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  • In-Game Encyclopedias

    - by SHiNKiROU
    There are some games where there is an in-game encyclopedia where you can know many things about characters and settings of the game. For example, the Codex in Mass Effect. I want to know if it is exclusive to Bioware, and get inspired about other encyclopedia systems. What are some other examples of in-game encyclopedias? How effective is it? I also want some examples where the in-game encyclopedia is not effective at all or an ignored feature

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  • Various roles in an Organization and their respective tasks.

    - by balu
    In various organizations(Software Company) there would be various designations having different roles. I would like to know the Industry accepted & followed trend in the organization hierarchy(..Like DBA,System Architect,Project Manager,Senior Developer,Developer,QA,Design Team,Delivery Manager etc..).And the various roles played by each of them in the various stages of the Software Development Life Cycle.Who all could possibly be sharing the responsibility mutually?

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  • Game Center alternatives for non-iOS development

    - by Eat at Joes
    I have completed a game for iOS which integrates GameKit. I am happy with Game Center however my game also has an HTML5 web version and will soo have an Android version. My question is what alternatives do I have for non-iOS platforms but primarily for Android and to a lesser extent a Javascript/Web SDK. I looked at Openfeint a year ago and it seemed to be a good solution back then but am not sure if this is still the case? Note, I have no plans to replace what I already have in my iOS game and I understand the leader boards, users, and achievements won't be shared out of Game Center.

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  • What can make a peaceful game successful?

    - by Miro
    Today, the most successful games are action games like FPS, RPG, MMORPG... I'd like to make peaceful game, but I don't know how to attract people. I can make good graphics, but that's not the main thing that makes people like game more that couple of minutes. The content is important. In game styles mentioned in beginning are main content fight, kill others, make from yourself predator/the most powerful creature/player in the game. But what content can attract people in peaceful game?

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  • What can make peaceful game successful?

    - by Miro
    Today, the most successful games are action games like FPS, RPG, MMORPG... I'd like to make peaceful game, but i don't know how to attract people. I can make good graphics, but that's not the main thing that makes people like game more that couple of minutes. The content is important. In game styles mentioned in beginning are main content fight, kill others, make from yourself predator/the most powerful creature/player in the game. But what content can attract people in peaceful game?

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  • Limiting game loop to exactly 60 tics per second (Android / Java)

    - by user22241
    So I'm having terrible problems with stuttering sprites. My rendering and logic takes less than a game tic (16.6667ms) However, although my game loop runs most of the time at 60 ticks per second, it sometimes goes up to 61 - when this happens, the sprites stutter. Currently, my variables used are: //Game updates per second final int ticksPerSecond = 60; //Amount of time each update should take final int skipTicks = (1000 / ticksPerSecond); This is my current game loop @Override public void onDrawFrame(GL10 gl) { // TODO Auto-generated method stub //This method will run continuously //You should call both 'render' and 'update' methods from here //Set curTime initial value if '0' //Set/Re-set loop back to 0 to start counting again loops=0; while(System.currentTimeMillis() > nextGameTick && loops < maxFrameskip){ SceneManager.getInstance().getCurrentScene().updateLogic(); //Time correction to compensate for the missing .6667ms when using int values nextGameTick+=skipTicks; timeCorrection += (1000d/ticksPerSecond) % 1; nextGameTick+=timeCorrection; timeCorrection %=1; //Increase loops loops++; } render(); } I realise that my skipTicks is an int and therefore will come out as 16 rather that 16.6667 However, I tried changing it (and ticksPerSecond) to Longs but got the same problem). I also tried to change the timer used to Nanotime and skiptics to 1000000000/ticksPerSecond, but everything just ran at about 300 ticks per seconds. All I'm attempting to do is to limit my game loop to 60 - what is the best way to guarantee that my game updates never happen at more than 60 times a second? Please note, I do realise that very very old devices might not be able to handle 60 although I really don't expect this to happen - I've tested it on the lowest device I have and it easily achieves 60 tics. So I'm not worried about a device not being able to handle the 60 ticks per second, but rather need to limit it - any help would be appreciated.

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  • Directx vs XNA - Which is better for me? [closed]

    - by tristo
    Recently I got Visual Studio 2012 from visual studio 2010, although did not expect Visual Studio to 2012 to designed the way it was. Anyway I am pleased with some of VS 2012 technology and have moved all of my projects to it. At this point of time since I got VS 2012 I have been into making windows applications and other non-game activities. ALTHOUGH have recently gotten into the spirit of game development and I am planning to make a 3d comical game, shader effects, not too complicated meshes, but it requires alot of lighting effects to emphasise certain parts of the game. When I was using VS 2010 I had a great time making 2d games with XNA, it uses a great language, and has a very awesome system. But I no longer have XNA with me, and the workarounds described in stackoverflow always gives me errors while using xna. Anyway it seems that microsoft have stuffed themselves up with xna anyway with the weirdness of Windows 8, and it being only avaliabe on pc and xbox. Due to these reasons I have decided to work with Directx and Direct3d to produce my new game, although the overflowing credits after each directx game gives me the shivers, and the low-level coding of directx also puts me on thin ice with my games, left in a confusional mess with what decision I should make. I don't know anything about directx or direct3d. I am an indie developer, but I am planning to take on alot of professional aspects of games. I don't have heaps of time(2-3 hours a day) I don't mind the complexity of how directx works, as long as I can learn how to make the fundementals of a game in a week. I am also unsure if directx is really for my situation, and keep with xna game development. Anyone can tell me the best technology for me would be great.

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  • HTML5/JS - Choppy Game Loop

    - by Rikonator
    I have been experimenting with HTML5/JS, trying to create a simple game when I hit a wall. My choice of game loop is too choppy to be actually of any use in a game. I'm trying for a fixed time step loop, rendering only when required. I simply use a requestAnimationFrame to run Game.update which finds the elapsed time since the last update, and calls State.update to update and render the current state. State.prototype.update = function(ms) { this.ticks += ms; var updates = 0; while(this.ticks >= State.DELTA_TIME && updates < State.MAX_UPDATES) { this.updateState(); this.updateFrameTicks += State.DELTA_TIME; this.updateFrames++; if(this.updateFrameTicks >= 1000) { this.ups = this.updateFrames; this.updateFrames = 0; this.updateFrameTicks -= 1000; } this.ticks -= State.DELTA_TIME; updates++; } if(updates > 0) { this.renderFrameTicks += updates*State.DELTA_TIME; this.renderFrames++; if(this.renderFrameTicks >= 1000) { this.rps = this.renderFrames; this.renderFrames = 0; this.renderFrameTicks -= 1000; } this.renderState(updates*State.DELTA_TIME); } }; But this strategy does not work very well. This is the result: http://jsbin.com/ukosuc/1 (Edit). As it is apparent, the 'game' has fits of lag, and when you tab out for a long period and come back, the 'game' behaves unexpectedly - updates faster than intended. This is either a problem due to something about game loops that I don't quite understand yet, or a problem due to implementation which I can't pinpoint. I haven't been able to solve this problem despite attempting several variations using setTimeout and requestAnimationFrame. (One such example is http://jsbin.com/eyarod/1/edit). Some help and insight would really be appreciated!

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  • How to integrate game logic in game engines

    - by MahanGM
    Recently I'm working on a 2d game engine example in .Net with C#. My main problem is that I can't figure out how I should include the game logic within the game. Currently I have a base engine which is a set of classes that they are running sub-systems like Render, Sound, Input and Core functionality. There is an editor which helps the user to add resources, build levels, write scripts and other stuffs. I came up with an idea to use Reflection and CSharpCodeProvider from my editor to compile the written code. This way I can get an executable of my product too. This way is quite well but I would like to know what's really the solution and architecture to do this. My engine's role is 2d platform. The scripting language is C# right now because I can't consist any other embeddable language for now. The game needs compilation and CSharpCodeProvider is the only way for me to do it meantime.

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  • Is Java viable for serious game development?

    - by tehtros
    Ever since I was a little kid, my dream has been to develop games. Well, now that I am older, more mature, and have some programming experience, I would like to start. However, I would like to turn this into a career. The problem, is that my language of choice is Java. Now, I am not intending this to be a Java vs. C++ question, but rather, is Java an acceptable language for serious game development, instead of lower level languages like C++. By serious, I mean high quality graphics, and being able to play a game with said high quality graphics, without much lag on decent computers. Also, eventually, possible making it to consoles. I have scoured the internet, but there are not very many resources for Java game development, not nearly as many as C++. In fact, most engines are written in C++. Once, I tried to play a made with jMonkeyEngine. The game was terribly slow, to the point where my computer froze. I had no other Java applications running and nothing too resource intensive. Keep in mind, that my computer can play most modern 3D games with ease. So, I am really serious about game development, is Java still a viable choice? I have tried multiple times to learn C++, but I don't really like the language. I don't really know why, but usually, whenever I try to learn, I can never grasp the topics. Also, my most of my friends know Java, and one is even anti-C++, saying that no one knows how to use it right. Then, he goes to say that "there is no right way to use C++, that it can not be used correctly. The nature of the language prevents good code." Also, if I continue to learn and improve Java now, and it turns out that later I am required to learn C++, will making the switch be difficult? So, in short, can Java be taken serious, for serious game development. This includes heavy graphics, fast game play without lag, and possibly, and easy switch to consoles?

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  • Implementing game rules in a tactical battle board game

    - by Setzer22
    I'm trying to create a game similar to what one would find in a typical D&D board game combat. For mor examples you could think of games like Advance Wars, Fire Emblem or Disgaea. I should say that I'm using design by component so far, but I can't find a nice way to fit components into the part I want to ask. I'm struggling right now with the "game rules" logic. That is, the code that displays the menu, allows the player to select units, and command them, then tells the unit game objects what to do given the player input. The best way I could thing of handling this was using a big state machine, so everything that could be done in a "turn" is handled by this state machine, and the update code of this state machine does different things depending on the state. This approach, though, leads to a large amount of code (anything not model-related) to go into a big class. Of course I can subdivide this big class into more classes, but it doesn't feel modular and upgradable enough. I'd like to know of better systems to handle this in order to be able to upgrade the game with new rules without having a monstruous if/else chain (or switch / case, for that matter). So, any ideas? I'd also like to ask that if you recommend me a specific design pattern to also provide some kind of example or further explanation and not stick to "Yeah you should use MVC and it'll work".

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  • Desktop development versus Web development

    - by eKek0
    What are the advantages and disadvantages of one model and the other? Why and when would you choose one or the other? If you were going to build a business application, which is the best approach for you? To make this a fair question, is better if you post only quantified non-subjective answers.

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  • How to structure game states in an entity/component-based system

    - by Eva
    I'm making a game designed with the entity-component paradigm that uses systems to communicate between components as explained here. I've reached the point in my development that I need to add game states (such as paused, playing, level start, round start, game over, etc.), but I'm not sure how to do it with my framework. I've looked at this code example on game states which everyone seems to reference, but I don't think it fits with my framework. It seems to have each state handling its own drawing and updating. My framework has a SystemManager that handles all the updating using systems. For example, here's my RenderingSystem class: public class RenderingSystem extends GameSystem { private GameView gameView_; /** * Constructor * Creates a new RenderingSystem. * @param gameManager The game manager. Used to get the game components. */ public RenderingSystem(GameManager gameManager) { super(gameManager); } /** * Method: registerGameView * Registers gameView into the RenderingSystem. * @param gameView The game view registered. */ public void registerGameView(GameView gameView) { gameView_ = gameView; } /** * Method: triggerRender * Adds a repaint call to the event queue for the dirty rectangle. */ public void triggerRender() { Rectangle dirtyRect = new Rectangle(); for (GameObject object : getRenderableObjects()) { GraphicsComponent graphicsComponent = object.getComponent(GraphicsComponent.class); dirtyRect.add(graphicsComponent.getDirtyRect()); } gameView_.repaint(dirtyRect); } /** * Method: renderGameView * Renders the game objects onto the game view. * @param g The graphics object that draws the game objects. */ public void renderGameView(Graphics g) { for (GameObject object : getRenderableObjects()) { GraphicsComponent graphicsComponent = object.getComponent(GraphicsComponent.class); if (!graphicsComponent.isVisible()) continue; GraphicsComponent.Shape shape = graphicsComponent.getShape(); BoundsComponent boundsComponent = object.getComponent(BoundsComponent.class); Rectangle bounds = boundsComponent.getBounds(); g.setColor(graphicsComponent.getColor()); if (shape == GraphicsComponent.Shape.RECTANGULAR) { g.fill3DRect(bounds.x, bounds.y, bounds.width, bounds.height, true); } else if (shape == GraphicsComponent.Shape.CIRCULAR) { g.fillOval(bounds.x, bounds.y, bounds.width, bounds.height); } } } /** * Method: getRenderableObjects * @return The renderable game objects. */ private HashSet<GameObject> getRenderableObjects() { return gameManager.getGameObjectManager().getRelevantObjects( getClass()); } } Also all the updating in my game is event-driven. I don't have a loop like theirs that simply updates everything at the same time. I like my framework because it makes it easy to add new GameObjects, but doesn't have the problems some component-based designs encounter when communicating between components. I would hate to chuck it just to get pause to work. Is there a way I can add game states to my game without removing the entity-component design? Does the game state example actually fit my framework, and I'm just missing something? EDIT: I might not have explained my framework well enough. My components are just data. If I was coding in C++, they'd probably be structs. Here's an example of one: public class BoundsComponent implements GameComponent { /** * The position of the game object. */ private Point pos_; /** * The size of the game object. */ private Dimension size_; /** * Constructor * Creates a new BoundsComponent for a game object with initial position * initialPos and initial size initialSize. The position and size combine * to make up the bounds. * @param initialPos The initial position of the game object. * @param initialSize The initial size of the game object. */ public BoundsComponent(Point initialPos, Dimension initialSize) { pos_ = initialPos; size_ = initialSize; } /** * Method: getBounds * @return The bounds of the game object. */ public Rectangle getBounds() { return new Rectangle(pos_, size_); } /** * Method: setPos * Sets the position of the game object to newPos. * @param newPos The value to which the position of the game object is * set. */ public void setPos(Point newPos) { pos_ = newPos; } } My components do not communicate with each other. Systems handle inter-component communication. My systems also do not communicate with each other. They have separate functionality and can easily be kept separate. The MovementSystem doesn't need to know what the RenderingSystem is rendering to move the game objects correctly; it just need to set the right values on the components, so that when the RenderingSystem renders the game objects, it has accurate data. The game state could not be a system, because it needs to interact with the systems rather than the components. It's not setting data; it's determining which functions need to be called. A GameStateComponent wouldn't make sense because all the game objects share one game state. Components are what make up objects and each one is different for each different object. For example, the game objects cannot have the same bounds. They can have overlapping bounds, but if they share a BoundsComponent, they're really the same object. Hopefully, this explanation makes my framework less confusing.

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  • Turn-based Strategy Loop

    - by Djentleman
    I'm working on a strategy game. It's turn-based and card-based (think Dominion-style), done in a client, with eventual AI in the works. I've already implemented almost all of the game logic (methods for calculations and suchlike) and I'm starting to work on the actual game loop. What is the "best" way to implement a game loop in such a game? Should I use a simple "while gameActive" loop that keeps running until gameActive is False, with sections that wait for player input? Or should it be managed through the UI with player actions determining what happens and when? Any help is appreciated. I'm doing it in Python (for now at least) to get my Python skills up a bit, although the language shouldn't matter for this question.

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  • What are examples of games with "minimalist" models/art assets

    - by Ken
    When teaching game development, my student's obsess about building realistic or complex art/models/animation. And spending wayyy to much time trying to get accurate collision detection between two 3D models [despite my best efforts] However I would like them to spend more time thinking about developing the game mechanics, interaction and game play. I'm looking for some games where the visuals are simple but have good game play. Things I am thinking about are Cubes' vs Spheres or Impossible Game. What are more examples of visually simple (preferably 3D) games to help inspire my students?

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  • With which class to start Test Driven Development of card game application? And what would be the next 5 to 7 tests?

    - by Maxis
    I have started to write card game applications. Some model classes: CardSuit, CardValue, Card Deck, IDeckCreator, RegularDeckCreator, DoubleDeckCreator Board Hand and some game classes: Turn, TurnHandler IPlayer, ComputerPlayer, HumanPlayer IAttackStrategy, SimpleAttachStrategy, IDefenceStrategy, SimpleDefenceStrategy GameData, Game are already written. My idea is to create engine, where two computer players could play game and then later I could add UI part. Already for some time I'm reading about Test Driven Development (TDD) and I have idea to start writing application from scratch, as currently I have tendency to write not needed code, which seems usable in future. Also code doesn't have any tests and it is hard to add them now. Seems that TDD could improve all these issue - minimum of needed code, good test coverage and also could help to come to right application design. But I have one issue - I can't decide from where to start TDD? Should I start from bottom - Card related classes or somewhere on top - Game, TurnHandler, ... ? With which class you would start? And what would be the next 5 to 7 tests? (use the card game you know the best) I would like to start TDD with your help and then continue on my own!

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  • Managing game state / 'what to update' within an XNA game 'screen'

    - by codinghands
    Note - having read through other GDev questions suggested when writing this question I'm confident this isn't a dupe. Of course, it's 3am and I'm likely wrong, so please mod as such if so. I'm trying to figure out how best to manage state within my game screens - please bare with me though! At the moment I'm using a heavily modified version of the fantastic game state management example on the XNA site available here. This is working perfectly for my 'Screens' - 'IntroScreen' with some shiny logos, 'TitleScreen' and a 'MenuScreen' stacked on top for the title and menu, 'PlayScreen' for the actual gameplay, etc. Each screen has the a bunch of sprites, and an 'Update' and 'Draw', managed by a 'ScreenManager'. In addition to the above, and as suggested as an answer to my other question here, most screens have a 'GameProcessQueue' class full of 'GameProcess'es which lets me do just about anything (animations, youbetcha!), in any order, in sequence or parallel. Why mention all this? When I talk about managing game state I'm thinking more for complex scenarios within a 'Screen'. 'TitleScreen', 'MenuScreen' and the like are all relatively simple. 'Play Screen' less so. How do people manage the different 'states' within the screen (or whatever you call it) that 'does' gameplay? (for me, the 'PlayScreen') I've thought about the following: Enum of different states in the Screen, 'activeState' enum-type variable, switching on the enum in the Screen Update() loop to determine what Screen Update 'sub'-function is called. I can see this getting hairy pretty fast though as screens get more complex and with the 'PlayScreen' becoming a behemoth mega-class. 'State' class with Update loop - a Screen can have any number of 'States', 1+ of which are 'active'. Screen update loop calls update on all active states. States themselves know which screen they belong to, and may even belong to a 'StateManager' which handles transitioning from one state to the next. Once a state is over it's removed from the ScreenState list. The Screen doesn't need a bunch of GameProcessQueues, each State has its own. Abstract Screen further to be more flexible - I can see the similarities between what I've got (game 'Screens' handled by a ScreenManager) and what I want (states within a screen, and a mechanism to manage them). However at the moment I see 'Screens' as high level and very distinct ('PlayScreen' with baddies != 'MenuScreen' with 4 words and event handlers), where as my proposed 'States' are more intrinsically tied to a specific screen with complex requirements. I think. This is for a turn-based board game, so it's easier to define things as a discrete series of steps (IntroAnimation - P1Turn - P2Turn - P1Turn ... - GameOver - .... Obviously with an open-world RPG things are very different, but any advice in this scenario is appreciated. If I'm just going OOP-crazy please say so. Similarly I'm concious there's a huge amount on this site re: state management. But as my first 'serious' game after a couple of false starts I'd like to get this right, and would rather be harassed and modded down than never ask :)

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  • Game mechanics patterns database?

    - by Klaim
    Do you know http://tvtropes.org ? It's a kind of wiki/database with scenaristic tropes, patterns that you can find in tones of stories, in tv shows, games, books, etc. Each trope/pattern have a (funny) name and there are references to where it appears, and the other way arround : each book/game/etc. have a list of tropes that it contains. I'm looking for an equivalent but for game mechanics patterns, something like "Death is definitive", "Perfect physical control (no inertia)", "Excell table gameplay", etc. I think it would be really useful. I can't find an equivalent for game mechanics (tvtrope is oriented to scenario, not game mechanics). Do you know any?

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  • iOS Game Center - Quit turn-based games for previous version of app

    - by rasmus
    I have a game on the iOS App Store that uses Game Center for turn-based multiplayer (GKTurnBasedMatch). I recently updated the app with a new game mode and I had to change the network protocol for that to happen. As a result I marked my new version as incompatible with the old one. That is, you cannot see the old games within the new app and you cannot initiate a game with someone with the old version of the app. This works as expected. However: The old games remain active after updating. There seems to be no way to quit them. What is worse is that they still count to the maximum number of games you can start. I have been contacted by players that can only start 1-3 games without hitting the roof. Have anyone experienced this before? Is there any way to quit the games? Thanks in advance

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  • Sources (other than tutorials) on Game Mechanics

    - by Holland
    But, I'm not quite sure where I should start from here. I know I have to go and grab an engine to use with some prebuilt libraries, and then from there learn how to actually code a game, etc. All I have right now is some "program Tetris" tutorial for C++ open right now, but I'm not even sure if that will really help me with what I want to accomplish. I'm curious if there are is any good C++ documentation related to game development which provides information on building a game in more of a component model (by this I'm referring to the documentation, not the actual object-oriented design of the game itself), rather than an entire tutorial designed to do something specific. This could include information based on various design methodologies, or how to link hardware with OpenGL interfaces, or just simply even learning how to render 2D images on a canvas. I suppose this place is definitely a good source :P, but what I'm looking for is quite a bit of information - and I think posting a new question every ten minutes would just flood the site...

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  • How Can I Improve This Card-Game AI?

    - by James Burgess
    Let me get this out there before anything else: this is a learning exercise for me. I am not a game developer by trade or hobby (at least, not seriously) and am purely delving into some AI- and 3D-related topics to broaden my horizons a bit. As part of the learning experience, I thought I'd have a go at developing a basic card game AI. I selected Pit as the card game I was going to attempt to emulate (specifically, the 'bull and bear' variation of the game as mentioned in the link above). Unfortunately, the rule-set that I'm used to playing with (an older version of the game) isn't described. The basics of it are: The number of commodities played with is equal to the number of players. The bull and bear cards are included. All but two players receive 8 cards, two receive 9 cards. A player can win the round with 7 + bull, 8, or 8 + bull (receiving double points). The bear is a penalty card. You can trade up to a maximum of 4 cards at a time. They must all be of the same type, but can optionally include the bull or bear (so, you could trade A, A, A, Bull - but not A, B, A, Bull). For those who have played the card game, it will probably have been as obvious to you as it was to me that given the nature of the game, gameplay would seem to resemble a greedy algorithm. With this in mind, I thought it might simplify my AI experience somewhat. So, here's what I've come up with for a basic AI player to play Pit... and I'd really just like any form of suggestion (from improvements to reading materials) relating to it. Here it is in something vaguely pseudo-code-ish ;) While AI does not hold 7 similar + bull, 8 similar, or 8 similar + bull, do: 1. Establish 'target' hand, by seeing which card AI holds the most of. 2. Prepare to trade next-most-numerous card type in a trade (max. held, or 4, whichever is fewer) 3. If holding the bear, add to (if trading <=3 cards) or replace in (if trading 4 cards) hand. 4. Offer cards for trade. 5. If cards are accepted for trade within X turns, continue (clearing 'failed card types'). Otherwise: a. If only one card remains in the trade, go to #6. Otherwise: i. Remove one non-penalty card from the trade. ii. Return to #5. 6. Add card type to temporary list of failed card types. 7. Repeat from #2 (excluding 'failed card types'). I'm aware this is likely to be a sub-optimal way of solving the problem, but that's why I'm posting this question. Are there any AI- or algorithm-related concepts that I've missed and should be incorporating to make a better AI? Additionally, what are the flaws with my AI at present (I'm well aware it's probably far from complete)? Thanks in advance!

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  • Cost to licence characters or ships for a game

    - by Michael Jasper
    I am producing a game pitch document for a university game design class, and I am looking for examples of licencing cost for using characters or ships from other IP holders in a game. For example: cost of using an X-Wing in a game, licencing from Lucas cost of using the Enterprise in a game, licencing from Paramount cost of using the Space Shuttle (if any), licencing from Nasa EDIT The closest information I can find is from an article about Nights of the Old Republic, but isn't nearly specific enough for my needs: What Kotick means by Lucas being the principal beneficiary of the success of The Old Republic is that there are most likely clauses in the license agreement that give percentages, points, or another denomination of revenue out to Lucas and his people just for the Star Wars name, and that amount is presumed to be a great deal of money. Kotick is saying that because the cost of the license is so prohibitive, as he has personally had experience with in his position as CEO of Activision Blizzard, that EA will not be able to be profitable because of the hemorrhaging of money to the licensor. EDIT 2 Another vague source stating that FOX uses a "five-figure rule" (assuming between $10,000 - $99,000) It seems FOX, like most studios, will not license individuals to create new works based upon their products. They will only commission individuals of their choosing if they elect to branch out into expanded product lines related to those licenses. Alternately, they are open to making the licencing available to large corporations with access to global markets, but only if those corporations agree to what Ms Friedman called a "five-figure guarantee". Presumably this means that the corporation seeking the licensing must agree to pay a 5-figure sum for that license, and be confident that their product will sell enough volume to recoup that fee, and to produce sufficient profits to make the acquisition worth their while. Thank you!

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  • Separating physics and game logic from UI code

    - by futlib
    I'm working on a simple block-based puzzle game. The game play consists pretty much of moving blocks around in the game area, so it's a trivial physics simulation. My implementation, however, is in my opinion far from ideal and I'm wondering if you can give me any pointers on how to do it better. I've split the code up into two areas: Game logic and UI, as I did with a lot of puzzle games: The game logic is responsible for the general rules of the game (e.g. the formal rule system in chess) The UI displays the game area and pieces (e.g. chess board and pieces) and is responsible for animations (e.g. animated movement of chess pieces) The game logic represents the game state as a logical grid, where each unit is one cell's width/height on the grid. So for a grid of width 6, you can move a block of width 2 four times until it collides with the boundary. The UI takes this grid, and draws it by converting logical sizes into pixel sizes (that is, multiplies it by a constant). However, since the game has hardly any game logic, my game logic layer [1] doesn't have much to do except collision detection. Here's how it works: Player starts to drag a piece UI asks game logic for the legal movement area of that piece and lets the player drag it within that area Player lets go of a piece UI snaps the piece to the grid (so that it is at a valid logical position) UI tells game logic the new logical position (via mutator methods, which I'd rather avoid) I'm not quite happy with that: I'm writing unit tests for my game logic layer, but not the UI, and it turned out all the tricky code is in the UI: Stopping the piece from colliding with others or the boundary and snapping it to the grid. I don't like the fact that the UI tells the game logic about the new state, I would rather have it call a movePieceLeft() method or something like that, as in my other games, but I didn't get far with that approach, because the game logic knows nothing about the dragging and snapping that's possible in the UI. I think the best thing to do would be to get rid of my game logic layer and implement a physics layer instead. I've got a few questions regarding that: Is such a physics layer common, or is it more typical to have the game logic layer do this? Would the snapping to grid and piece dragging code belong to the UI or the physics layer? Would such a physics layer typically work with pixel sizes or with some kind of logical unit, like my game logic layer? I've seen event-based collision detection in a game's code base once, that is, the player would just drag the piece, the UI would render that obediently and notify the physics system, and the physics system would call a onCollision() method on the piece once a collision is detected. What is more common? This approach or asking for the legal movement area first? [1] layer is probably not the right word for what I mean, but subsystem sounds overblown and class is misguiding, because each layer can consist of several classes.

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  • How to implement turn-based game engine?

    - by Dvole
    Let's imagine game like Heroes of Might and Magic, or Master of Orion, or your turn-based game of choice. What is the game logic behind making next turn? Are there any materials or books to read about the topic? To be specific, let's imagine game loop: void eventsHandler(); //something that responds to input void gameLogic(); //something that decides whats going to be output on the screen void render(); //this function outputs stuff on screen All those are getting called say 60 times a second. But how turn-based enters here? I might imagine that in gameLogic() there is a function like endTurn() that happens when a player clicks that button, but how do I handle it all? Need insights.

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  • First Person Shooter game agent development

    - by LangerHansIslands
    I would like to apply (program) the Artificial intelligence methods to create a intelligent game bots for a first person shooter game. Do you have any knowledge from where can I start to develop as a Linux user? Do you have a suggestion for an easy-to-start game for which I can develop bots easily, caring more about the result of my algorithms rather than spending a lot of time dealing with the game code? I've read some publications about the applied methods to Quake 3 (c) and Open Arena. But I couldn't find the source codes and manuals describing how to start coding( for compiling, developing ai and etc.). I appreciate your help.

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