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  • SQL SERVER – Get File Statistics Using fn_virtualfilestats

    - by pinaldave
    Quite often when I am staring at my SSMS I wonder what is going on under the hood in my SQL Server. I often want to know which database is very busy and which database is bit slow because of IO issue. Sometime, I think at the file level as well. I want to know which MDF or NDF is busiest and doing most of the work. Following query gets the same results very quickly. SELECT DB_NAME(vfs.DbId) DatabaseName, mf.name, mf.physical_name, vfs.BytesRead, vfs.BytesWritten, vfs.IoStallMS, vfs.IoStallReadMS, vfs.IoStallWriteMS, vfs.NumberReads, vfs.NumberWrites, (Size*8)/1024 Size_MB FROM ::fn_virtualfilestats(NULL,NULL) vfs INNER JOIN sys.master_files mf ON mf.database_id = vfs.DbId AND mf.FILE_ID = vfs.FileId GO When you run above query you will get many valuable information like what is the size of the file as well how many times the reads and writes are done for each file. It also displays the read/write data in bytes. Due to IO if there has been any stall (delay) in read or write, you can know that as well. I keep this handy but have not shared on blog earlier. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQL View, T SQL, Technology Tagged: Statistics

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  • SQL SERVER – Copy Column Headers from Resultset – SQL in Sixty Seconds #027 – Video

    - by pinaldave
    SQL Server Management Studio returns results in Grid View, Text View and to the file. When we copy results from Grid View to Excel there is a common complaint that the column  header displayed in resultset is not copied to the Excel. I often spend time in performance tuning databases and I run many DMV’s in SSMS to get a quick view of the server. In my case it is almost certain that I need all the time column headers when I copy my data to excel or any other place. SQL Server Management Studio have two different ways to do this. Method 1: Ad-hoc When result is rendered you can right click on the resultset and click on Copy Header. This will copy the headers along with the resultset. Additionally, you can use the shortcut key CTRL+SHIFT+C for coping column headers along with the resultset. Method 2: Option Setting at SSMS level This is SSMS level settings and I kept this option always selected as I often need the column headers when I select the resultset. Go Tools >> Options >> Query Results >> SQL Server >> Results to Grid >> Check the Box “Include column header when copying or saving the results.” Both of the methods are discussed in following SQL in Sixty Seconds Video. Here is the code used in the video. Related Tips in SQL in Sixty Seconds: Copy Column Headers in Query Analyzers in Result Set Getting Columns Headers without Result Data – SET FMTONLY ON If we like your idea we promise to share with you educational material. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Database, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL in Sixty Seconds, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Server Management Studio, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology, Video

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  • SQL SERVER – Identify Most Resource Intensive Queries – SQL in Sixty Seconds #029 – Video

    - by pinaldave
    There are a few questions I often get asked. I wonder how interesting is that in our daily life all of us have to often need the same kind of information at the same time. Here is the example of the similar questions: How many user created tables are there in the database? How many non clustered indexes each of the tables in the database have? Is table Heap or has clustered index on it? How many rows each of the tables is contained in the database? I finally wrote down a very quick script (in less than sixty seconds when I originally wrote it) which can answer above questions. I also created a very quick video to explain the results and how to execute the script. Here is the complete script which I have used in the SQL in Sixty Seconds Video. SELECT [schema_name] = s.name, table_name = o.name, MAX(i1.type_desc) ClusteredIndexorHeap, COUNT(i.TYPE) NoOfNonClusteredIndex, p.rows FROM sys.indexes i INNER JOIN sys.objects o ON i.[object_id] = o.[object_id] INNER JOIN sys.schemas s ON o.[schema_id] = s.[schema_id] LEFT JOIN sys.partitions p ON p.OBJECT_ID = o.OBJECT_ID AND p.index_id IN (0,1) LEFT JOIN sys.indexes i1 ON i.OBJECT_ID = i1.OBJECT_ID AND i1.TYPE IN (0,1) WHERE o.TYPE IN ('U') AND i.TYPE = 2 GROUP BY s.name, o.name, p.rows ORDER BY schema_name, table_name Related Tips in SQL in Sixty Seconds: Find Row Count in Table – Find Largest Table in Database Find Row Count in Table – Find Largest Table in Database – T-SQL Identify Numbers of Non Clustered Index on Tables for Entire Database Index Levels, Page Count, Record Count and DMV – sys.dm_db_index_physical_stats Index Levels and Delete Operations – Page Level Observation What would you like to see in the next SQL in Sixty Seconds video? Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Database, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL in Sixty Seconds, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Server Management Studio, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology, Video Tagged: Excel

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  • SQL SERVER – 2011 – SEQUENCE is not IDENTITY

    - by pinaldave
    Yesterday I posted blog post on the subject SQL SERVER – 2011 – Introduction to SEQUENCE – Simple Example of SEQUENCE and I received comment where user was not clear about difference between SEQUENCE and IDENTITY. The reality is that SEQUENCE not like IDENTITY. There is very clear difference between them. Identity is about single column. Sequence is always incrementing and it is not dependent on any table. Here is the quick example of the same. USE AdventureWorks2008R2 GO CREATE SEQUENCE [Seq] AS [int] START WITH 1 INCREMENT BY 1 MAXVALUE 20000 GO -- Run five times SELECT NEXT VALUE FOR Seq AS SeqNumber; SELECT NEXT VALUE FOR Seq AS SeqNumber; SELECT NEXT VALUE FOR Seq AS SeqNumber; SELECT NEXT VALUE FOR Seq AS SeqNumber; SELECT NEXT VALUE FOR Seq AS SeqNumber; GO -- Clean Up DROP SEQUENCE [Seq] GO Here is the resultset. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Get Date and Time From Current DateTime – SQL in Sixty Seconds #025 – Video

    - by pinaldave
    This is 25th video of series SQL in Sixty Seconds we started a few months ago. Even though this is 25th video it seems like we have just started this few days ago. The best part of this SQL in Sixty Seconds is that one can learn something new in less than sixty seconds. There are many concepts which are not new for many but just we all have 60 seconds to refresh our memories. In this video I have touched a very simple question which I receive very frequently on this blog. Q1) How to get current date time? Q2) How to get Only Date from datetime? Q3) How to get Only Time from datetime? I have created a sixty second video on this subject and hopefully this will help many beginners in the SQL Server field. This sixty second video describes the same. Here is a similar script which I have used in the video. SELECT GETDATE() GO -- SQL Server 2000/2005 SELECT CONVERT(VARCHAR(8),GETDATE(),108) AS HourMinuteSecond, CONVERT(VARCHAR(8),GETDATE(),101) AS DateOnly; GO -- SQL Server 2008 Onwards SELECT CONVERT(TIME,GETDATE()) AS HourMinuteSeconds; SELECT CONVERT(DATE,GETDATE()) AS DateOnly; GO Related Tips in SQL in Sixty Seconds: Retrieve Current Date Time in SQL Server CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, GETDATE(), {fn NOW()} Get Time in Hour:Minute Format from a Datetime – Get Date Part Only from Datetime Get Current System Date Time Get Date Time in Any Format – UDF – User Defined Functions Date and Time Functions – EOMONTH() – A Quick Introduction DATE and TIME in SQL Server 2008 I encourage you to submit your ideas for SQL in Sixty Seconds. We will try to accommodate as many as we can. If we like your idea we promise to share with you educational material. Image Credit: Movie Gone in 60 Seconds Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Database, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL in Sixty Seconds, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Server Management Studio, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology, Video

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  • SQL SERVER- Differences Between Left Join and Left Outer Join

    - by pinaldave
    There are a few questions that I had decided not to discuss on this blog because I think they are very simple and many of us know it. Many times, I even receive not-so positive notes from several readers when I am writing something simple. However, assuming that we know all and beginners should know everything is not the right attitude. Since day 1, I have been keeping a small journal regarding questions that I receive in this blog. There are around 200+ questions I receive every day through emails, comments and occasional phone calls. Yesterday, I received a comment with the following question: What are the differences between Left Join and Left Outer Join? Click here to read original comment. This question has triggered the threshold of receiving the same question repeatedly. Here is the answer: There is absolutely no difference between LEFT JOIN and LEFT OUTER JOIN. The same is true for RIGHT JOIN and RIGHT OUTER JOIN. When you use LEFT JOIN keyword in SQL Server, it means LEFT OUTER JOIN only. I have already written in-depth visual diagram discussing the JOINs. I encourage all of you to read the article for further understanding of the JOINs: Read Introduction to JOINs – Basic of JOINs Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Joins, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Three Methods to Insert Multiple Rows into Single Table – SQL in Sixty Seconds #024 – Video

    - by pinaldave
    One of the biggest ask I have always received from developers is that if there is any way to insert multiple rows into a single table in a single statement. Currently when developers have to insert any value into the table they have to write multiple insert statements. First of all this is not only boring it is also very much time consuming as well. Additionally, one has to repeat the same syntax so many times that the word boring becomes an understatement. In the following quick video we have demonstrated three different methods to insert multiple values into a single table. -- Insert Multiple Values into SQL Server CREATE TABLE #SQLAuthority (ID INT, Value VARCHAR(100)); Method 1: Traditional Method of INSERT…VALUE -- Method 1 - Traditional Insert INSERT INTO #SQLAuthority (ID, Value) VALUES (1, 'First'); INSERT INTO #SQLAuthority (ID, Value) VALUES (2, 'Second'); INSERT INTO #SQLAuthority (ID, Value) VALUES (3, 'Third'); Clean up -- Clean up TRUNCATE TABLE #SQLAuthority; Method 2: INSERT…SELECT -- Method 2 - Select Union Insert INSERT INTO #SQLAuthority (ID, Value) SELECT 1, 'First' UNION ALL SELECT 2, 'Second' UNION ALL SELECT 3, 'Third'; Clean up -- Clean up TRUNCATE TABLE #SQLAuthority; Method 3: SQL Server 2008+ Row Construction -- Method 3 - SQL Server 2008+ Row Construction INSERT INTO #SQLAuthority (ID, Value) VALUES (1, 'First'), (2, 'Second'), (3, 'Third'); Clean up -- Clean up DROP TABLE #SQLAuthority; Related Tips in SQL in Sixty Seconds: SQL SERVER – Insert Multiple Records Using One Insert Statement – Use of UNION ALL SQL SERVER – 2008 – Insert Multiple Records Using One Insert Statement – Use of Row Constructor I encourage you to submit your ideas for SQL in Sixty Seconds. We will try to accommodate as many as we can. If we like your idea we promise to share with you educational material. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Database, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL in Sixty Seconds, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Server Management Studio, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology, Video

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  • SQL SERVER – Two Puzzles – Answer and Win USD 25 Gift Card

    - by pinaldave
    Today I have two simple T-SQL Puzzle. You can answer them and win USD 25 Gift card. The gift card will be sent in email to winner. You will get choice of Gift Card brand based on your preference and country location. Puzzle 1: What will be the outcome and why? DECLARE @x REAL; SET @x = 9E-40 SELECT @x; The outcome here is obvious as I have used negative number in assignment. What is the reason behind the same? Puzzle 2: Why will be the outcome different from Puzzle 1: DECLARE @y REAL; SET @y = 9E+40 SELECT @y; The outcome of this puzzle very different from puzzle 1  as I have used positive number. There is number six (6) in the resultset why? Msg 232, Level 16, State 2, Line 2 Arithmetic overflow error for type real, value = 90000000000000006000000000000000000000000.000000. How to participate To win the Gift Card USD 25 you will have to answer both of the question on my Facebook page. If you are on twitter – you can increase the chance of winning by tweeting your participation. This contest is open for any one from any country. The winner will be selected Randomly. Winner will be announced on July 7, 2011. Related Post: SQLAuthority News – Monthly list of Puzzles and Solutions on SQLAuthority.com Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Puzzle, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLServer, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Reducing Page Contention on TempDB

    - by pinaldave
    I have recently received following email. “We are using TraceFlag 1118 to reduce the tempDB contention on our servers (2000 and 2005). What is your opinion? We have read lots of material, would you please answer me in single line.” Wow, this was very interesting question. What intrigued me was the second last where I am asked to answer in a single line. There is something about this strong email, I feel like blogging it here. I think I can talk over this subject forever – well, there is no clear answer. There are so many caveats about everything.  Again, I must stay honest to the request about answering in single line. I also do not like to answer which is YES/NO. What should I do? Let me ask this question to community today? What will you answer to this email? Let me start this by answering it myself in one line and taking one side. “I enable this trace flag in SQL Server 2000 without hot patch or service pack and not in later versions (2005+) onwards as code is improved”. What do you do in this case? The best answer will feature in this blog with due credit. Regarding further read and hint here is Microsoft KB which I think is very helpful. In quick summary: (Read KB for accuracy) When any page is allocated first 8 pages are allocated in mixed extended. This trace flag allocates uniform extended at the time, reducing contention. You can enable this trace flag at startup. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology Tagged: SQL TempDB, TempDB

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  • SQL SERVER – Table Variables and Transactions – SQL in Sixty Seconds #007 – Video

    - by pinaldave
    Today’s SQL in Sixty Seconds video is inspired from my presentation at TechEd India 2012 on Misconception and Resolution. Quite often I have seen people getting confused with certain behavior of the T-SQL. They expect SQL to behave certain way and SQL Server behave differently. This kind of issue often creates confusion and frustration. Sometime I have seen them also confusing it with bug and submitting the bug, where reality is totally different. Similar concept which are going to see today. I have seen quite commonly developer assuming that table various will be rolled back when transaction is rolled back. This sixty seconds video describes that table various are not rolled back when transactions are rolled back. More on Errors: Difference Temp Table and Table Variable – Effect of Transaction Effect of TRANSACTION on Local Variable – After ROLLBACK and After COMMIT Debate – Table Variables vs Temporary Tables – Quiz – Puzzle – 13 of 31 I encourage you to submit your ideas for SQL in Sixty Seconds. We will try to accommodate as many as we can. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Database, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL in Sixty Seconds, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLServer, T SQL, Video

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  • SQLAuthority News – Presenting at Virtual Tech Days TechEd Pre-Con – February 9, 2011

    - by pinaldave
    I will be presenting on following subject on Virtual Tech Days TechEd Pre-Con – February 9, 2011. Auditing Made Easy: Change Tracking and Change Data Capture Date and Time: February 9, 2011 11:45am-12:45pm Location: Online In this fast paced demo oriented session we will go over few of concept which are related to real life problem at customers. We often see developers and DBA looking for details like who has dropped the table, who has last modified any object as well what was actually modified. SQL Server 2008 has all the answers. It has various new methods for Auditing where not only you can know details about what was changed as well know who changed it as well. In addition to that we can capture way more details configuring Auditing. We can also work prevent changes if proper policy management is configured. If you have ever attended my session on this subject earlier, this is going to absolutely new session and very much demo oriented. There is going to be quiz at the end of the session and I promise that if you attend the session, you will get all the answers correct. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com)   Filed under: About Me, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLAuthority News, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – A Funny Cartoon on Index

    - by pinaldave
    Performance Tuning has been my favorite subject and I have done it for many years now. Today I will list one of the most common conversation about Index I have heard in my life. Every single time, I am at consultation for performance tuning I hear following conversation among various team members. I want to ask you, does this kind of conversation happens in your organization? Any way, If you think Index solves all of your performance problem I think it is not true. There are many other reason one has to consider along with Indexes. For example I consider following various topic one need to understand for performance tuning. ?Logical Query Processing ?Efficient Join Techniques ?Query Tuning Considerations ?Avoiding Common Performance Tuning Issues Statistics and Best Practices ?TempDB Tuning ?Hardware Planning ?Understanding Query Processor ?Using SQL Server 2005 and 2008 Updated Feature Sets ?CPU, Memory, I/O Bottleneck Index Tuning (of course) ?Many more… Well, I have written this blog thinking I will keep this blog post a bit easy and not load up. I will in future discuss about other performance tuning concepts. Let me know what do you think about the cartoon I made. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Humor, SQL Index, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQLAuthority News – SQL Server Interview Questions And Answers Book Summary

    - by pinaldave
    Today we are using computers for various activities, motor vehicles for traveling to places, and mobile phones for conversation. How many of us can claim the invention of micro-processor, a basic wheel, or the telegraph? Similarly, this book was not written overnight. The journey of this book goes many years back with many individuals to be thanked for. To begin with, we want to thank all those interviewers who reject interviewees by saying they need to know ‘the key things’ regardless of having high grades in class. The whole concept of interview questions and answers revolves around knowing those ‘key things’. The core concept of this book will continue to evolve over time. I am sure many of you will come along with us on this journey and submit your suggestions to us to make this book a key reference for anybody who wants to start with SQL Server. Today we want to acknowledge the fact that you will help us keep this book alive forever with the latest updates. We want to thank everyone who participates in this journey with us. Though each of these chapters are geared towards convenience we highly recommend reading each of the sections irrespective of the roles you might be doing since each of the sections have some interesting trivia about working with SQL Server. In the industry the role of accidental DBA’s (especially with SQL Server) is very common. Hence if you have performed the role of DBA for a short stint and want to brush-up your fundamentals then the upcoming sections will be a great review. Table Of Contents Database Concepts With Sql Server Common Generic Questions & Answers Common Developer Questions Common Tricky Questions Miscellaneous Questions On Sql Server 2008 Dba Skills Related Questions Data Warehousing Interview Questions & Answers General Best Practices [Amazon] | [Flipkart] Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Best Practices, Database, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Interview Questions and Answers, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLAuthority News, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Copy Column Headers from Resultset – SQL in Sixty Seconds #026 – Video

    - by pinaldave
    SQL Server Management Studio returns results in Grid View, Text View and to the file. When we copy results from Grid View to Excel there is a common complaint that the column  header displayed in resultset is not copied to the Excel. I often spend time in performance tuning databases and I run many DMV’s in SSMS to get a quick view of the server. In my case it is almost certain that I need all the time column headers when I copy my data to excel or any other place. SQL Server Management Studio have two different ways to do this. Method 1: Ad-hoc When result is rendered you can right click on the resultset and click on Copy Header. This will copy the headers along with the resultset. Additionally, you can use the shortcut key CTRL+SHIFT+C for coping column headers along with the resultset. Method 2: Option Setting at SSMS level This is SSMS level settings and I kept this option always selected as I often need the column headers when I select the resultset. Go Tools >> Options >> Query Results >> SQL Server >> Results to Grid >> Check the Box “Include column header when copying or saving the results.” Both of the methods are discussed in following SQL in Sixty Seconds Video. Here is the code used in the video. Related Tips in SQL in Sixty Seconds: Copy Column Headers in Query Analyzers in Result Set Getting Columns Headers without Result Data – SET FMTONLY ON If we like your idea we promise to share with you educational material. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Database, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL in Sixty Seconds, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Server Management Studio, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology, Video

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  • SQL SERVER – T-SQL Scripts to Find Maximum between Two Numbers

    - by pinaldave
    There are plenty of the things life one can make it simple. I really believe in the same. I was yesterday traveling for community related activity. On airport while returning I met a SQL Enthusiast. He asked me if there is any simple way to find maximum between two numbers in the SQL Server. I asked him back that what he really mean by Simple Way and requested him to demonstrate his code for finding maximum between two numbers. Here is his code: DECLARE @Value1 DECIMAL(5,2) = 9.22 DECLARE @Value2 DECIMAL(5,2) = 8.34 SELECT (0.5 * ((@Value1 + @Value2) + ABS(@Value1 - @Value2))) AS MaxColumn GO I thought his logic was accurate but the same script can be written another way. I quickly wrote following code for him and which worked just fine for him. Here is my code: DECLARE @Value1 DECIMAL(5,2) = 9.22 DECLARE @Value2 DECIMAL(5,2) = 8.34 SELECT CASE WHEN @Value1 > @Value2 THEN @Value1 ELSE @Value2 END AS MaxColumn GO He agreed that my code is much simpler but as per him there is some problem with my code which apparently he does not remember at this time. There are cases when his code will give accurate values and my code will not. I think his comment has value but both of us for the moment could not come up with any valid reason. Do you think any scenario where his code will work and my suggested code will not work? Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – 2011 – Multi-Monitor SSMS Windows

    - by pinaldave
    I have a dual screen arrangement at my home system. I love it because it’s very convenient. When I am working with SQL Server 2008 R2 or any earlier versions, I would want to use both of the Monitor so I open two separate SQL Server Management Studio and work along with it. I have no complaints with my system, at all. I am totally fine with it. However, sometimes I face small issues, like when I just want a small code open in a separate window but I do not want the windows to take over the whole of another window. But then again, I am already used to this current system. Recently when I was working with SQL Server 2011 ‘Denali’ CTP1, I dragged one of the windows by accident, and suddenly it magically appeared out of its ‘Shell’ of SSMS and was appearing on a separate monitor. I played around a bit and figured out that SSMS now supports multi-monitor (or multi screen) support with single SSMS instance. We can now drag out and drag in any window and resize them at any size. Fantastic! If you are multi-monitor user, I am sure you will like this feature. This leads me to ask you question? Do you use multi-monitor system while working with SQL Server? Leave a quick comment. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Server Management Studio, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQLAuthority News – Story of Seattle – SQLPASS 2011 Event Log

    - by pinaldave
    Just like every year I attended SQL PASS in Seattle earlier this month. The event was scheduled from Oct 11-14, 2011 in the convention center of the Seattle. I have been to Seattle more than 6 times so far so it is not a new city for me anymore. The city has always impressed me with its vibrant life and pleasant weather. Just like every other time, I had excellent experience once again in the city. Though I just arrived on the day of the event and left right after the event was over – I hardly visited Seattle – still some good experience to share. Here are few quick photographs from my quick trip of Seattle city. Skyline of Seattle Seattle Convention Center A Shop Tenzing Momo and Co at Pike St Market The Seattle Gum Wall Shoreline in Seattle Nigel and Paras First Starbucks (Relocated) People on Street of Seattle Food at Sandy’s – All Veg Well, this is a short summary of my extremely quick city tour of Seattle. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL PASS, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLAuthority Author Visit, SQLAuthority News, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Introduction to PERCENT_RANK() – Analytic Functions Introduced in SQL Server 2012

    - by pinaldave
    SQL Server 2012 introduces new analytical functions PERCENT_RANK(). This function returns relative standing of a value within a query result set or partition. It will be very difficult to explain this in words so I’d like to attempt to explain its function through a brief example. Instead of creating a new table, I will be using the AdventureWorks sample database as most developers use that for experiment purposes. Now let’s have fun following query: USE AdventureWorks GO SELECT SalesOrderID, OrderQty, RANK() OVER(ORDER BY SalesOrderID) Rnk, PERCENT_RANK() OVER(ORDER BY SalesOrderID) AS PctDist FROM Sales.SalesOrderDetail WHERE SalesOrderID IN (43670, 43669, 43667, 43663) ORDER BY PctDist DESC GO The above query will give us the following result: Now let us understand the resultset. You will notice that I have also included the RANK() function along with this query. The reason to include RANK() function was as this query is infect uses RANK function and find the relative standing of the query. The formula to find PERCENT_RANK() is as following: PERCENT_RANK() = (RANK() – 1) / (Total Rows – 1) If you want to read more about this function read here. Now let us attempt the same example with PARTITION BY clause USE AdventureWorks GO SELECT SalesOrderID, OrderQty, ProductID, RANK() OVER(PARTITION BY SalesOrderID ORDER BY ProductID ) Rnk, PERCENT_RANK() OVER(PARTITION BY SalesOrderID ORDER BY ProductID ) AS PctDist FROM Sales.SalesOrderDetail s WHERE SalesOrderID IN (43670, 43669, 43667, 43663) ORDER BY PctDist DESC GO Now you will notice that the same logic is followed in follow result set. I have now quick question to you – how many of you know the logic/formula of PERCENT_RANK() before this blog post? Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Function, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Tell me What You Want to Listen – My 2 TechED 2011 Sessions

    - by pinaldave
    I am going to present two sessions at TechEd India on March 25th, 2011. I would like to know what do you want me to cover in this session. Watch the video taken by my wife when I was preparing for the session. Sessions Date: March 25, 2011 Understanding SQL Server Behavioral Pattern – SQL Server Extended Events Date and Time: March 25, 2011 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM SQL Server Waits and Queues – Your Gateway to Perf. Troubleshooting Date and Time: March 25, 2011 04:15 PM to 05:15 PM I promise following for both of my sessions: I will share the scripts demonstrated in the session right at the end of the sessions The sessions will be 300-400 level but I promise to make the concept very simple Less slides and lots of meaningful Demos Session close to real life cases and scenarios Surprise gifts to best participants I promise to answer all the questions either in session or right after the hall after the session Lots of Technical Education and FUN! Please leave your comments with your expectation and if you are going to attend the session do let me know here. We will for sure meet at the event and do some interesting talk. You can read the abstract of the session over here. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLAuthority Author Visit, T SQL, Technology Tagged: TechEd, TechEdIn

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  • SQLAuthority News – Deployment guide for Microsoft SharePoint Foundation 2010

    - by pinaldave
    SharePoint and SQL Server both goes together – hands to hand. SharePoint installation is very interesting. At various organizations, the installation is very different and have various needs. SQL Server installation with SharePoint is equally important and I have often seen that it is being neglected. Microsoft has published the Deployment Guide for SharePoint Foundation. It talks about various database aspects as well. For optimal sharepoint installation the required version of SQL Server, including service packs and cumulative updates must be installed on the database server. The installation must include any additional features, such as SQL Analysis Services, and the appropriate SharePoint Foundation logins have to be added and configured. The database server must be hardened and, if it is required, databases must be created by the DBA. For more information, see: Hardware and software requirements (SharePoint Foundation 2010) Harden SQL Server for SharePoint environments (SharePoint Foundation 2010) Deploy by using DBA-created databases (SharePoint Foundation 2010) Deployment guide for Microsoft SharePoint Foundation 2010 Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology Tagged: SharePoint

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  • SQL SERVER 2008 – 2011 – Declare and Assign Variable in Single Statement

    - by pinaldave
    Many of us are tend to overlook simple things even if we are capable of doing complex work. In SQL Server 2008, inline variable assignment is available. This feature exists from last 3 years, but I hardly see its utilization. One of the common arguments was that as the project migrated from the earlier version, the feature disappears. I totally accept this argument and acknowledge it. However, my point is that this new feature should be used in all the new coding – what is your opinion? The code which we used in SQL Server 2005 and the earlier version is as follows: DECLARE @iVariable INT, @vVariable VARCHAR(100), @dDateTime DATETIME SET @iVariable = 1 SET @vVariable = 'myvar' SET @dDateTime = GETDATE() SELECT @iVariable iVar, @vVariable vVar, @dDateTime dDT GO The same should be re-written as following: DECLARE @iVariable INT = 1, @vVariable VARCHAR(100) = 'myvar', @dDateTime DATETIME = GETDATE() SELECT @iVariable iVar, @vVariable vVar, @dDateTime dDT GO I have started to use this new method to assign variables as I personally find it very easy to read as well write. Do you still use the earlier method to declare and assign variables? If yes, is there any particular reason or just an old routine? I am interested to hear about this. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQLAuthority News – Presenting at Tech-Ed On Road – Ahmedabad – June 11, 2011 – Wait Types and Queues

    - by pinaldave
    I will be presenting in person on the subject SQL Server Wait Types and Queues at Ahmedabad on June 11, 2011. Here is the quick summary of the session. SQL Server Waits and Queues – Your Gateway to Perf. Troubleshooting Time: 11:15am – 12:15pm – June 11, 2011 Just like a horoscope, SQL Server Waits and Queues can reveal your past, explain your present and predict your future. SQL Server Performance Tuning uses the Waits and Queues as a proven method to identify the best opportunities to improve performance. A glance at Wait Types can tell where there is a bottleneck. Learn how to identify bottlenecks and potential resolutions in this fast paced, advanced performance tuning session. This session is based on my performance tuning Wait Types and Queues series. SQL SERVER – Summary of Month – Wait Type – Day 28 of 28 During the session there will be Quiz and those who gets right answer will get very interesting gifts from me. Do not miss a single minute of the event. We are also going to have two rock star speakers – Harish Vaidyanathan and Jacob Sebastian. Here is the details for the event: SQLAuthority News – Community Tech Days – TechEd on The Road – Ahmedabad – June 11, 2011 Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: About Me, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLAuthority Author Visit, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – ORDER BY ColumnName vs ORDER BY ColumnNumber

    - by pinaldave
    I strongly favor ORDER BY ColumnName. I read one of the blog post where blogger compared the performance of the two SELECT statement and come to conclusion that ColumnNumber has no harm to use it. Let us understand the point made by first that there is no performance difference. Run following two scripts together: USE AdventureWorks GO -- ColumnName (Recommended) SELECT * FROM HumanResources.Department ORDER BY GroupName, Name GO -- ColumnNumber (Strongly Not Recommended) SELECT * FROM HumanResources.Department ORDER BY 3,2 GO If you look at the result and see the execution plan you will see that both of the query will take the same amount of the time. However, this was not the point of this blog post. It is not good enough to stop here. We need to understand the advantages and disadvantages of both the methods. Case 1: When Not Using * and Columns are Re-ordered USE AdventureWorks GO -- ColumnName (Recommended) SELECT GroupName, Name, ModifiedDate, DepartmentID FROM HumanResources.Department ORDER BY GroupName, Name GO -- ColumnNumber (Strongly Not Recommended) SELECT GroupName, Name, ModifiedDate, DepartmentID FROM HumanResources.Department ORDER BY 3,2 GO Case 2: When someone changes the schema of the table affecting column order I will let you recreate the example for the same. If your development server where your schema is different than the production server, if you use ColumnNumber, you will get different results on the production server. Summary: When you develop the query it may not be issue but as time passes by and new columns are added to the SELECT statement or original table is re-ordered if you have used ColumnNumber it may possible that your query will start giving you unexpected results and incorrect ORDER BY. One should note that the usage of ORDER BY ColumnName vs ORDER BY ColumnNumber should not be done based on performance but usability and scalability. It is always recommended to use proper ORDER BY clause with ColumnName to avoid any confusion. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQLAuthority News – My Evaluation of Singapore SharePoint Conference

    - by pinaldave
    Earlier this year I presented at SQLAuthority News – Presenting at South East Asia SharePoint Conference – Oct 26, 27, 2010 – Singapore. I felt very good to be presenting at Singapore as SharePoint Conference as I was the only SQL Speaker at the event. The event was filled with SharePoint enthusiasts and lots of other experts from all around the globe. The event was one of the best organized event, I attended in subcontinent. I just received my feedback score of the event. I was very much surprised and stunned. My ratting are very high as well, my demo were considered as one of the best demo of the whole event. I am not sure how much feedback I can share with community as organizer did not specify to me but I am very certain that I am allowed to share my own feedback. Speaker – 4.39 (best score 4.74, average 3.84) Contents – 4.37 (best score 4.39, average 3.65) Demo – 4.48 (best score, 4.48, average 3.61) I am very glad that all of my efforts to do presentations at SharePoint Conference are finally paid up. I was very much worried earlier if attendees will accept me or not as I am coming as speaker from foreign technology and no one knows me there. I must thank all of you for the same. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, SharePoint, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLAuthority Author Visit, T SQL, Technology Tagged: SharePoint

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  • SQL SERVER – First Month as DBA Trainee – Disasters and Recovery

    - by pinaldave
    This blog post is written in response to the T-SQL Tuesday hosted by Allen Kinsel. He has selected very interesting subject for T-SQL Tuesday – Disaster and Recovery. This subject took me in past – my past. There were various things, I had done or proposed when I started very first month as a DBA trainee. I was tagged along with very senior DBA in my organization who always protected me or correct my mistake. He was great guy and totally understand the young mind of over-enthusiastic Trainee DBA. I respect him very much. Here are few things which I had learned in my very first month (not necessarily I have practices them on production). Never compress (zip) native backup using any tools, when disaster happen sometime the extra time to un-compress the database can be too long and not acceptable for business SLA Do not truncate logs After restoring full database backup – only restore latest differential back, no need to restore all the backup Always write WHERE condition when deleting and updating Sr. DBA always advised me – always keep your résumé ready and car ready – you never know when you can not recover disaster! Well for sure it was a joke. Today’s T-SQL Tuesday remind me of my very first month as DBA trainee. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: About Me, Best Practices, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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