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  • SQLAuthority News – MSDN Flash Mentions – TechNet Flash Mention – Top Community Contributors (Annual

    - by pinaldave
    I was going over my email to reach the famous Inbox(0), I found TechNet Flash and MSDN Flash email. I had kept them because those email editions had mentioned me in the same. I quickly took the screenshot for the same. I am posting them here to refer them back again. It is always good idea to store important information for revisiting memory lane. As a recent update, Microsoft has awarded me Top Community Contributors (Annual) Winners. I want to express that I would have not done without your valuable contribution. I want to dedicate the award to all of you, as without your presence I would have not given this prestigious award. I could have not done this with myself only. I had complete support of Jacob Sebastian (SQL Server MVP) for all of the community related activity. Here are few images. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: About Me, Pinal Dave, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLAuthority News, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Puzzle to Win Print Book – Write T-SQL Self Join Without Using FIRST _VALUE and LAST_VALUE

    - by pinaldave
    Last week we asked a puzzle SQL SERVER – Puzzle to Win Print Book – Functions FIRST_VALUE and LAST_VALUE with OVER clause and ORDER BY . This puzzle got very interesting participation. The details of the winner is listed here. In this puzzle we received two very important feedback. This puzzle cleared the concepts of First_Value and Last_Value to the participants. As this was based on SQL Server 2012 many could not participate it as they have yet not installed SQL Server 2012. I really appreciate the feedback of user and decided to come up something as fun and helps learn new feature of SQL Server 2012. Please read yesterday’s blog post SQL SERVER – Introduction to LEAD and LAG – Analytic Functions Introduced in SQL Server 2012 before continuing this puzzle as it is based on yesterday’s post. Yesterday I ran following query which uses functions LEAD and LAG. USE AdventureWorks GO SELECT s.SalesOrderID,s.SalesOrderDetailID,s.OrderQty, FIRST_VALUE(SalesOrderDetailID) OVER (ORDER BY SalesOrderDetailID) FstValue, LAST_VALUE(SalesOrderDetailID) OVER (ORDER BY SalesOrderDetailID) LstValue FROM Sales.SalesOrderDetail s WHERE SalesOrderID IN (43670, 43669, 43667, 43663) ORDER BY s.SalesOrderID,s.SalesOrderDetailID,s.OrderQty GO The above query will give us the following result: Puzzle: Now use T-SQL Self Join where same table is joined to itself and get the same result without using LEAD or LAG functions. Hint: Introduction to JOINs – Basic of JOINs Self Join A new analytic functions in SQL Server Denali CTP3 – LEAD() and LAG() Rules Leave a comment with your detailed answer by Nov 21's blog post. Open world-wide (where Amazon ships books) If you blog about puzzle’s solution and if you win, you win additional surprise gift as well. Prizes Print copy of my new book SQL Server Interview Questions Amazon|Flipkart If you already have this book, you can opt for any of my other books SQL Wait Stats [Amazon|Flipkart|Kindle] and SQL Programming [Amazon|Flipkart|Kindle]. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Function, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQLAuthority News – 18 Seconds of Fame – My PASS Experience

    - by pinaldave
    Happy Holidays to All of YOU! Life is full of little and happy surprises. I think Christmas and Santa are based on it. I just received very interesting email earlier today, I had no idea about it. Earlier this year, I had visited Seattle to attend SQLPASS – read the complete summary over here: SQLAuthority News – SQLPASS Nov 8-11, 2010-Seattle – An Alternative Look at Experience. While I was walking down, someone has stopped me and asked if they can talk to me for 15 seconds, I said yes and they had shot quick movie with mobile. The conversation was very quick and I had forgotten about it. Today I received email from one of the blog reader about it being on YouTube. Honestly, I did not know if this was ever going to be on YouTube. I am surprised and thrilled. Watch my 18 seconds fame movie. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: About Me, Pinal Dave, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Optimization, SQL Performance, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLAuthority Author Visit, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Importing CSV File Into Database – SQL in Sixty Seconds #018 – Video

    - by pinaldave
    Importing data into database is one of the most important tasks. I often receive questions regarding what is the quickest way to insert CSV data or how to import CSV Data into SQL Server Table. Honestly the process is very simple and the script is even simpler. In today’s SQL in Sixty Seconds Video we will learn how quickly we can insert CSV data into SQL Server. The steps to import CSV are very simple. Create Table Use Bulk Insert to import the data Verify the data Done! Absolutely it is that simple. More on Importing CSV Data: SQL SERVER – Import CSV File Into SQL Server Using Bulk Insert – Load Comma Delimited File Into SQL Server SQL SERVER – Import CSV File into Database Table Using SSIS SQL SERVER – Create a Comma Delimited List Using SELECT Clause From Table Column SQL SERVER – Comma Separated Values (CSV) from Table Column SQL SERVER – Comma Separated Values (CSV) from Table Column – Part 2 I encourage you to submit your ideas for SQL in Sixty Seconds. We will try to accommodate as many as we can. If we like your idea we promise to share with you educational material. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Database, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL in Sixty Seconds, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Server Management Studio, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology, Video

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  • SQL SERVER – Online Session on What is New in Denali – Today Online

    - by pinaldave
    I will be presenting today on subject Inside of Next Generation SQL Server – Denali online at Zeollar.com. This sessions are really fun as they are online, downloadable, and 100% demo oriented. I will be using SQL Server ‘Denali’ CTP 1 to present on the subject of What is New in Denali. The webcast will start at 12:30 PM sharp and will end at 1 PM India Time. It will be 100% demo oriented and no slides. I will be covering following topics in the session. SQL SERVER – Denali Feature – Zoom Query Editor SQL SERVER – Denali – Improvement in Startup Options SQL SERVER – Denali – Clipboard Ring – CTRL+SHIFT+V SQL SERVER – Denali – Multi-Monitor SSMS Windows SQL SERVER – Denali – Executing Stored Procedure with Result Sets SQL SERVER – Performance Improvement with of Executing Stored Procedure with Result Sets in Denali SQL SERVER – ‘Denali’ – A Simple Example of Contained Databases SQL SERVER – Denali – ObjectID in Negative – Local TempTable has Negative ObjectID SQL SERVER – Server Side Paging in SQL Server Denali – A Better Alternative SQL SERVER – Server Side Paging in SQL Server Denali Performance Comparison SQL SERVER – Denali – SEQUENCE is not IDENTITY SQL SERVER – Denali – Introduction to SEQUENCE – Simple Example of SEQUENCE If time permits we will cover few more topics as well. The session will be recorded as well. My earlier session on the Topic of Best Practices Analyzer is also available to watch online here: SQL SERVER – Video – Best Practices Analyzer using Microsoft Baseline Configuration Analyzer Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLServer, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – 2012 – Summary of All the Analytic Functions – MSDN and SQLAuthority

    - by pinaldave
    SQL Server 2012 (RC0 Available here) has introduced new analytic functions. These functions were long awaited and I am glad that they are here. Previously when any of this function was needed people use to write long T-SQL code to simulate that and now no need of the same. Having available native function also helps performance as well readability. In last few days I have written many articles on this subject on my blog. The goal was make these complex analytic functions easy to understand and make it widely accepted. As this new functions are available and as awareness spreads we should start using the new functions. Here is the quick list of the new function and relevant MSDN site. Function SQLAuthority MSDN CUME_DIST CUME_DIST CUME_DIST FIRST_VALUE FIRST_VALUE FIRST_VALUE LAST_VALUE LAST_VALUE LAST_VALUE LEAD LEAD LEAD LAG LAG LAG PERCENTILE_CONT PERCENTILE_CONT PERCENTILE_CONT PERCENTILE_DISC PERCENTILE_DISC PERCENTILE_DISC PERCENT_RANK PERCENT_RANK PERCENT_RANK I also enjoyed three different puzzles during the course of this series which gave clear idea to the SQL Server 2012 analytic functions. SQL SERVER – Puzzle to Win Print Book – Functions FIRST_VALUE and LAST_VALUE with OVER clause and ORDER BY SQL SERVER – Puzzle to Win Print Book – Write T-SQL Self Join Without Using LEAD and LAG SQL SERVER – Puzzle to Win Print Book – Explain Value of PERCENTILE_CONT() Using Simple Example This series will be always my dear series as during this series I had went through very unique experience of my book going out of stock and becoming available after 48 hours. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Function, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Introduction to PERCENTILE_CONT() – Analytic Functions Introduced in SQL Server 2012

    - by pinaldave
    SQL Server 2012 introduces new analytical function PERCENTILE_CONT(). The book online gives following definition of this function: Computes a specific percentile for sorted values in an entire rowset or within distinct partitions of a rowset in Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Release Candidate 0 (RC 0). For a given percentile value P, PERCENTILE_DISC sorts the values of the expression in the ORDER BY clause and returns the value with the smallest CUME_DIST value (with respect to the same sort specification) that is greater than or equal to P. If you are clear with understanding of the function – no need to read further. If you got lost here is the same in simple words – it is lot like finding median with percentile value. Now let’s have fun following query: USE AdventureWorks GO SELECT SalesOrderID, OrderQty, ProductID, PERCENTILE_CONT(0.5) WITHIN GROUP (ORDER BY ProductID) OVER (PARTITION BY SalesOrderID) AS MedianCont FROM Sales.SalesOrderDetail WHERE SalesOrderID IN (43670, 43669, 43667, 43663) ORDER BY SalesOrderID DESC GO The above query will give us the following result: You can see that I have used PERCENTILE_COUNT(0.5) in query, which is similar to finding median. Let me explain above diagram with little more explanation. The defination of median is as following: In case of Even Number of elements = In ordered list add the two digits from the middle and devide by 2 In case of Odd Numbers of elements = In ordered list select the digits from the middle I hope this example gives clear idea how PERCENTILE_CONT() works. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Function, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Auto Recovery File Settings in SSMS – SQL in Sixty Seconds #034 – Video

    - by pinaldave
    Every developer once in a while facing an unfortunate situation where they have not yet saved the work and their SQL Server Management Studio crashes. Well, you can minimize the loss by optimizing auto recovery settings. In this video we can see how to set the auto recovery settings. Go to SSMS >> Tools >> Options >> Environment >> AutoRecover There are two different settings: 1) Save AutoRecover Information Every Minutes This option will save the SQL Query file at certain interval. Set this option to minimum value possible to avoid loss. If you have set this value to 5, in the worst possible case, you can loose last 5 minutes of the work. 2) Keep AutoRecover Information for Days This option will preserve the AutoRecovery information for specified days. Though, I suggest in case of accident open SQL Server Management Studio right away and recover your file. Do not procrastinate this important task for future dates. Related Tips in SQL in Sixty Seconds: Manage Help Settings – CTRL + ALT + F1 SSMS 2012 Reset Keyboard Shortcuts to Default A Cool Trick – Restoring the Default SQL Server Management Studio – SSMS Color Coding SQL Server Management Studio Status Bar – SQL in Sixty Seconds #023 – Video Clear Drop Down List of Recent Connection From SQL Server Management Studio SELECT TOP Shortcut in SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) What would you like to see in the next SQL in Sixty Seconds video? Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Database, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL in Sixty Seconds, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Server Management Studio, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology, Video Tagged: Excel

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  • SQL SERVER – Reduce the Virtual Log Files (VLFs) from LDF file

    - by pinaldave
    Earlier, I wrote a quite note on SQL SERVER – Detect Virtual Log Files (VLF) in LDF. Because of this I got responses suggesting too many VLFs are bad for log file. This prompts to a simple question: “How many is ‘too many’ VLFs?” I suggest that you go and read an article written by Kimberly over here. I am sure that you are going to have a clear understanding of what a good number for your VLFs is from that article. If you have lots of VLFs, you can reduce them right away using the following method: (I am just attempting to write a working script over here.) USE AdventureWorks GO BACKUP LOG AdventureWorks TO DISK='d:\adtlog.bak' GO -- Get Logical file name of the log file sp_helpfile GO DBCC SHRINKFILE(AdventureWorks_Log,TRUNCATEONLY) GO ALTER DATABASE AdventureWorks MODIFY FILE (NAME = AdventureWorks_Log,SIZE = 1GB) GO DBCC LOGINFO GO Again, here I have assumed that your initial log size is 1 GB, but in reality you should select the number based on your own ideal size of the log file. If your log file grows to 10 GB every day, you may want to put the value as 10 GB. For accuracy, read what Kimberly’s original article says over here. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Where Can YOU Get My Books – SQL Server Interview Question and Answers

    - by pinaldave
    Earlier month I released by third book SQL Server Interview Question and Answers. The focus of this book is ‘master the basics’. If you rate yourself 10 out of 10 in SQL Server – this book is not for you but if you want to learn fundamentals or want to refresh your fundamentals this book is for YOU. Earlier I was overwhelmed by love you all have shown to this book on release date leading our three digit inventory to run out of stock. Read detail blog post about the subject over here A Real Story of Book Getting ‘Out of Stock’ to A 25% Discount Story Available. Well, we learn the lesson from the experience and have made sure that the inventory does not run out any more. Since then we are now available on multiple outlets. Pretty much anywhere in USA and India the book is available. Additionally, where ever Amazon ships internationally. I have created dedicated page where I have listed where one can avail this book from Details of SQL Server Interview Question and Answers. Even though I keep on getting common question like – where one can get this book. You can get this book from: USA: Amazon India: Flipkart | IndiaPlaza | Crossword In India now you can walk into any crossword store and ask this book, if they do not have it, you can ask them get one for you. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Best Practices, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Documentation, SQL Download, SQL Interview Questions and Answers, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLAuthority Author Visit, SQLAuthority Book Review, SQLAuthority News, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Question to You – When to use Function and When to use Stored Procedure

    - by pinaldave
    This week has been very interesting week. I have asked few questions to users and have received remarkable participation on the subject. Q1) SQL SERVER – Puzzle – SELECT * vs SELECT COUNT(*) Q2) SQL SERVER – Puzzle – Statistics are not Updated but are Created Once Keeping the same spirit up, I am asking the third question over here. Q3) When to use User Defined Function and when to use Stored Procedure in your development? Personally, I believe that they are both different things - they cannot be compared. I can say, it will be like comparing apples and oranges. Each has its own unique use. However, they can be used interchangeably at many times and in real life (i.e., production environment). I have personally seen both of these being used interchangeably many times. This is the precise reason for asking this question. When do you use Function and when do you use Stored Procedure? What are Pros and Cons of each of them when used instead of each other? If you are going to answer that ‘To avoid repeating code, you use Function’ - please think harder! Stored procedure can do the same. In SQL Server Denali, even the stored procedure can return the result just like Function in SELECT statement; so if you are going to answer with ‘Function can be used in SELECT, whereas Stored Procedure cannot be used’ - again think harder! (link). Now, what do you say? I will post the answers of all the three questions with due credit next week. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, Readers Question, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Function, SQL Puzzle, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Stored Procedure, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLServer, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Plan Cache and Data Cache in Memory

    - by pinaldave
    I get following question almost all the time when I go for consultations or training. I often end up providing the scripts to my clients and attendees. Instead of writing new blog post, today in this single blog post, I am going to cover both the script and going to link to original blog posts where I have mentioned about this blog post. Plan Cache in Memory USE AdventureWorks GO SELECT [text], cp.size_in_bytes, plan_handle FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) WHERE cp.cacheobjtype = N'Compiled Plan' ORDER BY cp.size_in_bytes DESC GO Further explanation of this script is over here: SQL SERVER – Plan Cache – Retrieve and Remove – A Simple Script Data Cache in Memory USE AdventureWorks GO SELECT COUNT(*) AS cached_pages_count, name AS BaseTableName, IndexName, IndexTypeDesc FROM sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors AS bd INNER JOIN ( SELECT s_obj.name, s_obj.index_id, s_obj.allocation_unit_id, s_obj.OBJECT_ID, i.name IndexName, i.type_desc IndexTypeDesc FROM ( SELECT OBJECT_NAME(OBJECT_ID) AS name, index_id ,allocation_unit_id, OBJECT_ID FROM sys.allocation_units AS au INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p ON au.container_id = p.hobt_id AND (au.TYPE = 1 OR au.TYPE = 3) UNION ALL SELECT OBJECT_NAME(OBJECT_ID) AS name, index_id, allocation_unit_id, OBJECT_ID FROM sys.allocation_units AS au INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p ON au.container_id = p.partition_id AND au.TYPE = 2 ) AS s_obj LEFT JOIN sys.indexes i ON i.index_id = s_obj.index_id AND i.OBJECT_ID = s_obj.OBJECT_ID ) AS obj ON bd.allocation_unit_id = obj.allocation_unit_id WHERE database_id = DB_ID() GROUP BY name, index_id, IndexName, IndexTypeDesc ORDER BY cached_pages_count DESC; GO Further explanation of this script is over here: SQL SERVER – Get Query Plan Along with Query Text and Execution Count Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Optimization, SQL Performance, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL Tagged: SQL Memory

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  • SQL SERVER – Effect of Collation on Resultset – SQL in Sixty Seconds #026 – Video

    - by pinaldave
    Collation is a very important concept but often ignored. I have often seen developers either not understanding this or ignored it – this is plain wrong. In simple word we can say Collation is the language or interpreting done by SQL Server. Well, in today’s SQL in Sixty Seconds we are going to observe how collation affects the resultset. Today’s blog post is inspired from my earlier blog post SQL SERVER – Effect of Case Sensitive Collation on Resultset. I strongly encourage you to read this earlier blog post for sample code as well additional explanation related to the concept shared in today’s SQL in Sixty Seconds. Here is the code used in the video. USE TempDB GO -- Sample Data Building CREATE TABLE ColTable (Col1 VARCHAR(15) COLLATE Latin1_General_CI_AS, Col2 VARCHAR(14) COLLATE Latin1_General_CS_AS) ; INSERT ColTable(Col1, Col2) VALUES ('Apple','Apple'), ('apple','apple'), ('pineapple','pineapple'), ('Pineapple','Pineapple'); GO -- Retrieve Data SELECT * FROM ColTable GO -- Retrieve Data SELECT * FROM ColTable ORDER BY Col1 GO -- Retrieve Data SELECT * FROM ColTable ORDER BY Col2 GO -- Clean up DROP TABLE ColTable GO Related Tips in SQL in Sixty Seconds: SQL SERVER – Effect of Case Sensitive Collation on Resultset Example of Width Sensitive and Width Insensitive Collation Collation and Collation Sensitivity – Quiz – Puzzle – 6 of 31 Change Collation of Database Column – T-SQL Script Find Collation of Database and Table Column Using T-SQL Default Collation of SQL Server 2008 Cannot resolve collation conflict for equal to operation If we like your idea we promise to share with you educational material. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Database, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL in Sixty Seconds, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Server Management Studio, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology, Video

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  • SQL SERVER – Simple Installation of Master Data Services (MDS) and Sample Packages – Very Easy

    - by pinaldave
    I twitted recently about: ‘Installing #sql Server 2008 R2 – Master Data Services. Painless.‘ After doing so, I got quite a few emails from other users as to why I thought it was painless. The reason was very simple- I was able to install it rather quickly on my laptop without any issues. There were a few requests along with these emails sent to me, which regards to how to install MDS, as well sample databases. Please note that I am the admin of my machine and I installed this MDS as the admin as well. Talk to your network administrator to figure out the best suitable settings for better security of login users. Additionally, since MDS is only supported on a 64-bit machine, I had rebuilt my computer a week before with a 64-bit OS and 64-bit SQL Server to go with it. Here is a quick picture tour of the installation. First of all, go to your SQL Server 2008. Install self-extracted folder and find the .msi file for C:\1033_enu_lp\x64\setup\masterdataservices.msi. Once you clicked on the file, follow the image tour below. You can ask me any questions in case you are still confused with any of the steps of the installation. While searching the internet for a similar installation process, I have landed on the official blog of MDS team where they have many interesting posts about it. If any concept written on my posts are contradictory to the information on the official blog, I suggest that you should follow the advice of official blog. Reference : Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Demo Script – Keeping CPU Busy

    - by pinaldave
    Recently face very interesting situation, during presentations at event, I was asked very famous questions: “My CPU is very high all the time, how can I reduce it?” This is very interesting question and there are many answers and a single blog post is not good enough to justify this subject. I presented few situation to the person who asked the question. The member of the audience who asked question came to me afterwords and asked me few detailed questions. To answer him, I quickly wrote query which simulate high CPU. Here is the script which I wrote which increased CPU from 10% to 80%. I was wondering if there is any similar script which can simulate high CPU usage. If you have share with me and I will publish with due credit. Here is my script for the same: USE AdventureWorks GO DECLARE @Flag INT SET @Flag = 1 WHILE(@Flag < 1000) BEGIN ALTER INDEX [PK_SalesOrderDetail_SalesOrderID_SalesOrderDetailID] ON [Sales].[SalesOrderDetail] REBUILD SET @Flag = @Flag + 1 END GO   Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Copy Statistics from One Server to Another Server

    - by pinaldave
    I was recently working on a performance tuning project in Dubai (yeah I was able to see the tallest tower from the window of my work place). I had a very interesting learning experience there. There was a situation where we wanted to receive the schema of original database from a certain client. However, the client was not able to provide us any data due to privacy issues. The schema was very important because without having an access to underlying data, it was a bit difficult to judge the queries etc. For example, without any primary data, all the queries are running in 0 (zero) milliseconds and all were using nested loop as there were no data to be returned. Even though we had CPU offending queries, they were not doing anything without the data in the tables. This was really a challenge as I did not have access to production server data and I could not recreate the scenarios as production without data. Well, I was confused but Ruben from Solid Quality Mentors, Spain taught me new tricks. He suggested that when table schema is generated, we can create the statistics consequently. Here is how we had done that: Once statistics is created along with the schema, without data in the table, all the queries will work as how they will work on production server. This way, without access to the data, we were able to recreate the same scenario as production server on development server. When observed at the script, you will find that the statistics were also generated along with the query. You will find statistics included in WITH STATS_STREAM clause. What a very simple and effective script. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLServer, T SQL, Technology Tagged: SQL Statistics, Statistics

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  • SQL SERVER – Capturing Wait Types and Wait Stats Information at Interval – Wait Type – Day 5 of 28

    - by pinaldave
    Earlier, I have tried to cover some important points about wait stats in detail. Here are some points that we had covered earlier. DMV related to wait stats reset when we reset SQL Server services DMV related to wait stats reset when we manually reset the wait types However, at times, there is a need of making this data persistent so that we can take a look at them later on. Sometimes, performance tuning experts do some modifications to the server and try to measure the wait stats at that point of time and after some duration. I use the following method to measure the wait stats over the time. -- Create Table CREATE TABLE [MyWaitStatTable]( [wait_type] [nvarchar](60) NOT NULL, [waiting_tasks_count] [bigint] NOT NULL, [wait_time_ms] [bigint] NOT NULL, [max_wait_time_ms] [bigint] NOT NULL, [signal_wait_time_ms] [bigint] NOT NULL, [CurrentDateTime] DATETIME NOT NULL, [Flag] INT ) GO -- Populate Table at Time 1 INSERT INTO MyWaitStatTable ([wait_type],[waiting_tasks_count],[wait_time_ms],[max_wait_time_ms],[signal_wait_time_ms], [CurrentDateTime],[Flag]) SELECT [wait_type],[waiting_tasks_count],[wait_time_ms],[max_wait_time_ms],[signal_wait_time_ms], GETDATE(), 1 FROM sys.dm_os_wait_stats GO ----- Desired Delay (for one hour) WAITFOR DELAY '01:00:00' -- Populate Table at Time 2 INSERT INTO MyWaitStatTable ([wait_type],[waiting_tasks_count],[wait_time_ms],[max_wait_time_ms],[signal_wait_time_ms], [CurrentDateTime],[Flag]) SELECT [wait_type],[waiting_tasks_count],[wait_time_ms],[max_wait_time_ms],[signal_wait_time_ms], GETDATE(), 2 FROM sys.dm_os_wait_stats GO -- Check the difference between Time 1 and Time 2 SELECT T1.wait_type, T1.wait_time_ms Original_WaitTime, T2.wait_time_ms LaterWaitTime, (T2.wait_time_ms - T1.wait_time_ms) DiffenceWaitTime FROM MyWaitStatTable T1 INNER JOIN MyWaitStatTable T2 ON T1.wait_type = T2.wait_type WHERE T2.wait_time_ms > T1.wait_time_ms AND T1.Flag = 1 AND T2.Flag = 2 ORDER BY DiffenceWaitTime DESC GO -- Clean up DROP TABLE MyWaitStatTable GO If you notice the script, I have used an additional column called flag. I use it to find out when I have captured the wait stats and then use it in my SELECT query to SELECT wait stats related to that time group. Many times, I select more than 5 or 6 different set of wait stats and I find this method very convenient to find the difference between wait stats. In a future blog post, we will talk about specific wait stats. Read all the post in the Wait Types and Queue series. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL DMV, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQL Wait Stats, SQL Wait Types, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Find Details for Statistics of Whole Database – DMV – T-SQL Script

    - by pinaldave
    I was recently asked is there a single script which can provide all the necessary details about statistics for any database. This question made me write following script. I was initially planning to use sp_helpstats command but I remembered that this is marked to be deprecated in future. Again, using DMV is the right thing to do moving forward. I quickly wrote following script which gives a lot more information than sp_helpstats. USE AdventureWorks GO SELECT DISTINCT OBJECT_NAME(s.[object_id]) AS TableName, c.name AS ColumnName, s.name AS StatName, s.auto_created, s.user_created, s.no_recompute, s.[object_id], s.stats_id, sc.stats_column_id, sc.column_id, STATS_DATE(s.[object_id], s.stats_id) AS LastUpdated FROM sys.stats s JOIN sys.stats_columns sc ON sc.[object_id] = s.[object_id] AND sc.stats_id = s.stats_id JOIN sys.columns c ON c.[object_id] = sc.[object_id] AND c.column_id = sc.column_id JOIN sys.partitions par ON par.[object_id] = s.[object_id] JOIN sys.objects obj ON par.[object_id] = obj.[object_id] WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(s.OBJECT_ID,'IsUserTable') = 1 AND (s.auto_created = 1 OR s.user_created = 1); If you have better script to retrieve information about statistics, please share here and I will publish it with due credit. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL DMV, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology Tagged: SQL Statistics, Statistics

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  • SQL SERVER – 2000 – DBCC SQLPERF(waitstats) – Wait Type – Day 24 of 28

    - by pinaldave
    I have received many comments, email, suggestions and motivations for my current series of wait types and wait statistics. One of the questions which I keep on receiving almost every other day is whether all of the discussions I have presented so far are also applicable to SQL Server 2000. Additionally, I receive another question asking me if wait statistics matters in SQL Server 2000. If it is, then the asker wants to know how to measure wait types for SQL Server 2000. In SQL Server, you can run the following command to get a list of all the wait types: DBCC SQLPERF(waitstats) The query above will work in SQL Server 2005/2008/R2  because of backup compatibility. As you might have noticed, I have been discussing everything keeping SQL Server 2005+ in mind, but I have given little consideration on SQL Server 2000. However, I am pretty sure that most of the suggestions I have provided are applicable to SQL Server 2000. The wait types I have been discussing mostly exist in SQL Server 2000 as well. But the difference of the 2000 version is that it gets late recent releases, but it is worth it. Wait types are very essential to measure performance bottleneck. Because of this, I do not have to state that I am big fan of them just so I could identify performance bottleneck. Please read all the post in the Wait Types and Queue series. Note: The information presented here is from my experience and there is no way that I claim it to be accurate. I suggest reading Book OnLine for further clarification. All the discussion of Wait Stats in this blog is generic and varies from system to system. It is recommended that you test this on a development server before implementing it to a production server. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQL Wait Stats, SQL Wait Types, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Difference between COUNT(DISTINCT) vs COUNT(ALL)

    - by pinaldave
    This blog post is written in response to the T-SQL Tuesday hosted by Jes Schultz Borland. Earlier today, I was presenting a 45-minute session at the Community College about “The Beginning SQL Server Database”. One of the students asked me the following question. What is the difference between COUNT(DISTINCT) vs COUNT(ALL)? I found this question from the student very interesting. He seems to have read the documentation (Book Online) and was then asking me this question. I always carry laptop which has SQL Server installed. I quickly opened it and ran the following script. After looking at the result, I think it was clear to everybody. Here is the script: SELECT COUNT([Title]) Value FROM [AdventureWorks].[Person].[Contact] GO SELECT COUNT(ALL [Title]) ALLValue FROM [AdventureWorks].[Person].[Contact] GO SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT [Title]) DistinctValue FROM [AdventureWorks].[Person].[Contact] GO The above script will give me the following results. You can clearly notice from the result set that COUNT (ALL ColumnName) is the same as COUNT(ColumnName). The reality is that the “ALL” is actually  the default option and it needs not to be specified. The ALL keyword includes all the non-NULL values. I know this is very simple and may be it does not change how we work; however looking at the whole angle, I really enjoyed the question. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLAuthority News, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Installing AdventureWorks Sample Database – SQL in Sixty Seconds #010 – Video

    - by pinaldave
    SQL Server has so many enhancements and features that quite often I feel like playing with various features and try out new things. I often come across situation where I want to try something new but I do not have sample data to experiment with. Also just like any sane developer I do not try any of my new experiments on production server. Additionally, when it is about new version of the SQL Server, there are cases when there is no relevant sample data even available on development server. In this kind of scenario sample database can be very much handy. Additionally, in many SQL Books and online blogs and articles there are scripts written by using AdventureWork database. The often receive request that where people can get sample database as well how to restore sample database. In this sixty seconds video we have discussed the same. You can get various resources used in this video from http://bit.ly/adw2012. More on Errors: SQL SERVER – Install Samples Database Adventure Works for SQL Server 2012 SQL SERVER – 2012 – All Download Links in Single Page – SQL Server 2012 SQLAuthority News – SQL Server 2012 – Microsoft Learning Training and Certification SQLAuthority News – Download Microsoft SQL Server 2012 RTM Now I encourage you to submit your ideas for SQL in Sixty Seconds. We will try to accommodate as many as we can. If we like your idea we promise to share with you educational material. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Database, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL in Sixty Seconds, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology, Video

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  • SQL SERVER – Identify Most Resource Intensive Queries – SQL in Sixty Seconds #028 – Video

    - by pinaldave
    During performance tuning conversation the very first question people often ask is what are the queries offending the server or in another word let us identify the queries which are the most resource intensive. The resources are often described as either Memory, CPU or IO. When we talk about the queries the same is applicable for them as well. The query which is doing lots of reads or writes are for sure resource intensive as well query which are taking maximum CPU time. Performance tuning is a very deep subject and we all have our own preference regarding what should be the first step to tuning and what should be looked with the salt of grain. Though there is no denying that a query which uses more resources than what it should be using for sure require tuning. There are many ways to do identify query using intense resources (e.g. Extended events etc) but in this one we will go by simple DMV. There is a small gotcha we all have to remember about usage of DMV is that it only brings back results from existing cache. So if you have a query which is very resource intensive but is not cached or if you have explicitly removed the query from the cache it will be not part of the result returned by this DMV. It is quite possible that a query is aged and removed from the cache if your cache is not huge. If your cache is large you may want to be careful in running this query during business hours as this query itself can be resource intensive. Get Script to identify resource intensive query from Here Related Tips in SQL in Sixty Seconds: SQL SERVER – Find Most Expensive Queries Using DMV Simple Example to Configure Resource Governor – Introduction to Resource Governor SQL SERVER – DMV – sys.dm_exec_query_optimizer_info – Statistics of Optimizer SQL SERVER – Wait Stats – Wait Types – Wait Queues – Day 0 of 28 Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Database, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL in Sixty Seconds, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Server Management Studio, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology, Video Tagged: Excel

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  • SQL SERVER – Function: Is Function – SQL in Sixty Seconds #004 – Video

    - by pinaldave
    Today is February 29th. An unique date which we only get to observe once every four year. Year 2012 is leap year and SQL Server 2012 is also releasing this year. Yesterday I wrote an article where we have seen observed how using four different function we can create another function which can accurately validate if any year is leap year or not. We will use three functions newly introduced in SQL Server 2012 and demonstrate how we can find if any year is leap year or not. This function uses three of the SQL Server 2012 functions - IIF, EOMONTH and CONCAT. When I wrote this function, this is the sortest function I ever wrote to find out leap year. Please watch the video and let me know if any shorter function can be written to find leap year. More on Leap Yer: Detecting Leap Year in T-SQL using SQL Server 2012 – IIF, EOMONTH and CONCAT Function Date and Time Functions – EOMONTH() – A Quick Introduction Script/Function to Find Last Day of Month  I encourage you to submit your ideas for SQL in Sixty Seconds. We will try to accommodate as many as we can. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Database, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL in Sixty Seconds, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLServer, T SQL, Video

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  • SQL SERVER – SQL Server Performance: Indexing Basics – SQL in Sixty Seconds #006 – Video

    - by pinaldave
    A DBA’s role is critical, because a production environment has to run 24×7, hence maintenance, trouble shooting, and quick resolutions are the need of the hour.  The first baby step into any performance tuning exercise in SQL Server involves creating, analyzing, and maintaining indexes. Though we have learnt indexing concepts from our college days, indexing implementation inside SQL Server can vary.  Understanding this behavior and designing our applications appropriately will make sure the application is performed to its highest potential. Vinod Kumar and myself we often thought about this and realized that practical understanding of the indexes is very important. One can not master every single aspects of the index. However there are some minimum expertise one should gain if performance is one of the concern. More on Indexes: SQL Index SQL Performance I encourage you to submit your ideas for SQL in Sixty Seconds. We will try to accommodate as many as we can. Here is the interview of Vinod Kumar by myself. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Database, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL in Sixty Seconds, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLServer, T SQL, Video

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  • SQL SERVER – What is Fill Factor and What is the Best Value for Fill Factor

    - by pinaldave
    Working in performance tuning area, one has to know about Index and Index Maintenance. For any Index the most important property is Fill Factor. Fill factor is the value that determines the percentage of space on each leaf-level page to be filled with data. In an SQL Server, the smallest unit is a page, which is made of  Page with size 8K. Every page can store one or more rows based on the size of the row. The default value of the Fill Factor is 100, which is same as value 0. The default Fill Factor (100 or 0) will allow the SQL Server to fill the leaf-level pages of an index with the maximum numbers of the rows it can fit. There will be no or very little empty space left in the page, when the fill factor is 100. I have written following two article about Fill Factor. What is Fill factor? – Index, Fill Factor and Performance – Part 1 What is the best value for the Fill Factor? – Index, Fill Factor and Performance – Part 2 I strongly encourage read them and provide your feedback. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Index, SQL Performance, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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