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  • Counting and joining two tables

    - by Eikern
    Eventhosts – containing the three regular hosts and an "other" field (if someone is replacing them) eventid | host (SET[Steve,Tim,Brian,other]) ------------------------------------------- 1 | Steve 2 | Tim 3 | Brian 4 | other 5 | other Event id | other | name etc. ---------------------- 1 | | … 2 | | … 3 | | … 4 | Billy | … 5 | Irwin | … This query: SELECT h.host, COUNT(*) AS hostcount FROM host AS h LEFT OUTER JOIN event AS e ON h.eventid = e.id GROUP BY h.host Returns Steve | 1 Tim | 1 Brian | 1 other | 2 I want it to return Steve | 1 Tim | 1 Brian | 1 Billy | 1 Irwin | 1 OR Steve | | 1 Tim | | 1 Brian | | 1 other | Billy | 1 other | Irwin | 1 Can someone tell me how I can achieve this or point me in a direction?

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  • 500.19 error NetBios command limit thread on forums.iis.net

    - by steve schofield
    Here is a great thread on how a person reported fixing a problem 500.19 error NetBios command limit and using a UNC based content architecture. http://forums.iis.net/p/1165964/1937935.aspx http://download.microsoft.com/download/7/4/f/74fe970d-4a7d-4034-9f5d-02572567e7f7/24_CHAPTER_11_Troubleshooting_IIS_6.0.doc http://support.microsoft.com/kb/813776 Check out the UNC tag regarding others that have great information. http://weblogs.asp.net/steveschofield/archive/tags/UNC/default.aspx Steve SchofieldMicrosoft MVP - IIS

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  • Share IIS and related information via IIS Community Newsletter WIKI

    - by steve schofield
    Trying something different!  Do you have something to share with the IIS community?  Are you an IIS community leader wanting to share your info?  Do you run a local usergroup and want to let others know!  Sign-up for our WIKI @ http://www.iislogs.com/wiki/   The information will be reviewed and potentially included in the IIS Community Newsletter.  Cheers, Steve SchofieldMicrosoft MVP - IIS  

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  • Ubuntu 12.10 wont fully load

    - by Steve
    I want to try Ubuntu from my 16Gb stick without ditching Win7 just yet. Everything boots up fine, I get the spash screen, I get the question screen (Do you want to try Ubuntu or install (or something like that)) I select try and then my screen goes black with what appears to be a DOS prompt. No keyboard keys work at this time. Have tried re-downloading Ubuntu, rebooting etc. Any help very much appreciated. Regards Steve

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  • Wheaties Fuel = Wheaties FAIL

    - by Steve Bargelt
    Are you kidding me? What a load of nutritional CRAP. Don’t buy this product. Just don’t do it. They are just like Wheaties with more sugar and fat. Awesome just what we need more sugar!! Okay now I’m not against carbs… I’m really not. Being a cyclist I realize the importance of carbohydrates in the diet… but let’s be realistic here. Even though the commercials for Wheaties Fuel say they are for athletes you know that what General Mills is really hoping for is that kids will see Payton Manning, Albert Pujols and KG and buy this cereal and eat a ton of it for breakfast. Sad, really. I’ve watched all the videos and read all the propaganda on the Wheaties Fuel web site and no where do they talk about why they added sugar and fat the original Wheaties. There is a lot of double-speak by Dr. Ivy about “understanding the needs of athletes.” I had to laugh – in one of the videos Dr. Ivy even says that he thinks the "new Wheaties will have even more fiber! Wrong! My bad... there is 5g of fiber not 3g per serving. Just  Way more sugar. A serving of FROSTED FLAKES has less sugar per serving!!!   Wheaties Fuel Wheaties Frosted Flakes Honey Nut Cheerios Quaker Oatmeal Serving Size 3/4 cup 3/4 cup 3/4 cup 3/4 cup 3/4 cup Calories 210 100 110 110 225 Fat 3g .5g 0g 1.5g 4.5g Protein 3g 3g 1g 2g 7.5g Carbohydrates 46g 22g 27g 22g 40.5g Sugars 14g 4g 11g 9g 1.5g Fiber 5g 3g 1g 2g 6g   In reality it might not be a bad pre-workout meal but for a normal day-in-day-out breakfast is just seems to have too much sugar - especially when you bump the serving size up to 1 to 1.5 cups and add milk! I’ll stick with Oatmeal, thank you very much.

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  • Advanced (?) Excel sorting

    - by Preston Grayskull
    First of all, I'd like to admit that I don't really know anything about Excel, but I have tried to look up a solution to this in Excel books and Googling. Here's what I'm trying to do: I have a really long spreadsheet There are 7 columns total, but only two columns that I'm most interested in. Here's an example CSV that is much more simple than my actual dataset, but the search/sort is analogous: John, Apple Dave, Apple Dave, Orange Steve, Apple Steve, Orange Steve, Kiwi Bob, Apple Bob, Banana I'm interested in extracting the entire rows (all of the columns) that meet the following criteria: ["Apple"] OR ["Apple" and "Orange"] NOT ["Apple" and "Orange" and Anything Else] NOT ["Apple" and Anything that isn't Orange] So with the above CSV, I would get the entire rows for John and Dave, but not Steve and not Bob. I started doing this manually, and will likely finish by the time this question has an answer, but I would like to know this for future reference. Thanks!

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  • Skinning af:selectOneChoice

    - by Duncan Mills
    A question came in today about how to skin the selection button ()  of an <af:selectOneChoice>. If you have a delve in the ADF Skinning editor, you'll find that there are selectors for the selectOneChoice when in compact mode (af|selectOneChoice::compact-dropdown-icon-style), however, there is not a selector for the icon in the "normal" mode. I had a quick delve into the skinning source files that you can find in the adf-richclient-impl-11.jar and likewise there seemed to be no association there. However, a quick sample page and a peek with Chrome developer tools revealed the problem.  The af:selectOneChoice gets rendered in the browser as a good old <select> element (reasonable enough!). Herein lies the problem, and the reason why there is no skin selector. The <select> HTML element does not have a standard way of replacing the image used for the dropdown button.  If you have a search around with your favorite search engine, you can find various workarounds and solutions for this.  For example, using Chrome and Safari you can define the following for the select element: select {   -webkit-appearance: listbox;   background-image: url(blob.png);    background-position: center right;   background-repeat: no-repeat;   } Which gives a very exciting select box:  .

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  • Formating Columns in Excel created by af:exportCollectionActionListener

    - by Duncan Mills
    The af:exportCollectionActionListener behavior in ADF Faces Rich client provides a very simple way of quickly dumping out the contents or selected rows in a table or treeTable to Excel. However, that simplicity comes at a price as it pretty much left up to Excel how to format the data. A common use case where you have a problem is that of ID columns which are often long numerics. You probably want to represent this data as a string, Excel however will probably have other ideas and render it as an exponent  - not what you intended. In earlier releases of the framework you could sort of work around this by taking advantage of a bug which would allow you to surround the outputText in question with invisible outputText components which provided formatting hints to Excel. Something like this: <af:column headertext="Some wide label">  <af:panelgrouplayout layout="horizontal">     <af:outputtext value="=TEXT(" visible="false">     <af:outputtext value="#{row.bigNumberValue}" rendered="true"/>    <af:outputtext value=",0)" visible="false">   </af:panelgrouplayout> </af:column> However, this bug was fixed and so it can no longer be used as a trick, the export now ignores invisible columns. So, if you really need control over the formatting there are several alternatives: First the more powerful ADF Desktop Integration (ADFdi) package which allows you to build fully transactional spreadsheets that "pull" the data and can update it. This gives you all the control that might need on formatting but it does need specific Excel Add-ins on the client to work. For more information about ADFdi have a look at this tutorial on OTN. Or you can of course look at BI Publisher or Apache POI if you're happy with output only spreadsheets

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  • Browsing Your ADF Application Module Pooling Params with WLST

    - by Duncan Mills
    In ADF 11g you can of course use Enterprise Manager (EM) to browse and configure the settings used by ADF Business Components  Application Modules, as shown here for one of my sample deployed applications. This screen you can access from the EM homepage by pulling down the Application Deployment menu, and then ADF > Configure ADF Business Components. Then select the profile that you are actually using (Hint: look in the DataBindings.cpx file to work this out - probably the "Local" version unless you've explicitly changed it. )So, from this screen you can change the pooling parameters and the world is good. But what if you don't have EM installed? In that case you can use the WebLogic scripting capabilities to view (and Update) the MBean Properties. Explanation The pooling parameters and many others are handled through Message Driven Beans that are created for the deployed application in the server. In the case of the ADF BC pooling parameters, this MBean will combine the configuration deployed as part of the application, along with any overrides defined as -D environement commands on the JVM startup for the application server instance. Using WLST to Browse the Bean ValuesFor our purposes here I'm doing this interactively, although you can also write a script or write Java to achieve the same thing.Step 0: Before You Start You will need the followingAccess to the console on the machine that is running the serverThe WebLogic Admin username and password (I'll use weblogic/password as my example here - yours will be different)The name of the deployed application (in this example FMWdh_application1)The package path to the bc4j.xcfg file (in this example oracle.demo.fmwdh.model.service.common.bc4j.xcfg) This is based on the default path for your model project so it shoudl be fairly easy to work out.The BC configuration your AM is actually running with (look in the DataBindings.cpx for that. In this example DealHelpServiceDeployed is the profile being used..)Step 1: Start the WLST consoleTo start at the beginning, you need to run the WLST command but that needs a little setup:Change to the wlserver_10.3/server/bin directory e.g. under your Fusion Middleware Home[[email protected]] cd /home/oracle/FMW_R1/wlserver_10.3/server/binSet your environment using the setWLSEnv script. e.g. on Oracle Enterprise Linux:[[email protected] bin] source setWLSEnv.shStart the WLST interactive console[[email protected] bin] java weblogic.WLSTInitializing WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST) ...Welcome to WebLogic Server Administration Scripting ShellType help() for help on available commandswls:/offline> Step 2:Enter the WLST commandsConnect to the server wls:> connect('weblogic','password')Change to the Custom root, this is where the AMPooling MBeans are registered wls:> custom()Change to the b4j MBean directorywls:> cd ('oracle.bc4j.mbean.config')Work out the correct directory for the AM configuration you need. This is the difficult bit, not because it's hard to do, but because the names are long. The structure here is such that every child MBean is displayed at the same level as the parent, so for each deployed application there will be many directories shown. In fact, do an ls() command here and you'll see what I mean. Each application will have one MBean for the app as a whole, and then for each deployed configuration in the .xcfg file you'll see: One for the config entry itself, and then one each for Security, DB Connection and AM Pooling. So if you deploy an app with just one configuration you'll see 5 directories, if it has two configurations in the .xcfg you'll see 9 and so on.The directory you are looking for will contain those bits of information you gathered in Step 0, specifically the Application Name, the configuration you are using and the xcfg name: First of all narrow your list to just those directories returned from the ls() command that begin oracle.bc4j.mbean.config:name=AMPool. These identify the AM pooling MBeans for all the deployed applications. Now look for the correct application name e.g. Application=FMWdh_application1The config setting in that sub-list should already be correct and match what you expect e.g. oracle.bc4j.mbean.config=oracle.demo.fmwdh.model.service.common.bc4j.xcfgFinally look for the correct value for the AppModuleConfigType e.g. oracle.bc4j.mbean.config.AppModuleConfigType=DealHelpServiceDeployedNow you have identified the correct directory name, change to that (keep the name on one line of course - I've had to split it across lines here for clarity:wls:> cd ('oracle.bc4j.mbean.config:name=AMPool,     type=oracle.bc4j.mbean.config.AppModuleConfigType.AMPoolType,    oracle.bc4j.mbean.config=oracle.demo.fmwdh.model.service.common.bc4j.xcfg,    Application=FMWdh_application1,    oracle.bc4j.mbean.config.AppModuleConfigType=DealHelpServiceDeployed') Now you can actually view the parameter values with a simple ls() commandwls:> ls()And here's the output in which you can view the realtime values of the various pool settings: -rw- AmpoolConnectionstrategyclass oracle.jbo.common.ampool.DefaultConnectionStrategy -rw- AmpoolDoampooling true -rw- AmpoolDynamicjdbccredentials false -rw- AmpoolInitpoolsize 2 -rw- AmpoolIsuseexclusive true -rw- AmpoolMaxavailablesize 40 -rw- AmpoolMaxinactiveage 600000 -rw- AmpoolMaxpoolsize 4096 -rw- AmpoolMinavailablesize 2 -rw- AmpoolMonitorsleepinterval 600000 -rw- AmpoolResetnontransactionalstate true -rw- AmpoolSessioncookiefactoryclass oracle.jbo.common.ampool.DefaultSessionCookieFactory -rw- AmpoolTimetolive 3600000 -rw- AmpoolWritecookietoclient false -r-- ConfigMBean true -rw- ConnectionPoolManager oracle.jbo.server.ConnectionPoolManagerImpl -rw- Doconnectionpooling false -rw- Dofailover false -rw- Initpoolsize 0 -rw- Maxpoolcookieage -1 -rw- Maxpoolsize 4096 -rw- Poolmaxavailablesize 25 -rw- Poolmaxinactiveage 600000 -rw- Poolminavailablesize 5 -rw- Poolmonitorsleepinterval 600000 -rw- Poolrequesttimeout 30000 -rw- Pooltimetolive -1 -r-- ReadOnly false -rw- Recyclethreshold 10 -r-- RestartNeeded false -r-- SystemMBean false -r-- eventProvider true -r-- eventTypes java.lang.String[jmx.attribute.change] -r-- objectName oracle.bc4j.mbean.config:name=AMPool,type=oracle.bc4j.mbean.config.AppModuleConfigType.AMPoolType,oracle.bc4j.mbean.config=oracle.demo.fmwdh.model.service.common.bc4j.xcfg,Application=FMWdh_application1,oracle.bc4j.mbean.config.AppModuleConfigType=DealHelpServiceDeployed -rw- poolClassName oracle.jbo.common.ampool.ApplicationPoolImpl Thanks to Brian Fry on the JDeveloper PM Team who did most of the work to put this sequence of steps together with me badgering him over his shoulder.

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  • More Animation - Self Dismissing Dialogs

    - by Duncan Mills
    In my earlier articles on animation, I discussed various slide, grow and  flip transitions for items and containers.  In this article I want to discuss a fade animation and specifically the use of fades and auto-dismissal for informational dialogs.  If you use a Mac, you may be familiar with Growl as a notification system, and the nice way that messages that are informational just fade out after a few seconds. So in this blog entry I wanted to discuss how we could make an ADF popup behave in the same way. This can be an effective way of communicating information to the user without "getting in the way" with modal alerts. This of course, has been done before, but everything I've seen previously requires something like JQuery to be in the mix when we don't really need it to be.  The solution I've put together is nice and generic and will work with either <af:panelWindow> or <af:dialog> as a the child of the popup. In terms of usage it's pretty simple to use we  just need to ensure that the popup itself has clientComponent is set to true and includes the animation JavaScript (animateFadingPopup) on a popupOpened event: <af:popup id="pop1" clientComponent="true">   <af:panelWindow title="A Fading Message...">    ...  </af:panelWindow>   <af:clientListener method="animateFadingPopup" type="popupOpened"/> </af:popup>   The popup can be invoked in the normal way using showPopupBehavior or JavaScript, no special code is required there. As a further twist you can include an additional clientAttribute called preFadeDelay to define a delay before the fade itself starts (the default is 5 seconds) . To set the delay to just 2 seconds for example: <af:popup ...>   ...   <af:clientAttribute name="preFadeDelay" value="2"/>   <af:clientListener method="animateFadingPopup" type="popupOpened"/>  </af:popup> The Animation Styles  As before, we have a couple of CSS Styles which define the animation, I've put these into the skin in my case, and, as in the other articles, I've only defined the transitions for WebKit browsers (Chrome, Safari) at the moment. In this case, the fade is timed at 5 seconds in duration. .popupFadeReset {   opacity: 1; } .popupFadeAnimate {   opacity: 0;   -webkit-transition: opacity 5s ease-in-out; } As you can see here, we are achieving the fade by simply setting the CSS opacity property. The JavaScript The final part of the puzzle is, of course, the JavaScript, there are four functions, these are generic (apart from the Style names which, if you've changed above, you'll need to reflect here): The initial function invoked from the popupOpened event,  animateFadingPopup which starts a timer and provides the initial delay before we start to fade the popup. The function that applies the fade animation to the popup - initiatePopupFade. The callback function - closeFadedPopup used to reset the style class and correctly hide the popup so that it can be invoked again and again.   A utility function - findFadeContainer, which is responsible for locating the correct child component of the popup to actually apply the style to. Function - animateFadingPopup This function, as stated is the one hooked up to the popupOpened event via a clientListener. Because of when the code is called it does not actually matter how you launch the popup, or if the popup is re-used from multiple places. All usages will get the fade behavior. /**  * Client listener which will kick off the animation to fade the dialog and register  * a callback to correctly reset the popup once the animation is complete  * @param event  */ function animateFadingPopup(event) { var fadePopup = event.getSource();   var fadeCandidate = false;   //Ensure that the popup is initially Opaque   //This handles the situation where the user has dismissed   //the popup whilst it was in the process of fading   var fadeContainer = findFadeContainer(fadePopup);   if (fadeContainer != null) {     fadeCandidate = true;     fadeContainer.setStyleClass("popupFadeReset");   }   //Only continue if we can actually fade this popup   if (fadeCandidate) {   //See if a delay has been specified     var waitTimeSeconds = event.getSource().getProperty('preFadeDelay');     //Default to 5 seconds if not supplied     if (waitTimeSeconds == undefined) {     waitTimeSeconds = 5;     }     // Now call the fade after the specified time     var fadeFunction = function () {     initiatePopupFade(fadePopup);     };     var fadeDelayTimer = setTimeout(fadeFunction, (waitTimeSeconds * 1000));   } } The things to note about this function is the initial check that we have to do to ensure that the container is currently visible and reset it's style to ensure that it is.  This is to handle the situation where the popup has begun the fade, and yet the user has still explicitly dismissed the popup before it's complete and in doing so has prevented the callback function (described later) from executing. In this particular situation the initial display of the dialog will be (apparently) missing it's normal animation but at least it becomes visible to the user (and most users will probably not notice this difference in any case). You'll notice that the style that we apply to reset the  opacity - popupFadeReset, is not applied to the popup component itself but rather the dialog or panelWindow within it. More about that in the description of the next function findFadeContainer(). Finally, assuming that we have a suitable candidate for fading, a JavaScript  timer is started using the specified preFadeDelay wait time (or 5 seconds if that was not supplied). When this timer expires then the main animation styleclass will be applied using the initiatePopupFade() function Function - findFadeContainer As a component, the <af:popup> does not support styleClass attribute, so we can't apply the animation style directly.  Instead we have to look for the container within the popup which defines the window object that can have a style attached.  This is achieved by the following code: /**  * The thing we actually fade will be the only child  * of the popup assuming that this is a dialog or window  * @param popup  * @return the component, or null if this is not valid for fading  */ function findFadeContainer(popup) { var children = popup.getDescendantComponents();   var fadeContainer = children[0];   if (fadeContainer != undefined) {   var compType = fadeContainer.getComponentType();     if (compType == "oracle.adf.RichPanelWindow" || compType == "oracle.adf.RichDialog") {     return fadeContainer;     }   }   return null; }  So what we do here is to grab the first child component of the popup and check its type. Here I decided to limit the fade behaviour to only <af:dialog> and <af:panelWindow>. This was deliberate.  If  we apply the fade to say an <af:noteWindow> you would see the text inside the balloon fade, but the balloon itself would hang around until the fade animation was over and then hide.  It would of course be possible to make the code smarter to walk up the DOM tree to find the correct <div> to apply the style to in order to hide the whole balloon, however, that means that this JavaScript would then need to have knowledge of the generated DOM structure, something which may change from release to release, and certainly something to avoid. So, all in all, I think that this is an OK restriction and frankly it's windows and dialogs that I wanted to fade anyway, not balloons and menus. You could of course extend this technique and handle the other types should you really want to. One thing to note here is the selection of the first (children[0]) child of the popup. It does not matter if there are non-visible children such as clientListener before the <af:dialog> or <af:panelWindow> within the popup, they are not included in this array, so picking the first element in this way seems to be fine, no matter what the underlying ordering is within the JSF source.  If you wanted a super-robust version of the code you might want to iterate through the children array of the popup to check for the right type, again it's up to you.  Function -  initiatePopupFade  On to the actual fading. This is actually very simple and at it's heart, just the application of the popupFadeAnimate style to the correct component and then registering a callback to execute once the fade is done. /**  * Function which will kick off the animation to fade the dialog and register  * a callback to correctly reset the popup once the animation is complete  * @param popup the popup we are animating  */ function initiatePopupFade(popup) { //Only continue if the popup has not already been dismissed    if (popup.isPopupVisible()) {   //The skin styles that define the animation      var fadeoutAnimationStyle = "popupFadeAnimate";     var fadeAnimationResetStyle = "popupFadeReset";     var fadeContainer = findFadeContainer(popup);     if (fadeContainer != null) {     var fadeContainerReal = AdfAgent.AGENT.getElementById(fadeContainer.getClientId());       //Define the callback this will correctly reset the popup once it's disappeared       var fadeCallbackFunction = function (event) {       closeFadedPopup(popup, fadeContainer, fadeAnimationResetStyle);         event.target.removeEventListener("webkitTransitionEnd", fadeCallbackFunction);       };       //Initiate the fade       fadeContainer.setStyleClass(fadeoutAnimationStyle);       //Register the callback to execute once fade is done       fadeContainerReal.addEventListener("webkitTransitionEnd", fadeCallbackFunction, false);     }   } } I've added some extra checks here though. First of all we only start the whole process if the popup is still visible. It may be that the user has closed the popup before the delay timer has finished so there is no need to start animating in that case. Again we use the findFadeContainer() function to locate the correct component to apply the style to, and additionally we grab the DOM id that represents that container.  This physical ID is required for the registration of the callback function. The closeFadedPopup() call is then registered on the callback so as to correctly close the now transparent (but still there) popup. Function -  closeFadedPopup The final function just cleans things up: /**  * Callback function to correctly cancel and reset the style in the popup  * @param popup id of the popup so we can close it properly  * @param contatiner the window / dialog within the popup to actually style  * @param resetStyle the syle that sets the opacity back to solid  */ function closeFadedPopup(popup, container, resetStyle) { container.setStyleClass(resetStyle);   popup.cancel(); }  First of all we reset the style to make the popup contents opaque again and then we cancel the popup.  This will ensure that any of your user code that is waiting for a popup cancelled event will actually get the event, additionally if you have done this as a modal window / dialog it will ensure that the glasspane is dismissed and you can interact with the UI again.  What's Next? There are several ways in which this technique could be used, I've been working on a popup here, but you could apply the same approach to in-line messages. As this code (in the popup case) is generic it will make s pretty nice declarative component and maybe, if I get time, I'll look at constructing a formal Growl component using a combination of this technique, and active data push. Also, I'm sure the above code can be improved a little too.  Specifically things like registering a popup cancelled listener to handle the style reset so that we don't loose the subtle animation that takes place when the popup is opened in that situation where the user has closed the in-fade dialog.

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  • The UIManager Pattern

    - by Duncan Mills
    One of the most common mistakes that I see when reviewing ADF application code, is the sin of storing UI component references, most commonly things like table or tree components in Session or PageFlow scope. The reasons why this is bad are simple; firstly, these UI object references are not serializable so would not survive a session migration between servers and secondly there is no guarantee that the framework will re-use the same component tree from request to request, although in practice it generally does do so. So there danger here is, that at best you end up with an NPE after you session has migrated, and at worse, you end up pinning old generations of the component tree happily eating up your precious memory. So that's clear, we should never. ever, be storing references to components anywhere other than request scope (or maybe backing bean scope). So double check the scope of those binding attributes that map component references into a managed bean in your applications.  Why is it Such a Common Mistake?  At this point I want to examine why there is this urge to hold onto these references anyway? After all, JSF will obligingly populate your backing beans with the fresh and correct reference when needed.   In most cases, it seems that the rational is down to a lack of distinction within the application between what is data and what is presentation. I think perhaps, a cause of this is the logical separation between business data behind the ADF data binding (#{bindings}) façade and the UI components themselves. Developers tend to think, OK this is my data layer behind the bindings object and everything else is just UI.  Of course that's not the case.  The UI layer itself will have state which is intrinsically linked to the UI presentation rather than the business model, but at the same time should not be tighly bound to a specific instance of any single UI component. So here's the problem.  I think developers try and use the UI components as state-holders for this kind of data, rather than using them to represent that state. An example of this might be something like the selection state of a tabset (panelTabbed), you might be interested in knowing what the currently disclosed tab is. The temptation that leads to the component reference sin is to go and ask the tabset what the selection is.  That of course is fine in context - e.g. a handler within the same request scoped bean that's got the binding to the tabset. However, it leads to problems when you subsequently want the same information outside of the immediate scope.  The simple solution seems to be to chuck that component reference into session scope and then you can simply re-check in the same way, leading of course to this mistake. Turn it on its Head  So the correct solution to this is to turn the problem on its head. If you are going to be interested in the value or state of some component outside of the immediate request context then it becomes persistent state (persistent in the sense that it extends beyond the lifespan of a single request). So you need to externalize that state outside of the component and have the component reference and manipulate that state as needed rather than owning it. This is what I call the UIManager pattern.  Defining the Pattern The  UIManager pattern really is very simple. The premise is that every application should define a session scoped managed bean, appropriately named UIManger, which is specifically responsible for holding this persistent UI component related state.  The actual makeup of the UIManger class varies depending on a needs of the application and the amount of state that needs to be stored. Generally I'll start off with a Map in which individual flags can be created as required, although you could opt for a more formal set of typed member variables with getters and setters, or indeed a mix. This UIManager class is defined as a session scoped managed bean (#{uiManager}) in the faces-config.xml.  The pattern is to then inject this instance of the class into any other managed bean (usually request scope) that needs it using a managed property.  So typically you'll have something like this:   <managed-bean>     <managed-bean-name>uiManager</managed-bean-name>     <managed-bean-class>oracle.demo.view.state.UIManager</managed-bean-class>     <managed-bean-scope>session</managed-bean-scope>   </managed-bean>  When is then injected into any backing bean that needs it:    <managed-bean>     <managed-bean-name>mainPageBB</managed-bean-name>     <managed-bean-class>oracle.demo.view.MainBacking</managed-bean-class>     <managed-bean-scope>request</managed-bean-scope>     <managed-property>       <property-name>uiManager</property-name>       <property-class>oracle.demo.view.state.UIManager</property-class>       <value>#{uiManager}</value>     </managed-property>   </managed-bean> In this case the backing bean in question needs a member variable to hold and reference the UIManager: private UIManager _uiManager;  Which should be exposed via a getter and setter pair with names that match the managed property name (e.g. setUiManager(UIManager _uiManager), getUiManager()).  This will then give your code within the backing bean full access to the UI state. UI components in the page can, of course, directly reference the uiManager bean in their properties, for example, going back to the tab-set example you might have something like this: <af:paneltabbed>   <af:showDetailItem text="First"                disclosed="#{uiManager.settings['MAIN_TABSET_STATE'].['FIRST']}"> ...   </af:showDetailItem>   <af:showDetailItem text="Second"                      disclosed="#{uiManager.settings['MAIN_TABSET_STATE'].['SECOND']}">     ...   </af:showDetailItem>   ... </af:panelTabbed> Where in this case the settings member within the UI Manger is a Map which contains a Map of Booleans for each tab under the MAIN_TABSET_STATE key. (Just an example you could choose to store just an identifier for the selected tab or whatever, how you choose to store the state within UI Manger is up to you.) Get into the Habit So we can see that the UIManager pattern is not great strain to implement for an application and can even be retrofitted to an existing application with ease. The point is, however, that you should always take this approach rather than committing the sin of persistent component references which will bite you in the future or shotgun scattered UI flags on the session which are hard to maintain.  If you take the approach of always accessing all UI state via the uiManager, or perhaps a pageScope focused variant of it, you'll find your applications much easier to understand and maintain. Do it today!

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  • Java Tools Support Offering Now Available

    - by Duncan Mills
    Great news! Developers can now purchase a combined support offering covering all three of Oracle's Java IDE options (JDeveloper, Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse and NetBeans) in one premier support package. So no matter what tool, or mix of tools you use, you're covered! See Oracle Development Tools Support Offering for Details. A similar bundle is available for Oracle Solaris Development tools support which is detailed on the same page.

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  • ADF Mobile on BlackBerry

    - by Duncan Mills
    Worth checking out: Luc Bors has an article on OTN covering the use of both browser based and native applications written with ADF on BlackBerry. A great overview and of course perfectly timed for you to try this out yourself using the new ADF Mobile Client extension which is available as a technical preview with Oracle JDeveloper PatchSet .

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  • Installing Forms and Reports on a development system

    - by Duncan Mills
    By popular demand I've resurrected / updated one of the old blog postings from Jan Carlin's Blog on GroundSide here. A recent (lengthy) post on the Forms forums chronicles the problems some of you have had installing F&R on a development machine. See the link in the headline of this post for the main one. When installing, here are some points to bear in mind: Download and install Weblogic Server first. http://www.oracle.com/technology/software/products/middleware/index.htmlFind the Forms and Reports (and Disco and Portal) zip files here. Download them to the desktop (or some other temporary directory of your choosing). Unzip both of the two zip files into the same new directory (maybe called 'stage') and check that you have 4 directories in the stage dir when you are finished unzipping: 'Disk1', 'Disk2', 'Disk3' and 'Disk4'. These folders are specified in the zip file structure and must be preserved for the setup executable to work. If you use WinZip and have a right click menu option that say "Extract to here", use that by right click-dragging the zip file onto the newly created directory. Don't use the "Extract to folder %HOME%\Desktop\ofm_pfrd...disk_1of2" option. That will get you into the trouble that was reported early in this thread. Free up as much memory as you can. Stop services and background processes and virus scanners and databases (you don't need a DB to install Forms) and other things lurking about on your machine. You can restart them when the install is done. Around 1.5 GB free real memory should do it. If it doesn't, free up more if you can. Don't change the swap space unless you know what you are doing. Let Windows handle it. A 1 GB machine will likely not be enough. You will likely need at least 2GB of RAM.Start the install with setup.exe from the 'Disk1' directoryChoose the Install and Configure option unless you have a good reason not to.Choose a unique instance name even if you deinstalled and removed the last install. I suggest using 'asinst_20090722_1' (today's date in ISO format with a running incremented number at the end if you install more than two times on a particular day).Unselect Portal and Discoverer and select the Builders you want.Unselect WebCacheUnselect OHS.Unselect the single sign-on option Check for any failures and choose the retry option if any occur. If that doesn't fix the problem, call Oracle Customer Support .

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  • New ADF Design Paper Covering Task Flows

    - by Duncan Mills
    Just published to OTN today is a new paper that I've put together Task Flow Design Fundamentals. This paper collates a whole bunch of random thoughts about ADF Controller design that I've collected over the last couple of years. Hopefully this will be a useful aid to help you think about your task flow design in a more structured way.

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  • Task Flow Design Paper Revised

    - by Duncan Mills
    Thanks to some discussion over at the ADF Methodology Group and contributions from Simon Lessard and Jan Vervecken I have been able to make some refinements to the Task Flow Design Fundamentals paper on OTN.As a bonus, whilst I was making some edits anyway I've included some of Frank Nimphius's memory scope diagrams which are a really useful tool for understanding how request, view, backingBean and pageFlow scopes all fit together.

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  • Script For Detecting Availability of XMLHttp in Internet Explorer

    - by Duncan Mills
    Having the XMLHttpRequest API available is key to any ADF Faces Rich Client application. Unfortunately, it is possible for users to switch off this option in Internet Explorer as a Security setting. Without XMLHttpRequest available, your ADF Faces application will simply not work correctly, but rather than giving the user a bad user experience wouldn't it be nicer to tell them that they need to make some changes in order to use the application?  Thanks to Blake Sullivan in the ADF Faces team we now have a little script that can do just this. The script is available from https://samplecode.oracle.com here - The attached file browserCheck.js is what you'll need to add to your project.The best way to use this script is to make changes to whatever template you are using for the entry points to your application. If you're not currently using template then you'll have to make the same change in each of your JSPX pages. Save the browserCheck.js file into a /js/ directory under your HTML root within your UI project (e.g. ViewController)In the template or page, select the <af:document> object in the Structure window. From the right mouse (context) menu choose Facet and select the metaContainer facet.Switch to the source code view and locate the metaContainer facet. Then insert the following lines (I've included the facet tag for clarity but you'll already have that):      <f:facet name="metaContainer">        <af:resource type="javascript"                      source="/js/browserCheck.js"/>        <af:resource type="javascript">           xmlhttpNativeCheck(                     "help/howToConfigureYourBrowser.html");        </af:resource>      </f:facet>Note that the argument to the xmlhttpNativeCheck function is a page that you want to show to the user if they need to change their browser configuration. So build this page in the appropriate place as well. You can also just call the function without any arguments e.g. xmlhttpNativeCheck(); in which case it will pop up default instructions for the user to follow, but not redirect to any other page.

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  • forEach and Facelets - a bugfarm just waiting for harvest

    - by Duncan Mills
    An issue that I've encountered before and saw again today seems worthy of a little write-up. It's all to do with a subtle yet highly important difference in behaviour between JSF 2 running with JSP and running on Facelets (.jsf pages). The incident I saw today can be seen as a report on the ADF EMG bugzilla (Issue 53) and in a blog posting by Ulrich Gerkmann-Bartels who reported the issue to the EMG. Ulrich's issue nicely shows how tricky this particular gochya can be. On the surface, the problem is squarely the fault of MDS but underneath MDS is, in fact, innocent. To summarize the problem in a simpler testcase than Ulrich's example, here's a simple fragment of code: <af:forEach var="item" items="#{itemList.items}"> <af:commandLink id="cl1" text="#{item.label}" action="#{item.doAction}"  partialSubmit="true"/> </af:forEach> Looks innocent enough right? We see a bunch of links printed out, great. The issue here though is the id attribute. Logically you can kind of see the problem. The forEach loop is creating (presumably) multiple instances of the commandLink, but only one id is specified - cl1. We know that IDs have to be unique within a JSF component tree, so that must be a bad thing?  The problem is that JSF under JSP implements some hacks when the component tree is generated to transparently fix this problem for you. Behind the scenes it ensures that each instance really does have a unique id. Really nice of it to do so, thank you very much. However, (you could see this coming), the same is not true when running with Facelets  (this is under 11.1.2.n)  in that case, what you put for the id is what you get, and JSF does not mess around in the background for you. So you end up with a component tree that contains duplicate ids which are only created at runtime.  So subtle chaos can ensue.  The symptoms are wide and varied, from something pretty obscure such as the combination Ulrich uncovered, to something as frustrating as your ActionListener just not being triggered. And yes I've wasted hours on just such an issue.  The Solution  Once you're aware of this one it's really simple to fix it, there are two options: Remove the id attribute on components that will cause some kind of submission within the forEach loop altogether and let JSF do the right thing in generating them. Then you'll be assured of uniqueness. Use the var attribute of the loop to generate a unique id for each child instance.  for example in the above case: <af:commandLink id="cl1_#{item.index}" ... />.  So one to watch out for in your upgrades to JSF 2 and one perhaps, for your coding standards today to prepare you for. For completeness, here's the reference to the underlying JSF issue that's at the heart of this: JAVASERVERFACES-1527

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  • Interview

    Duncan Mills, senior director of product management at Oracle, talks about the recent release of Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse 11g.

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  • JDeveloper and Upgrading Your JDK on Ubuntu

    - by Duncan Mills
    One little gotcha, if you, as I did recently, upgrade your JDK on Ubuntu then you may have to make sure you reflect that change in a couple of places for JDeveloper to stay happy. Assuming that you've installed from the jar version of the JDeveloper installer, then the JDK that you specified at install time will be recorded in the .jdev_jdk file in your home directory.However, be aware that this is not the only reference to the absolute path of the JDK. When you run the embedded WebLogic for the first time then the .jdeveloper/system11.1.1.3.37.56.60/DefaultDomain/bin/startWebLogic.shscript will be created, and associated with that, the setDomainEnv.sh script in the same directory. So, if you do want to change the JDK location be sure to change this file as well. (or of course do everything with symbolic links)

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  • NetBeans 6.9 Released

    - by Duncan Mills
    Great news, the first NetBeans release that has been conducted fully under the stewardship of Oracle has now been released. NetBeans IDE 6.9 introduces the JavaFX Composer, a visual layout tool for building JavaFX GUI applications, similar to the Swing GUI builder for Java SE applications. With the JavaFX Composer, developers can quickly build, visually edit, and debug Rich Internet Applications (RIA) and bind components to various data sources, including Web services. The NetBeans 6.9 release also features OSGi interoperability for NetBeans Platform applications and support for developing OSGi bundles with Maven. With support for OSGi and Swing standards, the NetBeans Platform now supports the standard UI toolkit and the standard module system, providing a unique combination of standards for modular, rich-client development. Additional noteworthy features in this release include support for JavaFX SDK 1.3, PHP Zend framework, and Ruby on Rails 3.0; as well as improvements to the Java Editor, Java Debugger, issue tracking, and more. Head over to NetBeans.org for more details and of course downloads!

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  • DOAG 2011

    - by Grant Ronald
    This week is the German Oracle User Group (DOAG) one of the largest Oracle User Groups in Europe.  We have a strong representation from Oracle's Product Management Team.  I kick of things with Dummies Guide to ADF on Tuesday 10am Frank Nimphius explains Task Flows in 60 minutes Duncan Mills give an insight into Real World Performance Tuning for ADF. Susan Duncan explains the Amazing World of Application Lifecycle Management and Duncan Mills finished the day with ADF Mobile Development There is also a load of interesting sessions on Forms, Apex and ADF from customers, partners and Oracle employees from Oracle Germany.  Looking to be a great conference.

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  • Making Those PanelBoxes Behave

    - by Duncan Mills
    I have a little problem to solve earlier this week - misbehaving <af:panelBox> components... What do I mean by that? Well here's the scenario, I have a page fragment containing a set of panelBoxes arranged vertically. As it happens, they are stamped out in a loop but that does not really matter. What I want to be able to do is to provide the user with a simple UI to close and open all of the panelBoxes in concert. This could also apply to showDetailHeader and similar items with a disclosed attrubute, but in this case it's good old panelBoxes.  Ok, so the basic solution to this should be self evident. I can set up a suitable scoped managed bean that the panelBoxes all refer to for their disclosed attribute state. Then the open all / close commandButtons in the UI can simply set the state of that bean for all the panelBoxes to pick up via EL on their disclosed attribute. Sound OK? Well that works basically without a hitch, but turns out that there is a slight problem and this is where the framework is attempting to be a little too helpful. The issue is that is the user manually discloses or hides a panelBox then that will override the value that the EL is setting. So for example. I start the page with all panelBoxes collapsed, all set by the EL state I'm storing on the session I manually disclose panelBox no 1. I press the Expand All button - all works as you would hope and all the panelBoxes are now disclosed, including of course panelBox 1 which I just expanded manually. Finally I press the Collapse All button and everything collapses except that first panelBox that I manually disclosed.  The problem is that the component remembers this manual disclosure and that overrides the value provided by the expression. If I change the viewId (navigate away and back) then the panelBox will start to behave again, until of course I touch it again! Now, the more astute amoungst you would think (as I did) Ah, sound like the MDS personalizaton stuff is getting in the way and the solution should simply be to set the dontPersist attribute to disclosed | ALL. Alas this does not fix the issue.  After a little noodling on the best way to approach this I came up with a solution that works well, although if you think of an alternative way do let me know. The principle is simple. In the disclosureListener for the panelBox I take a note of the clientID of the panelBox component that has been touched by the user along with the state. This all gets stored in a Map of Booleans in ViewScope which is keyed by clientID and stores the current disclosed state in the Boolean value.  The listener looks like this (it's held in a request scope backing bean for the page): public void handlePBDisclosureEvent(DisclosureEvent disclosureEvent) { String clientId = disclosureEvent.getComponent().getClientId(FacesContext.getCurrentInstance()); boolean state = disclosureEvent.isExpanded(); pbState.addTouchedPanelBox(clientId, state); } The pbState variable referenced here is a reference to the bean which will hold the state of the panelBoxes that lives in viewScope (recall that everything is re-set when the viewid is changed so keeping this in viewScope is just fine and cleans things up automatically). The addTouchedPanelBox() method looks like this: public void addTouchedPanelBox(String clientId, boolean state) { //create the cache if needed this is just a Map<String,Boolean> if (_touchedPanelBoxState == null) { _touchedPanelBoxState = new HashMap<String, Boolean>(); } // Simply put / replace _touchedPanelBoxState.put(clientId, state); } So that's the first part, we now have a record of every panelBox that the user has touched. So what do we do when the Collapse All or Expand All buttons are pressed? Here we do some JavaScript magic. Basically for each clientID that we have stored away, we issue a client side disclosure event from JavaScript - just as if the user had gone back and changed it manually. So here's the Collapse All button action: public String CloseAllAction() { submitDiscloseOverride(pbState.getTouchedClientIds(true), false); _uiManager.closeAllBoxes(); return null; }  The _uiManager.closeAllBoxes() method is just manipulating the master-state that all of the panelBoxes are bound to using EL. The interesting bit though is the line:  submitDiscloseOverride(pbState.getTouchedClientIds(true), false); To break that down, the first part is a call to that viewScoped state holder to ask for a list of clientIDs that need to be "tweaked": public String getTouchedClientIds(boolean targetState) { StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); if (_touchedPanelBoxState != null && _touchedPanelBoxState.size() > 0) { for (Map.Entry<String, Boolean> entry : _touchedPanelBoxState.entrySet()) { if (entry.getValue() == targetState) { if (sb.length() > 0) { sb.append(','); } sb.append(entry.getKey()); } } } return sb.toString(); } You'll notice that this method only processes those panelBoxes that will be in the wrong state and returns those as a comma separated list. This is then processed by the submitDiscloseOverride() method: private void submitDiscloseOverride(String clientIdList, boolean targetDisclosureState) { if (clientIdList != null && clientIdList.length() > 0) { FacesContext fctx = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance(); StringBuilder script = new StringBuilder(); script.append("overrideDiscloseHandler('"); script.append(clientIdList); script.append("',"); script.append(targetDisclosureState); script.append(");"); Service.getRenderKitService(fctx, ExtendedRenderKitService.class).addScript(fctx, script.toString()); } } This method constructs a JavaScript command to call a routine called overrideDiscloseHandler() in a script attached to the page (using the standard <af:resource> tag). That method parses out the list of clientIDs and sends the correct message to each one: function overrideDiscloseHandler(clientIdList, newState) { AdfLogger.LOGGER.logMessage(AdfLogger.INFO, "Disclosure Hander newState " + newState + " Called with: " + clientIdList); //Parse out the list of clientIds var clientIdArray = clientIdList.split(','); for (var i = 0; i < clientIdArray.length; i++){ var panelBox = flipPanel = AdfPage.PAGE.findComponentByAbsoluteId(clientIdArray[i]); if (panelBox.getComponentType() == "oracle.adf.RichPanelBox"){ panelBox.broadcast(new AdfDisclosureEvent(panelBox, newState)); } }  }  So there you go. You can see how, with a few tweaks the same code could be used for other components with disclosure that might suffer from the same problem, although I'd point out that the behavior I'm working around here us usually desirable. You can download the running example (11.1.2.2) from here. 

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  • PanelGridLayout - A Layout Revolution

    - by Duncan Mills
    With the most recent 11.1.2 patchset (11.1.2.3) there has been a lot of excitement around ADF Essentials (and rightly so), however, in all the fuss I didn't want an even more significant change to get missed - yes you read that correctly, a more significant change! I'm talking about the new panelGridLayout component, I can confidently say that this one of the most revolutionary components that we've introduced in 11g, even though it sounds rather boring. To be totally accurate, panelGrid was introduced in 11.1.2.2 but without any presence in the component palette or other design time support, so it was largely missed unless you read the release notes. However in this latest patchset it's finally front and center. Its time to explore - we (really) need to talk about layout.  Let's face it,with ADF Faces rich client, layout is a rather arcane pursuit, once you are a layout master, all bow before you, but it's more of an art than a science, and it is often, in fact, way too difficult to achieve what should (apparently) be a pretty simple. Here's a great example, it's a homework assignment I set for folks I'm teaching this stuff to:  The requirements for this layout are: The header is 80px high, the footer is 30px. These are both fixed.  The first section of the header containing the logo is 180px wide The logo is centered within the top left hand corner of the header  The title text is start aligned in the center zone of the header and will wrap if the browser window is narrowed. It should be aligned in the center of the vertical space  The about link is anchored to the right hand side of the browser with a 20px gap and again is center aligned vertically. It will move as the browser window is reduced in width. The footer has a right aligned copyright statement, again middle aligned within a 30px high footer region and with a 20px buffer to the right hand edge. It will move as the browser window is reduced in width. All remaining space is given to a central zone, which, in this case contains a panelSplitter. Expect that at some point in time you'll need a separate messages line in the center of the footer.  In the homework assigment I set I also stipulate that no inlineStyles can be used to control alignment or margins and no use of other taglibs (e.g. JSF HTML or Trinidad HTML). So, if we take this purist approach, that basic page layout (in my stock solution) requires 3 panelStretchLayouts, 5 panelGroupLayouts and 4 spacers - not including the spacer I use for the logo and the contents of the central zone splitter - phew! The point is that even a seemingly simple layout needs a bit of thinking about, particulatly when you consider strechting and browser re-size behavior. In fact, this little sample actually teaches you much of what you need to know to become vaguely competant at layouts in the framework. The underlying result of "the way things are" is that most of us reach for panelStretchLayout before even finishing the first sip of coffee as we embark on a new page design. In fact most pages you will see in any moderately complex ADF page will basically be nested panelStretchLayouts and panelGroupLayouts, sometimes many, many levels deep. So this is a problem, we've known this for some time and now we have a good solution. (I should point out that the oft-used Trinidad trh tags are not a particularly good solution as you're tie-ing yourself to an HTML table based layout in that case with a host of attendent issues in resize and bi-di behavior, but I digress.) So, tadaaa, I give to you panelGridLayout. PanelGrid, as the name suggests takes a grid like (dare I say slightly gridbag-like) approach to layout, dividing your layout into rows and colums with margins, sizing, stretch behaviour, colspans and rowspans all rolled in, all without the use of inlineStyle. As such, it provides for a much more powerful and consise way of defining a layout such as the one above that is actually simpler and much more logical to design. The basic building blocks are the panelGridLayout itself, gridRow and gridCell. Your content sits inside the cells inside the rows, all helpfully allowing both streching, valign and halign definitions without the need to nest further panelGroupLayouts. So much simpler!  If I break down the homework example above my nested comglomorate of 12 containers and spacers can be condensed down into a single panelGrid with 3 rows and 5 cell definitions (39 lines of source reduced to 24 in the case of the sample). What's more, the actual runtime representation in the browser DOM is much, much simpler, and clean, with basically one DIV per cell (Note that just because the panelGridLayout semantics looks like an HTML table does not mean that it's rendered that way!) . Another hidden benefit is the runtime cost. Because we can use a single layout to achieve much more complex geometries the client side layout code inside the browser is having to work a lot less. This will be a real benefit if your application needs to run on lower powered clients such as netbooks or tablets. So, it's time, if you're on 11.1.2.2 or above, to smile warmly at your panelStretchLayouts, wrap the blanket around it's knees and wheel it off to the Sunset Retirement Home for a well deserved rest. There's a new kid on the block and it wants to be your friend. 

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  • Centered Content using panelGridLayout

    - by Duncan Mills
    A classic layout conundrum,  which I think pretty much every ADF developer may have faced at some time or other, is that of truly centered (centred) layout. Typically this requirement comes up in relation to say displaying a login type screen or similar. Superficially the  problem seems easy, but as my buddy Eduardo explained when discussing this subject a couple of years ago it's actually a little more complex than you might have thought. If fact, even the "solution" provided in that posting is not perfect and suffers from a several issues (not Eduardo's fault, just limitations of panelStretch!) The top, bottom, end and start facets all need something in them The percentages you apply to the topHeight, startWidth etc. are calculated as part of the whole width.  This means that you have to guestimate the correct percentage based on your typical screen size and the sizing of the centered content. So, at best, you will in fact only get approximate centering, and the more you tune that centering for a particular browser size the more it will fail if the user resizes. You can't attach styles to the panelStretchLayout facets so to provide things like background color or fixed sizing you need to embed another container that you can apply styles to, typically a panelgroupLayout   For reference here's the code to print a simple 100px x 100px red centered square  using the panelStretchLayout solution, approximately tuned to a 1980 x 1080 maximized browser (IDs omitted for brevity): <af:panelStretchLayout startWidth="45%" endWidth="45%"                        topHeight="45%"  bottomHeight="45%" >   <f:facet name="center">     <af:panelGroupLayout inlineStyle="height:100px;width:100px;background-color:red;"                          layout="vertical"/>   </f:facet>   <f:facet name="top">     <af:spacer height="1" width="1"/>   </f:facet>   <f:facet name="bottom">     <af:spacer height="1" width="1"/>   </f:facet>   <f:facet name="start">     <af:spacer height="1" width="1"/>   </f:facet>   <f:facet name="end">     <af:spacer height="1" width="1"/>    </f:facet> </af:panelStretchLayout>  And so to panelGridLayout  So here's the  good news, panelGridLayout makes this really easy and it works without the caveats above.  The key point is that percentages used in the grid definition are evaluated after the fixed sizes are taken into account, so rather than having to guestimate what percentage will "more, or less", center the content you can just say "allocate half of what's left" to the flexible content and you're done. Here's the same example using panelGridLayout: <af:panelGridLayout> <af:gridRow height="50%"/> <af:gridRow height="100px"> <af:gridCell width="50%" /> <af:gridCell width="100px" halign="stretch" valign="stretch"  inlineStyle="background-color:red;"> <af:spacer width="1" height="1"/> </af:gridCell> <af:gridCell width="50%" /> </af:gridRow> <af:gridRow height="50%"/> </af:panelGridLayout>  So you can see that the amount of markup is somewhat smaller (as is, I should mention, the generated DOM structure in the browser), mainly because we don't need to introduce artificial components to ensure that facets are actually observed in the final result.  But the key thing here is that the centering is no longer approximate and it will work as expected as the user resizes the browser screen.  By far this is a more satisfactory solution and although it's only a simple example, it will hopefully open your eyes to the potential of panelGridLayout as your number one, go-to layout container. Just a reminder though, right now, panelGridLayout is only available in 11.1.2.2 and above.

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