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  • New Sample Demonstrating the Traversing of Tree Bindings

    - by Duncan Mills
    A technique that I seem to use a fair amount, particularly in the construction of dynamic UIs is the use of a ADF Tree Binding to encode a multi-level master-detail relationship which is then expressed in the UI in some kind of looping form – usually a series of nested af:iterators, rather than the conventional tree or treetable. This technique exploits two features of the treebinding. First the fact that an treebinding can return both a collectionModel as well as a treeModel, this collectionModel can be used directly by an iterator. Secondly that the “rows” returned by the collectionModel themselves contain an attribute called .children. This attribute in turn gives access to a collection of all the children of that node which can also be iterated over. Putting this together you can represent the data encoded into a tree binding in all sorts of ways. As an example I’ve put together a very simple sample based on the HT schema and uploaded it to the ADF Sample project. It produces this UI: The important code is shown here for a Region -> Country -> Location Hierachy: <af:iterator id="i1" value="#{bindings.AllRegions.collectionModel}" var="rgn"> <af:showDetailHeader text="#{rgn.RegionName}" disclosed="true" id="sdh1"> <af:iterator id="i2" value="#{rgn.children}" var="cnty">     <af:showDetailHeader text="#{cnty.CountryName}" disclosed="true" id="sdh2">       <af:iterator id="i3" value="#{cnty.children}" var="loc">         <af:panelList id="pl1">         <af:outputText value="#{loc.City}" id="ot3"/>           </af:panelList>         </af:iterator>       </af:showDetailHeader>     </af:iterator>   </af:showDetailHeader> </af:iterator>  You can download the entire sample from here:

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  • Controlling the Sizing of the af:messages Dialog

    - by Duncan Mills
    Over the last day or so a small change in behaviour between 11.1.2.n releases of ADF and earlier versions has come to my attention. This has concerned the default sizing of the dialog that the framework automatically generates to handle the display of JSF messages being handled by the <af:messages> component. Unlike a normal popup, you don't have a physical <af:dialog> or <af:window> to set the sizing on in your page definition, so you're at the mercy of what the framework provides. In this case the framework now defines a fixed 250x250 pixel content area dialog for these messages, which can look a bit weird if the message is either very short, or very long. Unfortunately this is not something that you can control through the skin, instead you have to be a little more creative. Here's the solution I've come up with.  Unfortunately, I've not found a supportable way to reset the dialog so as to say  just size yourself based on your contents, it is actually possible to do this by tweaking the correct DOM objects, but I wanted to start with a mostly supportable solution that only uses the best practice of working through the ADF client side APIs. The Technique The basic approach I've taken is really very simple.  The af:messages dialog is just a normal richDialog object, it just happens to be one that is pre-defined for you with a particular known name "msgDlg" (which hopefully won't change). Knowing this, you can call the accepted APIs to control the content width and height of that dialog, as our meerkat friends would say, "simples" 1 The JavaScript For this example I've defined three JavaScript functions.   The first does all the hard work and is designed to be called from server side Java or from a page load event to set the default. The second is a utility function used by the first to validate the values you're about to use for height and width. The final function is one that can be called from the page load event to set an initial default sizing if that's all you need to do. Function resizeDefaultMessageDialog() /**  * Function that actually resets the default message dialog sizing.  * Note that the width and height supplied define the content area  * So the actual physical dialog size will be larger to account for  * the chrome containing the header / footer etc.  * @param docId Faces component id of the document  * @param contentWidth - new content width you need  * @param contentHeight - new content height  */ function resizeDefaultMessageDialog(docId, contentWidth, contentHeight) {   // Warning this value may change from release to release   var defMDName = "::msgDlg";   //Find the default messages dialog   msgDialogComponent = AdfPage.PAGE.findComponentByAbsoluteId(docId + defMDName); // In your version add a check here to ensure we've found the right object!   // Check the new width is supplied and is a positive number, if so apply it.   if (dimensionIsValid(contentWidth)){       msgDialogComponent.setContentWidth(contentWidth);   }   // Check the new height is supplied and is a positive number, if so apply it.   if (dimensionIsValid(contentHeight)){       msgDialogComponent.setContentHeight(contentHeight);   } }  Function dimensionIsValid()  /**  * Simple function to check that sensible numeric values are   * being proposed for a dimension  * @param sampleDimension   * @return booolean  */ function dimensionIsValid(sampleDimension){     return (!isNaN(sampleDimension) && sampleDimension > 0); } Function  initializeDefaultMessageDialogSize() /**  * This function will re-define the default sizing applied by the framework   * in 11.1.2.n versions  * It is designed to be called with the document onLoad event  */ function initializeDefaultMessageDialogSize(loadEvent){   //get the configuration information   var documentId = loadEvent.getSource().getProperty('documentId');   var newWidth = loadEvent.getSource().getProperty('defaultMessageDialogContentWidth');   var newHeight = loadEvent.getSource().getProperty('defaultMessageDialogContentHeight');   resizeDefaultMessageDialog(documentId, newWidth, newHeight); } Wiring in the Functions As usual, the first thing we need to do when using JavaScript with ADF is to define an af:resource  in the document metaContainer facet <af:document>   ....     <f:facet name="metaContainer">     <af:resource type="javascript" source="/resources/js/hackMessagedDialog.js"/>    </f:facet> </af:document> This makes the script functions available to call.  Next if you want to use the option of defining an initial default size for the dialog you use a combination of <af:clientListener> and <af:clientAttribute> tags like this. <af:document title="MyApp" id="doc1">   <af:clientListener method="initializeDefaultMessageDialogSize" type="load"/>   <af:clientAttribute name="documentId" value="doc1"/>   <af:clientAttribute name="defaultMessageDialogContentWidth" value="400"/>   <af:clientAttribute name="defaultMessageDialogContentHeight" value="150"/>  ...   Just in Time Dialog Sizing  So  what happens if you have a variety of messages that you might add and in some cases you need a small dialog and an other cases a large one? Well in that case you can re-size these dialogs just before you submit the message. Here's some example Java code: FacesContext ctx = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance();          //reset the default dialog size for this message ExtendedRenderKitService service =              Service.getRenderKitService(ctx, ExtendedRenderKitService.class); service.addScript(ctx, "resizeDefaultMessageDialog('doc1',100,50);");          FacesMessage msg = new FacesMessage("Short message"); msg.setSeverity(FacesMessage.SEVERITY_ERROR); ctx.addMessage(null, msg);  So there you have it. This technique should, at least, allow you to control the dialog sizing just enough to stop really objectionable whitespace or scrollbars. 1 Don't worry if you don't get the reference, lest's just say my kids watch too many adverts.

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  • Application Scope v's Static - Not Quite the same

    - by Duncan Mills
    An interesting question came up today which, innocent as it sounded, needed a second or two to consider. What's the difference between storing say a Map of reference information as a Static as opposed to storing the same map as an application scoped variable in JSF?  From the perspective of the web application itself there seems to be no functional difference, in both cases, the information is confined to the current JVM and potentially visible to your app code (note that Application Scope is not magically propagated across a cluster, you would need a separate instance on each VM). To my mind the primary consideration here is a matter of leakage. A static will be (potentially) visible to everything running within the same VM (OK this depends on which class-loader was used but let's keep this simple), and this includes your model code and indeed other web applications running in the same container. An Application Scoped object, in JSF terms, is much more ring-fenced and is only visible to the Web app itself, not other web apps running on the same server and not directly to the business model layer if that is running in the same VM. So given that I'm a big fan of coding applications to say what I mean, then using Application Scope appeals because it explicitly states how I expect the data to be used and a provides a more explicit statement about visibility and indeed dependency as I'd generally explicitly inject it where it is needed.  Alternative viewpoints / thoughts are, as ever, welcomed...

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  • Towards Ultra-Reusability for ADF - Adaptive Bindings

    - by Duncan Mills
    The task flow mechanism embodies one of the key value propositions of the ADF Framework, it's primary contribution being the componentization of your applications and implicitly the introduction of a re-use culture, particularly in large applications. However, what if we could do more? How could we make task flows even more re-usable than they are today? Well one great technique is to take advantage of a feature that is already present in the framework, a feature which I will call, for want of a better name, "adaptive bindings". What's an adaptive binding? well consider a simple use case.  I have several screens within my application which display tabular data which are all essentially identical, the only difference is that they happen to be based on different data collections (View Objects, Bean collections, whatever) , and have a different set of columns. Apart from that, however, they happen to be identical; same toolbar, same key functions and so on. So wouldn't it be nice if I could have a single parametrized task flow to represent that type of UI and reuse it? Hold on you say, great idea, however, to do that we'd run into problems. Each different collection that I want to display needs different entries in the pageDef file and: I want to continue to use the ADF Bindings mechanism rather than dropping back to passing the whole collection into the taskflow   If I do use bindings, there is no way I want to have to declare iterators and tree bindings for every possible collection that I might want the flow to handle  Ah, joy! I reply, no need to panic, you can just use adaptive bindings. Defining an Adaptive Binding  It's easiest to explain with a simple before and after use case.  Here's a basic pageDef definition for our familiar Departments table.  <executables> <iterator Binds="DepartmentsView1" DataControl="HRAppModuleDataControl" RangeSize="25"             id="DepartmentsView1Iterator"/> </executables> <bindings> <tree IterBinding="DepartmentsView1Iterator" id="DepartmentsView1">   <nodeDefinition DefName="oracle.demo.model.vo.DepartmentsView" Name="DepartmentsView10">     <AttrNames>       <Item Value="DepartmentId"/>         <Item Value="DepartmentName"/>         <Item Value="ManagerId"/>         <Item Value="LocationId"/>       </AttrNames>     </nodeDefinition> </tree> </bindings>  Here's the adaptive version: <executables> <iterator Binds="${pageFlowScope.voName}" DataControl="HRAppModuleDataControl" RangeSize="25"             id="TableSourceIterator"/> </executables> <bindings> <tree IterBinding="TableSourceIterator" id="GenericView"> <nodeDefinition Name="GenericViewNode"/> </tree> </bindings>  You'll notice three changes here.   Most importantly, you'll see that the hard-coded View Object name  that formally populated the iterator Binds attribute is gone and has been replaced by an expression (${pageFlowScope.voName}). This of course, is key, you can see that we can pass a parameter to the task flow, telling it exactly what VO to instantiate to populate this table! I've changed the IDs of the iterator and the tree binding, simply to reflect that they are now re-usable The tree binding itself has simplified and the node definition is now empty.  Now what this effectively means is that the #{node} map exposed through the tree binding will expose every attribute of the underlying iterator's collection - neat! (kudos to Eugene Fedorenko at this point who reminded me that this was even possible in his excellent "deep dive" session at OpenWorld  this year) Using the adaptive binding in the UI Now we have a parametrized  binding we have to make changes in the UI as well, first of all to reflect the new ID that we've assigned to the binding (of course) but also to change the column list from being a fixed known list to being a generic metadata driven set: <af:table value="#{bindings.GenericView.collectionModel}" rows="#{bindings.GenericView.rangeSize}"         fetchSize="#{bindings.GenericView.rangeSize}"           emptyText="#{bindings.GenericView.viewable ? 'No data to display.' : 'Access Denied.'}"           var="row" rowBandingInterval="0"           selectedRowKeys="#{bindings.GenericView.collectionModel.selectedRow}"           selectionListener="#{bindings.GenericView.collectionModel.makeCurrent}"           rowSelection="single" id="t1"> <af:forEach items="#{bindings.GenericView.attributeDefs}" var="def">   <af:column headerText="#{bindings.GenericView.labels[def.name]}" sortable="true"            sortProperty="#{def.name}" id="c1">     <af:outputText value="#{row[def.name]}" id="ot1"/>     </af:column>   </af:forEach> </af:table> Of course you are not constrained to a simple read only table here.  It's a normal tree binding and iterator that you are using behind the scenes so you can do all the usual things, but you can see the value of using ADFBC as the back end model as you have the rich pantheon of UI hints to use to derive things like labels (and validators and converters...)  One Final Twist  To finish on a high note I wanted to point out that you can take this even further and achieve the ultra-reusability I promised. Here's the new version of the pageDef iterator, see if you can notice the subtle change? <iterator Binds="{pageFlowScope.voName}"  DataControl="${pageFlowScope.dataControlName}" RangeSize="25"           id="TableSourceIterator"/>  Yes, as well as parametrizing the collection (VO) name, we can also parametrize the name of the data control. So your task flow can graduate from being re-usable within an application to being truly generic. So if you have some really common patterns within your app you can wrap them up and reuse then across multiple developments without having to dictate data control names, or connection names. This also demonstrates the importance of interacting with data only via the binding layer APIs. If you keep any code in the task flow generic in that way you can deal with data from multiple types of data controls, not just one flavour. Enjoy!

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  • Why Are We Here?

    - by Jonathan Mills
    Back in the early 2000s, Toyota had a vision of building the number one best selling minivan in North America. Their current minivan, the Sienna, was small, underpowered, and badly needed help.  Yuji Yokoya was given the job of re-engineering the Sienna. There was just one problem, Yuji, lived in Japan. He did not know the people or places that he would be engineering for. Believe it or not, Japan is nothing like North America. So, what does a chief engineer do in a situation like that? He packed up his team and flew halfway around the world. He made a commitment to drive through every state in the US, every province in Canada, and Mexico. He met the people and drove the roads that the Sienna would be driving. And guess what, what he learned on that trip revolutionized the Sienna. The innovations he made, sent the Sienna to number one. Why? Because he knew who he was building his product for. He knew, why he was there.Let me ask you this, do you know why you are building what you are building? As a member of a product team, can you tell me how your product will be used in the real world? As you are writing code, building test plans, writing stories, or any of the other project tasks, can you picture the face of a person who will be using what you are building? All to often, the answer to those questions is, no. Why is it important? Because, every day, project team members make assumptions. Over a given project, it is safe to say project team members will make thousands of assumptions about what they are doing. And all to often, those assumptions are not quite right. Its not that they are not good at their job, its just that they don’t really know why they are there.So, what to do? First and foremost, stop doing what you are doing. Yes, really. Schedule some time to go visit the people who will be using your product. Don’t invite them to you, go to them. Watch them work. Interact with them. Ask them questions. Maybe even try it out yourself. This serves two purposes. One, It shows them that you care about them. They will be far more engaged in your project if they feel like you care. And nothing says you care more that spending some time. Second, if gives you the proper frame of reference for you work. It gives you something tangible to go back to as you are building your product. As you make the thousands of assumptions that you will make over the life of your project, it gives you something to see in your mind that makes it real to you.Ultimately, setting a proper frame of reference is critical to the overall success of a project. The funny thing is, it really does not even take that long. In most cases, a 2-3 hour session will give you most of what you need to get the right insight. For the project, it will be the best 2 hours you could spend.

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  • ADF - Now with Robots!

    - by Duncan Mills
    I mentioned this briefly in a tweet the other day, just before the full rush of OOW really kicked off, so I though it was worth re-visiting. Check out this video, and then read on: So why so interesting? Well - you probably guessed from the title, ADF is involved. Indeed this is as about as far from the traditional ADF data entry application as you can get. Instead of a database at the back-end there's basically a robot. That's right, this remarkable tape drive is controlled through an ADF using all your usual friends of ADF Faces, Controller and Binding (but no ADFBC for obvious reasons). ADF is used both on the touch screen you see on the front of the device in the video, and also for the remote management console which provides a visual representation of the slots and drives. The latter uses ADF's Active Data Framework to provide a real-time view of what's going on the rack. . What's even more interesting (for the techno-geeks) is the fact that all of this is running out of flash storage on a ridiculously small form factor with tiny processor - I probably shouldn't reveal the actual specs but take my word for it, don't complain about the capabilities of your laptop ever again! This is a project that I've been personally involved in and I'm pumped to see such a good result and,  I have to say, those hardware guys are great to work with (and have way better toys on their desks than we do). More info in the SL150 (should you feel the urge to own one) is here. 

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  • Can I use Ubuntu One Icons for 3rd party thingy?

    - by Joseph Mills
    So I am wondering what the guide lines are for using Ubuntu One icons as I have heard from a number of people that Ubuntu One has some propitiatory things to it. So I am not sure if I am to use there logo in something like this http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~josephjamesmills/ubuntutv/fan_art/download/josephjamesmills%40gmail.com-20120728145710-sy00cvq1ja8o9qad/ubuntuoneactive.png-20120728145613-jtjdupswpqiocpb2-266/ubuntuone-active.png If That is OK ? I know that this might be a silly question but I do not want to get myself in trouble.Thanks so much for reading this and helping me with a project that helps others ;)

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  • Selective Suppression of Log Messages

    - by Duncan Mills
    Those of you who regularly read this blog will probably have noticed that I have a strange predilection for logging related topics, so why break this habit I ask?  Anyway here's an issue which came up recently that I thought was a good one to mention in a brief post.  The scenario really applies to production applications where you are seeing entries in the log files which are harmless, you know why they are there and are happy to ignore them, but at the same time you either can't or don't want to risk changing the deployed code to "fix" it to remove the underlying cause. (I'm not judging here). The good news is that the logging mechanism provides a filtering capability which can be applied to a particular logger to selectively "let a message through" or suppress it. This is the technique outlined below. First Create Your Filter  You create a logging filter by implementing the java.util.logging.Filter interface. This is a very simple interface and basically defines one method isLoggable() which simply has to return a boolean value. A return of false will suppress that particular log message and not pass it onto the handler. The method is passed the log record of type java.util.logging.LogRecord which provides you with access to everything you need to decide if you want to let this log message pass through or not, for example  getLoggerName(), getMessage() and so on. So an example implementation might look like this if we wanted to filter out all the log messages that start with the string "DEBUG" when the logging level is not set to FINEST:  public class MyLoggingFilter implements Filter {     public boolean isLoggable(LogRecord record) {         if ( !record.getLevel().equals(Level.FINEST) && record.getMessage().startsWith("DEBUG")){          return false;            }         return true;     } } Deploying   This code needs to be put into a JAR and added to your WebLogic classpath.  It's too late to load it as part of an application, so instead you need to put the JAR file into the WebLogic classpath using a mechanism such as the PRE_CLASSPATH setting in your domain setDomainEnv script. Then restart WLS of course. Using The final piece if to actually assign the filter.  The simplest way to do this is to add the filter attribute to the logger definition in the logging.xml file. For example, you may choose to define a logger for a specific class that is raising these messages and only apply the filter in that case.  <logger name="some.vendor.adf.ClassICantChange"         filter="oracle.demo.MyLoggingFilter"/> You can also apply the filter using WLST if you want a more script-y solution.

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  • ADF Logging In Deployed Apps

    - by Duncan Mills
    Harking back to my series on using the ADF logger and the related  ADF Insider Video, I've had a couple of queries this week about using the logger from Enterprise Manager (EM). I've alluded in those previous materials to how EM can be used but it's evident that folks need a little help.  So in this article, I'll quickly look at how you can switch logging on from the EM console for an application and how you can view the output.  Before we start I'm assuming that you have EM up and running, in my case I have a small test install of Fusion Middleware Patchset 5 with an ADF application deployed to a managed server. Step 1 - Select your Application In the EM navigator select the app you're interested in: At this point you can actually bring up the context ( right mouse click) menu to jump to the logging, but let's do it another way.  Step 2 - Open the Application Deployment Menu At the top of the screen, underneath the application name, you'll find a drop down menu which will take you to the options to view log messages and configure logging, thus: Step 3 - Set your Logging Levels  Just like the log configuration within JDeveloper, we can set up transient or permanent (not recommended!) loggers here. In this case I've filtered the class list down to just oracle.demo, and set the log level to config. You can now go away and do stuff in the app to generate log entries. Step 4 - View the Output  Again from the Application Deployment menu we can jump to the log viewer screen and, as I have here, start to filter down the logging output to the stuff you're interested in.  In this case I've filtered by module name. You'll notice here that you can again look at related log messages. Importantly, you'll also see the name of the log file that holds this message, so it you'd rather analyse the log in more detail offline, through the ODL log analyser in JDeveloper, then you can see which log to download.

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  • Adaptive Connections For ADFBC

    - by Duncan Mills
    Some time ago I wrote an article on Adaptive Bindings showing how the pageDef for a an ADF UI does not have to be wedded to a fixed data control or collection / View Object. This article has proved pretty popular, so as a follow up I wanted to cover another "Adaptive" feature of your ADF applications, the ability to make multiple different connections from an Application Module, at runtime. Now, I'm sure you'll be aware that if you define your application to use a data-source rather than a hard-coded JDBC connection string, then you have the ability to change the target of that data-source after deployment to point to a different database. So that's great, but the reality of that is that this single connection is effectively fixed within the application right?  Well no, this it turns out is a common misconception. To be clear, yes a single instance of an ADF Application Module is associated with a single connection but there is nothing to stop you from creating multiple instances of the same Application Module within the application, all pointing at different connections.  If fact this has been possible for a long time using a custom extension point with code that which extends oracle.jbo.http.HttpSessionCookieFactory. This approach, however, involves writing code and no-one likes to write any more code than they need to, so, is there an easier way? Yes indeed.  It is in fact  a little publicized feature that's available in all versions of 11g, the ELEnvInfoProvider. What Does it Do?  The ELEnvInfoProvider  is  a pre-existing class (the full path is  oracle.jbo.client.ELEnvInfoProvider) which you can plug into your ApplicationModule configuration using the jbo.envinfoprovider property. Visuallty you can set this in the editor, or you can also set it directly in the bc4j.xcfg (see below for an example) . Once you have plugged in this envinfoprovider, here's the fun bit, rather than defining the hard-coded name of a datasource instead you can plug in a EL expression for the connection to use.  So what's the benefit of that? Well it allows you to defer the selection of a connection until the point in time that you instantiate the AM. To define the expression itself you'll need to do a couple of things: First of all you'll need a managed bean of some sort – e.g. a sessionScoped bean defined in your ViewController project. This will need a getter method that returns the name of the connection. Now this connection itself needs to be defined in your Application Server, and can be managed through Enterprise Manager, WLST or through MBeans. (You may need to read the documentation [http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E28280_01/web.1111/b31974/deployment_topics.htm#CHDJGBDD] here on how to configure connections at runtime if you're not familiar with this)   The EL expression (e.g. ${connectionManager.connection} is then defined in the configuration by editing the bc4j.xcfg file (there is a hyperlink directly to this file on the configuration editing screen in the Application Module editor). You simply replace the hardcoded JDBCName value with the expression.  So your cfg file would end up looking something like this (notice the reference to the ELEnvInfoProvider that I talked about earlier) <BC4JConfig version="11.1" xmlns="http://xmlns.oracle.com/bc4j/configuration">   <AppModuleConfigBag ApplicationName="oracle.demo.model.TargetAppModule">   <AppModuleConfig DeployPlatform="LOCAL"  JDBCName="${connectionManager.connection}" jbo.project="oracle.demo.model.Model" name="TargetAppModuleLocal" ApplicationName="oracle.demo.model.TargetAppModule"> <AM-Pooling jbo.doconnectionpooling="true"/> <Database jbo.locking.mode="optimistic">       <Security AppModuleJndiName="oracle.demo.model.TargetAppModule"/>    <Custom jbo.envinfoprovider="oracle.jbo.client.ELEnvInfoProvider"/> </AppModuleConfig> </AppModuleConfigBag> </BC4JConfig> Still Don't Quite Get It? So far you might be thinking, well that's fine but what difference does it make if the connection is resolved "just in time" rather than up front and changed as required through Enterprise Manager? Well a trivial example would be where you have a single application deployed to your application server, but for different users you want to connect to different databases. Because, the evaluation of the connection is deferred until you first reference the AM you have a decision point that can take the user identity into account. However, think about it for a second.  Under what circumstances does a new AM get instantiated? Well at the first reference of the AM within the application yes, but also whenever a Task Flow is entered -  if the data control scope for the Task Flow is ISOLATED.  So the reality is, that on a single screen you can embed multiple Task Flows, all of which are pointing at different database connections concurrently. Hopefully you'll find this feature useful, let me know... 

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  • Learn How to Deliver a Superior Customer Experience

    - by steve.diamond
    That's right. Irene Ng, internationally acclaimed Oracle Web TV superstar, is hitting the Web airwaves again with a highly informative webcast! Tune in to hear Irene interview Steve Fearon, Oracle Vice President of CRM, Europe, Middle East and Africa, and explore how traditional CRM is converging with social networking and mobile technologies to deliver superior customer experiences that drive increased revenue and customer advocacy. And for you folks on the U.S. West Coast who REALLY like to get a jump on your day, we've got even better news. This Web TV event is taking place on June 17th at 2:00 a.m. Pacific time. But remember that for our friends in Central Europe, that is 11:00 a.m. CET. But we'll all be able to view a replay of this Webcast for those of us not awake for the original airing. So sign up now.

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  • Sharepoint 2010, People Picker (peoplepicker-searchadforests), 1 way Active Directory trust .... process monitor to the rescue!

    - by steve schofield
    If you run Sharepoint 2010 in one forest, users in another forest and a 1-way forest in-place.  There is some additional configuration needed in Sharepoint 2010.  I included links below that discuss the details.  My post is not to be in-depth how to setup, rather share a tidbit not discussed in documentation (not that I could find).  Thanks to a smart co-worker and process monitor, it was found there is a registry entry, the application pool needs READ access.  You can either manually grant permissions on the server or add registry permission in AD Group Policy.  Hope this helps. People Picker overview (SharePoint Server 2010)http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg602068.aspx Configure People Picker (SharePoint Server 2010)http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg602075(d=lightweight).aspx Peoplepicker-searchadforests: Stsadm property (Office SharePoint Server)http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc263460.aspx Application Pool needs read accessMACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Shared Tools\Web Server Extensions\14.0\Secure Multi Forest/Cross Forest People Pickerhttp://blogs.msdn.com/b/joelo/archive/2007/01/18/multi-forest-cross-forest-people-picker-peoplepicker-searchadcustomquery.aspx Process Monitorhttp://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896645.aspx Steve SchofieldMicrosoft MVP - IIS

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  • Is there a language where collections can be used as objects without altering the behavior?

    - by Dokkat
    Is there a language where collections can be used as objects without altering the behavior? As an example, first, imagine those functions work: function capitalize(str) //suppose this *modifies* a string object capitalizing it function greet(person): print("Hello, " + person) capitalize("pedro") >> "Pedro" greet("Pedro") >> "Hello, Pedro" Now, suppose we define a standard collection with some strings: people = ["ed","steve","john"] Then, this will call toUpper() on each object on that list people.toUpper() >> ["Ed","Steve","John"] And this will call greet once for EACH people on the list, instead of sending the list as argument greet(people) >> "Hello, Ed" >> "Hello, Steve" >> "Hello, John"

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  • How To: Spell Check InfoPath web form in SharePoint

    - by JeremyRamos
    This post is a compiled version of Steve Cavanagh's blog post on How To: Spell Check an InfoPath form displayed via XmlFormView. Many are not able to follow Steve's instructions due to lack of details. See below a downloadable zip of all changes need installed for your InfoPath Spell Checker. File Contents: CustomSpellCheckEntirePage.js - This is a customized SpellCheckEntirePage.js which includes changes outlined in Steve's post above.   FormServer.aspx - Note that this will replace the exisitng FormServer.aspx - this file acts like a masterpage for all infopath forms. So this change will add the spellchecker to all infopath forms in the sharepoint farm. Only thing i changed here is to add the 'Spell Check' link before and after the form.   ReadMe.rtf - Contains instructions where to copy the files to in your MOSS WFE server.

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  • VBUG Spring Conference, 28th and 29th March in Reading

    - by Eric Nelson
    I presented at VBUG last year and can confirm that they put on a really good event. This year I stood aside for my “replacement” Steve Plank to work his magic. Worth checking out… VBUG SPRING CONFERENCE 28/29 March 2011 Wokefield Park, Mortimer, Reading RG7 3AH Day One (Mon 28 March): Developing SharePoint 2010 with Visual Studio 2010 - Dave McMahon Cache Out with Windows Server AppFabric – Phil Pursglove Extending your Corporate Network in to the Windows Azure Data Centre with Windows Azure Connect – Steve Plank Silverlight Development on Windows Phone 7 - Andy Wigley Day Two (Tues 29 March): Self Service BI for your users, but what does that mean for you? - Andrew Fryer Design Patterns – Compare and Contrast – Gary Short Projecting your corporate identity to the cloud – Steve Plank May the Silverlight 4 be with you – Richard Costall The Step up to ALM – an Introduction to Visual Studio 2010 TFS for the Visual Sourcesafe User - Richard Fennell For more information go to http://cms.vbug.net (It isn’t free but it is high quality)

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  • Udacity: Teaching thousands of students to program online using App Engine

    Udacity: Teaching thousands of students to program online using App Engine Join Fred Sauer & Iein Valdez as they talk with Steve Huffman, founder of Reddit and Hipmunk, and Chris Chew, senior software engineer at Udacity. Steve will share his experience teaching a course on web development using App Engine at Udacity, and Chris will talk about his experience building Udacity itself using App Engine. Submit your questions for Steve and Chris to answer live on air. From: GoogleDevelopers Views: 0 0 ratings Time: 00:00 More in Science & Technology

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  • www.IISJobs.com has been launched.

    - by steve schofield
    Looking for a job related to Microsoft (Internet Information Server)? Or do you have a job opening which requires IIS experience.  Look no further, subscribe to the discussion forum today at http://www.iisjobs.com and be notified as soon as a job is posted or someone responds. Why start IISJobs.com?  I'm not looking to replace Monster, Careers.com.  I've seen in various places where jobs involving Microsoft IIS (Internet Information Server) have been posted.   I thought it would be a good idea to centralize under a easy to remember domain name. :)   My goal is to help the IIS community. Cheers, Steve SchofieldWindows Server MVP - IIShttp://weblogs.asp.net/steveschofield http://www.IISLogs.comLog archival solutionInstall, Configure, Forget

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  • Contract-Popup at Login

    - by Steve
    I want to give my notebook to guests of my little Hotel as an extra service. I love the Ubuntu guest-account and I think that this is the best possible way to help my guests get free internet-access. I found out how to "design" their user-accounts with /etc/skel, but unfortunately I have no clue, how to show them a small introduction to the system and a kind of user-agreement "contract" when they login. I read of xmessage, but this is too minimalistic. I'd like to implement some pictures. Does anyone have any idea of how to make this possible? Would it be possible that the user is logged out automatically if he rejects the user-agreement? Thank you so much in advance, Steve.

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  • [Android] Launching activity from widget

    - by Steve H
    Hi, I'm trying to do something which really ought to be quite easy, but it's driving me crazy. I'm trying to launch an activity when a home screen widget is pressed, such as a configuration activity for the widget. I think I've followed word for word the tutorial on the Android Developers website, and even a few unofficial tutorials as well, but I must be missing something important as it doesn't work. Here is the code: public class VolumeChangerWidget extends AppWidgetProvider { public void onUpdate(Context context, AppWidgetManager appWidgetManager, int[] appWidgetIds){ final int N = appWidgetIds.length; for (int i=0; i < N; i++) { int appWidgetId = appWidgetIds[i]; Log.d("Steve", "Running for appWidgetId " + appWidgetId); Toast.makeText(context, "Hello from onUpdate", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT); Log.d("Steve", "After the toast line"); Intent intent = new Intent(context, WidgetTest.class); PendingIntent pendingIntent = PendingIntent.getActivity(context, 0, intent, 0); RemoteViews views = new RemoteViews(context.getPackageName(), R.layout.widget); views.setOnClickPendingIntent(R.id.button, pendingIntent); appWidgetManager.updateAppWidget(appWidgetId, views); } } } When adding the widget to the homescreen, Logcat shows the two debugging lines, though not the Toast. (Any ideas why not?) However, more vexing is that when I then click on the button with the PendingIntent associated with it, nothing happens at all. I know the "WidgetTest" activity can run because if I set up an Intent from within the main activity, it launches fine. In case it matters, here is the Android Manifest file: <manifest xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" package="com.steve" android:versionCode="1" android:versionName="1.0"> <application android:icon="@drawable/icon" android:label="@string/app_name"> <activity android:name=".Volume_Change_Program" android:label="@string/app_name"> <intent-filter> <action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" /> <category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER" /> </intent-filter> </activity> <activity android:name=".WidgetTest" android:label="@string/hello"> <intent_filter> <action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN"/> <category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER"/> </intent_filter> </activity> <receiver android:name=".VolumeChangerWidget" > <intent-filter> <action android:name="android.appwidget.action.APPWIDGET_UPDATE" /> </intent-filter> <meta-data android:name="android.appwidget.provider" android:resource="@xml/volume_changer_info" /> </receiver> </application> <uses-sdk android:minSdkVersion="3" /> Is there a way to test where the fault is? I.e. is the fault that the button isn't linked properly to the PendingIntent, or that the PendingIntent or Intent isn't finding WidgetTest.class, etc? Thanks very much for your help! Steve

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  • JFall 2012

    - by Geertjan
    JFall 2012 was over far too soon! Seven tracks going on simultaneously in a great location, with many artifacts reminding me of JavaOne, and nice snacks and drinks afterwards. The day started, as such things always do, with a keynote. Thanks to @royvanrijn for the photo below, I didn't take any myself and without a picture this report might have been too dry: What you see above is Steve Chin riding into the keynote hall on his NightHacking bike. The keynote was interesting, I can't be too complimentary about it, since I was part of it myself. Bert Ertman introduced the day and then Steve Chin took over, together with Sharat Chander, Tom Eugelink, Timon Veenstra, and myself. We had a strict choreography for the keynote, one that would ensure a lot of variation and some unexpected surprises, such as Steve being thrown off the stage a few times by Bert because of mentioning JavaOne too many times, rather than the clearly much cooler JFall. Steve talked about JavaOne and the direction Java is headed in, Sharat talked about JavaME and embedded devices, Steve and Tom did a demo involving JavaFX, I did a Project Easel demo, and Timon from Ordina talked about his Duke's Choice Award winning AgroSense project. I think the Project Easel demo (which I repeated later in a screencast for Parleys arranged by Eugene Boogaart) came across well and several people I spoke to especially like the roundtrip/bi-directional work that can be done, from browser to IDE and back again, very simply and intuitively. (In a long conversation on the drive back home afterwards, the scenario of a designer laying out the UI in HTML and then handing the HTML to a developer for back-end work, a developer who would then find it convenient to open the HTML in a browser and quickly navigate from the browser to the resources within the IDE, was discussed and considered to be extremely interesting and worth considering adopting NetBeans for, for no other reason than that.) Later I attended a session by David Delabassee on Java EE 7, Hans Dockter on Gradle, and Sander Mak on cross-build injection attacks. I was sorry to have missed Martijn Verburg's session, which sounded like it was really fantastic, among others, such as Gerrit Grunwald. I did a session too, entitled "Unlocking the Java EE 6 Platform", which was very well attended, pretty much a full room, and the demo went very smoothly. I talked to many people, e.g., a long time with Hans Dockter about how cool Gradle is and how great the Gradle/NetBeans plugin is turning out to be. I also had a long conversation (and did a demo) with Chris Chedgey, from Structure101, after his session, which was incredibly well attended; very interesting how popular modularity is. I met several people for the first time, as well as some colleagues from past places I've worked at. All in all, it was a great conference, unfortunately too short, which was very well attended (clearly over 1000) people, with several international speakers, as well as international attendees such as Mattias Karlsson, Sweden JUG leader. And, unsurprisingly, I came across NetBeans Platform applications again, none of which I had ever heard of before. In each case, "our fat client application" was mentioned in passing, never as a main application, and never in a context where there are plans for the application to be migrated to the web or mobile, simply because doing so makes no business sense at all. Great times at JFall, looking forward to meeting with some of the people I met again soon.

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  • Ruby concatenate strings and add spaces

    - by David Oneill
    I have 4 string variables name, quest, favorite_color, speed that might be empty. I want to concatenate them all together, putting spaces between those that aren't empty. So: name = 'Tim' quest = 'destroy' favorite_color = 'red' speed = 'fast' becomes 'Tim destroy red fast' and name = 'Steve' quest = '' favorite_color = '' speed = 'slow' becomes: 'Steve slow' (Notice: there is only 1 space between 'Steve' and 'slow') How do I do that (preferably in 1 line).

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  • Kill a 10 minute old zombie process in linux bash script

    - by Steve
    I've been tinkering with a regex answer by yukondude with little success. I'm trying to kill processes that are older than 10 minutes. I already know what the process IDs are. I'm looping over an array every 10 min to see if any lingering procs are around and need to be killed. Anybody have any quick thoughts on this? Thanks, Steve ps -eo uid,pid,etime 3233332 | egrep ' ([0-9]+-)?([0-9]{2}:?){3}' | awk '{print $2}' | xargs -I{} kill {} I've been tinkering with the answer posted by yukondude with little success. I'm trying to kill processes that are older than 10 minutes. I already know what the process IDs are. I'm looping over an array every 10 min to see if any lingering procs are around and need to be killed. Anybody have any quick thoughts on this? Thanks, Steve

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  • Searches (and general querying) with HBase and/or Cassandra (best practices?)

    - by alexeypro
    I have User model object with quite few fields (properties, if you wish) in it. Say "firstname", "lastname", "city" and "year-of-birth". Each user also gets "unique id". I want to be able to search by them. How do I do that properly? How to do that at all? My understanding (will work for pretty much any key-value storage -- first goes key, then value) u:123456789 = serialized_json_object ("u" as a simple prefix for user's keys, 123456789 is "unique id"). Now, thinking that I want to be able to search by firstname and lastname, I can save in: f:Steve = u:384734807,u:2398248764,u:23276263 f:Alex = u:12324355,u:121324334 so key is "f" - which is prefix for firstnames, and "Steve" is actual firstname. For "u:Steve" we save as value all user id's who are "Steve's". That makes every search very-very easy. Querying by few fields (properties) -- say by firstname (i.e. "Steve") and lastname (i.e. "l:Anything") is still easy - first get list of user ids from "f:Steve", then list from "l:Anything", find crossing user ids, an here you go. Problems (and there are quite a few): Saving, updating, deleting user is a pain. It has to be atomic and consistent operation. Also, if we have size of value limited to some value - then we are in (potential) trouble. And really not of an answer here. Only zipping the list of user ids? Not too cool, though. What id we want to add new field to search by. Eventually. Say by "city". We certainly can do the same way "c:Los Angeles" = ..., "c:Chicago" = ..., but if we didn't foresee all those "search choices" from the very beginning, then we will have to be able to create some night job or something to go by all existing User records and update those "c:CITY" for them... Quite a big job! Problems with locking. User "u:123" updates his name "Alex", and user "u:456" updates his name "Alex". They both have to update "f:Alex" with their id's. That means either we get into overwriting problem, or one update will wait for another (and imaging if there are many of them?!). What's the best way of doing that? Keeping in mind that I want to search by many fields? P.S. Please, the question is about HBase/Cassandra/NoSQL/Key-Value storages. Please please - no advices to use MySQL and "read about" SELECTs; and worry about scaling problems "later". There is a reason why I asked MY question exactly the way I did. :-)

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  • IUSR account and SCCM 2007 R3 agent

    - by steve schofield
    I recently started working with SCCM and rolling the agent out with machine having IIS 7.x installed.  I ran into issues where the SCCM agent wouldn't install.  The errors mostly were 0x80004005 and 1603, another key one I found was Return Value 3 in the SCCM setup log.  During the troubleshooting, I found a cool utility called WMI Diag  WMI diag is a VBS script that reads the local WMI store and helps diagnose issue.  Anyone working with SMS or SCCM should keep this handy tool around.  The good thing my particular case WMI was healthy.  The issue turned out I changed the Anonymous Authentication module from using the IUSR account to inherit Application Pool identity.  Once we temporarily switched back to IUSR, installed the agent, then switched the setting back to inherit application pool identity, the SCCM agent installed with no issues. I'm not sure why switching back to the IUSR account solved my issue, if I find out I'll update the post.  More information on IIS 7 builtin accounts http://learn.iis.net/page.aspx/140/understanding-built-in-user-and-group-accounts-in-iis-7 Specify an application pool identity  http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc771170(WS.10).aspx SCCM resources (Config Mgr Setup  / Deployment forums) http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/configmgrsetup/threads http://www.myitforum.com (the best independent SCCM community resource) Hope this helps. Steve SchofieldMicrosoft MVP - IIS

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  • Webfarm and IIS configuration tips/tricks

    - by steve schofield
    I was recently talking with some good friends about tips for performance and what an IIS Administrator could do on the server side.  I also see this question from time to time in the forums @ http://forums.iis.net.    Of course, you should test individual settings in a controlled environment while performing load testing before just implementing on your production farm.  IIS Compression enabled (both static and dynamic if possible, set it to 9)  If you are running IIS 6, check this article out by Scott Forsyth. Run FRT for long running pages (Failed Request Tracing) Sql Connection pooling in code Look at using PAL with performance counters ( http://blogs.iis.net/ganekar/archive/2009/08/12/pal-performance-analyzer-with-iis.aspx )  Look at load testing using visual studio load testing tools Log parser finding long running pages.  Here is a couple examples Look at CPU, Memory and disk counters.  Make sure the server has enough resources. Same machineKey account across all same nodes Localize content vs. using UNC based content on a single server (My UNC tag with great posts) Content expiration ETAG’s the same across all web-farms Disable Scalable Networking Pack Use YSlow or Developer tools in Chrome to help measure the client experience improvements. Additionally, some basic counters in for measuring applications is: I would recommend checking out the Chapter 17 in IIS 7 Resource kit. it was one of the chapters I authored. :) Concurrent Connections,  Request Per / Sec, Request Queued.  I strongly suggest testing one change at a time to see how it helps improve your performance.  Hopefully this post provides a few options to review in your environment.   Cheers, Steve SchofieldMicrosoft MVP - IIS

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