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  • Setting Up an IP Camera in ZoneMinder from Ubuntu

    - by Chris S
    I recently bought a TV-IP312W wireless IP camera. I've completed the basic setup on the camera itself, and confirmed I can stream video using the utility CamViewer. Now I'm trying to access the camera from ZoneMinder, so I can setup monitors and alerts. However, I'm finding the documentation a bit laking. Following the tutorial and a forum post, I've install ZoneMinder, and can access the web interface, but I'm getting stuck at the "Check that your Camera Works!" section. I can add a monitor, but after I add the configuration: Source Type: FFMPEG Source Path: http://192.168.1.105/cgi/mjpg/mjpeg.cgi?.mjpeg all I get is a broken image. What am I doing wrong?

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  • Draw Bug 2D player Camera

    - by RedShft
    I have just implemented a 2D player camera for my game, everything works properly except the player on the screen jitters when it moves between tiles. What I mean by jitter, is that if the player is moving the camera updates the tileset to be drawn and if the player steps to the right, the camera snaps that way. The movement is not smooth. I'm guessing this is occurring because of how I implemented the function to calculate the current viewable area or how my draw function works. I'm not entirely sure how to fix this. This camera system was entirely of my own creation and a first attempt at that, so it's very possible this is not a great way of doing things. My camera class, pulls information from the current tileset and calculates the viewable area. Right now I am targettng a resolution of 800 by 600. So I try to fit the appropriate amount of tiles for that resolution. My camera class, after calculating the current viewable tileset relative to the players location, returns a slice of the original tileset to be drawn. This tileset slice is updated every frame according to the players position. This slice is then passed to the map class, which draws the tile on screen. //Map Draw Function //This draw function currently matches the GID of the tile to it's location on the //PNG file of the tileset and then draws this portion on the screen void Draw(SDL_Surface* background, int[] _tileSet) { enforce( tilesetImage != null, "Tileset is null!"); enforce( background != null, "BackGround is null!"); int i = 0; int j = 0; SDL_Rect DestR, SrcR; SrcR.x = 0; SrcR.y = 0; SrcR.h = 32; SrcR.w = 32; foreach(tile; _tileSet) { //This code is matching the current tiles ID to the tileset image SrcR.x = cast(short)(tileWidth * (tile >= 11 ? (tile - ((tile / 10) * 10) - 1) : tile - 1)); SrcR.y = cast(short)(tileHeight * (tile > 10 ? (tile / 10) : 0)); //Applying the tile to the surface SDL_BlitSurface( tilesetImage, &SrcR, background, &DestR ); //this keeps track of what column/row we are on i++; if ( i == mapWidth ) { i = 0; j++; } DestR.x = cast(short)(i * tileWidth); DestR.y = cast(short)(j * tileHeight); } } //Camera Class class Camera { private: //A rectangle representing the view area SDL_Rect viewArea; //In number of tiles int viewAreaWidth; int viewAreaHeight; //This is the x and y coordinate of the camera in MAP SPACE IN PIXELS vect2 cameraCoordinates; //The player location in map space IN PIXELS vect2 playerLocation; //This is the players location in screen space; vect2 playerScreenLoc; int playerTileCol; int playerTileRow; int cameraTileCol; int cameraTileRow; //The map is stored in a single array with the tile ids //this corresponds to the index of the starting and ending tile int cameraStartTile, cameraEndTile; //This is a slice of the current tile set int[] tileSetCopy; int mapWidth; int mapHeight; int tileWidth; int tileHeight; public: this() { this.viewAreaWidth = 25; this.viewAreaHeight = 19; this.cameraCoordinates = vect2(0, 0); this.playerLocation = vect2(0, 0); this.viewArea = SDL_Rect (0, 0, 0, 0); this.tileWidth = 32; this.tileHeight = 32; } void Init(vect2 playerPosition, ref int[] tileSet, int mapWidth, int mapHeight ) { playerLocation = playerPosition; this.mapWidth = mapWidth; this.mapHeight = mapHeight; CalculateCurrentCameraPosition( tileSet, playerPosition ); //writeln( "Tile Set Copy: ", tileSetCopy ); //writeln( "Orginal Tile Set: ", tileSet ); } void CalculateCurrentCameraPosition( ref int[] tileSet, vect2 playerPosition ) { playerLocation = playerPosition; playerTileCol = cast(int)((playerLocation.x / tileWidth) + 1); playerTileRow = cast(int)((playerLocation.y / tileHeight) + 1); //writeln( "Player Tile (Column, Row): ","(", playerTileCol, ", ", playerTileRow, ")"); cameraTileCol = playerTileCol - (viewAreaWidth / 2); cameraTileRow = playerTileRow - (viewAreaHeight / 2); CameraMapBoundsCheck(); //writeln( "Camera Tile Start (Column, Row): ","(", cameraTileCol, ", ", cameraTileRow, ")"); cameraStartTile = ( (cameraTileRow - 1) * mapWidth ) + cameraTileCol - 1; //writeln( "Camera Start Tile: ", cameraStartTile ); cameraEndTile = cameraStartTile + ( viewAreaWidth * viewAreaHeight ) * 2; //writeln( "Camera End Tile: ", cameraEndTile ); tileSetCopy = tileSet[cameraStartTile..cameraEndTile]; } vect2 CalculatePlayerScreenLocation() { cameraCoordinates.x = cast(float)(cameraTileCol * tileWidth); cameraCoordinates.y = cast(float)(cameraTileRow * tileHeight); playerScreenLoc = playerLocation - cameraCoordinates + vect2(32, 32);; //writeln( "Camera Coordinates: ", cameraCoordinates ); //writeln( "Player Location (Map Space): ", playerLocation ); //writeln( "Player Location (Screen Space): ", playerScreenLoc ); return playerScreenLoc; } void CameraMapBoundsCheck() { if( cameraTileCol < 1 ) cameraTileCol = 1; if( cameraTileRow < 1 ) cameraTileRow = 1; if( cameraTileCol + 24 > mapWidth ) cameraTileCol = mapWidth - 24; if( cameraTileRow + 19 > mapHeight ) cameraTileRow = mapHeight - 19; } ref int[] GetTileSet() { return tileSetCopy; } int GetViewWidth() { return viewAreaWidth; } }

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  • Camera for 2.5D Game

    - by me--
    I'm hoping someone can explain this to me like I'm 5, because I've been struggling with this for hours and simply cannot understand what I'm doing wrong. I've written a Camera class for my 2.5D game. The intention is to support world and screen spaces like this: The camera is the black thing on the right. The +Z axis is upwards in that image, with -Z heading downwards. As you can see, both world space and screen space have (0, 0) at their top-left. I started writing some unit tests to prove that my camera was working as expected, and that's where things started getting...strange. My tests plot coordinates in world, view, and screen spaces. Eventually I will use image comparison to assert that they are correct, but for now my test just displays the result. The render logic uses Camera.ViewMatrix to transform world space to view space, and Camera.WorldPointToScreen to transform world space to screen space. Here is an example test: [Fact] public void foo() { var camera = new Camera(new Viewport(0, 0, 250, 100)); DrawingVisual worldRender; DrawingVisual viewRender; DrawingVisual screenRender; this.Render(camera, out worldRender, out viewRender, out screenRender, new Vector3(30, 0, 0), new Vector3(30, 40, 0)); this.ShowRenders(camera, worldRender, viewRender, screenRender); } And here's what pops up when I run this test: World space looks OK, although I suspect the z axis is going into the screen instead of towards the viewer. View space has me completely baffled. I was expecting the camera to be sitting above (0, 0) and looking towards the center of the scene. Instead, the z axis seems to be the wrong way around, and the camera is positioned in the opposite corner to what I expect! I suspect screen space will be another thing altogether, but can anyone explain what I'm doing wrong in my Camera class? UPDATE I made some progress in terms of getting things to look visually as I expect, but only through intuition: not an actual understanding of what I'm doing. Any enlightenment would be greatly appreciated. I realized that my view space was flipped both vertically and horizontally compared to what I expected, so I changed my view matrix to scale accordingly: this.viewMatrix = Matrix.CreateLookAt(this.location, this.target, this.up) * Matrix.CreateScale(this.zoom, this.zoom, 1) * Matrix.CreateScale(-1, -1, 1); I could combine the two CreateScale calls, but have left them separate for clarity. Again, I have no idea why this is necessary, but it fixed my view space: But now my screen space needs to be flipped vertically, so I modified my projection matrix accordingly: this.projectionMatrix = Matrix.CreatePerspectiveFieldOfView(0.7853982f, viewport.AspectRatio, 1, 2) * Matrix.CreateScale(1, -1, 1); And this results in what I was expecting from my first attempt: I have also just tried using Camera to render sprites via a SpriteBatch to make sure everything works there too, and it does. But the question remains: why do I need to do all this flipping of axes to get the space coordinates the way I expect? UPDATE 2 I've since improved my rendering logic in my test suite so that it supports geometries and so that lines get lighter the further away they are from the camera. I wanted to do this to avoid optical illusions and to further prove to myself that I'm looking at what I think I am. Here is an example: In this case, I have 3 geometries: a cube, a sphere, and a polyline on the top face of the cube. Notice how the darkening and lightening of the lines correctly identifies those portions of the geometries closer to the camera. If I remove the negative scaling I had to put in, I see: So you can see I'm still in the same boat - I still need those vertical and horizontal flips in my matrices to get things to appear correctly. In the interests of giving people a repro to play with, here is the complete code needed to generate the above. If you want to run via the test harness, just install the xunit package: Camera.cs: using Microsoft.Xna.Framework; using Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Graphics; using System.Diagnostics; public sealed class Camera { private readonly Viewport viewport; private readonly Matrix projectionMatrix; private Matrix? viewMatrix; private Vector3 location; private Vector3 target; private Vector3 up; private float zoom; public Camera(Viewport viewport) { this.viewport = viewport; // for an explanation of the negative scaling, see: http://gamedev.stackexchange.com/questions/63409/ this.projectionMatrix = Matrix.CreatePerspectiveFieldOfView(0.7853982f, viewport.AspectRatio, 1, 2) * Matrix.CreateScale(1, -1, 1); // defaults this.location = new Vector3(this.viewport.Width / 2, this.viewport.Height, 100); this.target = new Vector3(this.viewport.Width / 2, this.viewport.Height / 2, 0); this.up = new Vector3(0, 0, 1); this.zoom = 1; } public Viewport Viewport { get { return this.viewport; } } public Vector3 Location { get { return this.location; } set { this.location = value; this.viewMatrix = null; } } public Vector3 Target { get { return this.target; } set { this.target = value; this.viewMatrix = null; } } public Vector3 Up { get { return this.up; } set { this.up = value; this.viewMatrix = null; } } public float Zoom { get { return this.zoom; } set { this.zoom = value; this.viewMatrix = null; } } public Matrix ProjectionMatrix { get { return this.projectionMatrix; } } public Matrix ViewMatrix { get { if (this.viewMatrix == null) { // for an explanation of the negative scaling, see: http://gamedev.stackexchange.com/questions/63409/ this.viewMatrix = Matrix.CreateLookAt(this.location, this.target, this.up) * Matrix.CreateScale(this.zoom) * Matrix.CreateScale(-1, -1, 1); } return this.viewMatrix.Value; } } public Vector2 WorldPointToScreen(Vector3 point) { var result = viewport.Project(point, this.ProjectionMatrix, this.ViewMatrix, Matrix.Identity); return new Vector2(result.X, result.Y); } public void WorldPointsToScreen(Vector3[] points, Vector2[] destination) { Debug.Assert(points != null); Debug.Assert(destination != null); Debug.Assert(points.Length == destination.Length); for (var i = 0; i < points.Length; ++i) { destination[i] = this.WorldPointToScreen(points[i]); } } } CameraFixture.cs: using Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Graphics; using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Linq; using System.Windows; using System.Windows.Controls; using System.Windows.Media; using Xunit; using XNA = Microsoft.Xna.Framework; public sealed class CameraFixture { [Fact] public void foo() { var camera = new Camera(new Viewport(0, 0, 250, 100)); DrawingVisual worldRender; DrawingVisual viewRender; DrawingVisual screenRender; this.Render( camera, out worldRender, out viewRender, out screenRender, new Sphere(30, 15) { WorldMatrix = XNA.Matrix.CreateTranslation(155, 50, 0) }, new Cube(30) { WorldMatrix = XNA.Matrix.CreateTranslation(75, 60, 15) }, new PolyLine(new XNA.Vector3(0, 0, 0), new XNA.Vector3(10, 10, 0), new XNA.Vector3(20, 0, 0), new XNA.Vector3(0, 0, 0)) { WorldMatrix = XNA.Matrix.CreateTranslation(65, 55, 30) }); this.ShowRenders(worldRender, viewRender, screenRender); } #region Supporting Fields private static readonly Pen xAxisPen = new Pen(Brushes.Red, 2); private static readonly Pen yAxisPen = new Pen(Brushes.Green, 2); private static readonly Pen zAxisPen = new Pen(Brushes.Blue, 2); private static readonly Pen viewportPen = new Pen(Brushes.Gray, 1); private static readonly Pen nonScreenSpacePen = new Pen(Brushes.Black, 0.5); private static readonly Color geometryBaseColor = Colors.Black; #endregion #region Supporting Methods private void Render(Camera camera, out DrawingVisual worldRender, out DrawingVisual viewRender, out DrawingVisual screenRender, params Geometry[] geometries) { var worldDrawingVisual = new DrawingVisual(); var viewDrawingVisual = new DrawingVisual(); var screenDrawingVisual = new DrawingVisual(); const int axisLength = 15; using (var worldDrawingContext = worldDrawingVisual.RenderOpen()) using (var viewDrawingContext = viewDrawingVisual.RenderOpen()) using (var screenDrawingContext = screenDrawingVisual.RenderOpen()) { // draw lines around the camera's viewport var viewportBounds = camera.Viewport.Bounds; var viewportLines = new Tuple<int, int, int, int>[] { Tuple.Create(viewportBounds.Left, viewportBounds.Bottom, viewportBounds.Left, viewportBounds.Top), Tuple.Create(viewportBounds.Left, viewportBounds.Top, viewportBounds.Right, viewportBounds.Top), Tuple.Create(viewportBounds.Right, viewportBounds.Top, viewportBounds.Right, viewportBounds.Bottom), Tuple.Create(viewportBounds.Right, viewportBounds.Bottom, viewportBounds.Left, viewportBounds.Bottom) }; foreach (var viewportLine in viewportLines) { var viewStart = XNA.Vector3.Transform(new XNA.Vector3(viewportLine.Item1, viewportLine.Item2, 0), camera.ViewMatrix); var viewEnd = XNA.Vector3.Transform(new XNA.Vector3(viewportLine.Item3, viewportLine.Item4, 0), camera.ViewMatrix); var screenStart = camera.WorldPointToScreen(new XNA.Vector3(viewportLine.Item1, viewportLine.Item2, 0)); var screenEnd = camera.WorldPointToScreen(new XNA.Vector3(viewportLine.Item3, viewportLine.Item4, 0)); worldDrawingContext.DrawLine(viewportPen, new Point(viewportLine.Item1, viewportLine.Item2), new Point(viewportLine.Item3, viewportLine.Item4)); viewDrawingContext.DrawLine(viewportPen, new Point(viewStart.X, viewStart.Y), new Point(viewEnd.X, viewEnd.Y)); screenDrawingContext.DrawLine(viewportPen, new Point(screenStart.X, screenStart.Y), new Point(screenEnd.X, screenEnd.Y)); } // draw axes var axisLines = new Tuple<int, int, int, int, int, int, Pen>[] { Tuple.Create(0, 0, 0, axisLength, 0, 0, xAxisPen), Tuple.Create(0, 0, 0, 0, axisLength, 0, yAxisPen), Tuple.Create(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, axisLength, zAxisPen) }; foreach (var axisLine in axisLines) { var viewStart = XNA.Vector3.Transform(new XNA.Vector3(axisLine.Item1, axisLine.Item2, axisLine.Item3), camera.ViewMatrix); var viewEnd = XNA.Vector3.Transform(new XNA.Vector3(axisLine.Item4, axisLine.Item5, axisLine.Item6), camera.ViewMatrix); var screenStart = camera.WorldPointToScreen(new XNA.Vector3(axisLine.Item1, axisLine.Item2, axisLine.Item3)); var screenEnd = camera.WorldPointToScreen(new XNA.Vector3(axisLine.Item4, axisLine.Item5, axisLine.Item6)); worldDrawingContext.DrawLine(axisLine.Item7, new Point(axisLine.Item1, axisLine.Item2), new Point(axisLine.Item4, axisLine.Item5)); viewDrawingContext.DrawLine(axisLine.Item7, new Point(viewStart.X, viewStart.Y), new Point(viewEnd.X, viewEnd.Y)); screenDrawingContext.DrawLine(axisLine.Item7, new Point(screenStart.X, screenStart.Y), new Point(screenEnd.X, screenEnd.Y)); } // for all points in all geometries to be rendered, find the closest and furthest away from the camera so we can lighten lines that are further away var distancesToAllGeometrySections = from geometry in geometries let geometryViewMatrix = geometry.WorldMatrix * camera.ViewMatrix from section in geometry.Sections from point in new XNA.Vector3[] { section.Item1, section.Item2 } let viewPoint = XNA.Vector3.Transform(point, geometryViewMatrix) select viewPoint.Length(); var furthestDistance = distancesToAllGeometrySections.Max(); var closestDistance = distancesToAllGeometrySections.Min(); var deltaDistance = Math.Max(0.000001f, furthestDistance - closestDistance); // draw each geometry for (var i = 0; i < geometries.Length; ++i) { var geometry = geometries[i]; // there's probably a more correct name for this, but basically this gets the geometry relative to the camera so we can check how far away each point is from the camera var geometryViewMatrix = geometry.WorldMatrix * camera.ViewMatrix; // we order roughly by those sections furthest from the camera to those closest, so that the closer ones "overwrite" the ones further away var orderedSections = from section in geometry.Sections let startPointRelativeToCamera = XNA.Vector3.Transform(section.Item1, geometryViewMatrix) let endPointRelativeToCamera = XNA.Vector3.Transform(section.Item2, geometryViewMatrix) let startPointDistance = startPointRelativeToCamera.Length() let endPointDistance = endPointRelativeToCamera.Length() orderby (startPointDistance + endPointDistance) descending select new { Section = section, DistanceToStart = startPointDistance, DistanceToEnd = endPointDistance }; foreach (var orderedSection in orderedSections) { var start = XNA.Vector3.Transform(orderedSection.Section.Item1, geometry.WorldMatrix); var end = XNA.Vector3.Transform(orderedSection.Section.Item2, geometry.WorldMatrix); var viewStart = XNA.Vector3.Transform(start, camera.ViewMatrix); var viewEnd = XNA.Vector3.Transform(end, camera.ViewMatrix); worldDrawingContext.DrawLine(nonScreenSpacePen, new Point(start.X, start.Y), new Point(end.X, end.Y)); viewDrawingContext.DrawLine(nonScreenSpacePen, new Point(viewStart.X, viewStart.Y), new Point(viewEnd.X, viewEnd.Y)); // screen rendering is more complicated purely because I wanted geometry to fade the further away it is from the camera // otherwise, it's very hard to tell whether the rendering is actually correct or not var startDistanceRatio = (orderedSection.DistanceToStart - closestDistance) / deltaDistance; var endDistanceRatio = (orderedSection.DistanceToEnd - closestDistance) / deltaDistance; // lerp towards white based on distance from camera, but only to a maximum of 90% var startColor = Lerp(geometryBaseColor, Colors.White, startDistanceRatio * 0.9f); var endColor = Lerp(geometryBaseColor, Colors.White, endDistanceRatio * 0.9f); var screenStart = camera.WorldPointToScreen(start); var screenEnd = camera.WorldPointToScreen(end); var brush = new LinearGradientBrush { StartPoint = new Point(screenStart.X, screenStart.Y), EndPoint = new Point(screenEnd.X, screenEnd.Y), MappingMode = BrushMappingMode.Absolute }; brush.GradientStops.Add(new GradientStop(startColor, 0)); brush.GradientStops.Add(new GradientStop(endColor, 1)); var pen = new Pen(brush, 1); brush.Freeze(); pen.Freeze(); screenDrawingContext.DrawLine(pen, new Point(screenStart.X, screenStart.Y), new Point(screenEnd.X, screenEnd.Y)); } } } worldRender = worldDrawingVisual; viewRender = viewDrawingVisual; screenRender = screenDrawingVisual; } private static float Lerp(float start, float end, float amount) { var difference = end - start; var adjusted = difference * amount; return start + adjusted; } private static Color Lerp(Color color, Color to, float amount) { var sr = color.R; var sg = color.G; var sb = color.B; var er = to.R; var eg = to.G; var eb = to.B; var r = (byte)Lerp(sr, er, amount); var g = (byte)Lerp(sg, eg, amount); var b = (byte)Lerp(sb, eb, amount); return Color.FromArgb(255, r, g, b); } private void ShowRenders(DrawingVisual worldRender, DrawingVisual viewRender, DrawingVisual screenRender) { var itemsControl = new ItemsControl(); itemsControl.Items.Add(new HeaderedContentControl { Header = "World", Content = new DrawingVisualHost(worldRender)}); itemsControl.Items.Add(new HeaderedContentControl { Header = "View", Content = new DrawingVisualHost(viewRender) }); itemsControl.Items.Add(new HeaderedContentControl { Header = "Screen", Content = new DrawingVisualHost(screenRender) }); var window = new Window { Title = "Renders", Content = itemsControl, ShowInTaskbar = true, SizeToContent = SizeToContent.WidthAndHeight }; window.ShowDialog(); } #endregion #region Supporting Types // stupidly simple 3D geometry class, consisting of a series of sections that will be connected by lines private abstract class Geometry { public abstract IEnumerable<Tuple<XNA.Vector3, XNA.Vector3>> Sections { get; } public XNA.Matrix WorldMatrix { get; set; } } private sealed class Line : Geometry { private readonly XNA.Vector3 magnitude; public Line(XNA.Vector3 magnitude) { this.magnitude = magnitude; } public override IEnumerable<Tuple<XNA.Vector3, XNA.Vector3>> Sections { get { yield return Tuple.Create(XNA.Vector3.Zero, this.magnitude); } } } private sealed class PolyLine : Geometry { private readonly XNA.Vector3[] points; public PolyLine(params XNA.Vector3[] points) { this.points = points; } public override IEnumerable<Tuple<XNA.Vector3, XNA.Vector3>> Sections { get { if (this.points.Length < 2) { yield break; } var end = this.points[0]; for (var i = 1; i < this.points.Length; ++i) { var start = end; end = this.points[i]; yield return Tuple.Create(start, end); } } } } private sealed class Cube : Geometry { private readonly float size; public Cube(float size) { this.size = size; } public override IEnumerable<Tuple<XNA.Vector3, XNA.Vector3>> Sections { get { var halfSize = this.size / 2; var frontBottomLeft = new XNA.Vector3(-halfSize, halfSize, -halfSize); var frontBottomRight = new XNA.Vector3(halfSize, halfSize, -halfSize); var frontTopLeft = new XNA.Vector3(-halfSize, halfSize, halfSize); var frontTopRight = new XNA.Vector3(halfSize, halfSize, halfSize); var backBottomLeft = new XNA.Vector3(-halfSize, -halfSize, -halfSize); var backBottomRight = new XNA.Vector3(halfSize, -halfSize, -halfSize); var backTopLeft = new XNA.Vector3(-halfSize, -halfSize, halfSize); var backTopRight = new XNA.Vector3(halfSize, -halfSize, halfSize); // front face yield return Tuple.Create(frontBottomLeft, frontBottomRight); yield return Tuple.Create(frontBottomLeft, frontTopLeft); yield return Tuple.Create(frontTopLeft, frontTopRight); yield return Tuple.Create(frontTopRight, frontBottomRight); // left face yield return Tuple.Create(frontTopLeft, backTopLeft); yield return Tuple.Create(backTopLeft, backBottomLeft); yield return Tuple.Create(backBottomLeft, frontBottomLeft); // right face yield return Tuple.Create(frontTopRight, backTopRight); yield return Tuple.Create(backTopRight, backBottomRight); yield return Tuple.Create(backBottomRight, frontBottomRight); // back face yield return Tuple.Create(backBottomLeft, backBottomRight); yield return Tuple.Create(backTopLeft, backTopRight); } } } private sealed class Sphere : Geometry { private readonly float radius; private readonly int subsections; public Sphere(float radius, int subsections) { this.radius = radius; this.subsections = subsections; } public override IEnumerable<Tuple<XNA.Vector3, XNA.Vector3>> Sections { get { var latitudeLines = this.subsections; var longitudeLines = this.subsections; // see http://stackoverflow.com/a/4082020/5380 var results = from latitudeLine in Enumerable.Range(0, latitudeLines) from longitudeLine in Enumerable.Range(0, longitudeLines) let latitudeRatio = latitudeLine / (float)latitudeLines let longitudeRatio = longitudeLine / (float)longitudeLines let nextLatitudeRatio = (latitudeLine + 1) / (float)latitudeLines let nextLongitudeRatio = (longitudeLine + 1) / (float)longitudeLines let z1 = Math.Cos(Math.PI * latitudeRatio) let z2 = Math.Cos(Math.PI * nextLatitudeRatio) let x1 = Math.Sin(Math.PI * latitudeRatio) * Math.Cos(Math.PI * 2 * longitudeRatio) let y1 = Math.Sin(Math.PI * latitudeRatio) * Math.Sin(Math.PI * 2 * longitudeRatio) let x2 = Math.Sin(Math.PI * nextLatitudeRatio) * Math.Cos(Math.PI * 2 * longitudeRatio) let y2 = Math.Sin(Math.PI * nextLatitudeRatio) * Math.Sin(Math.PI * 2 * longitudeRatio) let x3 = Math.Sin(Math.PI * latitudeRatio) * Math.Cos(Math.PI * 2 * nextLongitudeRatio) let y3 = Math.Sin(Math.PI * latitudeRatio) * Math.Sin(Math.PI * 2 * nextLongitudeRatio) let start = new XNA.Vector3((float)x1 * radius, (float)y1 * radius, (float)z1 * radius) let firstEnd = new XNA.Vector3((float)x2 * radius, (float)y2 * radius, (float)z2 * radius) let secondEnd = new XNA.Vector3((float)x3 * radius, (float)y3 * radius, (float)z1 * radius) select new { First = Tuple.Create(start, firstEnd), Second = Tuple.Create(start, secondEnd) }; foreach (var result in results) { yield return result.First; yield return result.Second; } } } } #endregion }

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  • Rotate sprite to face 3D camera

    - by omikun
    I am trying to rotate a sprite so it is always facing a 3D camera. shaders->setUniform("camera", gCamera.matrix()); glm::mat4 scale = glm::scale(glm::mat4(), glm::vec3(5e5, 5e5, 5e5)); glm::vec3 look = gCamera.position(); glm::vec3 right = glm::cross(gCamera.up(), look); glm::vec3 up = glm::cross(look, right); glm::mat4 newTransform = glm::lookAt(glm::vec3(0), gCamera.position(), up) * scale; shaders->setUniform("model", newTransform); In the vertex shader: gl_Position = camera * model * vec4(vert, 1); The object will track the camera if I move the camera up or down, but if I rotate the camera around it, it will rotate in the other direction so I end up seeing its front twice and its back twice as I rotate around it 360. What am I doing wrong?

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  • Limit the amount a camera can pitch

    - by ChocoMan
    I'm having problems trying to limit the range my camera can pitch. Currently my camera can pitch around a model without restriction, but having a hard time trying to find the value of the degree/radian the camera is currently at after pitching. Here is what I got so far: // Moves camera with thumbstick Pitch = pController.ThumbSticks.Right.Y * MathHelper.ToRadians(speedAngleMAX); // Pitch Camera around model public void cameraPitch(float pitch) { pitchAngle = ModelLoad.camTarget - ModelLoad.CameraPos; axisPitch = Vector3.Cross(Vector3.Up, pitchAngle); // pitch constrained to model's orientation axisPitch.Normalize(); ModelLoad.CameraPos = Vector3.Transform(ModelLoad.CameraPos - ModelLoad.camTarget, Matrix.CreateFromAxisAngle(axisPitch, pitch)) + ModelLoad.camTarget; } I've tried restraining the Y-camera position of ModelLoad.CameraPos.Y, but doing so gave me some unwanted results.

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  • Camera not staying behind model while moving in circle

    - by ChocoMan
    I have a camera behind a model (3rd Person) and I'm having problems KEEPING it behind the model. When I first start my game, you see the back of the model. If the model moves forward, backward or strafe left or right, the camera moves along accordingly. When the model rotates (stationary), the camera rotates accordingly with the model still pointing at the model's back. So far, so good. The problem comes when the player is BOTH moving and rotating at the same time. Take for example a model moving in a circular pattern like running around a track. As the model moves in this motion, the model rotates slightly more with each complete rotation. Eventually, instead of looking at the model's back, eventually you will see the model in a profile view and before you know it, the model's front is facing the camera. And when you stop moving the model, the model stays in that position. So, as long as my model is stationary and rotating in one place, the camera rotates correctly. But as soon as there is any sort movement while rotating, the model is offset by a mysterious increasing amount. How can I keep the camera maintaining the same view no matter how I move AND rotate at the same time? // Rotates model and pitches camera on its own axis public void modelRotMovement(GamePadState pController) { /* For rotating the model left or right. * Camera maintains distance from model * throughout rotation and if model moves * to a new position. */ Yaw = pController.ThumbSticks.Right.X * MathHelper.ToRadians(speedAngleMAX); AddRotation = Quaternion.CreateFromAxisAngle(Vector3.Up, yaw); //AddRotation = Quaternion.CreateFromYawPitchRoll(Yaw, 0, 0); ModelLoad.MRotation *= AddRotation; MOrientation = Matrix.CreateFromQuaternion(ModelLoad.MRotation); Pitch = pController.ThumbSticks.Right.Y * MathHelper.ToRadians(speedAngleMAX); AddPitch = Quaternion.CreateFromAxisAngle(Vector3.Up, pitch); ModelLoad.CRotation *= AddPitch; COrientation = Matrix.CreateFromQuaternion(ModelLoad.CRotation); } // Orbit (yaw) Camera around model public void cameraYaw(float yaw) { Vector3 yawAngle = ModelLoad.CameraPos - ModelLoad.camTarget; Vector3 axisYaw = Vector3.Up; ModelLoad.CameraPos = Vector3.Transform(yawAngle, Matrix.CreateFromAxisAngle(axisYaw, yaw)) + ModelLoad.camTarget; }

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  • Automatically zoom out the camera to show all players (XNA)

    - by user36159
    I am building a game in XNA that takes place in a rectangular arena. The game is multiplayer and each player may go where they like within the arena. The camera is a persepective camera that looks directly downwards. The camera should be automatically repositioned based on the game state. Currently, the xy position is a weighted sum of the xy positions of important entities. I would like the camera's z position to be calculated from the xy coordinates so that it zooms out to the point where all important entities are visible. My current approach is to: hw = the greatest x distance from the camera to an important entity hh = the greatest y distance from the camera to an important entity Calculate z = max(hw / tan(FoVx), hh / tan(FoVy)) My code seems to almost work as it should, but the resulting z values are always too low by a factor of about 4. Any ideas?

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  • Automatically zoom out the camera to show all players

    - by user36159
    I am building a game in XNA that takes place in a rectangular arena. The game is multiplayer and each player may go where they like within the arena. The camera is a perspective camera that looks directly downwards. The camera should be automatically repositioned based on the game state. Currently, the xy position is a weighted sum of the xy positions of important entities. I would like the camera's z position to be calculated from the xy coordinates so that it zooms out to the point where all important entities are visible. My current approach is to: hw = the greatest x distance from the camera to an important entity hh = the greatest y distance from the camera to an important entity Calculate z = max(hw / tan(FoVx), hh / tan(FoVy)) My code seems to almost work as it should, but the resulting z values are always too low by a factor of about 4. Any ideas?

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  • Drag camera/view in a 3D world

    - by Dono
    I'm trying to make a Draggable view in a 3D world. Currently, I've made it using mouse position on the screen, but, when I move the distance traveled by my mouse is not equal to the distance traveled in the 3D world. So, I've tried to do that : Compute a ray from mouse position to 3D world. Calculate intersection with the ground. Check intersection difference old position <- new position. Translate camera with the difference. I've got a problem with this method: The ray is computed with the current camera's position I move the camera I compute the new ray with new camera position. The difference between old ray and new ray is now invalid. So, graphically my camera don't stop to move to previous/new position everytime. How can I do a draggable camera with another solution ? Thanks!

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  • Camera frustum calculation coming out wrong

    - by Telanor
    I'm trying to calculate a view/projection/bounding frustum for the 6 directions of a point light and I'm having trouble with the views pointing along the Y axis. Our game uses a right-handed, Y-up system. For the other 4 directions I create the LookAt matrix using (0, 1, 0) as the up vector. Obviously that doesn't work when looking along the Y axis so for those I use an up vector of (-1, 0, 0) for -Y and (1, 0, 0) for +Y. The view matrix seems to come out correctly (and the projection matrix always stays the same), but the bounding frustum is definitely wrong. Can anyone see what I'm doing wrong? This is the code I'm using: camera.Projection = Matrix.PerspectiveFovRH((float)Math.PI / 2, ShadowMapSize / (float)ShadowMapSize, 1, 5); for(var i = 0; i < 6; i++) { var renderTargetView = shadowMap.GetRenderTargetView((TextureCubeFace)i); var up = DetermineLightUp((TextureCubeFace) i); var forward = DirectionToVector((TextureCubeFace) i); camera.View = Matrix.LookAtRH(this.Position, this.Position + forward, up); camera.BoundingFrustum = new BoundingFrustum(camera.View * camera.Projection); } private static Vector3 DirectionToVector(TextureCubeFace direction) { switch (direction) { case TextureCubeFace.NegativeX: return -Vector3.UnitX; case TextureCubeFace.NegativeY: return -Vector3.UnitY; case TextureCubeFace.NegativeZ: return -Vector3.UnitZ; case TextureCubeFace.PositiveX: return Vector3.UnitX; case TextureCubeFace.PositiveY: return Vector3.UnitY; case TextureCubeFace.PositiveZ: return Vector3.UnitZ; default: throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("direction"); } } private static Vector3 DetermineLightUp(TextureCubeFace direction) { switch (direction) { case TextureCubeFace.NegativeY: return -Vector3.UnitX; case TextureCubeFace.PositiveY: return Vector3.UnitX; default: return Vector3.UnitY; } } Edit: Here's what the values are coming out to for the PositiveX and PositiveY directions: Constants: Position = {X:0 Y:360 Z:0} camera.Projection = [M11:0.9999999 M12:0 M13:0 M14:0] [M21:0 M22:0.9999999 M23:0 M24:0] [M31:0 M32:0 M33:-1.25 M34:-1] [M41:0 M42:0 M43:-1.25 M44:0] PositiveX: up = {X:0 Y:1 Z:0} target = {X:1 Y:360 Z:0} camera.View = [M11:0 M12:0 M13:-1 M14:0] [M21:0 M22:1 M23:0 M24:0] [M31:1 M32:0 M33:0 M34:0] [M41:0 M42:-360 M43:0 M44:1] camera.BoundingFrustum: Matrix = [M11:0 M12:0 M13:1.25 M14:1] [M21:0 M22:0.9999999 M23:0 M24:0] [M31:0.9999999 M32:0 M33:0 M34:0] [M41:0 M42:-360 M43:-1.25 M44:0] Top = {A:0.7071068 B:-0.7071068 C:0 D:254.5584} Bottom = {A:0.7071068 B:0.7071068 C:0 D:-254.5584} Left = {A:0.7071068 B:0 C:0.7071068 D:0} Right = {A:0.7071068 B:0 C:-0.7071068 D:0} Near = {A:1 B:0 C:0 D:-1} Far = {A:-1 B:0 C:0 D:5} PositiveY: up = {X:0 Y:0 Z:-1} target = {X:0 Y:361 Z:0} camera.View = [M11:-1 M12:0 M13:0 M14:0] [M21:0 M22:0 M23:-1 M24:0] [M31:0 M32:-1 M33:0 M34:0] [M41:0 M42:0 M43:360 M44:1] camera.BoundingFrustum: Matrix = [M11:-0.9999999 M12:0 M13:0 M14:0] [M21:0 M22:0 M23:1.25 M24:1] [M31:0 M32:-0.9999999 M33:0 M34:0] [M41:0 M42:0 M43:-451.25 M44:-360] Top = {A:0 B:0.7071068 C:0.7071068 D:-254.5585} Bottom = {A:0 B:0.7071068 C:-0.7071068 D:-254.5585} Left = {A:-0.7071068 B:0.7071068 C:0 D:-254.5585} Right = {A:0.7071068 B:0.7071068 C:0 D:-254.5585} Near = {A:0 B:1 C:0 D:-361} Far = {A:0 B:-1 C:0 D:365} When I use the resulting BoundingFrustum to cull regions outside of it, this is the result: Pass PositiveX: Drew 3 regions Pass NegativeX: Drew 6 regions Pass PositiveY: Drew 400 regions Pass NegativeY: Drew 36 regions Pass PositiveZ: Drew 3 regions Pass NegativeZ: Drew 6 regions There are only 400 regions to draw and the light is in the center of them. As you can see, the PositiveY direction is drawing every single region. With the near/far planes of the perspective matrix set as small as they are, there's no way a single frustum could contain every single region.

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  • Light mask map and camera for static lights in XNA Platformer

    - by JiminyCricket
    Using the example for some basic light maps found here : http://blog.josack.com/2011/07/xna-2d-dynamic-lighting.html, I've managed to create a lightmap texture using individual lightmaps and display it over a 2D tiled world as in the Platformer example. I'm using the very basic 2D camera example as found here : http://www.david-amador.com/2009/10/xna-camera-2d-with-zoom-and-rotation/, and the problem is that the lightmap texture scrolls with the player sprite. This looks pretty good and would be excellent for lighting the player sprite as it moves. But, I also want to be able to place static lights (or some initial position for the lights) that do not move with the player or camera. When I turn off the camera or give it a static position, it works as a series of static lights so I believe it's probably caused by the camera transformation matrix following the player around. I'm using RenderTarget2Ds, one for the main game screen after all the backgrounds and tiles are rendered, and one for the "lightmap" which consists of a black background and a bunch of lighting textures which are merged with it using additive blending. For now, I'm doing all of this in PlatformerGame.cs where the camera transformation and position is set and the level.Draw() call is made. I can't figure out how to separate the drawing of the lightmap and the camera following the player. I was thinking it would be better to render the shadows and lighting directly in the drawing of the level itself, but I'm not sure how to do that either because this technique requires RenderTarget2Ds and calling SpriteBatch.Begin()/End().

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  • Isometric Camera trouble - can't rotate or move correctly

    - by Deukalion
    I'm trying to create a 3D editor, but I've been having some trouble with the Camera and understanding each component. I've created 2 camera that works OK, but now I'm trying to implement an Isometric Camera in XNA without success on the rotation and movement of the camera. All I get working is Zoom. (Cube with x=3f, y=3f, z=1f in center) And this is the constructor for my IsometricCamera (inherits from ICamera, with methods for Rotation, Movement and Zoom, and Properties for World/View/Projection matrices) public IsometricCamera3D(GraphicsDevice device, float startClip = -1000f, float endClip = 1000f) { matrix_projection = Matrix.CreateOrthographic(device.Viewport.Width, device.Viewport.Height, startClip, endClip); rotation = Vector3.Zero; matrix_view = Matrix.CreateScale(zoom) * Matrix.CreateRotationY(MathHelper.ToRadians(45 + 180)) * Matrix.CreateRotationX(MathHelper.ToRadians(30)) * Matrix.CreateRotationZ(MathHelper.ToRadians(120)) * Matrix.CreateTranslation(rotation.X, rotation.Y, rotation.Z); } Problem is when I rotate it, all that happens is that the Cube gets more or less shiny and nothing happens. What is wrong and how should I create my View matrix to move it / rotate it correctly? Rotate, Move and Zoom looks like: MethodName(Vector3 rotation/movement), Zoom(float value); and just increases the value, then calls an update to recreate the View Matrix according to the code in the constructor. Currently, in my editor I use MiddleButton + Mouse Movement to rotate the camera, but it's not working as the other camera. But in my default camera I use World Matrix to move, but I guess that's not the best way to go which is why I'm trying this.

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  • Implementing Camera Zoom in a 2D Engine

    - by Luke
    I'm currently trying to implement camera scaling/zoom in my 2D Engine. Normally I calculate the Sprite's drawing size and position similar to this pseudo code: render() { var x = sprite.x; var y = sprite.y; var sizeX = sprite.width * sprite.scaleX; // width of the sprite on the screen var sizeY = sprite.height * sprite.scaleY; // height of the sprite on the screen } To implement the scaling i changed the code to this: class Camera { var scaleX; var scaleY; var zoom; var finalScaleX; // = scaleX * zoom var finalScaleY; // = scaleY * zoom } render() { var x = sprite.x * Camera.finalScaleX; var y = sprite.y * Camera.finalScaleY; var sizeX = sprite.width * sprite.scaleX * Camera.finalScaleX; var sizeY = sprite.height * sprite.scaleY * Camera.finalScaleY; } The problem is that when the zoom is smaller than 1.0 all sprites are moved toward the top-left corner of the screen. This is expected when looking at the code but i want the camera to zoom on the center of the screen. Any tips on how to do that are welcome. :)

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  • Recommendations for an inexpensive Surveillance Camera Kit that I can remotely access

    - by dr dork
    Hello! I just saw a deal on Newegg for this surveillance camera kit and it got me to thinking about installing a setup in my house. Can anyone recommend a decent surveillance camera kit, nothing fancy, that will allow me to access it from any computer (whether it's through a webpage or client program I need to install)? Thanks so much in advance for your help, I'm going to start researching this question right now.

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  • Recommendations for a Surveillance Camera Kit that I can remotely access

    - by dr dork
    Hello! I just saw a deal on Newegg for this surveillance camera kit and it got me to thinking about installing a setup in my house. Can anyone recommend a decent surveillance camera kit, nothing fancy, that will allow me to access it from any computer (whether it's through a webpage or client program I need to install)? Thanks so much in advance for your help, I'm going to start researching this question right now.

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  • OpenGL - Calculating camera view matrix

    - by Karle
    Problem I am calculating the model, view and projection matrices independently to be used in my shader as follows: gl_Position = projection * view * model * vec4(in_Position, 1.0); When I try to calculate my camera's view matrix the Z axis is flipped and my camera seems like it is looking backwards. My program is written in C# using the OpenTK library. Translation (Working) I've created a test scene as follows: From my understanding of the OpenGL coordinate system they are positioned correctly. The model matrix is created using: Matrix4 translation = Matrix4.CreateTranslation(modelPosition); Matrix4 model = translation; The view matrix is created using: Matrix4 translation = Matrix4.CreateTranslation(-cameraPosition); Matrix4 view = translation; Rotation (Not-Working) I now want to create the camera's rotation matrix. To do this I use the camera's right, up and forward vectors: // Hard coded example orientation: // Normally calculated from up and forward // Similar to look-at camera. Vector3 r = Vector.UnitX; Vector3 u = Vector3.UnitY; Vector3 f = -Vector3.UnitZ; Matrix4 rot = new Matrix4( r.X, r.Y, r.Z, 0, u.X, u.Y, u.Z, 0, f.X, f.Y, f.Z, 0, 0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f); This results in the following matrix being created: I know that multiplying by the identity matrix would produce no rotation. This is clearly not the identity matrix and therefore will apply some rotation. I thought that because this is aligned with the OpenGL coordinate system is should produce no rotation. Is this the wrong way to calculate the rotation matrix? I then create my view matrix as: // OpenTK is row-major so the order of operations is reversed: Matrix4 view = translation * rot; Rotation almost works now but the -Z/+Z axis has been flipped, with the green cube now appearing closer to the camera. It seems like the camera is looking backwards, especially if I move it around. My goal is to store the position and orientation of all objects (including the camera) as: Vector3 position; Vector3 up; Vector3 forward; Apologies for writing such a long question and thank you in advance. I've tried following tutorials/guides from many sites but I keep ending up with something wrong. Edit: Projection Matrix Set-up Matrix4 projection = Matrix4.CreatePerspectiveFieldOfView( (float)(0.5 * Math.PI), (float)display.Width / display.Height, 0.1f, 1000.0f);

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  • Fuji camera "mounts" but folder not in Dolphin After Kubuntu 13.10 upgrade

    - by user207207
    Fuji camera mount reported in attached devices but not visible in Dolphin After Kubuntu 13.10 upgrade Have reinstalled the driver, and a few other suggestions, for other cameras mounts failing on previous Ubuntu upgrades. I have already spent a couple of hours trying to get my photo's off the camera, very annoying. Worked perfectly in 11.04, 11.10, 12.04, 12.10 and 13.04. dmesg | tail; lsusb; lsb_release -a [ 6181.858786] CPUM: APIC 03 at 00000000fee00000 (mapped at ffffc90009400000) - ver 0x80050010, lint0=0x10700 lint1=0x10400 pc=0x00400 thmr=0x10000 [17261.396236] CPUM: APIC 00 at 00000000fee00000 (mapped at ffffc90000c6a000) - ver 0x80050010, lint0=0x10700 lint1=0x00400 pc=0x00400 thmr=0x10000 [17261.396239] CPUM: APIC 03 at 00000000fee00000 (mapped at ffffc90000c72000) - ver 0x80050010, lint0=0x10700 lint1=0x10400 pc=0x00400 thmr=0x10000 [17261.396241] CPUM: APIC 02 at 00000000fee00000 (mapped at ffffc90000c70000) - ver 0x80050010, lint0=0x10700 lint1=0x10400 pc=0x00400 thmr=0x10000 [17261.396255] CPUM: APIC 01 at 00000000fee00000 (mapped at ffffc90000c6e000) - ver 0x80050010, lint0=0x10700 lint1=0x10400 pc=0x00400 thmr=0x10000 [32456.884907] usb 2-5: new high-speed USB device number 2 using ehci-pci [32457.654046] usb 2-5: New USB device found, idVendor=04cb, idProduct=01e8 [32457.654050] usb 2-5: New USB device strings: Mfr=0, Product=2, SerialNumber=3 [32457.654052] usb 2-5: Product: Digital Camera [32457.654053] usb 2-5: SerialNumber: 4C3230302020091117CAA59WP18548 Bus 002 Device 002: ID 04cb:01e8 Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub Bus 004 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub Bus 001 Device 003: ID 2013:024f PCTV Systems nanoStick T2 290e Bus 001 Device 002: ID 046d:082d Logitech, Inc. HD Pro Webcam C920 Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub No LSB modules are available. Distributor ID: Ubuntu vissibleDescription: Ubuntu 13.10 Release: 13.10 Codename: saucy sudo apt-get install gvfs-bin gvfs-mount gphoto2://[usb:002,002] Error mounting location: Error initializing camera: -108: No such file or directory ...... I have reported a bug in Dolphin, which has been transferred to Solid. Further information : I ran solid-hardware list details udi = '/org/kde/solid/udev/sys/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:04.1/usb2/2-5' parent = '/org/kde/solid/udev' (string) vendor = '04cb' (string) product = 'Digital Camera' (string) description = 'Camera' (string) Block.major = 189 (0xbd) (int) Block.minor = 137 (0x89) (int) Block.device = '/dev/bus/usb/002/010' (string) Camera.supportedProtocols = {'ptp'} (string list) Camera.supportedDrivers = {'gphoto'} (string list) I still can't get my photo's off, I can see the folders using the Gimp menu. If anyone has got any ideas, I'm willing to try them.

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  • Rotate camera around player and set new forward directions

    - by Samurai Fox
    I have a 3rd person camera which can rotate around the player. When I look at the back of the player and press forward, player goes forward. Then I rotate 360 around the player and "forward direction" is tilted for 90 degrees. So every 360 turn there is 90 degrees of direction change. For example when camera is facing the right side of the player, when I press button to move forward, I want player to turn to the left and make that the "new forward". I have Player object with Camera as child object. Camera object has Camera script. Inside Camera script there are Player and Camera classes. Player object itself, has Input Controller. Also I'm making this script for joystick/ controller primarily. My camera script so far: using UnityEngine; using System.Collections; public class CameraScript : MonoBehaviour { public GameObject Target; public float RotateSpeed = 10, FollowDistance = 20, FollowHeight = 10; float RotateSpeedPerTime, DesiredRotationAngle, DesiredHeight, CurrentRotationAngle, CurrentHeight, Yaw, Pitch; Quaternion CurrentRotation; void LateUpdate() { RotateSpeedPerTime = RotateSpeed * Time.deltaTime; DesiredRotationAngle = Target.transform.eulerAngles.y; DesiredHeight = Target.transform.position.y + FollowHeight; CurrentRotationAngle = transform.eulerAngles.y; CurrentHeight = transform.position.y; CurrentRotationAngle = Mathf.LerpAngle(CurrentRotationAngle, DesiredRotationAngle, 0); CurrentHeight = Mathf.Lerp(CurrentHeight, DesiredHeight, 0); CurrentRotation = Quaternion.Euler(0, CurrentRotationAngle, 0); transform.position = Target.transform.position; transform.position -= CurrentRotation * Vector3.forward * FollowDistance; transform.position = new Vector3(transform.position.x, CurrentHeight, transform.position.z); Yaw = Input.GetAxis("Right Horizontal") * RotateSpeedPerTime; Pitch = Input.GetAxis("Right Vertical") * RotateSpeedPerTime; transform.Translate(new Vector3(Yaw, -Pitch, 0)); transform.position = new Vector3(transform.position.x, transform.position.y, transform.position.z); transform.LookAt(Target.transform); } }

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  • How do I move the camera sideways in Libgdx?

    - by Bubblewrap
    I want to move the camera sideways (strafe). I had the following in mind, but it doesn't look like there are standard methods to achieve this in Libgdx. If I want to move the camera sideways by x, I think I need to do the following: Create a Matrix4 mat Determine the orthogonal vector v between camera.direction and camera.up Translate mat by v*x Multiply camera.position by mat Will this approach do what I think it does, and is it a good way to do it? And how can I do this in libgdx? I get "stuck" at step 2, as I have not found any standard method in Libgdx to calculate an orthogonal vector. EDIT: I think I can use camera.direction.crs(camera.up) to find v. I'll try this approach tonight and see if it works. EDIT2: I got it working and didn't need the matrix after all: Vector3 right = camera.direction.cpy().crs(camera.up).nor(); camera.position.add(right.mul(x));

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  • Problem with webcam after changing camera input to my iPhone's camera [closed]

    - by andrew
    While trying to use my iPhone as a webcam I changed the paths for the camera input - now I can neither use the built-in webcam nor my iPhone's camera This is the website where I got the information from: http://www.kudanai.com/2010/11/howto-use-your-iphone-as-webcam-in.html I got stuck at the loopback part. I would just like to know how to set the path back to my built-in camera so I can at least use that. Or if there is some way to reset the camera input settings. I'm using an Inspiron 1525 running Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. memory:2.9 GiB Processor:Intel® Core™2 Duo CPU T5750 @ 2.00GHz × 2 OS type: 64-bit

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  • Camera movement and threshold not working

    - by irish guy mcconagheh
    I have a platformer that is in progress, part of this has a camera which I only want to move when the character moves out of a certain threshold, to try to accomplish this I have the following if statement: if(((Mathf.Abs(target.transform.position.x))-(Mathf.Abs(transform.position.x)))>thres){ x = moveTo(transform.position.x, target.position.x, trackSpeed); } in unity/c#. In pseudocode it means if((absolute value of player x) - (absolute value of camera x) is greater than the threshold){ move { however this does not seem to work correctly. it appears to work for the first couple of times the threshold is reached, however the distance between the camera and the player has to increase every time for the camera to move. I do not believe the movement of the camera is the problem, however the code for it is as follows: private float moveTo(float n, float target, float accel) { if (n == target) { return n; } else { float dir = Mathf.Sign(target - n); n += accel * Time.deltaTime * dir; return (dir == Mathf.Sign(target-n))? n: target; } } }

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  • Obtain rectangle indicating 2D world space camera can see

    - by Gareth
    I have a 2D tile based game in XNA, with a moveable camera that can scroll around and zoom. I'm trying to obtain a rectangle which indicates the area, in world space, that my camera is looking at, so I can render anything this rectangle intersects with (currently, everything is rendered). So, I'm drawing the world like this: _SpriteBatch.Begin( SpriteSortMode.FrontToBack, null, SamplerState.PointClamp, // Don't smooth null, null, null, _Camera.GetTransformation()); The GetTransformation() method on my Camera object does this: public Matrix GetTransformation() { _transform = Matrix.CreateTranslation(new Vector3(-_pos.X, -_pos.Y, 0)) * Matrix.CreateRotationZ(Rotation) * Matrix.CreateScale(new Vector3(Zoom, Zoom, 1)) * Matrix.CreateTranslation(new Vector3(_viewportWidth * 0.5f, _viewportHeight * 0.5f, 0)); return _transform; } The camera properties in the method above should be self explanatory. How can I get a rectangle indicating what the camera is looking at in world space?

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  • Why do we move the world instead of the camera

    - by sharethis
    I heard that in an OpenGL game what we do to let the player move is not to move the camera but to move the whole world around. For example here is an extract of this tutorial: http://open.gl/transformations In real life you're used to moving the camera to alter the view of a certain scene, in OpenGL it's the other way around. The camera in OpenGL cannot move and is defined to be located at (0,0,0) facing the negative Z direction. That means that instead of moving and rotating the camera, the world is moved and rotated around the camera to construct the appropriate view. Why do we do that?

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  • Alternative approach to OpenGL View on top of Camera

    - by Mr. Roland
    Hi, the traditional way of doing a camera preview background with OpenGL on the front is to take two SurfaceViews(one for the camera another for OpenGL) and stack them on top of each other. The problem is that stacking SurfaceViews is discouraged: http://groups.google.com/group/android-developers/browse_thread/thread/4850fe5c314a3dc6 So what alternatives are there? I was considering the following: Subclass GlSurfaceView, and then call set the Camera preview onto the holder of this subclass: Camera.setPreviewDisplay(mHolder); Don't use GLSurfaceView, instead create your own SurfaceView subclass where you display the Camera preview onto the holder and also draw your openGL. This would require to use OpenGL without GLSurfaceView, has anyone done this before? I'm not sure if this even is possible or makes sense, since it implies displaying the camera preview onto the holder of the surface and at the same time drawing OpenGL on the same surface. Is there any other sensible alternative to solving the problem without using two SurfaceViews? Thanks!

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  • Android Camera takePicture function does not call Callback function

    - by Tomáš 'Guns Blazing' Frcek
    I am working on a custom Camera activity for my application. I was following the instruction from the Android Developers site here: http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/media/camera.html Everything seems to works fine, except the Callback function is not called and the picture is not saved. Here is my code: public class CameraActivity extends Activity { private Camera mCamera; private CameraPreview mPreview; private static final String TAG = "CameraActivity"; /** Called when the activity is first created. */ @Override public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) { super.onCreate(savedInstanceState); setContentView(R.layout.camera); // Create an instance of Camera mCamera = getCameraInstance(); // Create our Preview view and set it as the content of our activity. mPreview = new CameraPreview(this, mCamera); FrameLayout preview = (FrameLayout) findViewById(R.id.camera_preview); preview.addView(mPreview); Button captureButton = (Button) findViewById(R.id.button_capture); captureButton.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() { @Override public void onClick(View v) { Log.v(TAG, "will now take picture"); mCamera.takePicture(null, null, mPicture); Log.v(TAG, "will now release camera"); mCamera.release(); Log.v(TAG, "will now call finish()"); finish(); } }); } private PictureCallback mPicture = new PictureCallback() { @Override public void onPictureTaken(byte[] data, Camera camera) { Log.v(TAG, "Getting output media file"); File pictureFile = getOutputMediaFile(); if (pictureFile == null) { Log.v(TAG, "Error creating output file"); return; } try { FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(pictureFile); fos.write(data); fos.close(); } catch (FileNotFoundException e) { Log.v(TAG, e.getMessage()); } catch (IOException e) { Log.v(TAG, e.getMessage()); } } }; private static File getOutputMediaFile() { String state = Environment.getExternalStorageState(); if (!state.equals(Environment.MEDIA_MOUNTED)) { return null; } else { File folder_gui = new File(Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory() + File.separator + "GUI"); if (!folder_gui.exists()) { Log.v(TAG, "Creating folder: " + folder_gui.getAbsolutePath()); folder_gui.mkdirs(); } File outFile = new File(folder_gui, "temp.jpg"); Log.v(TAG, "Returnng file: " + outFile.getAbsolutePath()); return outFile; } } After clicking the Button, I get logs: "will now take picture", "will now release camera" and "will now call finish". The activity finishes succesfully, but the Callback function was not called during the mCamera.takePicture(null, null, mPicture); function (There were no logs from the mPicture callback or getMediaOutputFile functions) and there is no file in the location that was specified. Any ideas? :) Much thanks!

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