Java ME development, and other Java trainings coming to a desktop, laptop or user group near you. Sign up for the Oracle MOOC: Develop Java Embedded Applications Using Raspberry Pi Find out when Simon Ritter and the Java Evangelism team are coming to a Java event or JUG in your area--follow them on Twitter: Simon Ritter Angela Caicedo Steven Chin Jim Weaver 36:58 / Jaroslav Tulach - A Perfect Translation Jaroslav Tulach returns to the NetBeans podcast with tales about the Japanese translation of the Practical API Design book, which he contends surpasses all previous translations, including the English edition! Order "Practical API Design" (Japanese Version)  Find out why the Japanese translation is the best edition yet *Have ideas for NetBeans Podcast topics? Send them to ">nbpodcast at netbeans dot org. *Subscribe to the official NetBeans page on Facebook! Check us out as well on Twitter, YouTube, and Google+.

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  • UKOUG Application Server & Middleware SIG Meeting

    - by JuergenKress
    Date: Wednesday 10th Oct 2012 Time: 09:00 - 16:00 Location: Reading Venue: Oracle, Thames Valley Park, Reading Agenda: 09:00 Registration and Coffee 10:00 Welcome Application Server & Middleware Committee 10:10 Oracle Support Updates Nick Pounder, Oracle Customer Services 10:30 OpenWorld 2012 - News Round-up for Middleware Admins Simon Haslam, Veriton Limited 11:00 Coffee break 11:20 Oracle Single-Sign on to Oracle Access Manager Migration Rob Otto, Oracle Consulting Services UK 12:05 Supporting Fusion Middleware through First Failure Capture (theory) Greg Cook, Oracle 12:50 Lunch and Network 13:35 Deputy Chair Elections UKOUG 13:45 Supporting Fusion Middleware through First Failure Capture (demos) Greg Cook, Oracle 14:15 Networking session including tea/coffee 14:45 Real Life WebLogic Performance Tuning: Tales and Techniques from the Field Steve Millidge, C2B2 Consulting Limited 15:30 WLST: WebLogic's Swiss Army Knife Simon Haslam, Veriton Limited 15:45 AOB and Close For details please visit the registration page. WebLogic Partner Community For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center. BlogTwitterLinkedInMixForumWiki Technorati Tags: UK user group,Simon Haslam,WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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  • Inside Red Gate - Introduction

    - by Simon Cooper
    I work for Red Gate Software, a software company based in Cambridge, UK. In this series of posts, I'll be discussing how we develop software at Red Gate, and what we get up to, all from a dev's perspective. Before I start the series proper, in this post I'll give you a brief background to what I have done and continue to do as part of my job. The initial few posts will be giving an overview of how the development sections of the company work. There is much more to a software company than writing the products, but as I'm a developer my experience is biased towards that, and so that is what this series will concentrate on. My background Red Gate was founded in 1999 by Neil Davidson & Simon Galbraith, who continue to be joint CEOs. I joined in September 2007, and immediately set to work writing a new Check for Updates client and server (CfU), as part of a team of 2. That was finished at the end of 2007. I then joined the SQL Compare team. The first large project I worked on was updating SQL Compare for SQL Server 2008, resulting in SQL Compare 7, followed by a UI redesign in SQL Compare 8. By the end of this project in early 2009 I had become the 'go-to' guy for the SQL Compare Engine (I'll explain what that means in a later post), which is used by most of the other tools in the SQL Tools division in one way or another. After that, we decided to expand into Oracle, and I wrote the prototype for what became the engine of Schema Compare for Oracle (SCO). In the latter half of 2009 a full project was started, resulting in the release of SCO v1 in early 2010. Near the end of 2010 I moved to the .NET division, where I joined the team working on SmartAssembly. That's what I continue to work on today. The posts in this series will cover my experience in software development at Red Gate, within the SQL Tools and .NET divisions. Hopefully, you'll find this series an interesting look at what exactly goes into producing the software at Red Gate.

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  • Inside Red Gate - Divisions

    - by Simon Cooper
    When I joined Red Gate back in 2007, there were around 80 people in the company. Now, around 3 years later, it's grown to more than 200. It's a constant battle against Dunbar's number; the maximum number of people you can keep track of in a social group, to try and maintain that 'small company' feel that attracted myself and so many others to apply in the first place. There are several strategies the company's developed over the years to try and mitigate the effects of Dunbar's number. One of the main ones has been divisionalisation. Divisions The first division, .NET, appeared around the same time that I started in 2007. This combined the development, sales, marketing and management of the .NET tools (then, ANTS Profiler v3) into a separate section of the office. The idea was to increase the cohesion and communication between the different people involved in the entire lifecycle of the tools; from initial product development, through to marketing, then to customer support, who would feed back to the development team. This was such a success that the other development teams were re-worked around this model in 2009. Nowadays there are 4 divisions - SQL Tools, DBA, .NET, and New Business. Along the way there have been various tweaks to the details - the sales teams have been merged into the divisions, marketing and product support have been (mostly) centralised - but the same basic model remains. So, how has this helped? As Red Gate has continued to grow over the years, divisionalisation has turned Red Gate from a monolithic software company into what one person described as a 'federation of small businesses'. Each division is free to structure itself as it sees fit, it's free to decide what to concentrate development work on, organise its own newsletters and webinars, decide its own release schedule. Each division is its own small business. In terms of numbers, the size of each division varies from 20 people (.NET) to 52 (SQL Tools); well below Dunbar's number. From a developer's perspective, this means organisational structure is very flat & wide - there's only 2 layers between myself and the CEOs (not that it matters much; everyone can go and have a chat to Neil or Simon, or anyone else inbetween, whenever they want. Provided you can catch them at their desk!). As Red Gate grows, and expands into new areas, new divisions will be created as needed, old ones merged or disbanded, but the division structure will help to maintain that small-company feel that keeps Red Gate working as it does.

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  • Inside Red Gate - The Office

    - by Simon Cooper
    The vast majority of Red Gate is on the first and second floors (the second and third floors in US parlance) of an office building in Cambridge Business Park (here we are!). As you can see, the building is split into three sections; the two wings, and the section between them. As well as being organisationally separate, the four divisions are also split up in the office; each division has it's own floor and wing, so everyone in the division is working together in the same area (.NET and DBA on the left, SQL Tools and New Business on the right). The non-divisional parts of the business share wings with the smaller divisions, again keeping each group together. The canteen One of the downsides of divisionalisation is that communication between people in different decisions is greatly reduced. This is where the canteen (aka the SQL Servery) comes in. Occupying most of the central section on the first floor, the canteen provides free cooked lunch every day, and is where everyone in the company gathers for lunch. The idea is to encourage communication between the divisions; having lunch with people in a different division you wouldn't otherwise talk to helps people keep track of what's going on elsewhere in the company. (I'm still amazed at how the canteen staff provide a wide range of superbly cooked food for over 200 people out of a kitchen in which, if you were to swing a cat, it would get severe head injuries.). There's also table tennis and table football tables that anyone can use, provided you can grab them when they're free! Office layout Cubicles are practically unheard of in the UK, and no one, including the CEOs, has separate offices. The entire office is open-plan, as you can see in this youtube video from when we first moved in (although all the empty desks are now full!). Neil & Simon, instead of having dedicated offices, move between the different divisions every few months to keep up to date with what's going on around the company; sitting with a division gives you a much better overall impression of how the division's doing than written status reports from the division heads. There's also the usual plethora of meeting rooms scattered around the place; when we first moved in in 2009 we had a competition to name them all. We've got Afoxalypse A & B, Seagulls A & B, Traffic Jam, Thinking Hats, Camelids A & B, Horses, etc. All the meeting rooms have pictures on the walls corresponding to their theme, which adds a nice bit of individuality to otherwise fairly drab meeting rooms. Generally, any meeting room can be booked by anyone at any time, although some groups have priority in certain rooms (Camelids B is used a lot for UX testing, the Interview Room is used for, well, interviews). And, as you can see from the video, each area has various pictures, post-its, notes, signs, on the walls to try and stop it being a dull office space. Yes, it's still an office, but it's designed to be as interesting and as individual as possible.

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  • jQuery in sharepoint retruning Object Expected

    - by Simon Thompson
    When I add jquery to sharepoint 2007 (MOSS) and try and use it on a page no matter what I write on the client i get an "object expected" at the line/column where the "$" appears. I have used fiddler to check that the client is downloading the query JS (which it is) But its like its being ignore and therefor eth "$" is not understood. Searching google everybody is saying its the selector not finding the elements but see code below I do not see how it can not find my very simple example. In master page in header <script type="text/javascript" src="jquery.min.js"></script> version 1.4.2 On a page <a href="javascript:abc();">Testing</a> <script> function abc(){ $("#simon").css("border","3px solid red"); } </script> <div id="simon">

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