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  • Is it ethical for a programmer to promote his/her own library?

    - by Kit Menke
    Fairly recently I started maintaining my own open source JavaScript library. I created it to solve a pretty specific need but fairly regularly see questions that can be solved (in whole/part) by using my library. I've always gone ahead to post my answer including my library and make sure to always include a disclosure specifying that I maintain it. I feel for open source projects this may not be such a big deal but where do you draw the line? (ex: commercial products) Is it ethical for a programmer to promote is own library? When is it not?

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  • Are there any actual examples of profitable programmer's "worker's cooperatives"?

    - by Wannabe Tycoon
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worker_cooperative I'm curious whether there are, anywhere in the world, worker's cooperatives that center on a technology business that involves either programming, IT, or some sort of IT or programming related consulting or services. The wikipedia link above is an overview of the concept. The short form explanation is that a co-op is a worker-owned business. Also there is the notion that every worker owns shares in the business. I am interested in knowing whether an example of a "programmer's/IT co-op" even exists. Note: I am not talking about nor asking about a government-funded incubator nor any other socialized, state supported group. I also don't mean "co-working", which is renting an office with other self employed people doing their own thing. I mean a going, profitable IT business operating in a competitive environment that is worker-owned and run.

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  • What are some concise and comprehensive introductory guide to unit testing for a self-taught programmer [closed]

    - by Superbest
    I don't have much formal training in programming and I have learned most things by looking up solutions on the internet to practical problems I have. There are some areas which I think would be valuable to learn, but which ended up both being difficult to learn and easy to avoid learning for a self-taught programmer. Unit testing is one of them. Specifically, I am interested in tests in and for C#/.NET applications using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools in Visual Studio 2010 and/or 2012, but I really want a good introduction to the principles so language and IDE shouldn't matter much. At this time I'm interested in relatively trivial tests for small or medium sized programs (development time of weeks or months and mostly just myself developing). I don't necessarily intend to do test-driven development (I am aware that some say unit testing alone is supposed to be for developing features in TDD, and not an assurance that there are no bugs in the software, but unit testing is often the only kind of testing for which I have resources). I have found this tutorial which I feel gave me a decent idea of what unit tests and TDD looks like, but in trying to apply these ideas to my own projects, I often get confused by questions I can't answer and don't know how to answer, such as: What parts of my application and what sorts of things aren't necessarily worth testing? How fine grained should my tests be? Should they test every method and property separately, or work with a larger scope? What is a good naming convention for test methods? (since apparently the name of the method is the only way I will be able to tell from a glance at the test results table what works in my program and what doesn't) Is it bad to have many asserts in one test method? Since apparently VS2012 reports only that "an Assert.IsTrue failed within method MyTestMethod", and if MyTestMethod has 10 Assert.IsTrue statements, it will be irritating to figure out why a test is failing. If a lot of the functionality deals with writing and reading data to/from the disk in a not-exactly trivial fashion, how do I test that? If I provide a bunch of files as input by placing them in the program's directory, do I have to copy those files to the test project's bin/Debug folder now? If my program works with a large body of data and execution takes minutes or more, should my tests have it do the whole use all of the real data, a subset of it, or simulated data? If latter, how do I decide on the subset or how to simulate? Closely related to the previous point, if a class is such that its main operation happens in a state that is arrived to by the program after some involved operations (say, a class makes calculations on data derived from a few thousands of lines of code analyzing some raw data) how do I test just that class without inevitably ending up testing that class and all the other code that brings it to that state along with it? In general, what kind of approach should I use for test initialization? (hopefully that is the correct term, I mean preparing classes for testing by filling them in with appropriate data) How do I deal with private members? Do I just suck it up and assume that "not public = shouldn't be tested"? I have seen people suggest using private accessors and reflection, but these feel like clumsy and unsuited for regular use. Are these even good ideas? Is there anything like design patterns concerning testing specifically? I guess the main themes in what I'd like to learn more about are, (1) what are the overarching principles that should be followed (or at least considered) in every testing effort and (2) what are popular rules of thumb for writing tests. For example, at one point I recall hearing from someone that if a method is longer than 200 lines, it should be refactored - not a universally correct rule, but it has been quite helpful since I'd otherwise happily put hundreds of lines in single methods and then wonder why my code is so hard to read. Similarly I've found ReSharpers suggestions on member naming style and other things to be quite helpful in keeping my codebases sane. I see many resources both online and in print that talk about testing in the context of large applications (years of work, 10s of people or more). However, because I've never worked on such large projects, this context is very unfamiliar to me and makes the material difficult to follow and relate to my real world problems. Speaking of software development in general, advice given with the assumptions of large projects isn't always straightforward to apply to my own, smaller endeavors. Summary So my question is: What are some resources to learn about unit testing, for a hobbyist, self-taught programmer without much formal training? Ideally, I'm looking for a short and simple "bible of unit testing" which I can commit to memory, and then apply systematically by repeatedly asking myself "is this test following the bible of testing closely enough?" and then amending discrepancies if it doesn't.

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  • Can I be too old to be just a programmer? [closed]

    - by Tigran
    Possible Duplicate: How old is "too old"? Looking on this post Can I be "too young" to get a programming job? I would like to ask: I have 35 years, am I too old to be just a programmer and not jumping into marketing meetings, mails, clients management in your country? In country were I live now, for example, I'm very close to limit of age where I could ever have a chance to get a phone call for just soft engineer position. What about you? Is there any age limit in that sence?

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  • How to morph from a programmer noob to a guru?

    - by didxga
    I have been a programmer for two years, and i am getting hard to level up my skill especially working at legacy code maintenance right now. I think working hard is not enough to elevate my skill, because there are ton of opensource around us, the preoject i have been involved are all mixture of opensources --- from front end to back end from presentation tier to business logic tier. My work is just gluing all these together or something fewer complex which is to collect data from UI to logic module then retrieve the data processed and put it to UI. Sometime there is a need to add some simple logic(like assembling the data to a form that fit business logic interface) while transport data. Could you please give me any suggestion what should i do on the side to improve my skill? Thanks!

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  • How to start working as a programmer - what do I need?

    - by giorgo
    Hi i am learning java and php i have some projects from uni.(Gui,s in java with mysql and a web application in php with mysql ++ more things like this.) i have started learning mvc struts spring and i also lerning php +zend +++++ more stuff etc....you can't learn everything!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I would like to ask how can i find a job as a programmer-software eng because i have send my cv in many companys but all of them said me that i need work expirience. How All of you started your programming expirience. Did you make some projects and send them did you you have somebody that help you ...??? i am totaly alone i do everything by my self. can anyone answer this?everybody starts from somewhere but what if this somewhere don't come?what to do ?? how to start !!!!!!! Thanks

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  • How to minimize the data loss when laying off a programmer?

    - by thursdaysgeek
    I was just laid off and it was the standard process that is used in the US: call the person to talk to personnel, and remove access to the network while that is going on, then have someone help pack, always have someone with the person until they are escorted from the property. That is supposed to keep an unhappy developer from deleting or damaging software or data: to mimimize data loss. However, it still results in a lot of data loss, as all of the work the programmer was working on is dropped: software not checked in is possibly lost, documents not finished are lost, releases in process are slowed down or stopped, and a huge amount of knowledge could be lost. It seems the potential data loss is more than offset by the actual data loss. How can all losses, both potential and actual, be mimimized?

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  • Best advice for game programmer who wants to go indie?

    - by JStriedinger
    So. I'm working right now as an intern in a mobile game development company. I've used Unity quite a lot for 1 year now but, that's about all the experience I have with game design/development. Here's the things. I wanna go indie, the main reason is for fun, I really enjoy games and by making indie games I believe I can let my imagination fly and make personal personal stuff. Unfortunately I...I just don't know where to start! I'm interestes in making mobile and web games so what...should I download Stencyl? Construct 2?...XCODE for iOS, maybe a great plugin for Unity would be fine? What whould be your single best advice for someone like me? (programmer and interestes in design) :)

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  • Should I choose a programmer or on-site (QA) job?

    - by user3978
    This question is for all the professionals who have been in IT industry from long time. I have 4 years of experience in QA (manual testing) from a MNC located in India. I have been thinking about pursuing software developers job so I applied for some companies as a fresher and one company offered me to take as entry-level engineer. But my present company does not want to loose me and they are offering me an on-site opportunity? So which one should i go for Programmer job or on-site (QA) in terms of long term perspective?

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  • Can communications & computer engineer work as a programmer? [closed]

    - by Egy Prot
    I'm studying now communications & computer engineering. The professor told me that: Engineers have much hiring priority than Computer Scientists. It's good I've the ability to apply for the faculty of engineering. This'll help me to achieve my ambition to be a programmer. We'll study computer science. While I was browsing, I only saw computer science, computer science... etc. Courses vary from a faculty to another. Can he be right? If he's right, will employers prefer Computer Scientists or Engineers?

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  • As a solo programmer, of what use can Gerrit be?

    - by s.d
    Disclaimer: I'm aware of the questions How do I review my own code? and What advantages do continuous integration tools offer on a solo project?. I do feel that this question aims at a different set of answers though, as it is about a specific software, and not about general musings about the use of this or that practice or tech stack. I'm a solo programmer for an Eclipse RCP-based project. To be able to control myself and the quality of my software, I'm in the process of setting up a CSI stack. In this, I follow the Eclipse Common Build Infrastructure guidelines, with the exception that I will use Jenkins rather than Hudson. Sticking to these guidelines will hopefully help me in getting used to the Eclipse way of doing things, and I hope to be able to contribute some code to Eclipse in the future. However, CBI includes Gerrit, a code review software. While I think it's really helpful for teams, and I will employ it as soon as the team grows to at least two developers, I'm wondering how I could use it while I'm still solo. Question: Is there a use case for Gerrit that takes into account solo developers? Notes: I can imagine reviewing code myself after a certain amount of time to gain a little distance to it. This does complicate the workflow though, as code will only be built once it's been passed through code review. This might prove to be a "trap" as I might be tempted to quickly push bad code through Gerrit just to get it built. I'm very interested in hearing how other solo devs have made use of Gerrit.

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  • How do managers know if a person is a good or a bad programmer?

    - by Pavel Shved
    In most companies that do programming teams and divisions consist of programmers who design and write code and managers who... well, do the management stuff. Aside from just not writing code, managers usually do not even look at the code the team develops, and may even have no proper IDE installed on their work machines. Still, the managers are to judge if a person works well, if he or she should be put in charge of something, or if particular developer should be assigned to a task of the most importance and responsibility. And last, but not least: the managers usually assign the quarterly bonuses! To do the above effectively, a manager should know if a person is a good programmer—among other traits, of course. The question is, how do they do it? They don't even look at the code people write, they can't directly assess the quality of the components programmers develop... but their estimates of who is a good coder, and who is "not as good" are nevertheless correct in most cases! What is the secret?

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  • Entry / JR Php Programmer - What do I learn next?

    - by dtj
    I got very interested in programming toward the end of college. Took a few classes, but learned most everything on my own via books and such. Its mostly been Php and MySQL. Right out of school, I got a job working at a company for 2 years (web media) and ended up learning a lot of stuff and programming some things for them. I am no longer at that company but I am looking for my next steps as a programmer. I really enjoy Web Development and Php and MySQL seems to be my thing. Basically, I know how to do CRUD operations, i am mediocre at OOP and still have more to learn, I know HTML and CSS quite well, I know my way around a Unix terminal and can access MySQL through it and set up cron jobs and such. I know some basic Javascript. Whats a good next step? I don't anything about 3rd party services, PDO, APIs (twitter, facebook, etc), Drupal / Joomla, Unit Testing, E-Commerce, PECL, PEAR ....in other words A LOT I get easily overwhelmed by the amount of stuff there is to learn, so I'm sort of trying to find a path. Right now, I'm digging into OOP more, as that seems like a good conceptual first-step. Any suggestions?

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  • How Can I Know Whether I Am a Good Programmer?

    - by Kristopher Johnson
    Like most people, I think of myself as being a bit above average in my field. I get paid well, I've gotten promotions, and I've never had a real problem getting good references or getting a job. But I've been around enough to notice that many of the worst programmers I've worked with thought they were some of the best. Bad programmers who are surrounded by other bad programmers seem to be the most self-deluded. I'm certainly not perfect. I do make mistakes. I do miss deadlines. But I think I make about the same number of bonehead moves that "other good programmers" do. The problem is that I define "other good programmers" to mean "people who are like me." So, I wonder, is there any way a programmer can make some sort of reasonable self-evaluation? How do we know whether we are good or bad at our jobs? Or, if terms like good and bad are too ill-defined, how can programmers honestly identify their own strengths and weaknesses, so that they can take advantage of the former and work to improve the latter?

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  • Is this information about me as a programmer concise and good enough?

    - by Nick Rosencrantz
    I not only want you to review my resume but please tell me what you think Google means when they answered me: "We don't look at personal letters and we like your resume and we can recommend you internally but we need measurable experience. What is meant with "measurable" here? Do they mean like O(1) compared to O(n), selling an entire company, grades or what? This is what I sent: Curriculum vitae Nick Rosencrantz Competence: System development, web development Technical competence: Java, Javascript, HTML, XML, CSS, AJAX, PHP, SQL, Python Employments: 2012- Mobile Innovation AB System Developer IT consultant (Java programmer) 2011-2012 Bnano International Ltd System Developer Python programming in Google App Engine 2008-2009 Sweden Island AB System Developer Programming C++ and Java EE components 2003-2007 Studies Stockholm School of Economics During studies worked as network technician at Effnet AB 2000-2002 Jadestone AB System Developer System development in Java/J2EE. In 2001: KTH, Assistant. Teaching application server programming in Java Enterprise + weblogic + Informix. 1999-2000 Studies KTH 1996-1998 Spray.se System development, Researcher 1995-1995 Finance broker Backoffice work with financial instruments 1993-1994 Computer & Audio-Technical Systems AB Programming, sommer job Education/Courses: Stockholm School of Economics, Master of Science diploma, KTH, Computer Science undergraduate studies Languages Swedish, English, also some German and French Born 1973, Swedish citizen I also have a project-based CS which is several pages long but the above is about what I was aiming for in the beginning when I was looking for a job, now I have employment as an IT consultant in central Stockholm and I want to make my resume concise and also know what Google meant with their answer (It was a Swedish Google employee that via linkedin recruited from my Stockholm School of Economics groups since that is a small elite economics school where I took my M.Sc. and KTH is one of the largest universities in northern Europe so I sent her a link with my CV and she said she could promote me internally if I added "measurable experience" and I've been thinking for weeks what that may mean?

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  • How to tell your boss that he's a bad programmer? [closed]

    - by Doe
    Possible Duplicate: How to tell your boss that his programming style is really bad? There was a question about the boss having a bad programming style (weird booleans, empty loops, etc.) Having a bad/weird style does not imply being a bad programmer, but my situation is different. My boss outputs some really nasty code for the project, on which we are working together (just two of us). Examples: functions that span over several screens (big screens - 1900 x 1200) Deeply nested Conditional and Loop statements (up to 10 levels!!) Too much static variables, singletons, and both (singleton class with all the methods and members also static) Sometimes the code committed to the version control system does not even compile! Copy-Paste code instead of separating it into an independent function. Fail all the deadlines. "This's [C#|Java|Python] it shouldn't be efficient, that's why we loop all over the haystack to find the needle." "This's C/C++, it's fast enough to loop all over the haystack to find the needle." There is much more to mention... But the worst is that I have to redo much of the stuff he does, my code, which I try to keep clean is often polluted with above-mentioned atrocities. He's reaching 30 soon, so all his skills are established, and I don't even know if it's possible to change something. I like the project, but sometimes I just want to quit...

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  • How to be hired as a remote programmer abroad and not to be an entrepreneur?

    - by user592704
    The question is quite interesting as for me because I watched jobs adds and mostly they all: A) Require being located the same country a vacancy is B) Employers don't want to hire foreign programmers if they don't have H1B or something C) As a rule, most adds provide 6 month contract position I can keep adding the list for long time describing some job adds specifications, anyway, as a rule, most positions require non-employee cooperation status. I don't have a company for such kind of "making projects by a client order" so it is quite complicated; So I was trying, just, as for a statistics, to find out is there a way to be hired abroad as a remote programmer as if I get hired in my native city? The thing is not about being hired where I can be hired "because I am located this or that place" but the thing is about a possibility (not to relocate) which actually should provide nowadays technologies especially for IT specialists in many different fields; So the question is it possible to work any country in remote mode as if I am working in my own place? What do I need for that? Can you advice some useful web sites in this direction? If you can share your own experience I'd love to listen to. Any useful advices are much appreciated

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  • How do I start working as a programmer - what do I need?

    - by giorgo
    Hello, i am currently learning Java and PHP as I have some projects from university, which require me to apply both languages. Specifically, a Java GUI application, connecting to a MySQL database and a web application that will be implemented in PHP/MySQL. I have started learning the MVC pattern, Struts, Spring and I am also learning PHP with zend. My first question is: How can I find employment as a programmer/software engineer? The reason I ask is because I have sent my CV into many companys, but all of them stated that I required work experience. I really need some guidance on how to improve my career opportunites. At present, I work on my own and haven't worked in collaboration with anyone on a particular project. I'm assuming most people create projects and submit them along with their CVs. My second question is: Everyone has to make a start from somewhere, but what if this somewhere doesn't come? What do I need to do to create the circumstances where I can easily progress forward? Thanks

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  • How to convince non-programmer his notions about computers are wrong?

    - by Suma
    Recently I came across a question about 64b on SuperUser for which the accepted answer seemed like a complete nonsense to me. I made two comments pointing out obvious mistakes. To my perplexion, the comments had an effect of the poster of the answer being alienated. I have no idea how could I convince him he is wrong, as he does not seem to understand the basics of the problem. He seems to be mixing concepts like bus size and address size - see the pearl sentence "it will allow you to address all of your RAM because your processor is reading from your RAM in 64 bit words.". The poster asks me to provide proves of my claim by quoting a respectable source, but I have no idea where to find such source, as I doubt anything I would consider relevant would be relevant for him (it would be probably too technical). I think this instance can serve as an illustration of communication problems between programmers and users (and to certain extent even to any expert vs. non-expert communication). How should a programmer handle a communication like this, so that is does not become a useless quarrel?

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  • Java desktop programmer starting to learn Android development: how different is it?

    - by Prog
    I'm a Java programmer. All of my experience is on desktop applications, using Swing for the GUI. I spend a lot of time studying OOP, I have decent understanding of OO concepts and I design and program by the OO approach. I'm thinking of starting to learn Android development soon, and I'm wondering how different it is from desktop development. Obviously the GUI libraries will be different (not Swing), but other than that, I want to know if there are significant differences. I will divide this question to two parts: Apart from the GUI libraries, am I still going to use the standard Java libarary I'm used to? Aka same data structues, same utility classes, etc.? If not, what are the main differences between the libraries I'm used to and the libraries I'll be using? How different is Android development in regard to OO design? Are all of the familiar principles, design patterns, techniques and best pratices just as valid and used? Or is OOP and OOD in Android development significantly different than OO in desktop development? To summarize: apart from GUI design, how different is Java Android development than Java desktop development?

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  • How can I get non-programmer colleagues on board with bespoke software rather than Dynamics CRM + Sharepoint?

    - by Bendos
    I am working with a company which designs and builds one-off machines. They have been 'dabbling' with hosted Dynamics CRM and Sharepoint (on different servers!) in an attempt to centralise their data and help colleagues collaborate more effectively across projects. They haven't used either system to their potential. Now we are looking at the engineering department who already use a form of version control software for the various CAD files (Autodesk Vault) however it is becoming increasingly necessary to implement more of a generic file version control system as they use many more files than can be managed in Vault (sometimes just photos or scans of paper documents), hence why they were looking at using Sharepoint. However... as the 'programmer' of the bunch, I can see several scenarios which don't seem to fit well with the Dynamics + Sharepoint approach; simple reports based on cross-table queries, exporting certain metrics as a spreadsheet, defining project hierarchies and many-many relationships, and as such I have been pushing for an in-house developed 'ECM' / 'ERP' software package (perhaps in .NET or php). Some colleagues seem to attach a greater value to the MS software (perhaps becuase it has a logo!) but don't see that it's just a framework, not a solution. Can anyone provide a good example of when custom software would actually be better than using Dynamics + Sharepoint and how do I relate that to non-technical staff?

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  • Am I deluding myself? Business analyst transition to programmer

    - by Ryan
    Current job: Working as the lead business analyst for a Big 4 firm, leading a team of developers and testers working on a large scale re-platforming project (4 onshore dev, 4 offshore devs, several onshore/offshore testers). Also work in a similar capacity on other smaller scale projects. Extent of my role: Gathering/writing out requirements, creating functional specifications, designing the UI (basically mapping out all front-end aspects of the system), working closely with devs to communicate/clarify requirements and come up with solutions when we hit roadblocks, writing test cases (and doing much of the testing), working with senior management and key stakeholders, managing beta testers, creating user guides and leading training sessions, providing key technical support. I also write quite a few macros in Excel using VBA (several of my macros are now used across the entire firm, so there are maybe around 1000 people using them) and use SQL on a daily basis, both on the SQL compact files the program relies on, our SQL Server data and any Access databases I create. The developers feel that I am quite good in this role because I understand a lot about programming, inherent system limitations, structure of the databases, etc so it's easier for me to communicate ideas and come up with suggestions when we face problems. What really interests me is developing software. I do a fair amount of programming in VBA and have been wanting to learn C# for awhile (the dev team uses C# - I review code occasionally for my own sake but have not had any practical experience using it). I'm interested in not just the business process but also the technical side of things, so the traditional BA role doesn't really whet my appetite for the kind of stuff I want to do. Right now I have a few small projects that managers have given me and I'm finding new ways to do them (like building custom Access applications), so there's a bit here and there to keep me interested. My question is this: what I would like to do is create custom Excel or Access applications for small businesses as a freelance business (working as a one-man shop; maybe having an occasional contractor depending on a project's complexity). This would obviously start out as a part-time venture while I have a day job, but eventually become a full-time job. Am I deluding myself to thinking I can go from BA/part-time VBA programmer to making a full-time go of a freelance business (where I would be starting out just writing custom Excel/Access apps in VBA)? Or is this type of thing not usually attempted until someone gains years of full-time programming experience? And is there even a market for these types of applications amongst small businesses (and maybe medium-sized) businesses?

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  • How to deal with fellow programmer who likes to delegate task with lack any support from boss [closed]

    - by Rudy
    I have a problem with my fellow programmer. We are currently working together in a small project that need to be shipped every 2 weeks. She has a tendency to ask for help for every issues that she is facing. Whether it's a compile error, algorithm problem or even sync/merge issue that caused by herself. She does not even bother to check Google or try to find out by herself. I can be asked to help her for 5-10 times a day. Everyday her husband keeps calling (4-6 times a day), and most of the code that has been delivered by her are actually incorrect. Today she framed me for sending the wrong delivery product. She went home after lunch on the delivery day without telling PM and other team member on that day and her code she commited does not work at all. It's not even tested. I have no choice to roll back her code and cleaning her code just for sake to able to run the product. I have warned her about her defective codes for almost 3 iterations. She said when she was not around I should be able to test her module for her. I snapped and yelled that I am not her slave and directly reported to my boss. However, my boss is not a person that can manage and care about software quality. What is the most important thing to my boss is delivery of product, whether it tested or not. He can even asked us to deliver something that not even tested by QA to the client, on the next day. Most of our suggestion is not followed by him. He even asked me to apologize to her because I snapped. I am tired of the whole situation. This kind of thing keeps repeated. I do have saving to be able to survive for 6 months and the idea of resigning is keep haunting. There is nothing else that can be learned in my current job and I had been in a better environment than this. What should I do with the situation?

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  • A programmer who doesn't get to program - where to turn? [closed]

    - by Just an Anon
    I'm in my mid 20's, and have been working as a full time programmer / developer for the last ~6 years, with several years of part-time freelancing before this, and three straight years of freelancing in the middle of this short career. I work mostly with PHP and the Drupal framework. By and large, I focus on programming custom pieces of functionality; these, of course, vary greatly from project to project. I've got years of solid experience with OOP (have done some Java & C# years ago, too) including intensive experience with front-end development, and even some design work. I've lead small teams (2-4 people) of developers. And of course, given the large amount of freelancing, I've got decent project- & client-management skills. My problem is staying motivated at any place of employment. In the time mentioned I've worked (full-time) at six local companies. The longest I've stayed at any company was just over a year. I find that I'll get hired and be very excited and motivated for the first few months, but the work quickly gets "stale." By that I mean that the interesting components (ie. the programming) get done, and the rest of the work turns into boring cleanup (move a button, add text, change colours, add a field). I don't get challenged, and I don't feel like I'm learning anything new. This happens repeatedly time and time again, and I always end up leaving for either a new opportunity, or to freelance. I'm wondering if perhaps I've painted myself into a corner with the rather niche work market (although with very high demand and good compensation) and need to explore other career choices. Another possibility is that I may be choosing the wrong places of employment, mostly small agencies, and need to look into working for a larger, more established firm. I find programming, writing code, and architecting solutions very rewarding. When I'm working on an interesting problem I lose all sense of time and 14-16 hours can fly by like minutes. I get the same exciting feeling when I'm doing high-level planning of a complex system, breaking up the work and figuring out how everything will tie-in together. I absolutely hate doing small, "stupid" changes that pose no challenge, yet seem to make up more and more of my work. I want to find a workplace where I will get to work on such tasks, be challenged, and improve in all areas of product development. This maybe a programming job, management, architecture of desktop apps, or may be managing a taco stand on a beach in Mexico - I don't know, and I need some advice and real-world feedback. What are some job areas worth exploring? The requirements are fairly simple: working with computers interacting with others challenging decent pay (I'm making just short of 90k / year with a month of vacation & some benefits, and would like to stay in this range, but am willing to take a temporary cut in pay for a more interesting position) Any advice would be much appreciated!

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