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  • Choosing a design pattern for a class that might change it's internal attributes

    - by the_drow
    I have a class that holds arbitrary state and it's defined like this: class AbstractFoo { }; template <class StatePolicy> class Foo : public StatePolicy, public AbstractFoo { }; The state policy contains only protected attributes that represent the state. The state might be the same for multiple behaviors and they can be replaced at runtime. All Foo objects have the same interface to abstract the state itself and to enable storing Foo objects in containers. I would like to find the least verbose and the most maintainable way to express this.

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  • Expose subset of a class - design question

    - by thanikkal
    Suppose i have a product class with about close to 100 properties. Now for some operations (Say tax calculation) i dont really need this bulky product type, rather only a subset that has price related properties. I am not sure if i should create different snap shots(class) of products that just has the properties that i am interested in. what would be the ideal approach so that i don't unnecessarily pass around unsought fluff? Thanks in advance.

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  • Suitable Hosting for Web Development Company: VPS Hosting, Cloud hosting, Shared Hosting

    - by KoolKabin
    Hi, We are web development company here in nepal. We are still in growth phase. Our URL: http://www.outsourcingnepal.com We have our clients demanding for web hosting and are now ready for getting hosting package to host websites of our clients. Since we have multiple clients and they want their own cpanel for self configuration, only creating ftp channel is not appropirate. So their own cpanel is needed. So i thought of reseller package. When i searched for reseller package i came across with vps, cloud hosting and shared hosting. So now confused which one is better for our company?

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  • Book Review: Pro SQL Server 2008 Relational Database Design and Implementation

    - by Alexander Kuznetsov
    Investing in proper database design is a very efficient way to cut maintenance costs. If we expect a system to last, we need to make sure it has a good solid foundation - high quality database design. Surely we can and sometimes do cut corners and save on database design to get things done faster. Unfortunately, such cutting corners frequently comes back and bites us: we may end up spending a lot of time solving issues caused by poor design. So, solid understanding of relational database design is...(read more)

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  • Will it hurt my website's SEO friendliness if I host a french targetted website at, let's say, godaddy.com?

    - by Suraj
    Hi guys, I have read that the server location is important for a website to be SEO friendly. I am planning to build a website from scratch which is targetted mainly to french audience (in france), but I am planning to host the web site at godaddy.com. My concern is will it hurt the website SEO friendliness? Or do you recommend me to host the website in france itself? I have also read that I need to have a static IP Address. If it's true, can anyone explain me for what reason? Can anyone suggest me some good web hosting companies, prefereable in france? Thanks in advance!

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  • Are there any GUI or user interface design patterns? [closed]

    - by Niranjan Kala
    I was curious about GUI design patterns, so I searched and got some information, including a list of UI patterns for the web. This UI patterns website says that: UI Patterns is a growing collection of User Interface Design Principles and User Interface Usability Patterns present on web applications and sites today. Are there any other design patterns for constructing websites or other user interfaces? Are there any books that describe these patterns? I'm particularly interested in patterns for Windows desktop development and web development in the .NET platform.

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  • Advantages and disadvantages of building a single page web application

    - by ryanzec
    I'm nearing the end of a prototyping/proof of concept phase for a side project I'm working on, and trying to decide on some larger scale application design decisions. The app is a project management system tailored more towards the agile development process. One of the decisions I need to make is whether or not to go with a traditional multi-page application or a single page application. Currently my prototype is a traditional multi-page setup, however I have been looking at backbone.js to clean up and apply some structure to my Javascript (jQuery) code. It seems like while backbone.js can be used in multi-page applications, it shines more with single page applications. I am trying to come up with a list of advantages and disadvantages of using a single page application design approach. So far I have: Advantages All data has to be available via some sort of API - this is a big advantage for my use case as I want to have an API to my application anyway. Right now about 60-70% of my calls to get/update data are done through a REST API. Doing a single page application will allow me to better test my REST API since the application itself will use it. It also means that as the application grows, the API itself will grow since that is what the application uses; no need to maintain the API as an add-on to the application. More responsive application - since all data loaded after the initial page is kept to a minimum and transmitted in a compact format (like JSON), data requests should generally be faster, and the server will do slightly less processing. Disadvantages Duplication of code - for example, model code. I am going to have to create models both on the server side (PHP in this case) and the client side in Javascript. Business logic in Javascript - I can't give any concrete examples on why this would be bad but it just doesn't feel right to me having business logic in Javascript that anyone can read. Javascript memory leaks - since the page never reloads, Javascript memory leaks can happen, and I would not even know where to begin to debug them. There are also other things that are kind of double edged swords. For example, with single page applications, the data processed for each request can be a lot less since the application will be asking for the minimum data it needs for the particular request, however it also means that there could be a lot more small request to the server. I'm not sure if that is a good or bad thing. What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of single page web applications that I should keep in mind when deciding which way I should go for my project?

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  • What books/references are recommended on the subject of planning and developing efficient web sites [closed]

    - by Shakil
    Once I visited a site containing videos; a well-known web developer creating a site from scratch via planning(paper, software), management, designing then development. I bookmarked the site but unable to find it now. My question is : How to do web-development effectively? What books or videos are recommended ???(I tried google but unable to find useful books or videos). I want to learn how people does it. Can you share resources(books, videos, links) about this... Thanks in advance.. Note: I created a job site for my university project. It gave me huge pain. Thats why I want to learn efficient way. I know html, css, javascript, jquery, php[learning(mvc and framework not yet completed)], phpmyadmin.

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  • AngularJS: structuring a web application with multiple ng-apps

    - by mg1075
    The blogosphere has a number of articles on the topic of AngularJS app structuring guidelines such as these (and others): http://www.johnpapa.net/angular-app-structuring-guidelines/ http://codingsmackdown.tv/blog/2013/04/19/angularjs-modules-for-great-justice/ http://danorlando.com/angularjs-architecture-understanding-modules/ http://henriquat.re/modularizing-angularjs/modularizing-angular-applications/modularizing-angular-applications.html However, one scenario I have yet to come across for guidelines and best practices is the case where you have a large web application containing multiple "mini-spa" apps, and the mini-spa apps all share a certain amount of code. I am not referring to the case of trying to have multiple ng-app declarations on the same page; rather, I mean different sections of a large site that have their own, unique ng-app declaration. As Scott Allen writes in his OdeToCode blog: One scenario I haven't found addressed very well is the scenario where multiple apps exist in the same greater web application and require some shared code on the client. Are there any recommended approaches to take, pitfalls to avoid, or good sample structures of this scenario that you can point to?

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  • Is there a definitive reference on Pinball playfield design?

    - by World Engineer
    I'm looking at designing tables for Future Pinball but I'm not sure where to start as I've little background in game design per se. I've played scores of pinball tables over the years so I've a fairly good idea of what is "fun" in those terms. However, I'd like to know if there is a definitive "bible" of pinball design as far as layout and scoring/mode design goes. I've looked but there doesn't seem to be anything really coherent that I could find. Is it simply a lost art or am I missing some buried gem?

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  • Implementing a modern web application with Web API on top of old services

    - by Gaui
    My company has many WCF services which may or may not be replaced in the near future. The old web application is written in WebForms and communicates straight with these services via SOAP and returns DataTables. Now I am designing a new modern web application in a modern style, an AngularJS client which communicates with an ASP.NET Web API via JSON. The Web API then communicates with the WCF services via SOAP. In the future I want to let the Web API handle all requests and go straight to the database, but because the business logic implemented in the WCF services is complicated it's going to take some time to rewrite and replace it. Now to the problem: I'm trying to make it easy in the near future to replace the WCF services with some other data storage, e.g. another endpoint, database or whatever. I also want to make it easy to unit test the business logic. That's why I have structured the Web API with a repository layer and a service layer. The repository layer has a straight communication with the data storage (WCF service, database, or whatever) and the service layer then uses the repository (Dependency Injection) to get the data. It doesn't care where it gets the data from. Later on I can be in control and structure the data returned from the data storage (DataTable to POCO) and be able to test the logic in the service layer with some mock repository (using Dependency Injection). Below is some code to explain where I'm going with this. But my question is, does this all make sense? Am I making this overly complicated and could this be simplified in any way possible? Does this simplicity make this too complicated to maintain? My main goal is to make it as easy as possible to switch to another data storage later on, e.g. an ORM and be able to test the logic in the service layer. And because the majority of the business logic is implemented in these WCF services (and they return DataTables), I want to be in control of the data and the structure returned to the client. Any advice is greatly appreciated. Update 20/08/14 I created a repository factory, so services would all share repositories. Now it's easy to mock a repository, add it to the factory and create a provider using that factory. Any advice is much appreciated. I want to know if I'm making things more complicated than they should be. So it looks like this: 1. Repository Factory public class RepositoryFactory { private Dictionary<Type, IServiceRepository> repositories; public RepositoryFactory() { this.repositories = new Dictionary<Type, IServiceRepository>(); } public void AddRepository<T>(IServiceRepository repo) where T : class { if (this.repositories.ContainsKey(typeof(T))) { this.repositories.Remove(typeof(T)); } this.repositories.Add(typeof(T), repo); } public dynamic GetRepository<T>() { if (this.repositories.ContainsKey(typeof(T))) { return this.repositories[typeof(T)]; } throw new RepositoryNotFoundException("No repository found for " + typeof(T).Name); } } I'm not very fond of dynamic but I don't know how to retrieve that repository otherwise. 2. Repository and service // Service repository interface // All repository interfaces extend this public interface IServiceRepository { } // Invoice repository interface // Makes it easy to mock the repository later on public interface IInvoiceServiceRepository : IServiceRepository { List<Invoice> GetInvoices(); } // Invoice repository // Connects to some data storage to retrieve invoices public class InvoiceServiceRepository : IInvoiceServiceRepository { public List<Invoice> GetInvoices() { // Get the invoices from somewhere // This could be a WCF, a database, or whatever using(InvoiceServiceClient proxy = new InvoiceServiceClient()) { return proxy.GetInvoices(); } } } // Invoice service // Service that handles talking to a real or a mock repository public class InvoiceService { // Repository factory RepositoryFactory repoFactory; // Default constructor // Default connects to the real repository public InvoiceService(RepositoryFactory repo) { repoFactory = repo; } // Service function that gets all invoices from some repository (mock or real) public List<Invoice> GetInvoices() { // Query the repository return repoFactory.GetRepository<IInvoiceServiceRepository>().GetInvoices(); } }

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  • Cleanest RESTful design for purely "action" calls?

    - by Josh Handel
    Hello all, I am sticking my toe in the RESTful waters and I just can't find a "satisfactory" solution to how to handle truely "action" oriented calls on a RESTful service? My quandry can be broken down into two parts. 1) Transactional calls: I understand the idea of having an ActionTransactor that you get a resource too with a post, update the parameters and then commit with a PUT (as described all over the place and in the Orilly RESTful Web services book).. But I struggle with the idea of keeping URLs with states present for ever.. If we really honestly don't need to keep a transaction for ever can we kill the resource URI? do URIs need to be perminate or can they be transiant URIs that expire 2) Non transactional calls: these might be calls to perform some workflow that spans multiple resources but having a resource just doesn't make since.. An example might be to re-generating some calculated ans cached value like a large aggreget or re-indexing blog or some such "purely" action. Anyways, I'm curious about the communities thoughts on this... Thus far, I've read that Overloading Post is the cleanest way to handle part 2.. But there is an equal amount of argument against that approach as well. And (to me) its not self documenting which I though was one of the key design goals of RESTful APIs.

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  • Running Non-profit Web Applications on Cloud/Dedicated Hosting [closed]

    - by cillosis
    Possible Duplicate: How to find web hosting that meets my requirements? I often times build web applications purely because I enjoy it. I like building useful tools or open source applications that don't come with a price tag. That being said, many of these applications can be quite complex requiring services beyond shared hosting (ex. specific PHP extensions). This leaves me with two options: Make the web application less complex and run on shared hosting. Fork out money for cloud or dedicated/VPS hosting. Considering the application is free (I don't make money off of it intentionally), the money for hosting comes out of my own pocket. I know I am not alone in this sticky situation. So the question is, what are the hosting options that provide more advanced features such as shell access via SSH, ability to install specific software/extensions (ex. if I wish to use a NoSQL DB such as Redis, MongoDB, or Cassandra), etc., at a free or low price point? I know free usually equates to bad/unreliable hosting -- but it's not always the case. There are a couple providers with free plans I know of: Amazon EC2 - Free micro-instance for 1 year AppHarbor - Cloud based .NET web application hosting w/ free plan. What else is available for hosting of non-profit applications?

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  • Guide to the web development ecosystem

    - by acjohnson55
    I'm a long-time software developer, and I've been thrown in the deep, deep end of developing from the ground up what will hopefully be a highly scalable and interactive web application. I've been out of the web game for about 8 years, and even when I was last in it, I wasn't exactly on the cutting edge. I think I've made judicious design decisions and I'm quite happy with the progress I've been making so far, but new, hot web technologies keep crawling out of the woodwork and into my headspace, forcing me to continually revalidate my implementation decisions. Complicating things even further is the preponderance of out-of-date information and the difficulty of knowing what is out of date in the first place. What I'm wondering is, are there any comprehensive books or guides dedicated to compiling and comparing the technologies out there, end-to-end in the web application stack? I'm happy to learn new techs on demand, but I don't like learning about them after I've already spent time going in another direction. I'm looking for the sort of executive info a CTO might read to make sure the best architectural decisions are being made. And just to be clear, this is a question about resources, not about specific technology suggestions.

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  • What are solutions and tradeoffs to maintain search result consistency in a web application

    - by iammichael
    Consider a web application with a custom search function that must display the results in a paged manner (twenty per page with up to hundreds of thousands of total results) and the ability to drill down to individual results that maintain next/previous links to navigate through the results. Re-executing the search on each page request to get the appropriate results for that page of data can be too expensive (up to 15s per search). Also, since the underlying data can change frequently (e.g. addition of new results), re-executing could cause the next/previous functionality to result in inconsistent behavior (e.g. the same results reappearing on a later page after having been viewed on an earlier page). What options exist to ensure the search results can be viewed across multiple pages in a consistent manner, and what tradeoffs does each option have in terms of network, CPU, memory, and storage requirements? EDIT: I thought caching the query search results was an obvious necessity. The question is really asking about where to cache the result set and what tradeoffs might exist to each. For example, storing the ids of the entities in the result set on the client, or storing the IDs of the entities themselves in the users session on the web server, or in a temporary table in the database. I'm not looking specifically for a single solution as different scenarios may result in different approaches (and such a question would be more suited for stackoverflow.com rather than here), but more of a design comparison between the possible approaches.

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  • On Developing Web Services with Global State

    - by user74418
    I'm new to web programming. I'm more experienced and comfortable with client-side code. Recently, I've been dabbling in web programming through Python's Google App Engine. I ran into some difficulty while trying to write some simple apps for the purposes of learning, mainly involving how to maintain some kind of consistent universally-accessible state for the application. I tried to write a simple queueing management system, the kind you would expect to be used in a small clinic, or at a cafeteria. Typically, this is done with hardware. You take a number from a ticketing machine, and when your number is displayed or called you approach the counter for service. Alternatively, you could be given a small pager, which will beep or vibrate when it is your turn to receive service. The former is somewhat better in that you have an idea of how many people are still ahead of you in the queue. In this situation, the global state is the last number in queue, which needs to be updated whenever a request is made to the server. I'm not sure how to best to store and maintain this value in a GAE context. The solution I thought of was to keep the value in the Datastore, attempt to query it during a ticket request, update the value, and then re-store it with put. My problem is that I haven't figured out how to lock the resource so that other requests do not check the value while it is in the middle of being updated. I am concerned that I may end up ticket requests that have the same queue number. Also, the whole solution feels awkward to me. I was wondering if there was a more natural way to accomplish this without having to go through the Datastore. Can anyone with more experience in this domain provide some advice on how to approach the design of the above application?

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  • How can a web developer contribute to Ubuntu?

    - by Kyle Macey
    I've done web development for the past ten years, and have used Ubuntu for my operating system for the past five. I feel like my design and development skills could be useful, but don't know how I can help with experience in web development. I'm currently versed in Ruby, PHP, ColdFusion, and Javascript, and I took a Java class in college. I'm also willing to learn a new language, but don't even know where to start as far as what would be most helpful to the Ubuntu community. Are there projects that a web developer could help with in Ubuntu? Or what language should I learn to best help contribute?

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  • Website development from scratch v/s web framework [duplicate]

    - by Ali
    This question already has an answer here: What should every programmer know about web development? 1 answer Do people develop websites from scratch when there are no particular requirements or they just pick up an existing web framework like Drupal, Joomla, WordPress, etc. The requirements are almost similar in most cases; if personal, it will be a blog or image gallery; if corporate, it will be information pages that can be updated dynamically along with news section. And similarly, there are other requirements which can be fulfilled by WordPress, Joomla or Drupal. So, Is it advisable to develop a website from scratch and why ? Update: to explain more as got commentt from @Raynos (thanks for comment and helping me clearify the question), the question is about: Should web sites be developed and designed fully from scratch? Should they be done by using framework like Spring, Zend, CakePHP? Should they be done using CMS like Joomla, WordPress, Drupal (people in east are using these as frameworks)?

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  • Single database, multiple system dependency

    - by davenewza
    Consider an environment where we have a single, core database, with many separate systems using this one database. This leads to all of these systems have a common dependency, which ultimately introduces coupling between them. This means that we cannot always evolve systems independently of each other. Structural changes to the database (even if only intended for one, particular system), requires a full sweep test of ALL systems, and may require that other systems be 'patched' and subsequently released. This is especially tricky when you want to have separate teams working on different projects. What is a good 'pattern' to help in avoiding such coupling? I would imagine that a database should be exclusively depended on by one system. If other systems require data for whatever reason, they should request such from an API service of some kind. A drawback of this approach which comes to mind is performance: routing data between high-throughput systems through service calls is much slower than through a database connection.

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  • Resources for Test Driven Development in Web Applications?

    - by HorusKol
    I would like to try and implement some TDD in our web applications to reduce regressions and improve release quality, but I'm not convinced at how well automated testing can perform with something as fluffy as web applications. I've read about and tried TDD and unit testing, but the examples are 'solid' and rather simple functionalities like currency converters, and so on. Are there any resources that can help with unit testing content management and publication systems? How about unit testing a shopping cart/store (physical and online products)? AJAX? Googling for "Web Test Driven Development" just gets me old articles from several years ago either covering the same examples of calculator-like function or discussions about why TDD is better than anything (without any examples).

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  • Developing Web Portal

    - by Ya Basha
    I'm php, Ruby on Rails and HTML5 developer I need some advises and suggestions for a web portal project that I will build from scratch. This is my first time to build a web portal, Which developing scripting language you prefer and why? and how I should start planing my project as it will contains many modules. I'm excited to start building this project and I want to build it in the right way with planing, if you know some web resources that help me decide and plan my project please give them to me. Best Regards,

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  • Web Frameworks caring about persistence?

    - by Mik378
    I have noticed that Play! Framework encompasses persistence strategy (like JPA etc...) Why would a web framework care about persistence ?! Indeed, this would be the job of the server-sides components (like EJB etc...), wouldn't this? Otherwise, client would be too coupled with server's business logic. UPDATE: One answer would be : it's more likely used for simple application including itself the whole business logics. However, for large applications with well-designed layers(services, domain, DAO's etc..), persistence is not recommended within web client layer since there would be several different web(or not) clients.

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  • Advice on developing a social network [on hold]

    - by Siraj Mansour
    I am doing research on assembling a team, using the right tools, and the cost to develop a highly responsive social network that is capable of dealing with a lot of users. Similar to the Facebook concept but using the basics package for now. Profile, friends, posts, updates, media upload/download, streaming, chat and Inbox messaging are all in the package. We certainly do not expect it to be as popular as Facebook or handle the same number of users and requests, but in its own game it has to be a monster, and expandable for later on. Neglecting the hosting, and servers part, i am looking for technical advise and opinions, on what kind of team i need ? how many developers ? their expertise ? What are the right tools ? languages ? frameworks ? environments ? Any random ideas about the infrastructure ? Quick thoughts on the development process ? Please use references, if you have any to support your ideas. Development cost mere estimation ? NEGLECTING THE COST OF SERVERS I know my question is too broad but my knowledge is very limited and i need detailed help, for any help you can offer i thank you in advance.

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  • Is it better to define all routes in the Global.asax than to define separately in the areas?

    - by Matthew Patrick Cashatt
    I am working on a MVC 4 project that will serve as an API layer of a larger application. The developers that came before me set up separate Areas to separate different API requests (i.e Search, Customers, Products, and so forth). I am noticing that each Area has separate Area registration classes that define routes for that area. However, the routes defined are not area-specific (i.e. {controller}/{action}/{id} might be defined redundantly in a couple of areas). My instinct would be to move all of these route definitions to a common place like the Global.asax to avoid redundancy and collisions, but I am not sure if I am correct about that.

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  • How to layer if statements when order of logic is irrelevant?

    - by jimmyjimmy
    Basically I have a series of logic in my website that can lead to 5 total outcomes. Basically two different if tests and then a catch all else statement. For example: if cond1: if mod1: #do things elif mod2: #do things elif cond2: if mod1: #do things elif mod2 #do things else: #do things I was thinking about rewriting it like this: if cond1 and mod1: #do things elif cond1 and mod2: #do things elif cond2 and mod1: #do things elif cond2 and mod2: #do things else: #do things Is there any real difference in these two coding options/a better choice for this kind of logic testing?

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