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  • Make Text and Images Easier to Read with the Windows 7 Magnifier

    - by DigitalGeekery
    Do you have impaired vision or find it difficult to read small print on your computer screen? Today, we’ll take a closer look at how to magnify that hard to read content with the Magnifier in Windows 7. Magnifier was available in previous versions of Windows, but the Windows 7 version comes with some notable improvements. There are now three screen modes in Magnifier. Full Screen and Lens mode, however, require Windows Aero to be enabled. If your computer doesn’t support Aero, or if you’re not using am Aero theme, Magnifier will only work in Docked mode. Using Magnifier in Windows 7 You can find the Magnifier by going to Start > All Programs > Accessories > Ease of Access > Magnifier.   Alternately, you can type magnifier into the Search box in the Start Menu and hit Enter. On the Magnifier toolbar, choose your View mode by clicking Views and choosing from the available options. Clicking the plus (+) and minus (-) buttons will zoom in or zoom out. You can change the zoom in/out percentage by adjusting the slider bar. You can also enable color inversion and select tracking options. Click OK when finished to save your settings.   After a brief period, the Magnifier Toolbar will switch to a magnifying glass icon. Simply click the magnifying glass to display the Magnifier Toolbar again.   Docked Mode In Docked mode, a portion of the screen is magnified and docked at the top of the screen. The rest of your desktop will remain in it’s normal state. You can then control which area of the screen is magnified by moving your mouse.   Full Screen Mode This magnifies your entire screen and follows your mouse as you move it around. If you loose track of where you are on the screen, use the Ctrl + Alt + Spacebar shortcut to preview where your mouse pointer is on the screen.   Lens Mode The Lens screen mode is similar to holding a magnifying glass up to your screen. Full screen mode magnifies the area around the mouse. The magnified area moves around the screen with your mouse.    Shortcut Keys Windows key + (+) to zoom in Windows key + (-) to zoom out Windows key + ESC to exit Ctrl + Alt + F – Full screen mode Ctrl + Alt + L – Lens mode Ctrl + Alt + D – Dock mode Ctrl + Alt + R – Resize the lens Ctrl + Alt + Spacebar – Preview full screen Conclusion Windows Magnifier is a nice little tool if you have impaired vision or just need to make items on the screen easier to read. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips New Features in WordPad and Paint in Windows 7How-To Geek on Lifehacker: How to Make Windows Vista Less AnnoyingUsing Comments in Word 2007 DocumentsMake Your PC Look Like Windows Phone 7Use Image Placeholders to Display Documents Faster in Word TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips HippoRemote Pro 2.2 Xobni Plus for Outlook All My Movies 5.9 CloudBerry Online Backup 1.5 for Windows Home Server Windows Media Player Plus! – Cool WMP Enhancer Get Your Team’s World Cup Schedule In Google Calendar Backup Drivers With Driver Magician TubeSort: YouTube Playlist Organizer XPS file format & XPS Viewer Explained Microsoft Office Web Apps Guide

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  • Prolific USB-to-Serial Comm Port significantly slower under Windows 7 comparing to Windows XP

    - by Dmitry S
    Not sure if this question should be asked here or on SuperUser but if we get an answer here it may be useful for others here I am using a Prolific USB-to-Serial adapter based on the Prolific chip to use with a device on serial port. I have the latest version of the driver installed: 1.3.0 (2010-7-15). When I use my device with this adapter on my main Windows 7 (32bit) system it takes 8-9 seconds to send a command through to the device. However, when I do the same thing on a different Windows XP system (an old laptop I borrowed for testing) it only takes 2-3 seconds. I have made sure that the port settings and other variables are the same between systems. I also tested on a third laptop (also running Windows 7) and again got a significant delay. So the question is if anyone else experienced the same problem and found a solution. I would like to avoid moving to an XP system for what I need to achieve so that's my last option. Thanks in advance.

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  • Use a Free Utility to Create Multiple Virtual Desktops in Windows

    - by Lori Kaufman
    If you’ve used Linux, you’re probably familiar with the virtual desktop feature. It provides a convenient way to organize programs and folders open on your desktop. You can switch among multiple desktops and have different programs and folders open on each one. However, virtual desktops is a feature missing in Windows. There are many third-party options for adding virtual desktops to Windows, including one called Dexpot, which we have covered previously. Dexpot is free, but only for private use. Companies, public institutions, non-profit organizations, and even freelancers and self-employed people must buy the program. We found another virtual desktop tool that is completely free for everyone to use, called mDesktop. It’s a lightweight, open source program that allows you to switch among multiple desktops using hot keys and specify open programs or folders to be active on all desktops. You can use mDesktop to group related programs or to work on different projects on separate desktops. mDesktop is portable and does not need to be installed. Simply extract the .zip file you downloaded (see the link at the end of this article) and double-click the mDesktop.exe file. How To Boot Your Android Phone or Tablet Into Safe Mode HTG Explains: Does Your Android Phone Need an Antivirus? How To Use USB Drives With the Nexus 7 and Other Android Devices

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  • Changing enum in a different class for screen

    - by user2434321
    I'm trying to make a start menu for my game and my code uses Enum's to moniter the screen state. Now i want to change the screenstate declared in the main class, in my Background class Screen screen = new Screen(); is declared in the Game1 class Background(ref screen); This is in the update method for the Background Class KeyboardState keystate = Keyboard.GetState(); switch (screen) { case Screen.Start: if (isPressed && keystate.IsKeyUp(Keys.Up) && keystate.IsKeyUp(Keys.Down) && keystate.IsKeyUp(Keys.Enter)) { isPressed = false; } if (keystate.IsKeyDown(Keys.Down) && isPressed != true) { if (menuState == MenuState.Options) menuState = MenuState.Credits; if (menuState == MenuState.Play) menuState = MenuState.Options; isPressed = true; } if (keystate.IsKeyDown(Keys.Up) && isPressed != true) { if (menuState == MenuState.Options) menuState = MenuState.Play; if (menuState == MenuState.Credits) menuState = MenuState.Options; isPressed = true; } switch (menuState) { case MenuState.Play: arrowRect.X = 450; arrowRect.Y = 220; if (keystate.IsKeyDown(Keys.Enter) && isPressed != true) screen = Screen.Play; break; case MenuState.Options: arrowRect.X = 419; arrowRect.Y = 340; if (keystate.IsKeyDown(Keys.Enter) && isPressed != true) screen = Screen.Options; break; case MenuState.Credits: arrowRect.X = 425; arrowRect.Y = 460; if (keystate.IsKeyDown(Keys.Enter) && isPressed != true) screen = Screen.Credits; break; } break; } } For some reason when I play this and I hit the enter button the Background class's screen is changed but the main class's screen isn't how can i change this? EDIT 1* class Background { private Texture2D background; private Rectangle backgroundRect; private Texture2D arrow; private Rectangle arrowRect; private Screen screen; private MenuState menuState; private bool isPressed = false; public Screen getScreenState(ref Screen screen) { this.screen = screen; return this.screen; } public Background(ref Screen screen) { this.screen = screen; } public void Update() { KeyboardState keystate = Keyboard.GetState(); switch (screen) { case Screen.Start: if (isPressed && keystate.IsKeyUp(Keys.Up) && keystate.IsKeyUp(Keys.Down) && keystate.IsKeyUp(Keys.Enter)) { isPressed = false; } if (keystate.IsKeyDown(Keys.Down) && isPressed != true) { if (menuState == MenuState.Options) menuState = MenuState.Credits; if (menuState == MenuState.Play) menuState = MenuState.Options; isPressed = true; } if (keystate.IsKeyDown(Keys.Up) && isPressed != true) { if (menuState == MenuState.Options) menuState = MenuState.Play; if (menuState == MenuState.Credits) menuState = MenuState.Options; isPressed = true; } switch (menuState) { case MenuState.Play: arrowRect.X = 450; arrowRect.Y = 220; if (keystate.IsKeyDown(Keys.Enter) && isPressed != true) screen = Screen.Play; break; case MenuState.Options: arrowRect.X = 419; arrowRect.Y = 340; if (keystate.IsKeyDown(Keys.Enter) && isPressed != true) screen = Screen.Options; break; case MenuState.Credits: arrowRect.X = 425; arrowRect.Y = 460; if (keystate.IsKeyDown(Keys.Enter) && isPressed != true) screen = Screen.Credits; break; } break; case Screen.Pause: break; case Screen.Over: break; } } public void LoadStartContent(ContentManager Content, GraphicsDeviceManager graphics) { background = Content.Load<Texture2D>("startBackground"); arrow = Content.Load<Texture2D>("arrow"); backgroundRect = new Rectangle(0, 0, graphics.GraphicsDevice.Viewport.Width, graphics.GraphicsDevice.Viewport.Height); arrowRect = new Rectangle(450, 225, arrow.Width, arrow.Height); screen = Screen.Start; } public void LoadPlayContent(ContentManager Content, GraphicsDeviceManager graphics) { background = Content.Load<Texture2D>("Background"); backgroundRect = new Rectangle(0, 0, graphics.GraphicsDevice.Viewport.Width, graphics.GraphicsDevice.Viewport.Height); screen = Screen.Play; } public void LoadOverContent(ContentManager Content, GraphicsDeviceManager graphics) { } public void Draw(SpriteBatch spritebatch) { if (screen == Screen.Start) { spritebatch.Draw(background, backgroundRect, Color.White); spritebatch.Draw(arrow, arrowRect, Color.White); } else spritebatch.Draw(background, backgroundRect, Color.White); } } Thats my background class!

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  • Windows 7 Desktop/Start Menu Redirection: Server O/S: Windows Server 2003 And Server 2008

    - by Moody Tech
    Hi, I am new here so I am might be asking a question which has already been answered [however I can't see it in the suggested answers above] I manage a network which is split into a parent domain and a child domain. Recently I have been looking at when to migrate to Windows 7. The child domain users [authenticated by the 2008 based (child) domain] get the redirected Desktop [as expected] but not the Start Menu. The parent domain users [authenticated by the 2003 based (parent) domain] get neither desktop nor Start Menu redirected. Does anyone here know how to successfully redirect the properties for these users as desired? Many thanks.

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  • Windows 7 Desktop/Start Menu Redirection: Server O/S: Windows Server 2003 And Server 2008

    - by VerGuy
    Hi, I am new here so I am might be asking a question which has already been answered [however I can't see it in the suggested answers above] I manage a network which is split into a parent domain and a child domain. Recently I have been looking at when to migrate to Windows 7. The child domain users [authenticated by the 2008 based (child) domain] get the redirected Desktop [as expected] but not the Start Menu. The parent domain users [authenticated by the 2003 based (parent) domain] get neither desktop nor Start Menu redirected. Does anyone here know how to successfully redirect the properties for these users as desired? Many thanks.

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  • What is the difference between Windows RT and Windows Phone 8?

    - by Rakib Ansary
    From what I have read it seems there are more or less three versions(?) of Windows 8: Windows 8, Windows RT, and Windows Phone 8. While the difference between Windows 8 and Windows RT is clear, I don't understand the difference between Windows RT and Windows Phone 8. The Android parallel, Jelly Bean that runs on Tablets and on Phones doesn't have any differences. Are there any differences between Windows RT and Windows Phone 8 except for the fact that one is for Tablets (Windows RT) and the other is for Phones (Windows Phone 8)?

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  • What is a robust method for capturing screen of child window in Windows 7?

    - by Dogan Demir
    Pardon my frustration. I've asked about this in many places and I seriously don't think that there wouldn't be a way in Windows 7 SDK to accomplish this. All I want, is to capture part of a 'child window' ( setParent() ) created by a parent. I used to do this with bitblt() but the catch is that the child window can be any type of application, and in my case has OpenGL running in a section of it. If I bitblt() that, then the OGL part comes blank, doesn't get written to the BMP. DWM, particularly dwmRegisterThumbnail() doesn't allow thumbnail generation of child windows. So please give me a direction. Thanks.

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  • Mecer laptop gives me a white screen when I close the screen

    - by Dane Rossenrode
    I'm having a very strange hardware issue with my Mecer m770u laptop with intel i7 quad core, etc... I'm wondering if anyone has had this issue with any other brand/model of laptop, and what I should fix/replace to solve it...? Basically when I close the screen of the laptop, the screen often goes completely white. If I open it slowly and smoothly again, the screen returns to normal. But if I close the screen when the computer is off, and then switch it on, it boots with a white screen, and opening it slowly/smoothly doesn't help. I have to then switch it on and off a few times before it returns to normal. Makes travelling with my laptop really difficult! Any suggestions?

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  • Using screen, commands like less and man don't clear the screen afterwards

    - by Boldewyn
    In contrast to this question I want the clearing of the screen re-enabled for less. It works fine in my xterm terminal under Cygwin/mintty or Gnome Terminal (both xterms). However, when inside a screen session, the clearing of the screen is somehow disabled. I tried several things, like screen -T xterm or putting the autonuke statement in my ~/.screenrc. Also, inside the screen session export TERM=xterm tset has no effect. So, now I'm out of ideas. Any help appreciated.

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  • SSAS Multithreaded sync with Windows 2008 R2

    - by ACALVETT
    We have been happily running some of our systems on WIndows 2003 and have had an upgrade to W2K8 R2 on the list for quite some time. The upgrade has now completed and we can start taking advantage of some of the new features which is the reason for this post. For a long time we have used the sample Robocopy script from the SQLCat team to synchronize some of our larger SSAS databases. If your wondering what i mean by large, around 5 TB with a good few thousand partitions. The script works like a dream...(read more)

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  • Windows 8 upgrade advisor in windows xp not starting

    - by TBohnen.jnr
    I really hope someone can help me as I am stuck and can't figure out what to do next. I am trying to upgrade from windows xp sp3 (Media Centre edition) Steps I've followed: Clean install from XP SP3 Professional disc Installed all drivers downloaded upgrade advisor and ran where it just closed after like 2 seconds without even showing the screen changed to have a selected startup after finding guidance on the internet, this still did not make a difference Does anybody have an idea? I've looked for logs but can't find anything.

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  • Upgrade to Genuine Windows 8 Pro from non genuine Windows 7

    - by mark
    I have a computer with non-genuine windows 7 (cracked with windows loader). I was thinking of buying / upgrading to Windows 8 Pro. I ran Windows8-UpgradeAssistant.exe and was said that I can upgrade to Windows 8 Pro. Can I perform a clean upgrade (format and install) from my current windows 7 to windows 8? In future, in order to re-install Windows 8 do I need to re-install the non-genuine Windows 7 and install on top of it? If my hard disk crash, or I want to install on a new hard disk (clean install), do I need to install windows 7 again before upgrading to Windows 8? If I don't like Windows 8, can I downgrade to Windows 7 genuine?

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  • Add "My Dropbox" to Your Windows 7 Start Menu

    - by The Geek
    Over here at How-To Geek, we’re huge fans of Dropbox, the amazingly fast online file sync utility, but we’d be even happier if we could natively add it to the Windows 7 Start Menu, where it belongs. And today, that’s what we’ll do. Yep, that’s right. You can add it to the Start Menu… using a silly hack to the Libraries feature and renaming the Recorded TV library to a different name. It’s not a perfect solution, but you can access your Dropbox folder this way and it just seems to belong there. First things first, head into the Customize Start Menu panel by right-clicking on the start menu and using Properties, then make sure that Recorded TV is set to “Display as a link”. Next, right-click on Recorded TV, choose Rename, and then change it to something else like My Dropbox.   Now you’ll want to right-click on that button again, and choose Properties, where you’ll see the Library locations in the list… the general idea is that you want to remove Recorded TV, and then add your Dropbox folder. Oh, and you’ll probably want to make sure to set “Optimize this library for” to “General Items”. At this point, you can just click on My Dropbox, and you’ll see, well, Your Dropbox! (no surprise there). Yeah, I know, it’s totally a hack. But it’s a very useful one! Also, if you aren’t already using Dropbox, you should really check it out—2 GB for free, accessible via the web from anywhere, and you can sync to multiple desktops. Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Use the Windows Key for the "Start" Menu in Ubuntu LinuxAccess Your Dropbox Files in Google ChromeSpeed up Windows Vista Start Menu Search By Limiting ResultsPin Any Folder to the Vista Start Menu the Easy WayEnable "Pin to Start Menu" for Folders in Windows Vista / XP TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Classic Cinema Online offers 100’s of OnDemand Movies OutSync will Sync Photos of your Friends on Facebook and Outlook Windows 7 Easter Theme YoWindoW, a real time weather screensaver Optimize your computer the Microsoft way Stormpulse provides slick, real time weather data

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  • How to Easily Put a Windows PC into Kiosk Mode With Assigned Access

    - by Chris Hoffman
    Windows 8.1′s Assigned Access feature allows you to easily lock a Windows PC to a single application, such as a web browser. This feature makes it easy for anyone to configure Windows 8.1 devices as point-of-sale or other kiosk systems. In the past, setting up a Windows PC in kiosk mode involved much more work, requiring the use of third-party software, group policy, or Linux distributions designed around kiosk mode. Assigned Access is available on Windows 8.1 RT, Windows 8.1 Professional, and Windows 8.1 Enterprise. The standard edition of Windows 8.1 doesn’t support Assigned Access. Create a User Account for Assigned Access Rather than turn your entire computer into a locked-down kiosk system, Assigned Access allows you to create a separate user account that can only launch a single app — such as a web browser. To set this up, you must be logged into Windows as a user with administrator permissions. First, open the PC settings app — swipe in from the right or press Windows Key + C to open the charms bar, tap Settings, and tap Change PC settings. In the PC settings app, select Accounts and select Other accounts. Use the Add an account button to create a new Windows account. Select  the “Sign in without a Microsoft account” option and select Local account to create a local user account. You could also create a Microsoft account, but you may not want to do this if you just want a locked-down account with only browser access. If you need to install apps from the Windows Store to use in Assigned Access mode, you’ll have to set up a Microsoft account instead of a local account. A local account will still allow you access to the preinstalled apps, such as Internet Explorer. You may want to create a user account with a blank password. This would make it simple for anyone to access kiosk mode, even if the system becomes locked or needs to be rebooted. The account will be created as a standard user account with limited permissions. Leave it as a standard user account — don’t make it an administrator account. Set Up Assigned Access Once you’ve created an account, you’ll first need to sign into it. If you don’t, you’ll see a “This account has no apps” message when trying to enable Assigned Access. Go back to the welcome screen, log in to the new account you created, and allow Windows to go through the first-time account setup process. If you want to use a non-default app in kiosk mode, install it while logged in as that user account. Once you’re done, log out of the other account, log back in as your administrator account, and go back to the Other accounts screen. Click the Set up an account for assigned access option to continue. Select the user account you created and select the app you want to limit the account to. For a web-based kiosk, this can be a web browser such as the Modern version of Internet Explorer. Businesses can also create their own Modern apps and set them to run in kiosk mode in this way. Note that Microsoft’s documentation says “web browsers are not good choices for assigned access” because they require more permissions than average Modern (or “Windows Store”) apps. However, if you want to provide a kiosk for web-browsing, using Assigned Access is a much better option than using Guest Mode and offering up a full Windows desktop. When you’re done, restart your PC and log in as the Assigned Access account. Windows will automatically open the app you chose and won’t allow a user to leave that app. Standard Windows 8 features like the charms bar, app switcher, and Start screen won’t appear. Pressing the Windows key once will do nothing. To sign out of Assigned Access mode, press the Windows key five times — quickly — while signed in. You’ll be sent back to the standard login screen. The account will actually still be logged in and the app will remain running — this method just “locks” the screen and allows another user to log in. Automatically Log Into Assigned Access Whenever your Windows device boots, you can log into the Assigned Access account and turn it into a kiosk system. While this isn’t ideal for all kiosk systems, you may want the device to automatically launch the specific app when it boots without requiring any login process. To do so, you’ll just need to have Windows automatically log into the Assigned Access account when it boots. This option is hidden and not available in the standard Control Panel. You’ll need to use the hidden netplwiz Control Panel tool to set up automatic login on boot. If you didn’t create a password for the user account, leave the Password field empty while configuring this. Security Considerations If you’re using this feature to turn a Windows 8.1 system into a kiosk and leaving it open to the public, remember to consider security. Anyone could come up to the system, press the Windows key five times, and try to log into your standard administrator user account. Ensure the administrator user account has a strong password so people won’t be able to get past the kiosk system’s limitations and tamper with the system. Even Windows 8′s detractors have to admit that it’s an ideal system for a touch-screen kiosk device, running either a browser or another specific application. Assigned Access finally makes this easy to set up on Windows systems in the real world — no IT experience, third-party software, or Linux distributions necessary.     

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  • NET START command not passing parameters in Windows Server 2008

    - by Amanbbk
    My application calls a Stored Procedure, through the stored procedure I am calling a Windows Service using the NET START command as follows: SELECT @Cmd = 'Net Start ServiceName /"' + @param1 + '" /"' + @param2 + '"' Now the parameters passed here are not reaching the OnStart method. These values are blank. Protected Overrides Sub OnStart(ByVal args() As String) Try service1= New Service service1.param2 = args(1) service1.param1 = args(0) Here I get args(0) as the name of service instead of the value that is passed, and args(1) is blank. Although the args.Getlength(0) returns 2. The service starts successfully, it invokes the executable, but the parameters are not there. What can be the reason? Administrative access might be required in NET START command? Has the syntax changed for NET START command in Windows Server 2008? Windows Services do not accept parameters in Windows Server 2008? The same thing is running fine on Windows Server 2003.

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  • Desktop bigger than screen

    - by alex
    I am using MSI U115 11" netbook (OS: Windows XP Home, graphics card: Intel Graphics Media Accelerator 500) and today after I switched it on, desktop was bigger than screen. To be exact: screen resolution was set to the lowest possible and I could move mouse outside of screen (but only below - left, right and up worked normally, mouse could not exceed screen boundaries). I changed resolution back to normal, but the problem with desktop being bigger than screen remained (as before, only lower part - cannot see task bar, etc. When I hit windows button on keyboard, only upper part of menu start is visible). What I already tried was changing all kind of graphics and screen settings - none of them helped. I also tried to restore the system to few days before, but it didn't help neither. What can I do to make the desktop look "normally"? EDIT: Some additional info regarding screen: Sorry it's in polish - but let me explain. There are two screens I can choose (Monitor domyslny means default screen), but the second one (the default one) is not available. After I choose it and click apply number 1. is used (and as you can see it has only two resolutions available. There are more in the second one - but without 1024x600 though). The two ticked and grayed out options here are Use this screen as the main one and Enlarge Windows desktop to match this monitor's size. Too bad I cannot change them. When I choose the second screen, the first box is unchecked and grayed out. The second box is available to be changed but it doesn't matter anyway as after applying changes it reverts to the first screen anyway. EDIT: Intel Graphics Media Control Panel screenshot.

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  • Screen Flickering: Hardware or Software?

    - by Wesley
    I have a Samsung N120 netbook (upgraded to 2GB DDR2 RAM) and there has been a screen flickering issue for some time now. However, I have not been able to accurately determine whether it is a software or hardware issue. Here are some of the symptoms: The flicker is white-colored and shows up as vertical lines. Flickering or not, there may be occasionally some random blue patterns (no image distortion) The screen tends to flicker more when the screen is not tilted back all the way. When tilting the screen back and forth, the screen will usually flicker. Some images on the screen may randomly distort without full-on flickering. The screen will flicker only on certain websites, but not on others. A certain part of a webpage may constantly be distorted randomly, even when scrolling. While flickering, the mouse will not move though I'm moving my finger along the touchpad. A connected external monitor does not have any problems. The flickering is completely random and does not seem to follow any CPU/GPU usage trends. Flickering usually gets worse when the screen brightness is turned higher. There will be flickering on battery and while plugged in. Search up "Samsung N120 - Screen Flickering" on YouTube for an idea of what the flickering looks like. However, there is no visible distortions and the flickering seems to stop when the screen has dimmed. Since the problems started, I tried formatting and using Windows 7, then formatted again and went back to Windows XP. The screen was also replaced sometime during this past summer. The uninstallation of the Samsung Battery Manager (on the original install of XP) seemed to reduce the flicker partially, but eventually got worse. So, what could possibly be the problem?

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  • How to search for a Windows 8 folder by name

    - by Edward Brey
    In Windows 7, if you press the Windows key and type the name of a folder, and the folder shows up among the Start menu search results. In Windows 8, if you do the same thing, no folders are listed. The Files filter shows files with matching names, but no folders. I realize that you can still search for folders from the Windows Explorer search box, but navigating that way is a bit slow and clumsy. Is there a quicker way, in particular a way to search directly from the Windows 8 Start screen?

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  • Add New Features to WMP with Windows Media Player Plus

    - by DigitalGeekery
    Do you use Windows Media Player 11 or 12 as your default media player? Today, we’re going to show you how to add some handy new features and enhancements with the Windows Media Player Plus third party plug-in. Installation and Setup Download and install Media Player Plus! (link below). You’ll need to close out of Windows Media Player before you begin or you’ll receive the message below. The next time you open Media Player you’ll be presented with the Media Player Plus settings window. Some of the settings will be enabled by default, such as the Find as you type feature. Using Media Player Plus! Find as you type allows you to start typing a search term from anywhere in Media Player without having to be in the Search box. The search term will automatically fill in the search box and display the results.   You’ll also see Disable group headers in the Library Pane.   This setting will display library items in a continuous list similar to the functionality of Windows Media Player 10. Under User Interface you can enable displaying the currently playing artist and title in the title bar. This is enabled by default.   The Context Menu page allows you to enable context menu enhancements. The File menu enhancement allows you to add the Windows Context menu to Media Player on the library pane, list pane, or both. Right click on a Title, select File, and you’ll see the Windows Context Menu. Right-click on a title and select Tag Editor Plus. Tag Editor Plus allows you to quickly edit media tags.   The Advanced tab displays a number of tags that Media Player usually doesn’t show. Only the tags with the notepad and pencil icon are editable.   The Restore Plug-ins page allows you to configure which plug-ins should be automatically restored after a Media Player crash. The Restore Media at Startup page allows you to configure Media Player to resume playing the last playlist, track, and even whether it was playing or paused at the time the application was closed. So, if you close out in the middle of a song, it will begin playing from that point the next time you open Media Player. You can also set Media Player to rewind a certain number of seconds from where you left off. This is especially useful if you are in the middle of watching a movie. There’s also the option to have your currently playing song sent to Windows Live Messenger. You can access the settings at any time by going to Tools, Plug-in properties, and selecting Windows Media Player Plus. Windows Media Plus is a nice little free plug-in for WMP 11 and 12 that brings a lot of additional functionality to Windows Media Player. If you use Media Player 11 or WMP 12 in Windows 7 as your main player, you might want to give this a try. Download Windows Media Player Plus! Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Install and Use the VLC Media Player on Ubuntu LinuxFixing When Windows Media Player Library Won’t Let You Add FilesMake VLC Player Look like Windows Media Player 10Make VLC Player Look like Windows Media Player 11Make Windows Media Player Automatically Open in Mini Player Mode TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips Xobni Plus for Outlook All My Movies 5.9 CloudBerry Online Backup 1.5 for Windows Home Server Snagit 10 Easily Create More Bookmark Toolbars in Firefox Filevo is a Cool File Hosting & Sharing Site Get a free copy of WinUtilities Pro 2010 World Cup Schedule Boot Snooze – Reboot and then Standby or Hibernate Customize Everything Related to Dates, Times, Currency and Measurement in Windows 7

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  • Make Your PC Look Like Windows Phone 7

    - by Matthew Guay
    Windows Phone 7 offers a unique and exciting UI that displays lots of information efficiently on the screen.  And with a simple Rainmeter theme, you can have the same UI and content directly on your Windows 7 desktop. Turn your Desktop into a Windows Phone 7 lookalike To give your Windows 7 desktop a Windows Phone 7 makeover, first you need to have the free Rainmeter application installed.  If you do not have it installed, download it from the link below and run the setup.  Accept the license agreement, and install it with the default settings. By default Rainmeter will automatically run when you start your computer.  If you do not want this, you can uncheck the box during the setup. Now, download the Omnimo UI theme for Rainmeter (link below).  You will need to unzip the folder first. This theme uses the Segoe UI and the Segoe UI Light font, so Windows Vista users need to install the segoeuil.ttf font first, and XP users need to install both the segoeui.ttf and the segoeuil.ttf font first.  Copy the appropriate fonts to C:\Windows\Fonts, or in Vista double-click on the font and select Install. Now, run the Rainmeter theme setup.  Double-click on the Rainstaller.exe in the Omnimo folder. Click Express install to add the theme and skin to Rainmeter. Click Finish, and by default Rainmeter will open with your new theme. When the new theme opens the first time, you will be asked to read the readme, or simply go to the gallery. When you open the gallery, you can choose from a wide variety of tiles and gadgets to place on your desktop.  You can also choose a different color scheme for your tiles. Once you’re done, click the X in the top right hand corner to close the Gallery.  Welcome to your Windows Phone 7 desktop!  Many of the gadgets are dynamic, and you can change the settings for most of them.  The only thing missing is the transition animations that Windows Phone 7 shows when you launch an application. To make it look even more like Windows Phone 7, you can change your background to black.  This makes the desktop theme really dramatic. And, if you want to add gadgets or change the color scheme, simply click on the + logo on the top. Windows Phone 7 Desktop Wallpapers If you’d prefer to simply change your background, My Microsoft Life has several very nice Windows Phone 7 wallpapers available for free.  Click the link below to download these and other Microsoft-centric wallpapers. If you can’t wait to get the new Windows phone 7, this is a great way to start experiencing the beauty of the phone UI on your desktop. Links Download Rainmeter Download the Omnimo UI Rainmeter theme Download Windows Phone 7 inspired wallpapers Similar Articles Productive Geek Tips Try out Windows Phone 7 on your PC todayTest All Features of Windows Phone 7 On Your PCHow-To Geek on Lifehacker: How to Make Windows Vista Less AnnoyingCreate a Shortcut or Hotkey to Mute the System Volume in WindowsMake Ubuntu Automatically Save Changes to Your Session TouchFreeze Alternative in AutoHotkey The Icy Undertow Desktop Windows Home Server – Backup to LAN The Clear & Clean Desktop Use This Bookmarklet to Easily Get Albums Use AutoHotkey to Assign a Hotkey to a Specific Window Latest Software Reviews Tinyhacker Random Tips DVDFab 6 Revo Uninstaller Pro Registry Mechanic 9 for Windows PC Tools Internet Security Suite 2010 Norwegian Life If Web Browsers Were Modes of Transportation Google Translate (for animals) Roadkill’s Scan Port scans for open ports Out of 100 Tweeters Out of band Security Update for Internet Explorer

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  • GNU Screen: Combining split-regions and full-screen sessions

    - by scrrr
    Let's say I have three sessions: 0, 1 and 2 I'm on session 0 and I press CTRL-A S to split the screen. Then I select session 1 for the bottom split region, while 0 is in the upper. Can I switch to session 2 and have it display in full-screen while 0 and 1 remain split? If I CTRL-A n to other sessions in a split screen it only changes the split-region. I want some sessions to be full-screen though. Is that possible?

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  • How can I connect to a Windows server using a Command Line Interface? (CLI)

    - by HopelessN00b
    Especially with the option to install Server Core in Server 2008 and above, connecting to Windows servers over a CLI is increasingly useful ability, if not one that's very widespread amongst Windows administrators. Practically every Windows GUI management tool has an option to connect to a remote computer, but there is no such option present in the built-in Windows CLI (cmd.exe), which gives the initial impression that this might not be possible. Is it possible to remotely management or administer a Windows Server using a CLI? And if so, what options are there to achieve this?

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  • Automated capturing of screen using "Microsoft Expression Encoder Screen Capture" command line operations

    - by gentlesea
    I want to capture screen output automatically from within my TestComplete test program. For this i found the free limited version of "Microsoft Expression Encoder Screen Capture" which I want to automate. Is there a separate command line interface for Microsoft Expression Encoder Screen Capture or do I have to use the command line interface for Expression Studio? I found this options: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc294683.aspx. But before I dig deeper, I want to know if I am on the right way.

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  • How switch between screen inside screen?

    - by André Andrade
    I have to work inside two environment. One Windows (local) and one Linux (remote). I've installed the screen linux utility in both. I'm able to open a screen on my windows, then in one tab, I opened a ssh connection to the linux remote and I start another screen. Sample linux -- |0 linux remote 0| 1 linux remote 1 windows-- |0 linux | 9 windows I can switch between "linux remote 0" and "linux remote 1" using Atl+. This is configured in .screenrc (bindkey "^[0" select 0) How could I switch to "9 windows"?

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