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  • Differing packages between Ubuntu 9.04 and 9.10

    - by bergyman
    So I've been playing around with VirtualBox and both of the above Ubuntu versions and I've noticed that there are some differences between the available packages when doing a apt-cache search <package>. Some of these I'm sure are obvious, as they potentially only work on their respective systems. But I've noticed specifically several ruby packages differ. So my question is whether or not there's a way to get some of the ruby packages (ruby1.9.1-full for example) which only seem to be available on 9.10 (yup, I did a sudo apt-get update on both 9.10 and 9.04) on my 9.04 system? Is there a way I can just do a kernel upgrade on 9.04, or whatever else may be needed in order to get at these more recent packages?

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  • ubuntu 9.04 pptp broken after a power failure

    - by kevin42
    I have a small Ubuntu 9.04 router setup as a NAT box and a PPTP server. After a power failure everything except the PPTP server still works. A windows client gets to "registering your computer on the network" but then says Error 742: The remote computer does not support the required data encryption type. I did some research and I think the problem is with the ppp_mppe module. When I try to run 'modprobe ppp_mppe' it hangs indefinitely. What would cause this hang? Any ideas how I can troubleshoot this further? Thanks for the help! UPDATE: I am still having the problem, however I have found some more information. When the first user tries to connect to pptp, the process list shows modprobe sha1 running, and one instance of modprobe ppp_mppe for each connection attempt. If I killall modprobe at this point the next connection attempt works, and everything is fine until the next reboot. I'm planning to do a clean install at some point in the future but I'd really like to get to the real cause of this.

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  • Clone a Hard Drive Using an Ubuntu Live CD

    - by Trevor Bekolay
    Whether you’re setting up multiple computers or doing a full backup, cloning hard drives is a common maintenance task. Don’t bother burning a new boot CD or paying for new software – you can do it easily with your Ubuntu Live CD. Not only can you do this with your Ubuntu Live CD, you can do it right out of the box – no additional software needed! The program we’ll use is called dd, and it’s included with pretty much all Linux distributions. dd is a utility used to do low-level copying – rather than working with files, it works directly on the raw data on a storage device. Note: dd gets a bad rap, because like many other Linux utilities, if misused it can be very destructive. If you’re not sure what you’re doing, you can easily wipe out an entire hard drive, in an unrecoverable way. Of course, the flip side of that is that dd is extremely powerful, and can do very complex tasks with little user effort. If you’re careful, and follow these instructions closely, you can clone your hard drive with one command. We’re going to take a small hard drive that we’ve been using and copy it to a new hard drive, which hasn’t been formatted yet. To make sure that we’re working with the right drives, we’ll open up a terminal (Applications > Accessories > Terminal) and enter in the following command sudo fdisk –l We have two small drives, /dev/sda, which has two partitions, and /dev/sdc, which is completely unformatted. We want to copy the data from /dev/sda to /dev/sdc. Note: while you can copy a smaller drive to a larger one, you can’t copy a larger drive to a smaller one with the method described below. Now the fun part: using dd. The invocation we’ll use is: sudo dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/sdc In this case, we’re telling dd that the input file (“if”) is /dev/sda, and the output file (“of”) is /dev/sdc. If your drives are quite large, this can take some time, but in our case it took just less than a minute. If we do sudo fdisk –l again, we can see that, despite not formatting /dev/sdc at all, it now has the same partitions as /dev/sda.  Additionally, if we mount all of the partitions, we can see that all of the data on /dev/sdc is now the same as on /dev/sda. Note: you may have to restart your computer to be able to mount the newly cloned drive. And that’s it…If you exercise caution and make sure that you’re using the right drives as the input file and output file, dd isn’t anything to be scared of. Unlike other utilities, dd copies absolutely everything from one drive to another – that means that you can even recover files deleted from the original drive in the clone! Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Reset Your Ubuntu Password Easily from the Live CDHow to Browse Without a Trace with an Ubuntu Live CDRecover Deleted Files on an NTFS Hard Drive from a Ubuntu Live CDCreate a Bootable Ubuntu 9.10 USB Flash DriveWipe, Delete, and Securely Destroy Your Hard Drive’s Data the Easy Way TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips Xobni Plus for Outlook All My Movies 5.9 CloudBerry Online Backup 1.5 for Windows Home Server Snagit 10 Windows Media Player Glass Icons (icons we like) How to Forecast Weather, without Gadgets Outlook Tools, one stop tweaking for any Outlook version Zoofs, find the most popular tweeted YouTube videos Video preview of new Windows Live Essentials 21 Cursor Packs for XP, Vista & 7

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  • Installing Ubuntu One on Ubuntu 11.10 server

    - by Yaron
    I have installed "Ubuntu One" on an Ubuntu server 11.10 based on these instructions: How do I configure Ubuntu one on a 11.10 server? Everything went smooth during installation. However when I try the command: u1sdtool --start to get the server up, I get the following stack error: u1sdtool --start /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/gtk-2.0/gtk/init.py:57: GtkWarning: could not open display warnings.warn(str(e), _gtk.Warning) Unhandled Error Traceback (most recent call last): dbus.exceptions.DBusException: org.freedesktop.DBus.Error.NotSupported: Unable to autolaunch a dbus-daemon without a $DISPLAY for X11 Does anyone have a clue how to solve this issue?

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  • Can't boot Ubuntu 12.10 32 or 64 Bit, only Ubuntu 12.04 32 Bit [closed]

    - by Alexander
    Possible Duplicate: My computer boots to a black screen, what options do I have to fix it? i tried to install Ubuntu 12.04 64Bit, 12.10 32 and 64Bit, but it doesn't work. I'm used the Ubuntu 12.04 32Bit Start Disc Creator and also Unetboot on Win7, the installation-process are finished and i restart without the Stick. I can choose for example 12.10 and it starts writing "start ... [OK], ...", but then it hangs most on "Stop Kernel Messages [OK]". Then i can only shutdown normal the system and it writes stopping, shutdown and something like that. I am use an Aspire One D270 Netbook with Intel Atom N2600. It also doesn't work to try Ubuntu 12.10 from running on USB Stick. It starts, but then its black and the cursor blink on the left upside. Please can you help me? :(

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  • Recover Data Like a Forensics Expert Using an Ubuntu Live CD

    - by Trevor Bekolay
    There are lots of utilities to recover deleted files, but what if you can’t boot up your computer, or the whole drive has been formatted? We’ll show you some tools that will dig deep and recover the most elusive deleted files, or even whole hard drive partitions. We’ve shown you simple ways to recover accidentally deleted files, even a simple method that can be done from an Ubuntu Live CD, but for hard disks that have been heavily corrupted, those methods aren’t going to cut it. In this article, we’ll examine four tools that can recover data from the most messed up hard drives, regardless of whether they were formatted for a Windows, Linux, or Mac computer, or even if the partition table is wiped out entirely. Note: These tools cannot recover data that has been overwritten on a hard disk. Whether a deleted file has been overwritten depends on many factors – the quicker you realize that you want to recover a file, the more likely you will be able to do so. Our setup To show these tools, we’ve set up a small 1 GB hard drive, with half of the space partitioned as ext2, a file system used in Linux, and half the space partitioned as FAT32, a file system used in older Windows systems. We stored ten random pictures on each hard drive. We then wiped the partition table from the hard drive by deleting the partitions in GParted. Is our data lost forever? Installing the tools All of the tools we’re going to use are in Ubuntu’s universe repository. To enable the repository, open Synaptic Package Manager by clicking on System in the top-left, then Administration > Synaptic Package Manager. Click on Settings > Repositories and add a check in the box labelled “Community-maintained Open Source software (universe)”. Click Close, and then in the main Synaptic Package Manager window, click the Reload button. Once the package list has reloaded, and the search index rebuilt, search for and mark for installation one or all of the following packages: testdisk, foremost, and scalpel. Testdisk includes TestDisk, which can recover lost partitions and repair boot sectors, and PhotoRec, which can recover many different types of files from tons of different file systems. Foremost, originally developed by the US Air Force Office of Special Investigations, recovers files based on their headers and other internal structures. Foremost operates on hard drives or drive image files generated by various tools. Finally, scalpel performs the same functions as foremost, but is focused on enhanced performance and lower memory usage. Scalpel may run better if you have an older machine with less RAM. Recover hard drive partitions If you can’t mount your hard drive, then its partition table might be corrupted. Before you start trying to recover your important files, it may be possible to recover one or more partitions on your drive, recovering all of your files with one step. Testdisk is the tool for the job. Start it by opening a terminal (Applications > Accessories > Terminal) and typing in: sudo testdisk If you’d like, you can create a log file, though it won’t affect how much data you recover. Once you make your choice, you’re greeted with a list of the storage media on your machine. You should be able to identify the hard drive you want to recover partitions from by its size and label. TestDisk asks you select the type of partition table to search for. In most cases (ext2/3, NTFS, FAT32, etc.) you should select Intel and press Enter. Highlight Analyse and press enter. In our case, our small hard drive has previously been formatted as NTFS. Amazingly, TestDisk finds this partition, though it is unable to recover it. It also finds the two partitions we just deleted. We are able to change their attributes, or add more partitions, but we’ll just recover them by pressing Enter. If TestDisk hasn’t found all of your partitions, you can try doing a deeper search by selecting that option with the left and right arrow keys. We only had these two partitions, so we’ll recover them by selecting Write and pressing Enter. Testdisk informs us that we will have to reboot. Note: If your Ubuntu Live CD is not persistent, then when you reboot you will have to reinstall any tools that you installed earlier. After restarting, both of our partitions are back to their original states, pictures and all. Recover files of certain types For the following examples, we deleted the 10 pictures from both partitions and then reformatted them. PhotoRec Of the three tools we’ll show, PhotoRec is the most user-friendly, despite being a console-based utility. To start recovering files, open a terminal (Applications > Accessories > Terminal) and type in: sudo photorec To begin, you are asked to select a storage device to search. You should be able to identify the right device by its size and label. Select the right device, and then hit Enter. PhotoRec asks you select the type of partition to search. In most cases (ext2/3, NTFS, FAT, etc.) you should select Intel and press Enter. You are given a list of the partitions on your selected hard drive. If you want to recover all of the files on a partition, then select Search and hit enter. However, this process can be very slow, and in our case we only want to search for pictures files, so instead we use the right arrow key to select File Opt and press Enter. PhotoRec can recover many different types of files, and deselecting each one would take a long time. Instead, we press “s” to clear all of the selections, and then find the appropriate file types – jpg, gif, and png – and select them by pressing the right arrow key. Once we’ve selected these three, we press “b” to save these selections. Press enter to return to the list of hard drive partitions. We want to search both of our partitions, so we highlight “No partition” and “Search” and then press Enter. PhotoRec prompts for a location to store the recovered files. If you have a different healthy hard drive, then we recommend storing the recovered files there. Since we’re not recovering very much, we’ll store it on the Ubuntu Live CD’s desktop. Note: Do not recover files to the hard drive you’re recovering from. PhotoRec is able to recover the 20 pictures from the partitions on our hard drive! A quick look in the recup_dir.1 directory that it creates confirms that PhotoRec has recovered all of our pictures, save for the file names. Foremost Foremost is a command-line program with no interactive interface like PhotoRec, but offers a number of command-line options to get as much data out of your had drive as possible. For a full list of options that can be tweaked via the command line, open up a terminal (Applications > Accessories > Terminal) and type in: foremost –h In our case, the command line options that we are going to use are: -t, a comma-separated list of types of files to search for. In our case, this is “jpeg,png,gif”. -v, enabling verbose-mode, giving us more information about what foremost is doing. -o, the output folder to store recovered files in. In our case, we created a directory called “foremost” on the desktop. -i, the input that will be searched for files. This can be a disk image in several different formats; however, we will use a hard disk, /dev/sda. Our foremost invocation is: sudo foremost –t jpeg,png,gif –o foremost –v –i /dev/sda Your invocation will differ depending on what you’re searching for and where you’re searching for it. Foremost is able to recover 17 of the 20 files stored on the hard drive. Looking at the files, we can confirm that these files were recovered relatively well, though we can see some errors in the thumbnail for 00622449.jpg. Part of this may be due to the ext2 filesystem. Foremost recommends using the –d command-line option for Linux file systems like ext2. We’ll run foremost again, adding the –d command-line option to our foremost invocation: sudo foremost –t jpeg,png,gif –d –o foremost –v –i /dev/sda This time, foremost is able to recover all 20 images! A final look at the pictures reveals that the pictures were recovered with no problems. Scalpel Scalpel is another powerful program that, like Foremost, is heavily configurable. Unlike Foremost, Scalpel requires you to edit a configuration file before attempting any data recovery. Any text editor will do, but we’ll use gedit to change the configuration file. In a terminal window (Applications > Accessories > Terminal), type in: sudo gedit /etc/scalpel/scalpel.conf scalpel.conf contains information about a number of different file types. Scroll through this file and uncomment lines that start with a file type that you want to recover (i.e. remove the “#” character at the start of those lines). Save the file and close it. Return to the terminal window. Scalpel also has a ton of command-line options that can help you search quickly and effectively; however, we’ll just define the input device (/dev/sda) and the output folder (a folder called “scalpel” that we created on the desktop). Our invocation is: sudo scalpel /dev/sda –o scalpel Scalpel is able to recover 18 of our 20 files. A quick look at the files scalpel recovered reveals that most of our files were recovered successfully, though there were some problems (e.g. 00000012.jpg). Conclusion In our quick toy example, TestDisk was able to recover two deleted partitions, and PhotoRec and Foremost were able to recover all 20 deleted images. Scalpel recovered most of the files, but it’s very likely that playing with the command-line options for scalpel would have enabled us to recover all 20 images. These tools are lifesavers when something goes wrong with your hard drive. If your data is on the hard drive somewhere, then one of these tools will track it down! Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Recover Deleted Files on an NTFS Hard Drive from a Ubuntu Live CDUse an Ubuntu Live CD to Securely Wipe Your PC’s Hard DriveReset Your Ubuntu Password Easily from the Live CDBackup Your Windows Live Writer SettingsAdding extra Repositories on Ubuntu TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Awe inspiring, inter-galactic theme (Win 7) Case Study – How to Optimize Popular Wordpress Sites Restore Hidden Updates in Windows 7 & Vista Iceland an Insurance Job? Find Downloads and Add-ins for Outlook Recycle !

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  • Advantages of Ubuntu LTS versions over regular Ubuntu?

    - by Adam Matan
    Do the LTS versions of Ubuntu have any advantages for the non-paying customers (who don't get any support?) From the tech spec only, these versions seem outdated in many aspects - mainly drivers and installed software versions. For instance, My previous (bounty!) problem regarding the AGN 5100 drivers would have been solved under Ubuntu 9.04.

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  • Use Ubuntu’s Public Folder to Easily Share Files Between Computers

    - by Chris Hoffman
    You’ve probably noticed that Ubuntu comes with a Public folder in your home directory. This folder isn’t shared by default, but you can easily set up several different types of file-sharing to easily share files on your local network. This folder was originally meant for the Personal File Sharing tool, which is no longer included with Ubuntu by default. You can install the Personal File Sharing tool or use Ubuntu’s built-in file-sharing feature to share files. HTG Explains: What Is RSS and How Can I Benefit From Using It? HTG Explains: Why You Only Have to Wipe a Disk Once to Erase It HTG Explains: Learn How Websites Are Tracking You Online

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  • How to Encrypt Your Home Folder After Installing Ubuntu

    - by Chris Hoffman
    Ubuntu offers to encrypt your home folder during installation. If you decline the encryption and change your mind later, you don’t have to reinstall Ubuntu. You can activate the encryption with a few terminal commands. Ubuntu uses eCryptfs for encryption. When you log in, your home directory is automatically decrypted with your password. While there is a performance penalty to encryption, it can keep private data confidential, particularly on laptops that may be stolen. HTG Explains: What Is RSS and How Can I Benefit From Using It? HTG Explains: Why You Only Have to Wipe a Disk Once to Erase It HTG Explains: Learn How Websites Are Tracking You Online

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  • How to Turn Your Ubuntu Laptop into a Wireless Access Point

    - by Chris Hoffman
    If you have a single wired Internet connection – say, in a hotel room – you can create an ad-hoc wireless network with Ubuntu and share the Internet connection among multiple devices. Ubuntu includes an easy, graphical setup tool. Unfortunately, there are some limitations. Some devices may not support ad-hoc wireless networks and Ubuntu can only create wireless hotspots with weak WEP encryption, not strong WPA encryption. HTG Explains: What Is RSS and How Can I Benefit From Using It? HTG Explains: Why You Only Have to Wipe a Disk Once to Erase It HTG Explains: Learn How Websites Are Tracking You Online

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  • How to Create a Custom Ubuntu Live CD or USB the Easy Way

    - by Chris Hoffman
    There are several different ways to create custom Ubuntu live CDs. We’ve covered using the Reconstructor web app in the past, but some commenters recommended the Ubuntu Customization Kit instead. It’s an open-source utility found in Ubuntu’s software repositories. UCK offers more powerful features than Reconstructor does, but Reconstructor makes most tasks easier for novice users. Be sure to take a look at Reconstructor, too. How To Be Your Own Personal Clone Army (With a Little Photoshop) How To Properly Scan a Photograph (And Get An Even Better Image) The HTG Guide to Hiding Your Data in a TrueCrypt Hidden Volume

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  • How to Create a Separate Home Partition After Installing Ubuntu

    - by Chris Hoffman
    Ubuntu doesn’t use a separate /home partition by default, although many Linux users prefer one. Using a separate home partition allows you to reinstall Ubuntu without losing your personal files and settings. While a separate home partition is normally chosen during installation, you can also migrate to a separate home partition after installing Ubuntu – this takes a bit of work, though. HTG Explains: What Is Windows RT and What Does It Mean To Me? HTG Explains: How Windows 8′s Secure Boot Feature Works & What It Means for Linux Hack Your Kindle for Easy Font Customization

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  • Has anyone got Ubuntu Touch working on Nexus 5?

    - by user1628
    I have been debating whether to get a nexus 5 phone since it came out. My only fear is that I won't like android. I love ubuntu, I know that I'd love ubuntu. So I have a few question related to Ubuntu Touch: Is it easy or possible to switch between Ubuntu Touch and Android? Would I have to keep hacking the phone? Can I dual boot them? Would I lose my data every time I switch? The nexus 5 isn't mentioned here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Touch/Devices Does that mean it simply won't work if I follow the porting instructions? Would I have to do a bit of hacking? Has anyone got it working? Will it eventually be supported?

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  • Ubuntu hardy to intrepid upgrade hung on starting bluetooth

    - by srboisvert
    I have no bluetooth. Preliminary googling indicates that is probably an issue with some usb devices. I had an external drive, a mouse and a network dongle attached. It is just stalled during the Installing the Upgrades phase - the last commands were "Creating device nodes" Cancel will leave the system in a broken state. What next?

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  • sudo apt-get update does not work for 12.10

    - by Brian Hawi
    hey i recently installed ubuntu 12.10 but the software center does not work i tried the sudo apt-get update because that worked when i was using ubuntu 11.04.... these are the errors [email protected]:~$ sudo apt-get update [sudo] password for hawi: Err http:ke.archive.ubuntu.com quantal InRelease Err http:ke.archive.ubuntu.com quantal-updates InRelease Err http:ke.archive.ubuntu.com quantal-backports InRelease Err http:ke.archive.ubuntu.com quantal Release.gpg Unable to connect to ke.archive.ubuntu.com:http: Err http:ke.archive.ubuntu.com quantal-updates Release.gpg Unable to connect to ke.archive.ubuntu.com:http: Err http:ke.archive.ubuntu.com quantal-backports Release.gpg Unable to connect to ke.archive.ubuntu.com:http: Err http:security.ubuntu.com quantal-security InRelease Err http:security.ubuntu.com quantal-security Release.gpg Unable to connect to security.ubuntu.com:http: [IP: 91.189.92.190 80] Err http:extras.ubuntu.com quantal InRelease Err http:extras.ubuntu.com quantal Release.gpg Unable to connect to extras.ubuntu.com:http: Reading package lists... Done W: Failed to fetch http:ke.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/dists/quantal/InRelease W: Failed to fetch http:ke.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/dists/quantal-updates/InRelease W: Failed to fetch http:ke.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/dists/quantal-backports/InRelease W: Failed to fetch http:security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/dists/quantal-security/InRelease W: Failed to fetch http:extras.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/dists/quantal/InRelease W: Failed to fetch http:ke.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/dists/quantal/Release.gpg Unable to connect to ke.archive.ubuntu.com:http: W: Failed to fetch http:ke.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/dists/quantal-updates/Release.gpg Unable to connect to ke.archive.ubuntu.com:http: W: Failed to fetch http:ke.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/dists/quantal-backports/Release.gpg Unable to connect to ke.archive.ubuntu.com:http: W: Failed to fetch http:security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/dists/quantal-security/Release.gpg Unable to connect to security.ubuntu.com:http: [IP: 91.189.92.190 80] W: Failed to fetch http:extras.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/dists/quantal/Release.gpg Unable to connect to extras.ubuntu.com:http: W: Some index files failed to download. They have been ignored, or old ones used instead. (note i have removed the // after http because the site does not allow me to post more than two links) what could be the issue?

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  • Install Ubuntu Netbook Edition with Wubi Installer

    - by Matthew Guay
    Ubuntu is one of the most popular versions of Linux, and their Netbook Remix edition is especially attractive for netbook owners.  Here we’ll look at how you can easily try out Ubuntu on your netbook without a CD/DVD drive. Netbooks, along with the growing number of thin, full powered laptops, lack a CD/DVD drive.  Installing software isn’t much of a problem since most programs, whether free or for-pay, are available for download.  Operating systems, however, are usually installed from a disk.  You can easily install Windows 7 from a flash drive with our tutorial, but installing Ubuntu from a USB flash drive is more complicated.  However, using Wubi, a Windows installer for Ubuntu, you can easily install it directly on your netbook and even uninstall it with only a few clicks. Getting Started Download and run the Wubi installer for Ubuntu (link below).  In the installer, select the drive you where you wish to install Ubuntu, the size of the installation (this is the amount dedicated to Ubuntu; under 20Gb should be fine), language, username, and desired password.  Also, from the Desktop environment menu, select Ubuntu Netbook to install the netbook edition.  Click Install when your settings are correct. Wubi will automatically download the selected version of Ubuntu and install it on your computer. Windows Firewall may ask if you want to unblock Wubi; select your network and click Allow access. The download will take around an hour on broadband, depending on your internet connection speed.  Once the download is completed, it will automatically install to your computer.  If you’d prefer to have everything downloaded before you start the install, download the ISO of Ubuntu Netbook edition (link below) and save it in the same folder as Wubi. Then, when you run Wubi, select the netbook edition as before and click Install.  Wubi will verify that your download is valid, and will then proceed to install from the downloaded ISO.  This install will only take about 10 minutes. Once the install is finished you will be asked to reboot your computer.  Save anything else you’re working on, and then reboot to finish setting up Ubuntu on your netbook. When your computer reboots, select Ubuntu at the boot screen.  Wubi leaves the default OS as Windows 7, so if you don’t select anything it will boot into Windows 7 after a few seconds. Ubuntu will automatically finish the install when you boot into it the first time.  This took about 12 minutes in our test. When the setup is finished, your netbook will reboot one more time.  Remember again to select Ubuntu at the boot screen.  You’ll then see a second boot screen; press your Enter key to select the default.   Ubuntu only took less than a minute to boot in our test.  When you see the login screen, select your name and enter your password you setup in Wubi.  Now you’re ready to start exploring Ubuntu Netbook Remix. Using Ubuntu Netbook Remix Ubuntu Netbook Remix offers a simple, full-screen interface to take the best advantage of netbooks’ small screens.  Pre-installed applications are displayed in the application launcher, and are organized by category.  Click once to open an application. The first screen on the application launcher shows your favorite programs.  If you’d like to add another application to the favorites pane, click the plus sign beside its icon. Your files from Windows are still accessible from Ubuntu Netbook Remix.  From the home screen, select Files & Folders on the left menu, and then click the icon that says something like 100GB Filesystem under the Volumes section. Now you’ll be able to see all of your files from Windows.  Your user files such as documents, music, and pictures should be located in Documents and Settings in a folder with your user name. You can also easily install a variety of free applications via the Software Installer. Connecting to the internet is also easy, as Ubuntu Netbook Remix automatically recognized the WiFi adaptor on our test netbook, a Samsung N150.  To connect to a wireless network, click the wireless icon on the top right of the screen and select the network’s name from the list. And, if you’d like to customize your screen, right-click on the application launcher and select Change desktop background. Choose a background picture you’d like. Now you’ll see it through your application launcher.  Nice! Most applications are opened full-screen.  You can close them by clicking the x on the right of the program’s name. You can also switch to other applications from their icons on the top left.  Open the home screen by clicking the Ubuntu logo in the far left. Changing Boot Options By default, Wubi will leave Windows as the default operating system, and will give you 10 seconds at boot to choose to boot into Ubuntu.  To change this, boot into Windows and enter Advanced system settings in your start menu search. In this dialog, click Settings under Startup and Recovery. From this dialog, you can select the default operating system and the time to display list of operating systems.  You can enter a lower number to make the boot screen appear for less time. And if you’d rather make Ubuntu the default operating system, select it from the drop-down list.   Uninstalling Ubuntu Netbook Remix If you decide you don’t want to keep Ubuntu Netbook Remix on your computer, you can uninstall it just like you uninstall any normal application.  Boot your computer into Windows, open Control Panel, click Uninstall a Program, and enter ubuntu in the search box.  Select it, and click Uninstall. Click Uninstall at the prompt.  Ubuntu uninstalls very quickly, and removes the entry from the bootloader as well, so your computer is just like it was before you installed it.   Conclusion Ubuntu Netbook Remix offers an attractive Linux interface for netbooks.  We enjoyed trying it out, and found it much more user-friendly than most Linux distros.  And with the Wubi installer, you can install it risk-free and try it out on your netbook.  Or, if you’d like to try out another alternate netbook operating system, check out our article on Jolicloud, another new OS for netbooks. Links Download Wubi Installer for Windows Download Ubuntu Netbook Edition Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Easily Install Ubuntu Linux with Windows Using the Wubi InstallerInstall VMware Tools on Ubuntu Edgy EftHow to install Spotify in Ubuntu 9.10 using WineInstalling PHP5 and Apache on UbuntuInstalling PHP4 and Apache on Ubuntu TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips VMware Workstation 7 Acronis Online Backup DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Explorer++ is a Worthy Windows Explorer Alternative Error Goblin Explains Windows Error Codes Twelve must-have Google Chrome plugins Cool Looking Skins for Windows Media Player 12 Move the Mouse Pointer With Your Face Movement Using eViacam Boot Windows Faster With Boot Performance Diagnostics

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  • Choose Your Ubuntu: 8 Ubuntu Derivatives with Different Desktop Environments

    - by Chris Hoffman
    There are a wide variety of Linux distributions, but there are also a wide variety of distributions based on other Linux distributions. The official Ubuntu release with the Unity desktop is only one of many possible ways to use Ubuntu. Most of these Ubuntu derivatives are officially supported by Ubuntu. Some, like the Ubuntu GNOME Remix and Linux Mint, aren’t official. Each includes different desktop environments with different software, but the base system is the same (except with Linux Mint.) You can try each of these derivatives by downloading its appropriate live CD, burning it to a disc, and booting from it – no installation required. Testing desktop environments is probably the best way to find the one you’re most comfortable with. How Hackers Can Disguise Malicious Programs With Fake File Extensions Can Dust Actually Damage My Computer? What To Do If You Get a Virus on Your Computer

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  • Virtualbox 4 hangs when trying to install ubuntu guest on ubuntu host system

    - by misterjinx
    I'm trying to install ubuntu server using virtualbox 4.0.4 in a ubuntu 10.10 host OS. I have the iso image on my hard drive which I used to perform the install. I edited the settings and added this image at the storage section, selected it as a primary master, so I could boot from it and start the install process. But now, each time I start the installation, at the very beginning or if I'm lucky, after I click on the install link at the welcome screen, the process hangs and all the computer is blocked. This happened 3 times already. I even tried to perform the installation using an old CD I had with the 9.10 server version, thinking that the iso image might be the issue, but the problem still persists. I dont know what could cause this problem. My computer is a dell laptop with AMD processor (I dont know if this is important). Any help is very appreciated.

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  • permission denied: /etc/apt/sources.list

    - by Eli
    I'm trying to install java jre, i usually do it like this sudo echo 'deb http://www.duinsoft.nl/pkg debs all' >> /etc/apt/sources.list sudo apt-key adv --keyserver keys.gnupg.net --recv-keys 5CB26B26 sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install update-sun-jre exit but when i do sudo echo 'deb http://www.duinsoft.nl/pkg debs all' >> /etc/apt/sources.list i see permission denied: /etc/apt/sources.list When i do ls -l /etc/apt/sources.list i see -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 3360 Aug 26 01:45 /etc/apt/sources.list When i do sudo mv /etc/apt/sources.list /etc/apt/sources.list.old sudo cat /etc/apt/sources.list.old | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list i see #deb cdrom:[Ubuntu 12.04 LTS _Precise Pangolin_ - Release amd64 (20120425)]/ dists/precise/main/binary-i386/ #deb cdrom:[Ubuntu 12.04 LTS _Precise Pangolin_ - Release amd64 (20120425)]/ dists/precise/restricted/binary-i386/ #deb cdrom:[Ubuntu 12.04 LTS _Precise Pangolin_ - Release amd64 (20120425)]/ precise main restricted # See http://help.ubuntu.com/community/UpgradeNotes for how to upgrade to # newer versions of the distribution. deb http://lb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise main restricted deb-src http://lb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise main restricted ## Major bug fix updates produced after the final release of the ## distribution. deb http://lb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-updates main restricted deb-src http://lb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-updates main restricted ## N.B. software from this repository is ENTIRELY UNSUPPORTED by the Ubuntu ## team. Also, please note that software in universe WILL NOT receive any ## review or updates from the Ubuntu security team. deb http://lb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise universe deb-src http://lb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise universe deb http://lb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-updates universe deb-src http://lb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-updates universe ## N.B. software from this repository is ENTIRELY UNSUPPORTED by the Ubuntu ## team, and may not be under a free licence. Please satisfy yourself as to ## your rights to use the software. Also, please note that software in ## multiverse WILL NOT receive any review or updates from the Ubuntu ## security team. deb http://lb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise multiverse deb-src http://lb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise multiverse deb http://lb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-updates multiverse deb-src http://lb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-updates multiverse ## N.B. software from this repository may not have been tested as ## extensively as that contained in the main release, although it includes ## newer versions of some applications which may provide useful features. ## Also, please note that software in backports WILL NOT receive any review ## or updates from the Ubuntu security team. deb http://lb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-backports main restricted universe multiverse deb-src http://lb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-backports main restricted universe multiverse deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu precise-security main restricted deb-src http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu precise-security main restricted deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu precise-security universe deb-src http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu precise-security universe deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu precise-security multiverse deb-src http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu precise-security multiverse ## Uncomment the following two lines to add software from Canonical's ## 'partner' repository. ## This software is not part of Ubuntu, but is offered by Canonical and the ## respective vendors as a service to Ubuntu users. # deb http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu precise partner # deb-src http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu precise partner ## This software is not part of Ubuntu, but is offered by third-party ## developers who want to ship their latest software. deb http://extras.ubuntu.com/ubuntu precise main deb-src http://extras.ubuntu.com/ubuntu precise main and the issue is not solved, i still see that permission error, I'm on a 64 bit laptop

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  • apt-get 403 Forbidden

    - by Lerp
    I've start a new job today and I am trying to set up my machine to run through their Windows server. I've managed to get a internet connection through the server now but now I can't run apt-get update as I get a "403 Forbidden" error. This is for every repo under my source list, apart from translations(?). I do have a proxy in apt.conf, if I don't have it I get a 407 Permission Denied error. Here's my apt.conf file (I have omitted my username and password) Acquire::http::proxy "http://username:[email protected]:8080/"; Here's my sources.list #deb cdrom:[Ubuntu 12.04.2 LTS _Precise Pangolin_ - Release amd64 (20130213)]/ dists/precise/main/binary-i386/ #deb cdrom:[Ubuntu 12.04.2 LTS _Precise Pangolin_ - Release amd64 (20130213)]/ dists/precise/restricted/binary-i386/ #deb cdrom:[Ubuntu 12.04.2 LTS _Precise Pangolin_ - Release amd64 (20130213)]/ precise main restricted # See http://help.ubuntu.com/community/UpgradeNotes for how to upgrade to # newer versions of the distribution. deb http://gb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise main restricted deb-src http://gb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise main restricted ## Major bug fix updates produced after the final release of the ## distribution. deb http://gb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-updates main restricted deb-src http://gb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-updates main restricted ## N.B. software from this repository is ENTIRELY UNSUPPORTED by the Ubuntu ## team. Also, please note that software in universe WILL NOT receive any ## review or updates from the Ubuntu security team. deb http://gb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise universe deb-src http://gb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise universe deb http://gb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-updates universe deb-src http://gb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-updates universe ## N.B. software from this repository is ENTIRELY UNSUPPORTED by the Ubuntu ## team, and may not be under a free licence. Please satisfy yourself as to ## your rights to use the software. Also, please note that software in ## multiverse WILL NOT receive any review or updates from the Ubuntu ## security team. deb http://gb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise multiverse deb-src http://gb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise multiverse deb http://gb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-updates multiverse deb-src http://gb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-updates multiverse ## N.B. software from this repository may not have been tested as ## extensively as that contained in the main release, although it includes ## newer versions of some applications which may provide useful features. ## Also, please note that software in backports WILL NOT receive any review ## or updates from the Ubuntu security team. deb http://gb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-backports main restricted universe multiverse deb-src http://gb.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-backports main restricted universe multiverse deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu precise-security main restricted deb-src http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu precise-security main restricted deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu precise-security universe deb-src http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu precise-security universe deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu precise-security multiverse deb-src http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu precise-security multiverse ## Uncomment the following two lines to add software from Canonical's ## 'partner' repository. ## This software is not part of Ubuntu, but is offered by Canonical and the ## respective vendors as a service to Ubuntu users. # deb http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu precise partner # deb-src http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu precise partner ## This software is not part of Ubuntu, but is offered by third-party ## developers who want to ship their latest software. deb http://extras.ubuntu.com/ubuntu precise main deb-src http://extras.ubuntu.com/ubuntu precise main I can sort-of fix this by changing all the http in sources.list to ftp but I still have issues with ppas

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  • Use Any Folder For Your Ubuntu Desktop (Even a Dropbox Folder)

    - by Trevor Bekolay
    By default, Ubuntu creates a folder called Desktop in your home directory that gets displayed on your desktop. What if you want to use something else, like your Dropbox folder? Here we look at how to use any folder for your desktop. Not only can you change your desktop folder, you can change the location of any other folder Ubuntu creates for you in your home folder, like Documents or Music – and this works in any Linux distribution using the Gnome desktop manager. In this example, we’re going to change desktop to show our Dropbox folder. Open your home folder in a File Browser by clicking on Places > Home Folder. In the Home Folder, open the .config folder. By default, .config is hidden, so you may have to show hidden folders (temporarily) by clicking on View > Show Hidden Files. Then open the .config folder by double-clicking on it. Now open the user-dirs.dirs file… If double-clicking on it does not open it in a text editor, right-click on it and choose Open with Other Application… and find a text editor like Gedit. Change the entry associated with XDG_DESKTOP_DIR to the folder you want to be shown as your desktop. In our case, this is $HOME/Dropbox. Note: The “~” shortcut for the home directory won’t work in this file (use $HOME for that), but an absolute path (i.e. a path starting with “/”) will work. Feel free to change the locations of the other folders as well. Save and close user-dirs.dirs. At this point you can either log off and then log back on to get your desktop back, or open a terminal window Applications > Accessories > Terminal and enter: killall nautilus Nautilus (the file manager in Gnome) will restart itself and display your newly chosen folder as the desktop! This is a cool trick to use any folder for your Ubuntu desktop. What did you use as your desktop folder? Let us know in the comments! Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Sync Your Pidgin Profile Across Multiple PCs with DropboxAdd "My Dropbox" to Your Windows 7 Start MenuCreate a Keyboard Shortcut to Access Hidden Desktop Icons and FilesAdd "My Computer" to Your Windows 7 / Vista TaskbarCheck your Disk Usage on Ubuntu with Disk Usage Analyzer TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips VMware Workstation 7 Acronis Online Backup DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Use Flixtime To Create Video Slideshows Creating a Password Reset Disk in Windows Bypass Waiting Time On Customer Service Calls With Lucyphone MELTUP – "The Beginning Of US Currency Crisis And Hyperinflation" Enable or Disable the Task Manager Using TaskMgrED Explorer++ is a Worthy Windows Explorer Alternative

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  • apt-get update error after removing apt-key

    - by Caterpillar
    After Running apt-get update on ubuntu 10.04 server, I found this issue, Can any help me to solve this issue. Before this I had remove apt-key. Where can I get this apt-key to add it again. apt-get update Get:1 http://security.ubuntu.com lucid-security Release.gpg [198B] Ign http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ lucid-security/main Translation-en_IN Ign http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ lucid-security/restricted Translation-en_IN Get:2 http://in.archive.ubuntu.com lucid Release.gpg [189B] Ign http://in.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ lucid/main Translation-en_IN Ign http://in.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ lucid/restricted Translation-en_IN Ign http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ lucid-security/universe Translation-en_IN Ign http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ lucid-security/multiverse Translation-en_IN Get:3 http://security.ubuntu.com lucid-security Release [44.7kB] Err http://security.ubuntu.com lucid-security Release Ign http://in.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ lucid/universe Translation-en_IN Ign http://in.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ lucid/multiverse Translation-en_IN Get:4 http://in.archive.ubuntu.com lucid-updates Release.gpg [198B] Ign http://in.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ lucid-updates/main Translation-en_IN Ign http://in.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ lucid-updates/restricted Translation-en_IN Ign http://in.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ lucid-updates/universe Translation-en_IN Ign http://in.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ lucid-updates/multiverse Translation-en_IN Hit http://in.archive.ubuntu.com lucid Release Ign http://in.archive.ubuntu.com lucid Release Get:5 http://in.archive.ubuntu.com lucid-updates Release [44.7kB] Err http://in.archive.ubuntu.com lucid-updates Release Hit http://in.archive.ubuntu.com lucid/main Packages Hit http://in.archive.ubuntu.com lucid/restricted Packages Hit http://in.archive.ubuntu.com lucid/main Sources Hit http://in.archive.ubuntu.com lucid/restricted Sources Hit http://in.archive.ubuntu.com lucid/universe Packages Hit http://in.archive.ubuntu.com lucid/universe Sources Hit http://in.archive.ubuntu.com lucid/multiverse Packages Hit http://in.archive.ubuntu.com lucid/multiverse Sources Fetched 587B in 1s (465B/s) Reading package lists... Done W: A error occurred during the signature verification. The repository is not updated and the previous index files will be used.GPG error: http://security.ubuntu.com lucid-security Release: The following signatures couldn't be verified because the public key is not available: NO_PUBKEY 40976EAF437D05B5 W: GPG error: http://in.archive.ubuntu.com lucid Release: The following signatures couldn't be verified because the public key is not available: NO_PUBKEY 40976EAF437D05B5 W: A error occurred during the signature verification. The repository is not updated and the previous index files will be used.GPG error: http://in.archive.ubuntu.com lucid-updates Release: The following signatures couldn't be verified because the public key is not available: NO_PUBKEY 40976EAF437D05B5 W: Failed to fetch http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/dists/lucid-security/Release W: Failed to fetch http://in.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/dists/lucid-updates/Release W: Some index files failed to download, they have been ignored, or old ones used instead.

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  • Ubuntu not installed-Please Remove installation media and close tray and press enter

    - by Ram
    I have downloaded Ubuntu 12.04.1 LTS 32 bit, burned it on DVD and tried to install it on my PC. My PC is running in Windows 7 Ultimate 32 bit mounted on the C: drive. Now I want install Ubuntu along with my Windows 7. When I boot Ubuntu through the CD, It boots and the Ubuntu install windows opens It offers "Try Ubuntu" and "Install Ubuntu". I choose "Install Ubuntu" Then I go on to install Ubuntu with Windows(First Option)-install It shows some blank screen with some lines, and says "Please Remove installation media and close tray and press enter" Then the PC restarts and runs Windows 7 same as before normally. But Ubuntu is not installed. How to solve this problem and install Ubuntu on my PC properly? Note: I am an Android Developer. So I need to install Ubuntu for my Android Development purpose.

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  • How To Disable the Amazon Search Ads in Ubuntu’s Unity Dash

    - by Chris Hoffman
    Upgrade to Ubuntu 12.10 (Quantal Quetzal) and you’ll run into a surprise – Ubuntu now shows you advertisements for Amazon products when you search in your dash. There’s also an Amazon shortcut pinned to Unity’s launcher. There are several ways to disable these ads, and they aren’t immediately obvious. However, you can easily disable the Amazon search results if you don’t want to see them, or if you’re concerned about the privacy implications. What To Do If You Get a Virus on Your Computer Why Enabling “Do Not Track” Doesn’t Stop You From Being Tracked HTG Explains: What is the Windows Page File and Should You Disable It?

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  • How to rename Ubuntu One folders? Locked by syncdaemon?

    - by ENG_ACK
    tl;dr: Does Ubuntu One detect renamed synced folders? I'm trying to rename a large synced folder ('Sync locally' checked) outside of Ubuntu One, but still inside the home folder on Windows. Attempting to do so results in an error message: Cannot rename foldernamehere: It is being used by another person or program. Close any programs that might be using the file and try again. Quitting ubuntuone-syncdaemon and renaming results in Ubuntu One not finding the synced folder (folder in ubuntuone-control-panel-qt becomes grayed out). Ticking 'Sync locally' again causes Ubuntu One to begin downloading the synced folder with it's old name and ignoring the renamed folder. Is there any way to locally rename a synced folder short of reuploading the entire folder under a new name? Thanks for the help!

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