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  • XNA: Camera's Rotation and Translation matrices seem to interfere with each other

    - by Danjen
    I've been following the guide here for how to create a custom 2D camera in XNA. It works great, I've implemented it before, but for some reason, the matrix math is throwing me off. public sealed class Camera2D { public Vector2 Origin { get; set; } public Vector2 Position { get; set; } public float Scale { get; set; } public float Rotation { get; set; } } It might be easier to just show you a picture of my problem: http://i.imgur.com/H1l6LEx.png What I want to do is allow the camera to pivot around any given point. Right now, I have the rotations mapped to my shoulder buttons on a gamepad, and if I press them, it should rotate around the point the camera is currently looking at. Then, I use the left stick to move the camera around. The problem is that after it's been rotated, pressing "up" results in it being used relative to the rotation, creating the image above. I understand that matrices have to be applied in a certain order, and that I have to offset the thing to be rotated around the world origin and move it back, but it just won't work! public Matrix GetTransformationMatrix() { Matrix mRotate = Matrix.Identity * Matrix.CreateTranslation(-Origin.X, -Origin.Y, 0.00f) * // Move origin to world center Matrix.CreateRotationZ(MathHelper.ToRadians(Rotation)) * // Apply rotation Matrix.CreateTranslation(+Origin.X, +Origin.Y, 0.00f); // Undo the move operation Matrix mTranslate = Matrix.Identity * Matrix.CreateTranslation(-Position.X, Position.Y, 0.00f); // Apply the actual translation return mRotate * mTranslate; } So to recap, it seems I can have it rotate around an arbitrary point and lose the ability to have "up" move the camera straight up, or I can rotate it around the world origin and have the camera move properly, but not both.

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  • Strange 3D game engine camera with X,Y,Zoom instead of X,Y,Z

    - by Jenko
    I'm using a 3D game engine, that uses a 4x4 matrix to modify the camera projection, in this format: r r r x r r r y r r r z - - - zoom Strangely though, the camera does not respond to the Z translation parameter, and so you're forced to use X, Y, Zoom to move the camera around. Technically this is plausible for isometric-style games such as Age Of Empires III. But this is a 3D engine, and so why would they have designed the camera to ignore Z and respond only to zoom? Am I missing something here? I've tried every method of setting the camera and it really seems to ignore Z. So currently I have to resort to moving the main object in the scene graph instead of moving the camera in relation to the objects. My question: Do you have any idea why the engine would use such a scheme? Is it common? Why? Or does it seem like I'm missing something and the SetProjection(Matrix) function is broken and somehow ignores the Z translation in the matrix? (unlikely, but possible) Anyhow, what are the workarounds? Is moving objects around the only way? Edit: I'm sorry I cannot reveal much about the engine because we're in a binding contract. It's a locally developed engine (Australia) written in managed C# used for data visualizations. Edit: The default mode of the engine is orthographic, although I've switched it into perspective mode. Its probably more effective to use X, Y, Zoom in orthographic mode, but I need to use perspective mode to render everyday objects as well.

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  • Drawing chunks, and positioning the camera

    - by Troubleshoot
    I've seen many questions and answers regarding how to draw tiled maps but I can't really get my head around it. Many answers suggest either loading the visible part of the map, or loading and unloading chunks of the map. I've decided the best option would be to load chunks, but I'm slightly confused as to how this would be implemented. Currently I'm loading the full map to a 2D array of buffered images, then drawing it every time repaint is called. Q1: If I were to load chunks of the map, would I load the map as a whole then draw the necessary chunk(s), or load & unload the chunks as the player moves along, and if so, how? My second question regards the camera. I want the player to be in the centre of the X axis and the camera to follow it. I've thought of drawing everything in relation to the map and calculating the position of the camera in relation to the players coordinates on the map. So, to calculate the camera's X position I understand that I should use cameraX = playerX - (canvasWidth/2), but how should I calculate the Y position? I want the camera to only move up when the player reaches cameraHeight/2 but to move down when the player reaches 3/4(cameraHeight). Q2: Should I check for this in the same way I check for collision, and move the camera relative to the movement of the player until the player stops moving, or am I thinking about it in the wrong way?

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  • Problem importing pictures from a digital camera with Windows 7

    - by snark
    Hi, Since I'm using Windows 7 (Beta, then RC, now RTM), I have issues when I download pictures from my digital cameras. It happens with my 2 cameras: a Canon Powershot S2 IS and a Canon Ixus 80 IS. When I plug a camera (any of them) to a USB port and switch it on in Play mode, the Autoplay function of Windows 7 starts with this screen: I select "Import pictures and videos" to call the native Windows 7 tool. It searches a bit for pictures to download from the camera and starts the transfer. However, during the transfer, I often get errors like this one: If I use "Try again", it works fine the second time and the picture is retrieved correctly. It's very annoying when it happens 20 or 30 times in a 500-picture download. I cannot leave it running standalone, as I have to watch for the errors and click on "Try again". Any idea what is causing these errors? I tried changing the USB port (normally the cameras are connected via a USB hub but it happens also when I connect them directly to a MB USB port) and the USB cable, but no success. I also checked the SD card by connecting them with a card reader and running a ChkDsk on them but it found no errors on the cards. Update: No problem when I copy the pictures manually with the Windows Explorer. And no problem either when I access the card with a reader. The builtin import tool of Windows is convenient as it sorts the pictures automatically by date (1 folder per day). And this is the way I sort my pictures

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  • LWJGL: Camera distance from image plane?

    - by Rogem
    Let me paste some code before I ask the question... public static void createWindow(int[] args) { try { Display.setFullscreen(false); DisplayMode d[] = Display.getAvailableDisplayModes(); for (int i = 0; i < d.length; i++) { if (d[i].getWidth() == args[0] && d[i].getHeight() == args[1] && d[i].getBitsPerPixel() == 32) { displayMode = d[i]; break; } } Display.setDisplayMode(displayMode); Display.create(); } catch (Exception e) { e.printStackTrace(); System.exit(0); } } public static void initGL() { GL11.glEnable(GL11.GL_TEXTURE_2D); GL11.glShadeModel(GL11.GL_SMOOTH); GL11.glClearColor(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f); GL11.glClearDepth(1.0); GL11.glEnable(GL11.GL_DEPTH_TEST); GL11.glDepthFunc(GL11.GL_LEQUAL); GL11.glMatrixMode(GL11.GL_PROJECTION); GL11.glLoadIdentity(); GLU.gluPerspective(45.0f, (float) displayMode.getWidth() / (float) displayMode.getHeight(), 0.1f, 100.0f); GL11.glMatrixMode(GL11.GL_MODELVIEW); GL11.glHint(GL11.GL_PERSPECTIVE_CORRECTION_HINT, GL11.GL_NICEST); } So, with the camera and screen setup out of the way, I can now ask the actual question: How do I know what the camera distance is from the image plane? I also would like to know what the angle between the image plane's center normal and a line drawn from the middle of one of the edges to the camera position is. This will be used to consequently draw a vector from the camera's position through the player's click-coordinates to determine the world coordinates they clicked (or could've clicked). Also, when I set the camera coordinates, do I set the coordinates of the camera or do I set the coordinates of the image plane? Thank you for your help. EDIT: So, I managed to solve how to calculate the distance of the camera... Here's the relevant code... private static float getScreenFOV(int dim) { if (dim == 0) { float dist = (float) Math.tan((Math.PI / 2 - Math.toRadians(FOV_Y))/2) * 0.5f; float FOV_X = 2 * (float) Math.atan(getScreenRatio() * 0.5f / dist); return FOV_X; } else if (dim == 1) { return FOV_Y; } return 0; } FOV_Y is the Field of View that one defines in gluPerspective (float fovy in javadoc). This seems to be (and would logically be) for the height of the screen. Now I just need to figure out how to calculate that vector.

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  • Cisco PrecisionHD USB Camera (Detected but no video)

    - by Marcel Bissonnette
    I'm having an issue with my Cisco PrecisionHD USB Camera. It is detected but does not show video (using "Cheese Webcam Booth"). Any ideas? (I'm a newbie with ubuntu) Specs: Ubuntu 12.10 32bit Dell Latitude E6400 Cisco PrecisionHD USB Camera (USB 2.0) connected directly into laptop (no docking station) Troubleshooting: Using the command lsusb, I find the following device: Bus 002 Device 003: ID 1f82:0001 TANDBERG PrecisionHD Camera '+ more devices like audio, finger swipe, Linux foundation 2.0, 1.1 So what now? Thanks. MB

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  • Smooth Camera Rotation around 90 degrees

    - by Nicholas
    I'm developing a third person 3D platformer in XNA. My problem is when I try to rotate the camera around the player. I would like to rotate (and animate) the camera 90 degrees around the player. So the camera should rotate until it has reached 90 degrees from the starting position. I cannot figure out how to keep track of the rotation, and when the rotation has made the full 90 degrees. Currently my cameras update: public void Update(Vector3 playerPosition) { if (rotateCamera) { position = Vector3.Transform(position - playerPosition, Matrix.CreateRotationY(0.1f)) + playerPosition; } this.viewMatrix = Matrix.CreateLookAt(position, playerPosition, Vector3.Up); } The initial position of the camera is set in the constructor. The "rotateCamera" bool is set on keypress. Thanks for the help in advance. Cheers.

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  • Error when trying to get movies off my Camera

    - by matt wilkie
    How do I retrieve movies and audio files from my Canon PowerShot S5 IS camera? Shotwell only sees the pictures. Mounting the camera via "Places Canon Digital Camera" and then clicking twice on the resulting desktop icon yields this error: could not display "gphoto2://[usb:001,002]/" There is nothing in /media. update: output of sudo fdisk -l Disk /dev/sda: 40.0 GB, 40007761920 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 4864 cylinders Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0x3ee33ee2 Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sda1 2364 2612 1999872 82 Linux swap / Solaris /dev/sda2 * 1 2364 18979840 83 Linux /dev/sda3 2613 4864 18089159+ f W95 Ext'd (LBA) /dev/sda5 2613 4864 18089158+ b W95 FAT32 Partition table entries are not in disk order Solution: install gphotofs, then Nautilus shows camera contents similar to a standard usb storage device (though note that gphotofs does not yet support adding to or deleting contents).

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  • Pitch camera around model

    - by ChocoMan
    Currently, my camera rotates with my model's Y-Axis (yaw) perfectly. What I'm having trouble with is rotating the X-Axis (pitch) along with it. I've tried the same method for cameraYaw() in the form of cameraPitch(), while adjusting the axis to Vector.Right, but the camera wouldn't pitch at all in accordance to the Y-Axes of the controller. Is there a way similar to this to get the same effect for pitching the camera around the model? // Rotates model on its own Y-axis public void modelRotMovement(GamePadState pController) { Yaw = pController.ThumbSticks.Right.X * MathHelper.ToRadians(speedAngleMAX); AddRotation = Quaternion.CreateFromYawPitchRoll(Yaw, 0, 0); ModelLoad.MRotation *= AddRotation; MOrientation = Matrix.CreateFromQuaternion(ModelLoad.MRotation); } // Orbit (yaw) Camera around model public void cameraYaw(Vector3 axis, float yaw, float pitch) { Pitch = pController.ThumbSticks.Right.Y * MathHelper.ToRadians(speedAngleMAX); ModelLoad.CameraPos = Vector3.Transform(ModelLoad.CameraPos - ModelLoad.camTarget, Matrix.CreateFromAxisAngle(axis, yaw)) + ModelLoad.camTarget; } public void updateCamera() { cameraYaw(Vector3.Up, Yaw); }

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  • Frustum culling with third person camera

    - by Christian Frantz
    I have a third person camera that contains two matrices: view and projection, and two Vector3's: camPosition and camTarget. I've read up on frustum culling and it makes it seem easy enough for a first person camera, but how would I implement this for a third person camera? I need to take into effect the objects I can see behind me too. How would I implement this into my camera class so it runs at the same time as my update method? public void CameraUpdate(Matrix objectToFollow) { camPosition = objectToFollow.Translation + (objectToFollow.Backward *backward) + (objectToFollow.Up * up); camTarget = objectToFollow.Translation; view = Matrix.CreateLookAt(camPosition, camTarget, Vector3.Up); } Can I just create another method within the class which creates a bounding sphere with a value from my camera and then uses the culling based on that? And if so, which value am I using to create the bounding sphere from? After this is implemented, I'm planning on using occlusion culling for the faces of my objects adjacent to other objects. Will using just one or the other make a difference? Or will both of them be better? I'm trying to keep my framerate as high as possible

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  • Viewport / Camera Calculation in 2D Game

    - by Dave
    we have a 2D game with some sprites and tiles and some kind of camera/viewport, that "moves" around the scene. so far so good, if we wouldn't had some special behaviour for your camera/viewport translation. normally you could stick the camera to your player figure and center it, resulting in a very cheap, undergraduate, translation equation, like : vec_translation -/+= speed (depending in what keys are pressed. WASD as default.) buuuuuuuuuut, we want our player figure be able to actually reach the bounds, when the viewport/camera has reached a maximum translation. we came up with the following solution (only keys a and d are the shown here, the rest is just adaption of calculation or maybe YOUR super-cool and elegant solution :) ): if(keys[A]) { playerX -= speed; if(playerScreenX <= width / 2 && tx < 0) { playerScreenX = width / 2; tx += speed; } else if(playerScreenX <= width / 2 && (tx) >= 0) { playerScreenX -= speed; tx = 0; if(playerScreenX < 0) playerScreenX = 0; } else if(playerScreenX >= width / 2 && (tx) < 0) { playerScreenX -= speed; } } if(keys[D]) { playerX += speed; if(playerScreenX >= width / 2 && (-tx + width) < sceneWidth) { playerScreenX = width / 2; tx -= speed; } if(playerScreenX >= width / 2 && (-tx + width) >= sceneWidth) { playerScreenX += speed; tx = -(sceneWidth - width); if(playerScreenX >= width - player.width) playerScreenX = width - player.width; } if(playerScreenX <= width / 2 && (-tx + width) < sceneWidth) { playerScreenX += speed; } } i think the code is rather self explaining: keys is a flag container for currently active keys, playerX/-Y is the position of the player according to world origin, tx/ty are the translation components vital to background / npc / item offset calculation, playerOnScreenX/-Y is the actual position of the player figure (sprite) on screen and width/height are the dimensions of the camera/viewport. this all looks quite nice and works well, but there is a very small and nasty calculation error, which in turn sums up to some visible effect. let's consider following piece of code: if(playerScreenX <= width / 2 && tx < 0) { playerScreenX = width / 2; tx += speed; } it can be translated into plain english as : if the x position of your player figure on screen is less or equal the half of your display / camera / viewport size AND there is enough space left LEFT of your viewport/camera then set players x position on screen to width half, increase translation (because we subtract the translation from something we want to move). easy, right?! doing this will create a small delta between playerX and playerScreenX. after so much talking, my question appears now here at the bottom of this document: how do I stick the calculation of my player-on-screen to the actual position of the player AND having a viewport that is not always centered aroung the players figure? here is a small test-case in processing: http://pastebin.com/bFaTauaa thank you for reading until now and thank you in advance for probably answering my question.

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  • What game systems exist which uses camera input?

    - by Marc Pilgaard
    The group and I is in the middle of a semester project where we are currently researching on which game systems are using camera as input or as an interactive medium? We would like some help listing some of the game systems which uses camera input, as it seems hard to find other examples. Currently we know that webcam browser games uses camera input (Newgrounds webcam games), as well as the xbox kinect. I know this questions seems rather vague, though I still hope some people is capable of helping.

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  • Panning a 3d viewport in 2d direction with rotated camera

    - by Noob Game Developer
    I am using below code to pan the viewport (action script 3 code using flare3d framework) _mainCamera.x-= Input3D.mouseXSpeed; _mainCamera.z+= Input3D.mouseYSpeed; Where as Input3D.mouse[X|Y]Speed gives the displacement of the mouse on the X/Y axis starting from the position of the last frame. This works perfect if my camera is not rotated. However, if I rotate the camera (x by 30, y by 60) and pan the camera then it goes wrong. Which is actually correctly panning according to the code. But this is not desired and I know I need to do some math to get the correct x/y which I am not aware of it. Can some one help me achieving it? Update: I am getting an Idea but I am not sure how to do it :( Get the mouseX/Y deltas (xd,yd) Get the current camera coords (pos3d) Convert to screen coords (pos2d) Add deltas to screen coords (pos2d+ (xd,yd)) Convert above coords to 3d coords

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  • OpenGL ES 2 jittery camera movement

    - by user16547
    First of all, I am aware that there's no camera in OpenGL (ES 2), but from my understanding proper manipulation of the projection matrix can simulate the concept of a camera. What I'm trying to do is make my camera follow my character. My game is 2D, btw. I think the principle is the following (take Super Mario Bros or Doodle Jump as reference - actually I'm trying to replicate the mechanics of the latter): when the caracter goes beyond the center of the screen (in the positive axis/direction), update the camera to be centred on the character. Else keep the camera still. I did accomplish that, however the camera movement is noticeably jittery and I ran out of ideas how to make it smoother. First of all, my game loop (following this article): private int TICKS_PER_SECOND = 30; private int SKIP_TICKS = 1000 / TICKS_PER_SECOND; private int MAX_FRAMESKIP = 5; @Override public void run() { loops = 0; if(firstLoop) { nextGameTick = SystemClock.elapsedRealtime(); firstLoop = false; } while(SystemClock.elapsedRealtime() > nextGameTick && loops < MAX_FRAMESKIP) { step(); nextGameTick += SKIP_TICKS; loops++; } interpolation = ( SystemClock.elapsedRealtime() + SKIP_TICKS - nextGameTick ) / (float)SKIP_TICKS; draw(); } And the following code deals with moving the camera. I was unsure whether to place it in step() or draw(), but it doesn't make a difference to my problem at the moment, as I tried both and neither seemed to fix it. center just represents the y coordinate of the centre of the screen at any time. Initially it is 0. The camera object is my own custom "camera" which basically is a class that just manipulates the view and projection matrices. if(character.getVerticalSpeed() >= 0) { //only update camera if going up float[] projectionMatrix = camera.getProjectionMatrix(); if( character.getY() > center) { center += character.getVerticalSpeed(); cameraBottom = center + camera.getBottom(); cameraTop = center + camera.getTop(); Matrix.orthoM(projectionMatrix, 0, camera.getLeft(), camera.getRight(), center + camera.getBottom(), center + camera.getTop(), camera.getNear(), camera.getFar()); } } Any thought about what I should try or what I am doing wrong? Update 1: I think I updated every value you can see on screen to check whether the jittery movement is affected by that, but nothing changed, so something must be fundamentally flawed with my approach/calculations.

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  • Help me get my 3D camera to look like the ones in RTS

    - by rFactor
    I am a newbie in 3D game development and I am trying to make a real-time strategy game. I am struggling with the camera currently as I am unable to make it look like they do in RTS games. Here is my Camera.cs class using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using Microsoft.Xna.Framework; using Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Input; namespace BB { public class Camera : Microsoft.Xna.Framework.GameComponent { public Matrix view; public Matrix projection; protected Game game; KeyboardState currentKeyboardState; Vector3 cameraPosition = new Vector3(600.0f, 0.0f, 600.0f); Vector3 cameraForward = new Vector3(0, -0.4472136f, -0.8944272f); BoundingFrustum cameraFrustum = new BoundingFrustum(Matrix.Identity); // Light direction Vector3 lightDir = new Vector3(-0.3333333f, 0.6666667f, 0.6666667f); public Camera(Game game) : base(game) { this.game = game; } public override void Initialize() { this.view = Matrix.CreateLookAt(this.cameraPosition, this.cameraPosition + this.cameraForward, Vector3.Up); this.projection = Matrix.CreatePerspectiveFieldOfView(MathHelper.PiOver4, this.game.renderer.aspectRatio, 1, 10000); base.Initialize(); } /* Handles the user input * @ param GameTime gameTime */ private void HandleInput(GameTime gameTime) { float time = (float)gameTime.ElapsedGameTime.TotalMilliseconds; currentKeyboardState = Keyboard.GetState(); } void UpdateCamera(GameTime gameTime) { float time = (float)gameTime.ElapsedGameTime.TotalMilliseconds; // Check for input to rotate the camera. float pitch = 0.0f; float turn = 0.0f; if (currentKeyboardState.IsKeyDown(Keys.Up)) pitch += time * 0.001f; if (currentKeyboardState.IsKeyDown(Keys.Down)) pitch -= time * 0.001f; if (currentKeyboardState.IsKeyDown(Keys.Left)) turn += time * 0.001f; if (currentKeyboardState.IsKeyDown(Keys.Right)) turn -= time * 0.001f; Vector3 cameraRight = Vector3.Cross(Vector3.Up, cameraForward); Vector3 flatFront = Vector3.Cross(cameraRight, Vector3.Up); Matrix pitchMatrix = Matrix.CreateFromAxisAngle(cameraRight, pitch); Matrix turnMatrix = Matrix.CreateFromAxisAngle(Vector3.Up, turn); Vector3 tiltedFront = Vector3.TransformNormal(cameraForward, pitchMatrix * turnMatrix); // Check angle so we cant flip over if (Vector3.Dot(tiltedFront, flatFront) > 0.001f) { cameraForward = Vector3.Normalize(tiltedFront); } // Check for input to move the camera around. if (currentKeyboardState.IsKeyDown(Keys.W)) cameraPosition += cameraForward * time * 0.4f; if (currentKeyboardState.IsKeyDown(Keys.S)) cameraPosition -= cameraForward * time * 0.4f; if (currentKeyboardState.IsKeyDown(Keys.A)) cameraPosition += cameraRight * time * 0.4f; if (currentKeyboardState.IsKeyDown(Keys.D)) cameraPosition -= cameraRight * time * 0.4f; if (currentKeyboardState.IsKeyDown(Keys.R)) { cameraPosition = new Vector3(0, 50, 50); cameraForward = new Vector3(0, 0, -1); } cameraForward.Normalize(); // Create the new view matrix view = Matrix.CreateLookAt(cameraPosition, cameraPosition + cameraForward, Vector3.Up); // Set the new frustum value cameraFrustum.Matrix = view * projection; } public override void Update(Microsoft.Xna.Framework.GameTime gameTime) { HandleInput(gameTime); UpdateCamera(gameTime); } } } The problem is that the initial view is looking in a horizontal direction. I would like to have an RTS like top down view (but with a slight pitch). Can you help me out?

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  • Android Camera intent creating two files

    - by Kyle Ramstad
    I am making a program that takes a picture and then shows it's thumbnail. When using the emulator all goes well and the discard button deletes the photo. But on a real device the camera intent saves the image at the imageUri variable and a second one that is named like if I had just opened up the camera and took a picture by itself. private static final int CAMERA_PIC_REQUEST = 1337; /** Called when the activity is first created. */ @Override public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) { super.onCreate(savedInstanceState); setContentView(R.layout.camera); //start camera values = new ContentValues(); values.put(MediaStore.Images.Media.TITLE, "New Picture"); values.put(MediaStore.Images.Media.DESCRIPTION,"From your Camera"); imageUri = getContentResolver().insert(MediaStore.Images.Media.EXTERNAL_CONTENT_URI, values); image = (ImageView) findViewById(R.id.ImageView01); Intent intent = new Intent(MediaStore.ACTION_IMAGE_CAPTURE); intent.putExtra(MediaStore.EXTRA_OUTPUT, imageUri); startActivityForResult(intent, CAMERA_PIC_REQUEST); //save the image buttons Button save = (Button) findViewById(R.id.Button01); Button close = (Button) findViewById(R.id.Button02); } @Override protected void onActivityResult(int requestCode, int resultCode, Intent data) { if (requestCode == CAMERA_PIC_REQUEST && resultCode == RESULT_OK) { try{ thumbnail = MediaStore.Images.Media.getBitmap(getContentResolver(), imageUri); image.setImageBitmap(thumbnail); } catch(Exception e){ e.printStackTrace(); } } else{ finish(); } } public void myClickHandler(View view) { switch (view.getId()) { case R.id.Button01: finish(); break; case R.id.Button02: dicard(); } } private void dicard(){ getContentResolver().delete(imageUri, null, null); finish(); }

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  • Mac webcam photo application with access to camera settings (resolution, camera selection, color balance, focus)

    - by Pascal T.
    Does anyone know about a webcam photo application (ie an alternative to photo booth) with would allow to change the settings on the camera, such as : Select camera (I.e I want to use an external webcam) Change camera resolution (with photobooth change camera settings (I.e autofocus, aperture, color balance, etc..) I did a lot of research on the internet with no success. I am looking for a very simple app (such as wmcap.exe on Windows) What I tried so far: photo booth: it works with an external camera, however there is no way to change the resolution, or the color/focus settings manycam : a virtual webcam driver. you can add special effects to your camera and transfer those effects to any app, but not change your camera settings... iGlasses : enables you to change the camera settings inside photo booth and other apps. However you cannot control the focus, nor the video resolution macam (did not work on my Mac book Pro) Does anyone know better than me? Note : my only solution now is to launch a virtual machine (with parallels desktop) and take the pictures from there!

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  • Lock mouse in center of screen, and still use to move camera Unity

    - by Flotolk
    I am making a program from 1st person point of view. I would like the camera to be moved using the mouse, preferably using simple code, like from XNA var center = this.Window.ClientBounds; MouseState newState = Mouse.GetState(); if (Keyboard.GetState().IsKeyUp(Keys.Escape)) { Mouse.SetPosition((int)center.X, (int)center.Y); camera.Rotation -= (newState.X - center.X) * 0.005f; camera.UpDown += (newState.Y - center.Y) * 0.005f; } Is there any code that lets me do this in Unity, since Unity does not support XNA, I need a new library to use, and a new way to collect this input. this is also a little tougher, since I want one object to go up and down based on if you move it the mouse up and down, and another object to be the one turning left and right. I am also very concerned about clamping the mouse to the center of the screen, since you will be selecting items, and it is easiest to have a simple cross-hairs in the center of the screen for this purpose. Here is the code I am using to move right now: using UnityEngine; using System.Collections; [AddComponentMenu("Camera-Control/Mouse Look")] public class MouseLook : MonoBehaviour { public enum RotationAxes { MouseXAndY = 0, MouseX = 1, MouseY = 2 } public RotationAxes axes = RotationAxes.MouseXAndY; public float sensitivityX = 15F; public float sensitivityY = 15F; public float minimumX = -360F; public float maximumX = 360F; public float minimumY = -60F; public float maximumY = 60F; float rotationY = 0F; void Update () { if (axes == RotationAxes.MouseXAndY) { float rotationX = transform.localEulerAngles.y + Input.GetAxis("Mouse X") * sensitivityX; rotationY += Input.GetAxis("Mouse Y") * sensitivityY; rotationY = Mathf.Clamp (rotationY, minimumY, maximumY); transform.localEulerAngles = new Vector3(-rotationY, rotationX, 0); } else if (axes == RotationAxes.MouseX) { transform.Rotate(0, Input.GetAxis("Mouse X") * sensitivityX, 0); } else { rotationY += Input.GetAxis("Mouse Y") * sensitivityY; rotationY = Mathf.Clamp (rotationY, minimumY, maximumY); transform.localEulerAngles = new Vector3(-rotationY, transform.localEulerAngles.y, 0); } while (Input.GetKeyDown(KeyCode.Space) == true) { Screen.lockCursor = true; } } void Start () { // Make the rigid body not change rotation if (GetComponent<Rigidbody>()) GetComponent<Rigidbody>().freezeRotation = true; } } This code does everything except lock the mouse to the center of the screen. Screen.lockCursor = true; does not work though, since then the camera no longer moves, and the cursor does not allow you to click anything else either.

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  • Making a Camera look at a target Vector

    - by Peteyslatts
    I have a camera that works as long as its stationary. Now I'm trying to create a child class of that camera class that will look at its target. The new addition to the class is a method called SetTarget(). The method takes in a Vector3 target. The camera wont move but I need it to rotate to look at the target. If I just set the target, and then call CreateLookAt() (which takes in position, target, and up), when the object gets far enough away and underneath the camera, it suddenly flips right side up. So I need to transform the up vector, which currently always stays at Vector3.Up. I feel like this has something to do with taking the angle between the old direction vector and the new one (which I know can be expressed by target - position). I feel like this is all really vague, so here's the code for my base camera class: public class BasicCamera : Microsoft.Xna.Framework.GameComponent { public Matrix view { get; protected set; } public Matrix projection { get; protected set; } public Vector3 position { get; protected set; } public Vector3 direction { get; protected set; } public Vector3 up { get; protected set; } public Vector3 side { get { return Vector3.Cross(up, direction); } protected set { } } public BasicCamera(Game game, Vector3 position, Vector3 target, Vector3 up) : base(game) { this.position = position; this.direction = target - position; this.up = up; CreateLookAt(); projection = Matrix.CreatePerspectiveFieldOfView( MathHelper.PiOver4, (float)Game.Window.ClientBounds.Width / (float)Game.Window.ClientBounds.Height, 1, 500); } public override void Update(GameTime gameTime) { // TODO: Add your update code here CreateLookAt(); base.Update(gameTime); } } And this is the code for the class that extends the above class to look at its target. class TargetedCamera : BasicCamera { public Vector3 target { get; protected set; } public TargetedCamera(Game game, Vector3 position, Vector3 target, Vector3 up) : base(game, position, target, up) { this.target = target; } public void SetTarget(Vector3 target) { direction = target - position; } protected override void CreateLookAt() { view = Matrix.CreateLookAt(position, target, up); } }

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  • 2D camera perspective projection from 3D coordinates -- HOW?

    - by Jack
    I am developing a camera for a 2D game with a top-down view that has depth. It's almost a 3D camera. Basically, every object has a Z even though it is in 2D, and similarly to parallax layers their position, scale and rotation speed vary based on their Z. I guess this would be a perspective projection. But I am having trouble converting the objects' 3D coordinates into the 2D space of the screen so that everything has correct perspective and scale. I never learned matrices though I did dig the topic a bit today. I tried without using matrices thanks to this article but every attempt gave awkward results. I'm using ActionScript 3 and Flash 11+ (Starling), where the screen coordinates work like this: Left-handed coordinates system illustration I can explain further what I did if you want to help me sort out what's wrong, or you can directly tell me how you would do it properly. In case you prefer the former, read on. These are images showing the formulas I used: upload.wikimedia.org/math/1/c/8/1c89722619b756d05adb4ea38ee6f62b.png upload.wikimedia.org/math/d/4/0/d4069770c68cb8f1aa4b5cfc57e81bc3.png (Sorry new users can't post images, but both are from the wikipedia article linked above, section "Perspective projection". That's where you'll find what all variables mean, too) The long formula is greatly simplified because I believe a normal top-down 2D camera has no X/Y/Z rotation values (correct ?). Then it becomes d = a - c. Still, I can't get it to work. Maybe you could explain what numbers I should put in a(xyz), c(xyz), theta(xyz), and particularly, e(xyz) ? I don't quite get how e is different than c in my case. c.z is also an issue to me. If the Z of the camera's target object is 0, should the camera's Z be something like -600 ? ( = focal length of 600) Whatever I do, it's wrong. I only got it to work when I used arbitrary calculations that "looked" right, like most cameras with parallax layers seem to do, but that's fake! ;) If I want objects to travel between Z layers I might as well do it right. :) Thanks a lot for your help!

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  • Camera Collision inside the room model

    - by sanddy
    I am having a problem in Calculating the camera collision for my Room model which consists of sofa, tables and other models. The users shall be moving the camera front, back, rotating so i need to make sure that the camera does not collide with any of the models with in the room. I have treated all my models inside the room by BoundingBox[] and the camera by BoundingSphere. So, far i have implemented collision by looking into the tutorial from http://www.toymaker.info/Games/XNA/html/xna_model_collisions.html which was great. But, I guess the problem lies in the Transformation part. I debugged and found some points to be at Vector(-XXX,-XXX,-XXX) where X is digit. Also i found my radius of some models where too large(in thousand, i just looked into its radius value before converting to BoundingBox). Do I need to scale the model for collision??? Below are my code:- On My LoadContent(): Matrix[] transforms = new Matrix[myModel.Bones.Count]; myModel.CopyAbsoluteBoneTransformsTo(transforms); int index = 0; box = new List<BoundingBox>(); BoundingBox worldModel = Utility.CalculateBoundingBox(myModel); foreach (ModelMesh mesh in myModel.Meshes) { Vector3[] obb = new Vector3[8]; worldModel.GetCorners(obb); Vector3[] asdf = (Vector3[])obb.Clone(); Vector3.Transform(obb, ref transforms[mesh.ParentBone.Index], obb); BoundingBox worldBox = BoundingBox.CreateFromPoints(obb); box.Add(worldBox); index++; } On CameraPosition Update: BoundingSphere bs = new BoundingSphere(this.cameraPos, 5.0f); if (RoomWalkthrough.Utility.CheckCollision(bs, bb)) { // Do Something } Please Help.

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  • How do I create a camera?

    - by Morphex
    I am trying to create a generic camera class for a game engine, which works for different types of cameras (Orbital, GDoF, FPS), but I have no idea how to go about it. I have read about quaternions and matrices, but I do not understand how to implement it. Particularly, it seems you need "Up", "Forward" and "Right" vectors, a Quaternion for rotations, and View and Projection matrices. For example, an FPS camera only rotates around the World Y and the Right Axis of the camera; the 6DoF rotates always around its own axis, and the orbital is just translating for a set distance and making it look always at a fixed target point. The concepts are there; implementing this is not trivial for me. SharpDX seems to have has already Matrices and Quaternions implemented, but I don't know how to use them to create a camera. Can anyone point me on what am I missing, what I got wrong? I would really enjoy if you could give a tutorial, some piece of code, or just plain explanation of the concepts.

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  • Moving player in direciton camera is facing

    - by Samurai Fox
    I have a 3rd person camera which can rotate around the player. My problem is that wherever camera is facing, players forward is always the same direction. For example when camera is facing the right side of the player, when I press button to move forward, I want player to turn to the left and make that the "new forward". My camera script so far: using UnityEngine; using System.Collections; public class PlayerScript : MonoBehaviour { public float RotateSpeed = 150, MoveSpeed = 50; float DeltaTime; void Update() { DeltaTime = Time.deltaTime; transform.Rotate(0, Input.GetAxis("LeftX") * RotateSpeed * DeltaTime, 0); transform.Translate(0, 0, -Input.GetAxis("LeftY") * MoveSpeed * DeltaTime); } } public class CameraScript : MonoBehaviour { public GameObject Target; public float RotateSpeed = 170, FollowDistance = 20, FollowHeight = 10; float RotateSpeedPerTime, DesiredRotationAngle, DesiredHeight, CurrentRotationAngle, CurrentHeight, Yaw, Pitch; Quaternion CurrentRotation; void LateUpdate() { RotateSpeedPerTime = RotateSpeed * Time.deltaTime; DesiredRotationAngle = Target.transform.eulerAngles.y; DesiredHeight = Target.transform.position.y + FollowHeight; CurrentRotationAngle = transform.eulerAngles.y; CurrentHeight = transform.position.y; CurrentRotationAngle = Mathf.LerpAngle(CurrentRotationAngle, DesiredRotationAngle, 0); CurrentHeight = Mathf.Lerp(CurrentHeight, DesiredHeight, 0); CurrentRotation = Quaternion.Euler(0, CurrentRotationAngle, 0); transform.position = Target.transform.position; transform.position -= CurrentRotation * Vector3.forward * FollowDistance; transform.position = new Vector3(transform.position.x, CurrentHeight, transform.position.z); Yaw = Input.GetAxis("Right Horizontal") * RotateSpeedPerTime; Pitch = Input.GetAxis("Right Vertical") * RotateSpeedPerTime; transform.Translate(new Vector3(Yaw, -Pitch, 0)); transform.position = new Vector3(transform.position.x, transform.position.y, transform.position.z); transform.LookAt(Target.transform); } }

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  • OpenGL camera moves faster than player

    - by opiop65
    I have a side scroller game made in OpenGL, and I'm trying to center the player in the viewport when he moves. I know how to do it: cameraX = Width / 2 / TileSize - playerPosX cameraY = Height / 2 / TileSize - playerPosY However, I have a problem. The player and "camera" move, but the player moves faster than the "camera" scrolls. So, the player can actually move out of the screen. Some code, this is how I translate the camera: public Camera(){ } public void update(Player p){ glTranslatef(-p.getPos().x - Main.WIDTH / 64 / 2, -p.getPos().y - Main.HEIGHT / 64 / 2, 1); } Here's how I move the player: public void update(){ if(Keyboard.isKeyDown(Keyboard.KEY_D)){ this.move(MOVESPEED, 0); } if(Keyboard.isKeyDown(Keyboard.KEY_A)){ this.move(-MOVESPEED, 0); } } The move method: public void move(float x, float y){ this.getPos().set(this.getPos().x + x, this.getPos().y + y); } And then after I move the player, I update the player's geometry, which shouldn't matter. What am I doing wrong here, this seems like such a simple problem, yet it doesn't work!

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  • Quaternion LookAt for camera

    - by Homar
    I am using the following code to rotate entities to look at points. glm::vec3 forwardVector = glm::normalize(point - position); float dot = glm::dot(glm::vec3(0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f), forwardVector); float rotationAngle = (float)acos(dot); glm::vec3 rotationAxis = glm::normalize(glm::cross(glm::vec3(0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f), forwardVector)); rotation = glm::normalize(glm::quat(rotationAxis * rotationAngle)); This works fine for my usual entities. However, when I use this on my Camera entity, I get a black screen. If I flip the subtraction in the first line, so that I take the forward vector to be the direction from the point to my camera's position, then my camera works but naturally my entities rotate to look in the opposite direction of the point. I compute the transformation matrix for the camera and then take the inverse to be the View Matrix, which I pass to my OpenGL shaders: glm::mat4 viewMatrix = glm::inverse( cameraTransform->GetTransformationMatrix() ); The orthographic projection matrix is created using glm::ortho. What's going wrong?

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