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  • Which type RAM support Our Servers?

    - by Mikunos
    I need to increase the RAM in our DELL servers but with the lshw I cannot see if the RAM installed is a UDIMM or RDIMM. Handle 0x1100, DMI type 17, 28 bytes Memory Device Array Handle: 0x1000 Error Information Handle: Not Provided Total Width: 72 bits Data Width: 64 bits Size: 2048 MB Form Factor: DIMM Set: 1 Locator: DIMM_A1 Bank Locator: Not Specified Type: <OUT OF SPEC> Type Detail: Synchronous Speed: 1333 MHz (0.8 ns) Manufacturer: 00CE00B380CE Serial Number: 8244850B Asset Tag: 02103961 Part Number: M393B5773CH0-CH9 Handle 0x1101, DMI type 17, 28 bytes Memory Device Array Handle: 0x1000 Error Information Handle: Not Provided Total Width: 72 bits Data Width: 64 bits Size: 2048 MB Form Factor: DIMM Set: 1 Locator: DIMM_A2 Bank Locator: Not Specified Type: <OUT OF SPEC> Type Detail: Synchronous Speed: 1333 MHz (0.8 ns) Manufacturer: 00CE00B380CE Serial Number: 8244855D Asset Tag: 02103961 Part Number: M393B5773CH0-CH9 Handle 0x1102, DMI type 17, 28 bytes Memory Device Array Handle: 0x1000 Error Information Handle: Not Provided Total Width: 72 bits Data Width: 64 bits Size: 2048 MB Form Factor: DIMM Set: 2 Locator: DIMM_A3 Bank Locator: Not Specified Type: <OUT OF SPEC> Type Detail: Synchronous Speed: 1333 MHz (0.8 ns) Manufacturer: 00CE00B380CE Serial Number: 8244853E Asset Tag: 02103961 Part Number: M393B5773CH0-CH9 how have we do to know which is the right RAM memory to buy? thanks

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  • Why is piping dd through gzip so much faster than a direct copy?

    - by Foo Bar
    I wanted to backup a path from a computer in my network to another computer in the same network over a 100MBit/s line. For this I did dd if=/local/path of=/remote/path/in/local/network/backup.img which gave me a very low network transfer speed of something about 50 to 100 kB/s, which would have taken forever. So I stopped it and decided to try gzipping it on the fly to make it much smaller so that the amount to transfer is less. So I did dd if=/local/folder | gzip > /remote/path/in/local/network/backup.img.gz But now I get something like 1 MB/s network transfer speed, so a factor of 10 to 20 faster. After noticing this, I tested this on several paths and files and it was always the same. Why does piping dd through gzip also increase the transfer rates by a large factor instead of only reducing the bytelength of the stream by a large factor? I'd expected even a small decrease in transfer rates instead, due to the higher CPU consumption while compressing, but now I get a double plus. Not that I'm not happy, but just wondering. ;)

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  • How can i estimate memory usage of stl::map?

    - by Drakosha
    For example, I have a std::map with known sizeof(A) and sizefo(B), while map has N entries inside. How would you estimate its memory usage? I'd say it's something like (sizeof(A) + sizeof(B)) * N * factor But what is the factor? Different formula maybe? Update: Maybe it's easier to ask for upper bound?

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  • My first Lisp macro; is it leaky?

    - by Tom Martin
    I've been working through Practical Common Lisp and as an exercise decided to write a macro to determine if a number is a multiple of another number: (defmacro multp (value factor) `(= (rem ,value ,factor) 0)) so that : (multp 40 10) evaluates to true whilst (multp 40 13) does not The question is does this macro leak in some way? Also is this "good" Lisp? Is there already an existing function/macro that I could have used?

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  • Fractional y-var in ggplot

    - by Misha
    How can I easily create a fractional y-value when using ggplot? t <- as.factor(test=sample(seq(0,100,10),1000,rep=T)) d <- as.factor(sample(c(0,1),1000,rep=T) p <- data.frame(t,d) My best shot was: ggplot(p,aes(x=t,y=prop.table(table(t,d),1)[,1])) + geom_point() However this doesnt work and I guess there is an easier way around this...

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  • SQLAuthority News – Job Interviewing the Right Way (and for the Right Reasons) – Guest Post by Feodor Georgiev

    - by pinaldave
    Feodor Georgiev is a SQL Server database specialist with extensive experience of thinking both within and outside the box. He has wide experience of different systems and solutions in the fields of architecture, scalability, performance, etc. Feodor has experience with SQL Server 2000 and later versions, and is certified in SQL Server 2008. Feodor has written excellent article on Job Interviewing the Right Way. Here is his article in his own language. A while back I was thinking to start a blog post series on interviewing and employing IT personnel. At that time I had just read the ‘Smart and gets things done’ book (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/items/2007/06/05.html) and I was hyped up on some debatable topics regarding finding and employing the best people in the branch. I have no problem with hiring the best of the best; it’s just the definition of ‘the best of the best’ that makes things a bit more complicated. One of the fundamental books one can read on the topic of interviewing is the one mentioned above. If you have not read it, then you must do so; not because it contains the ultimate truth, and not because it gives the answers to most questions on the subject, but because the book contains an extensive set of questions about interviewing and employing people. Of course, a big part of these questions have different answers, depending on location, culture, available funds and so on. (What works in the US may not necessarily work in the Nordic countries or India, or it may work in a different way). The only thing that is valid regardless of any external factor is this: curiosity. In my belief there are two kinds of people – curious and not-so-curious; regardless of profession. Think about it – professional success is directly proportional to the individual’s curiosity + time of active experience in the field. (I say ‘active experience’ because vacations and any distractions do not count as experience :)  ) So, curiosity is the factor which will distinguish a good employee from the not-so-good one. But let’s shift our attention to something else for now: a few tips and tricks for successful interviews. Tip and trick #1: get your priorities straight. Your status usually dictates your priorities; for example, if the person looking for a job has just relocated to a new country, they might tend to ignore some of their priorities and overload others. In other words, setting priorities straight means to define the personal criteria by which the interview process is lead. For example, similar to the following questions can help define the criteria for someone looking for a job: How badly do I need a (any) job? Is it more important to work in a clean and quiet environment or is it important to get paid well (or both, if possible)? And so on… Furthermore, before going to the interview, the candidate should have a list of priorities, sorted by the most importance: e.g. I want a quiet environment, x amount of money, great helping boss, a desk next to a window and so on. Also it is a good idea to be prepared and know which factors can be compromised and to what extent. Tip and trick #2: the interview is a two-way street. A job candidate should not forget that the interview process is not a one-way street. What I mean by this is that while the employer is interviewing the potential candidate, the job seeker should not miss the chance to interview the employer. Usually, the employer and the candidate will meet for an interview and talk about a variety of topics. In a quality interview the candidate will be presented to key members of the team and will have the opportunity to ask them questions. By asking the right questions both parties will define their opinion about each other. For example, if the candidate talks to one of the potential bosses during the interview process and they notice that the potential manager has a hard time formulating a question, then it is up to the candidate to decide whether working with such person is a red flag for them. There are as many interview processes out there as there are companies and each one is different. Some bigger companies and corporates can afford pre-selection processes, 3 or even 4 stages of interviews, small companies usually settle with one interview. Some companies even give cognitive tests on the interview. Why not? In his book Joel suggests that a good candidate should be pampered and spoiled beyond belief with a week-long vacation in New York, fancy hotels, food and who knows what. For all I can imagine, an interview might even take place at the top of the Eifel tower (right, Mr. Joel, right?) I doubt, however, that this is the optimal way to capture the attention of a good employee. The ‘curiosity’ topic What I have learned so far in my professional experience is that opinions can be subjective. Plus, opinions on technology subjects can also be subjective. According to Joel, only hiring the best of the best is worth it. If you ask me, there is no such thing as best of the best, simply because human nature (well, aside from some physical limitations, like putting your pants on through your head :) ) has no boundaries. And why would it have boundaries? I have seen many curious and interesting people, naturally good at technology, though uninterested in it as one  can possibly be; I have also seen plenty of people interested in technology, who (in an ideal world) should have stayed far from it. At any rate, all of this sums up at the end to the ‘supply and demand’ factor. The interview process big-bang boils down to this: If there is a mutual benefit for both the employer and the potential employee to work together, then it all sorts out nicely. If there is no benefit, then it is much harder to get to a common place. Tip and trick #3: word-of-mouth is worth a thousand words Here I would just mention that the best thing a job candidate can get during the interview process is access to future team members or other employees of the new company. Nowadays the world has become quite small and everyone knows everyone. Look at LinkedIn, look at other professional networks and you will realize how small the world really is. Knowing people is a good way to become more approachable and to approach them. Tip and trick #4: Be confident. It is true that for some people confidence is as natural as breathing and others have to work hard to express it. Confidence is, however, a key factor in convincing the other side (potential employer or employee) that there is a great chance for success by working together. But it cannot get you very far if it’s not backed up by talent, curiosity and knowledge. Tip and trick #5: The right reasons What really bothers me in Sweden (and I am sure that there are similar situations in other countries) is that there is a tendency to fill quotas and to filter out candidates by criteria different from their skill and knowledge. In job ads I see quite often the phrases ‘positive thinker’, ‘team player’ and many similar hints about personality features. So my guess here is that discrimination has evolved to a new level. Let me clear up the definition of discrimination: ‘unfair treatment of a person or group on the basis of prejudice’. And prejudice is the ‘partiality that prevents objective consideration of an issue or situation’. In other words, there is not much difference whether a job candidate is filtered out by race, gender or by personality features – it is all a bad habit. And in reality, there is no proven correlation between the technology knowledge paired with skills and the personal features (gender, race, age, optimism). It is true that a significantly greater number of Darwin awards were given to men than to women, but I am sure that somewhere there is a paper or theory explaining the genetics behind this. J This topic actually brings to mind one of my favorite work related stories. A while back I was working for a big company with many teams involved in their processes. One of the teams was occupying 2 rooms – one had the team members and was full of light, colorful posters, chit-chats and giggles, whereas the other room was dark, lighted only by a single monitor with a quiet person in front of it. Later on I realized that the ‘dark room’ person was the guru and the ultimate problem-solving-brain who did not like the chats and giggles and hence was in a separate room. In reality, all severe problems which the chatty and cheerful team members could not solve and all emergencies were directed to ‘the dark room’. And thus all worked out well. The moral of the story: Personality has nothing to do with technology knowledge and skills. End of story. Summary: I’d like to stress the fact that there is no ultimately perfect candidate for a job, and there is no such thing as ‘best-of-the-best’. From my personal experience, the main criteria by which I measure people (co-workers and bosses) is the curiosity factor; I know from experience that the more curious and inventive a person is, the better chances there are for great achievements in their field. Related stories: (for extra credit) 1) Get your priorities straight. A while back as a consultant I was working for a few days at a time at different offices and for different clients, and so I was able to compare and analyze the work environments. There were two different places which I compared and recently I asked a friend of mine the following question: “Which one would you prefer as a work environment: a noisy office full of people, or a quiet office full of faulty smells because the office is rarely cleaned?” My friend was puzzled for a while, thought about it and said: “Hmm, you are talking about two different kinds of pollution… I will probably choose the second, since I can clean the workplace myself a bit…” 2) The interview is a two-way street. One time, during a job interview, I met a potential boss that had a hard time phrasing a question. At that particular time it was clear to me that I would not have liked to work under this person. According to my work religion, the properly asked question contains at least half of the answer. And if I work with someone who cannot ask a question… then I’d be doing double or triple work. At another interview, after the technical part with the team leader of the department, I was introduced to one of the team members and we were left alone for 5 minutes. I immediately jumped on the occasion and asked the blunt question: ‘What have you learned here for the past year and how do you like your job?’ The team member looked at me and said ‘Nothing really. I like playing with my cats at home, so I am out of here at 5pm and I don’t have time for much.’ I was disappointed at the time and I did not take the job offer. I wasn’t that shocked a few months later when the company went bankrupt. 3) The right reasons to take a job: personality check. A while back I was asked to serve as a job reference for a coworker. I agreed, and after some weeks I got a phone call from the company where my colleague was applying for a job. The conversation started with the manager’s question about my colleague’s personality and about their social skills. (You can probably guess what my internal reaction was… J ) So, after 30 minutes of pouring common sense into the interviewer’s head, we finally agreed on the fact that a shy or quiet personality has nothing to do with work skills and knowledge. Some years down the road my former colleague is taking the manager’s position as the manager is demoted to a different department. Reference: Feodor Georgiev, Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: PostADay, Readers Contribution, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • Simplex Noise Help

    - by Alex Larsen
    Im Making A Minecraft Like Gae In XNA C# And I Need To Generate Land With Caves This Is The Code For Simplex I Have /// <summary> /// 1D simplex noise /// </summary> /// <param name="x"></param> /// <returns></returns> public static float Generate(float x) { int i0 = FastFloor(x); int i1 = i0 + 1; float x0 = x - i0; float x1 = x0 - 1.0f; float n0, n1; float t0 = 1.0f - x0 * x0; t0 *= t0; n0 = t0 * t0 * grad(perm[i0 & 0xff], x0); float t1 = 1.0f - x1 * x1; t1 *= t1; n1 = t1 * t1 * grad(perm[i1 & 0xff], x1); // The maximum value of this noise is 8*(3/4)^4 = 2.53125 // A factor of 0.395 scales to fit exactly within [-1,1] return 0.395f * (n0 + n1); } /// <summary> /// 2D simplex noise /// </summary> /// <param name="x"></param> /// <param name="y"></param> /// <returns></returns> public static float Generate(float x, float y) { const float F2 = 0.366025403f; // F2 = 0.5*(sqrt(3.0)-1.0) const float G2 = 0.211324865f; // G2 = (3.0-Math.sqrt(3.0))/6.0 float n0, n1, n2; // Noise contributions from the three corners // Skew the input space to determine which simplex cell we're in float s = (x + y) * F2; // Hairy factor for 2D float xs = x + s; float ys = y + s; int i = FastFloor(xs); int j = FastFloor(ys); float t = (float)(i + j) * G2; float X0 = i - t; // Unskew the cell origin back to (x,y) space float Y0 = j - t; float x0 = x - X0; // The x,y distances from the cell origin float y0 = y - Y0; // For the 2D case, the simplex shape is an equilateral triangle. // Determine which simplex we are in. int i1, j1; // Offsets for second (middle) corner of simplex in (i,j) coords if (x0 > y0) { i1 = 1; j1 = 0; } // lower triangle, XY order: (0,0)->(1,0)->(1,1) else { i1 = 0; j1 = 1; } // upper triangle, YX order: (0,0)->(0,1)->(1,1) // A step of (1,0) in (i,j) means a step of (1-c,-c) in (x,y), and // a step of (0,1) in (i,j) means a step of (-c,1-c) in (x,y), where // c = (3-sqrt(3))/6 float x1 = x0 - i1 + G2; // Offsets for middle corner in (x,y) unskewed coords float y1 = y0 - j1 + G2; float x2 = x0 - 1.0f + 2.0f * G2; // Offsets for last corner in (x,y) unskewed coords float y2 = y0 - 1.0f + 2.0f * G2; // Wrap the integer indices at 256, to avoid indexing perm[] out of bounds int ii = i % 256; int jj = j % 256; // Calculate the contribution from the three corners float t0 = 0.5f - x0 * x0 - y0 * y0; if (t0 < 0.0f) n0 = 0.0f; else { t0 *= t0; n0 = t0 * t0 * grad(perm[ii + perm[jj]], x0, y0); } float t1 = 0.5f - x1 * x1 - y1 * y1; if (t1 < 0.0f) n1 = 0.0f; else { t1 *= t1; n1 = t1 * t1 * grad(perm[ii + i1 + perm[jj + j1]], x1, y1); } float t2 = 0.5f - x2 * x2 - y2 * y2; if (t2 < 0.0f) n2 = 0.0f; else { t2 *= t2; n2 = t2 * t2 * grad(perm[ii + 1 + perm[jj + 1]], x2, y2); } // Add contributions from each corner to get the final noise value. // The result is scaled to return values in the interval [-1,1]. return 40.0f * (n0 + n1 + n2); // TODO: The scale factor is preliminary! } public static float Generate(float x, float y, float z) { // Simple skewing factors for the 3D case const float F3 = 0.333333333f; const float G3 = 0.166666667f; float n0, n1, n2, n3; // Noise contributions from the four corners // Skew the input space to determine which simplex cell we're in float s = (x + y + z) * F3; // Very nice and simple skew factor for 3D float xs = x + s; float ys = y + s; float zs = z + s; int i = FastFloor(xs); int j = FastFloor(ys); int k = FastFloor(zs); float t = (float)(i + j + k) * G3; float X0 = i - t; // Unskew the cell origin back to (x,y,z) space float Y0 = j - t; float Z0 = k - t; float x0 = x - X0; // The x,y,z distances from the cell origin float y0 = y - Y0; float z0 = z - Z0; // For the 3D case, the simplex shape is a slightly irregular tetrahedron. // Determine which simplex we are in. int i1, j1, k1; // Offsets for second corner of simplex in (i,j,k) coords int i2, j2, k2; // Offsets for third corner of simplex in (i,j,k) coords /* This code would benefit from a backport from the GLSL version! */ if (x0 >= y0) { if (y0 >= z0) { i1 = 1; j1 = 0; k1 = 0; i2 = 1; j2 = 1; k2 = 0; } // X Y Z order else if (x0 >= z0) { i1 = 1; j1 = 0; k1 = 0; i2 = 1; j2 = 0; k2 = 1; } // X Z Y order else { i1 = 0; j1 = 0; k1 = 1; i2 = 1; j2 = 0; k2 = 1; } // Z X Y order } else { // x0<y0 if (y0 < z0) { i1 = 0; j1 = 0; k1 = 1; i2 = 0; j2 = 1; k2 = 1; } // Z Y X order else if (x0 < z0) { i1 = 0; j1 = 1; k1 = 0; i2 = 0; j2 = 1; k2 = 1; } // Y Z X order else { i1 = 0; j1 = 1; k1 = 0; i2 = 1; j2 = 1; k2 = 0; } // Y X Z order } // A step of (1,0,0) in (i,j,k) means a step of (1-c,-c,-c) in (x,y,z), // a step of (0,1,0) in (i,j,k) means a step of (-c,1-c,-c) in (x,y,z), and // a step of (0,0,1) in (i,j,k) means a step of (-c,-c,1-c) in (x,y,z), where // c = 1/6. float x1 = x0 - i1 + G3; // Offsets for second corner in (x,y,z) coords float y1 = y0 - j1 + G3; float z1 = z0 - k1 + G3; float x2 = x0 - i2 + 2.0f * G3; // Offsets for third corner in (x,y,z) coords float y2 = y0 - j2 + 2.0f * G3; float z2 = z0 - k2 + 2.0f * G3; float x3 = x0 - 1.0f + 3.0f * G3; // Offsets for last corner in (x,y,z) coords float y3 = y0 - 1.0f + 3.0f * G3; float z3 = z0 - 1.0f + 3.0f * G3; // Wrap the integer indices at 256, to avoid indexing perm[] out of bounds int ii = i % 256; int jj = j % 256; int kk = k % 256; // Calculate the contribution from the four corners float t0 = 0.6f - x0 * x0 - y0 * y0 - z0 * z0; if (t0 < 0.0f) n0 = 0.0f; else { t0 *= t0; n0 = t0 * t0 * grad(perm[ii + perm[jj + perm[kk]]], x0, y0, z0); } float t1 = 0.6f - x1 * x1 - y1 * y1 - z1 * z1; if (t1 < 0.0f) n1 = 0.0f; else { t1 *= t1; n1 = t1 * t1 * grad(perm[ii + i1 + perm[jj + j1 + perm[kk + k1]]], x1, y1, z1); } float t2 = 0.6f - x2 * x2 - y2 * y2 - z2 * z2; if (t2 < 0.0f) n2 = 0.0f; else { t2 *= t2; n2 = t2 * t2 * grad(perm[ii + i2 + perm[jj + j2 + perm[kk + k2]]], x2, y2, z2); } float t3 = 0.6f - x3 * x3 - y3 * y3 - z3 * z3; if (t3 < 0.0f) n3 = 0.0f; else { t3 *= t3; n3 = t3 * t3 * grad(perm[ii + 1 + perm[jj + 1 + perm[kk + 1]]], x3, y3, z3); } // Add contributions from each corner to get the final noise value. // The result is scaled to stay just inside [-1,1] return 32.0f * (n0 + n1 + n2 + n3); // TODO: The scale factor is preliminary! } private static byte[] perm = new byte[512] { 151,160,137,91,90,15, 131,13,201,95,96,53,194,233,7,225,140,36,103,30,69,142,8,99,37,240,21,10,23, 190, 6,148,247,120,234,75,0,26,197,62,94,252,219,203,117,35,11,32,57,177,33, 88,237,149,56,87,174,20,125,136,171,168, 68,175,74,165,71,134,139,48,27,166, 77,146,158,231,83,111,229,122,60,211,133,230,220,105,92,41,55,46,245,40,244, 102,143,54, 65,25,63,161, 1,216,80,73,209,76,132,187,208, 89,18,169,200,196, 135,130,116,188,159,86,164,100,109,198,173,186, 3,64,52,217,226,250,124,123, 5,202,38,147,118,126,255,82,85,212,207,206,59,227,47,16,58,17,182,189,28,42, 223,183,170,213,119,248,152, 2,44,154,163, 70,221,153,101,155,167, 43,172,9, 129,22,39,253, 19,98,108,110,79,113,224,232,178,185, 112,104,218,246,97,228, 251,34,242,193,238,210,144,12,191,179,162,241, 81,51,145,235,249,14,239,107, 49,192,214, 31,181,199,106,157,184, 84,204,176,115,121,50,45,127, 4,150,254, 138,236,205,93,222,114,67,29,24,72,243,141,128,195,78,66,215,61,156,180, 151,160,137,91,90,15, 131,13,201,95,96,53,194,233,7,225,140,36,103,30,69,142,8,99,37,240,21,10,23, 190, 6,148,247,120,234,75,0,26,197,62,94,252,219,203,117,35,11,32,57,177,33, 88,237,149,56,87,174,20,125,136,171,168, 68,175,74,165,71,134,139,48,27,166, 77,146,158,231,83,111,229,122,60,211,133,230,220,105,92,41,55,46,245,40,244, 102,143,54, 65,25,63,161, 1,216,80,73,209,76,132,187,208, 89,18,169,200,196, 135,130,116,188,159,86,164,100,109,198,173,186, 3,64,52,217,226,250,124,123, 5,202,38,147,118,126,255,82,85,212,207,206,59,227,47,16,58,17,182,189,28,42, 223,183,170,213,119,248,152, 2,44,154,163, 70,221,153,101,155,167, 43,172,9, 129,22,39,253, 19,98,108,110,79,113,224,232,178,185, 112,104,218,246,97,228, 251,34,242,193,238,210,144,12,191,179,162,241, 81,51,145,235,249,14,239,107, 49,192,214, 31,181,199,106,157,184, 84,204,176,115,121,50,45,127, 4,150,254, 138,236,205,93,222,114,67,29,24,72,243,141,128,195,78,66,215,61,156,180 }; private static int FastFloor(float x) { return (x > 0) ? ((int)x) : (((int)x) - 1); } private static float grad(int hash, float x) { int h = hash & 15; float grad = 1.0f + (h & 7); // Gradient value 1.0, 2.0, ..., 8.0 if ((h & 8) != 0) grad = -grad; // Set a random sign for the gradient return (grad * x); // Multiply the gradient with the distance } private static float grad(int hash, float x, float y) { int h = hash & 7; // Convert low 3 bits of hash code float u = h < 4 ? x : y; // into 8 simple gradient directions, float v = h < 4 ? y : x; // and compute the dot product with (x,y). return ((h & 1) != 0 ? -u : u) + ((h & 2) != 0 ? -2.0f * v : 2.0f * v); } private static float grad(int hash, float x, float y, float z) { int h = hash & 15; // Convert low 4 bits of hash code into 12 simple float u = h < 8 ? x : y; // gradient directions, and compute dot product. float v = h < 4 ? y : h == 12 || h == 14 ? x : z; // Fix repeats at h = 12 to 15 return ((h & 1) != 0 ? -u : u) + ((h & 2) != 0 ? -v : v); } private static float grad(int hash, float x, float y, float z, float t) { int h = hash & 31; // Convert low 5 bits of hash code into 32 simple float u = h < 24 ? x : y; // gradient directions, and compute dot product. float v = h < 16 ? y : z; float w = h < 8 ? z : t; return ((h & 1) != 0 ? -u : u) + ((h & 2) != 0 ? -v : v) + ((h & 4) != 0 ? -w : w); } This Is My World Generation Code Block[,] BlocksInMap = new Block[1024, 256]; public bool IsWorldGenerated = false; Random r = new Random(); private void RunThread() { for (int BH = 0; BH <= 256; BH++) { for (int BW = 0; BW <= 1024; BW++) { Block b = new Block(); if (BH >= 192) { } BlocksInMap[BW, BH] = b; } } IsWorldGenerated = true; } public void GenWorld() { new Thread(new ThreadStart(RunThread)).Start(); } And This Is A Example Of How I Set Blocks Block b = new Block(); b.BlockType = = Block.BlockTypes.Air; This Is A Example Of How I Set Models foreach (Block b in MyWorld) { switch(b.BlockType) { case Block.BlockTypes.Dirt: b.Model = DirtModel; break; ect. } } How Would I Use These To Generate To World (The Block Array) And If Possible Thread It More? btw It's 1024 Wide And 256 Tall

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  • SPARC T4-4 Beats 8-CPU IBM POWER7 on TPC-H @3000GB Benchmark

    - by Brian
    Oracle's SPARC T4-4 server delivered a world record TPC-H @3000GB benchmark result for systems with four processors. This result beats eight processor results from IBM (POWER7) and HP (x86). The SPARC T4-4 server also delivered better performance per core than these eight processor systems from IBM and HP. Comparisons below are based upon system to system comparisons, highlighting Oracle's complete software and hardware solution. This database world record result used Oracle's Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays (rotating disk) connected to a SPARC T4-4 server running Oracle Solaris 11 and Oracle Database 11g Release 2 demonstrating the power of Oracle's integrated hardware and software solution. The SPARC T4-4 server based configuration achieved a TPC-H scale factor 3000 world record for four processor systems of 205,792 [email protected] with price/performance of $4.10/[email protected] The SPARC T4-4 server with four SPARC T4 processors (total of 32 cores) is 7% faster than the IBM Power 780 server with eight POWER7 processors (total of 32 cores) on the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark. The SPARC T4-4 server is 36% better in price performance compared to the IBM Power 780 server on the TPC-H @3000GB Benchmark. The SPARC T4-4 server is 29% faster than the IBM Power 780 for data loading. The SPARC T4-4 server is up to 3.4 times faster than the IBM Power 780 server for the Refresh Function. The SPARC T4-4 server with four SPARC T4 processors is 27% faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server with eight x86 processors on the TPC-H @3000GB benchmark. The SPARC T4-4 server is 52% faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server for data loading. The SPARC T4-4 server is up to 3.2 times faster than the HP ProLiant DL980 G7 for the Refresh Function. The SPARC T4-4 server achieved a peak IO rate from the Oracle database of 17 GB/sec. This rate was independent of the storage used, as demonstrated by the TPC-H @3000TB benchmark which used twelve Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays (rotating disk) and the TPC-H @1000TB benchmark which used four Sun Storage F5100 Flash Array devices (flash storage). [*] The SPARC T4-4 server showed linear scaling from TPC-H @1000GB to TPC-H @3000GB. This demonstrates that the SPARC T4-4 server can handle the increasingly larger databases required of DSS systems. [*] The SPARC T4-4 server benchmark results demonstrate a complete solution of building Decision Support Systems including data loading, business questions and refreshing data. Each phase usually has a time constraint and the SPARC T4-4 server shows superior performance during each phase. [*] The TPC believes that comparisons of results published with different scale factors are misleading and discourages such comparisons. Performance Landscape The table lists the leading TPC-H @3000GB results for non-clustered systems. TPC-H @3000GB, Non-Clustered Systems System Processor P/C/T – Memory Composite(QphH) $/perf($/QphH) Power(QppH) Throughput(QthH) Database Available SPARC Enterprise M9000 3.0 GHz SPARC64 VII+ 64/256/256 – 1024 GB 386,478.3 $18.19 316,835.8 471,428.6 Oracle 11g R2 09/22/11 SPARC T4-4 3.0 GHz SPARC T4 4/32/256 – 1024 GB 205,792.0 $4.10 190,325.1 222,515.9 Oracle 11g R2 05/31/12 SPARC Enterprise M9000 2.88 GHz SPARC64 VII 32/128/256 – 512 GB 198,907.5 $15.27 182,350.7 216,967.7 Oracle 11g R2 12/09/10 IBM Power 780 4.1 GHz POWER7 8/32/128 – 1024 GB 192,001.1 $6.37 210,368.4 175,237.4 Sybase 15.4 11/30/11 HP ProLiant DL980 G7 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon X7560 8/64/128 – 512 GB 162,601.7 $2.68 185,297.7 142,685.6 SQL Server 2008 10/13/10 P/C/T = Processors, Cores, Threads QphH = the Composite Metric (bigger is better) $/QphH = the Price/Performance metric in USD (smaller is better) QppH = the Power Numerical Quantity QthH = the Throughput Numerical Quantity The following table lists data load times and refresh function times during the power run. TPC-H @3000GB, Non-Clustered Systems Database Load & Database Refresh System Processor Data Loading(h:m:s) T4Advan RF1(sec) T4Advan RF2(sec) T4Advan SPARC T4-4 3.0 GHz SPARC T4 04:08:29 1.0x 67.1 1.0x 39.5 1.0x IBM Power 780 4.1 GHz POWER7 05:51:50 1.5x 147.3 2.2x 133.2 3.4x HP ProLiant DL980 G7 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon X7560 08:35:17 2.1x 173.0 2.6x 126.3 3.2x Data Loading = database load time RF1 = power test first refresh transaction RF2 = power test second refresh transaction T4 Advan = the ratio of time to T4 time Complete benchmark results found at the TPC benchmark website http://www.tpc.org. Configuration Summary and Results Hardware Configuration: SPARC T4-4 server 4 x SPARC T4 3.0 GHz processors (total of 32 cores, 128 threads) 1024 GB memory 8 x internal SAS (8 x 300 GB) disk drives External Storage: 12 x Sun Storage 2540-M2 array storage, each with 12 x 15K RPM 300 GB drives, 2 controllers, 2 GB cache Software Configuration: Oracle Solaris 11 11/11 Oracle Database 11g Release 2 Enterprise Edition Audited Results: Database Size: 3000 GB (Scale Factor 3000) TPC-H Composite: 205,792.0 [email protected] Price/performance: $4.10/[email protected] Available: 05/31/2012 Total 3 year Cost: $843,656 TPC-H Power: 190,325.1 TPC-H Throughput: 222,515.9 Database Load Time: 4:08:29 Benchmark Description The TPC-H benchmark is a performance benchmark established by the Transaction Processing Council (TPC) to demonstrate Data Warehousing/Decision Support Systems (DSS). TPC-H measurements are produced for customers to evaluate the performance of various DSS systems. These queries and updates are executed against a standard database under controlled conditions. Performance projections and comparisons between different TPC-H Database sizes (100GB, 300GB, 1000GB, 3000GB, 10000GB, 30000GB and 100000GB) are not allowed by the TPC. TPC-H is a data warehousing-oriented, non-industry-specific benchmark that consists of a large number of complex queries typical of decision support applications. It also includes some insert and delete activity that is intended to simulate loading and purging data from a warehouse. TPC-H measures the combined performance of a particular database manager on a specific computer system. The main performance metric reported by TPC-H is called the TPC-H Composite Query-per-Hour Performance Metric ([email protected], where SF is the number of GB of raw data, referred to as the scale factor). [email protected] is intended to summarize the ability of the system to process queries in both single and multiple user modes. The benchmark requires reporting of price/performance, which is the ratio of the total HW/SW cost plus 3 years maintenance to the QphH. A secondary metric is the storage efficiency, which is the ratio of total configured disk space in GB to the scale factor. Key Points and Best Practices Twelve Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays were used for the benchmark. Each Sun Storage 2540-M2 array contains 12 15K RPM drives and is connected to a single dual port 8Gb FC HBA using 2 ports. Each Sun Storage 2540-M2 array showed 1.5 GB/sec for sequential read operations and showed linear scaling, achieving 18 GB/sec with twelve Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays. These were stand alone IO tests. The peak IO rate measured from the Oracle database was 17 GB/sec. Oracle Solaris 11 11/11 required very little system tuning. Some vendors try to make the point that storage ratios are of customer concern. However, storage ratio size has more to do with disk layout and the increasing capacities of disks – so this is not an important metric in which to compare systems. The SPARC T4-4 server and Oracle Solaris efficiently managed the system load of over one thousand Oracle Database parallel processes. Six Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays were mirrored to another six Sun Storage 2540-M2 arrays on which all of the Oracle database files were placed. IO performance was high and balanced across all the arrays. The TPC-H Refresh Function (RF) simulates periodical refresh portion of Data Warehouse by adding new sales and deleting old sales data. Parallel DML (parallel insert and delete in this case) and database log performance are a key for this function and the SPARC T4-4 server outperformed both the IBM POWER7 server and HP ProLiant DL980 G7 server. (See the RF columns above.) See Also Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC) Home Page Ideas International Benchmark Page SPARC T4-4 Server oracle.com OTN Oracle Solaris oracle.com OTN Oracle Database 11g Release 2 Enterprise Edition oracle.com OTN Sun Storage 2540-M2 Array oracle.com OTN Disclosure Statement TPC-H, QphH, $/QphH are trademarks of Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC). For more information, see www.tpc.org. SPARC T4-4 205,792.0 [email protected], $4.10/[email protected], available 5/31/12, 4 processors, 32 cores, 256 threads; IBM Power 780 [email protected], 192,001.1 [email protected], $6.37/[email protected], available 11/30/11, 8 processors, 32 cores, 128 threads; HP ProLiant DL980 G7 162,601.7 [email protected], $2.68/[email protected] available 10/13/10, 8 processors, 64 cores, 128 threads.

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  • Getting a NullPointerException at seemingly random intervals, not sure why

    - by Miles
    I'm running an example from a Kinect library for Processing (http://www.shiffman.net/2010/11/14/kinect-and-processing/) and sometimes get a NullPointerException pointing to this line: int rawDepth = depth[offset]; The depth array is created in this line: int[] depth = kinect.getRawDepth(); I'm not exactly sure what a NullPointerException is, and much googling hasn't really helped. It seems odd to me that the code compiles 70% of the time and returns the error unpredictably. Could the hardware itself be affecting it? Here's the whole example if it helps: // Daniel Shiffman // Kinect Point Cloud example // http://www.shiffman.net // https://github.com/shiffman/libfreenect/tree/master/wrappers/java/processing import org.openkinect.*; import org.openkinect.processing.*; // Kinect Library object Kinect kinect; float a = 0; // Size of kinect image int w = 640; int h = 480; // We'll use a lookup table so that we don't have to repeat the math over and over float[] depthLookUp = new float[2048]; void setup() { size(800,600,P3D); kinect = new Kinect(this); kinect.start(); kinect.enableDepth(true); // We don't need the grayscale image in this example // so this makes it more efficient kinect.processDepthImage(false); // Lookup table for all possible depth values (0 - 2047) for (int i = 0; i < depthLookUp.length; i++) { depthLookUp[i] = rawDepthToMeters(i); } } void draw() { background(0); fill(255); textMode(SCREEN); text("Kinect FR: " + (int)kinect.getDepthFPS() + "\nProcessing FR: " + (int)frameRate,10,16); // Get the raw depth as array of integers int[] depth = kinect.getRawDepth(); // We're just going to calculate and draw every 4th pixel (equivalent of 160x120) int skip = 4; // Translate and rotate translate(width/2,height/2,-50); rotateY(a); for(int x=0; x<w; x+=skip) { for(int y=0; y<h; y+=skip) { int offset = x+y*w; // Convert kinect data to world xyz coordinate int rawDepth = depth[offset]; PVector v = depthToWorld(x,y,rawDepth); stroke(255); pushMatrix(); // Scale up by 200 float factor = 200; translate(v.x*factor,v.y*factor,factor-v.z*factor); // Draw a point point(0,0); popMatrix(); } } // Rotate a += 0.015f; } // These functions come from: http://graphics.stanford.edu/~mdfisher/Kinect.html float rawDepthToMeters(int depthValue) { if (depthValue < 2047) { return (float)(1.0 / ((double)(depthValue) * -0.0030711016 + 3.3309495161)); } return 0.0f; } PVector depthToWorld(int x, int y, int depthValue) { final double fx_d = 1.0 / 5.9421434211923247e+02; final double fy_d = 1.0 / 5.9104053696870778e+02; final double cx_d = 3.3930780975300314e+02; final double cy_d = 2.4273913761751615e+02; PVector result = new PVector(); double depth = depthLookUp[depthValue];//rawDepthToMeters(depthValue); result.x = (float)((x - cx_d) * depth * fx_d); result.y = (float)((y - cy_d) * depth * fy_d); result.z = (float)(depth); return result; } void stop() { kinect.quit(); super.stop(); } And here are the errors: processing.app.debug.RunnerException: NullPointerException at processing.app.Sketch.placeException(Sketch.java:1543) at processing.app.debug.Runner.findException(Runner.java:583) at processing.app.debug.Runner.reportException(Runner.java:558) at processing.app.debug.Runner.exception(Runner.java:498) at processing.app.debug.EventThread.exceptionEvent(EventThread.java:367) at processing.app.debug.EventThread.handleEvent(EventThread.java:255) at processing.app.debug.EventThread.run(EventThread.java:89) Exception in thread "Animation Thread" java.lang.NullPointerException at org.openkinect.processing.Kinect.enableDepth(Kinect.java:70) at PointCloud.setup(PointCloud.java:48) at processing.core.PApplet.handleDraw(PApplet.java:1583) at processing.core.PApplet.run(PApplet.java:1503) at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:637)

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  • How to modulate every texture unit in OpenGL ES 1.1?

    - by Jesse Beder
    I have two textures and a "blend factor", and I'd like to mix them, modulated by the current color; in effect, I want to use the following shader: gl_FragColor = gl_Color * mix(tex0, tex1, blendFactor); I'm using OpenGL ES 1.1, targeting all versions of the iPhone, so I can't use shaders, and I have two texture units. My best attempt is: // texture 0 glActiveTexture(GL_TEXTURE0); image1.Bind(); glTexEnvi(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_TEXTURE_ENV_MODE, GL_MODULATE); // texture 1 glActiveTexture(GL_TEXTURE1); image2.Bind(); glTexEnvi(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_TEXTURE_ENV_MODE, GL_COMBINE); glTexEnvi(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_COMBINE_RGB, GL_INTERPOLATE); glTexEnvi(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_SRC0_RGB, GL_PREVIOUS); glTexEnvi(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_OPERAND0_RGB, GL_SRC_COLOR); glTexEnvi(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_SRC1_RGB, GL_TEXTURE); glTexEnvi(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_OPERAND1_RGB, GL_SRC_COLOR); glTexEnvi(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_SRC2_RGB, GL_CONSTANT); glTexEnvi(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_OPERAND2_RGB, GL_SRC_ALPHA); glTexEnvi(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_COMBINE_ALPHA, GL_INTERPOLATE); glTexEnvi(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_SRC0_ALPHA, GL_PREVIOUS); glTexEnvi(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_OPERAND0_ALPHA, GL_SRC_ALPHA); glTexEnvi(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_SRC1_ALPHA, GL_TEXTURE); glTexEnvi(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_OPERAND1_ALPHA, GL_SRC_ALPHA); glTexEnvi(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_SRC2_ALPHA, GL_CONSTANT); glTexEnvi(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_OPERAND2_ALPHA, GL_SRC_ALPHA); const float factor[] = { 0, 0, 0, blendFactor }; glTexEnvfv(GL_TEXTURE_ENV, GL_TEXTURE_ENV_COLOR, factor); This has the effect of the shader: gl_FragColor = mix(gl_Color * tex0, tex1, blendFactor); but I don't see how to module texture 1 by the color. Is there any way to have the color provided by a texture unit automatically modulated by the incoming primary color? Or any other way to do what I want that I'm missing? Multiple passes are definitely allowed, but they have to have the proper blend effect; I have glBlend(GL_ONE, GL_ONE_MINUS_SRC_ALPHA); enabled, so it can be tricky to get right with multiple passes.

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  • What's the best way to annotate this ggplot2 plot? [R]

    - by Matt Parker
    Here's a plot: library(ggplot2) ggplot(mtcars, aes(x = factor(cyl), y = hp, group = factor(am), color = factor(am))) + stat_smooth(fun.data = "mean_cl_boot", geom = "pointrange") + stat_smooth(fun.data = "mean_cl_boot", geom = "line") + geom_hline(yintercept = 130, color = "red") + annotate("text", label = "130 hp", x = .22, y = 135, size = 4) I've been experimenting with labeling the geom_hline in a few different ways, each of which does something I want but has a problem that the other methods don't have. annotate(), used above, is nice - the text is resizeable, black, and easy to position. But it can only be placed within the plot itself, not outside the plot like the axis labels. It also makes an "a" appear in the legend, which I can't dismiss with legend = FALSE. legend = FALSE works with geom_text, but I can't get geom_text to just be black - it seems to be getting tangled up in the line colorings. grid.text lets me put the text anywhere I want, but I can't seem to resize it. I can definitely accept the text being inside of the plot area, but I'd like to keep the legend clean. I feel like I'm missing something simple, but I'm just fried. Thanks in advance for your consideration.

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  • Move camera to fit 3D scene

    - by Burre
    Hi there. I'm looking for an algorithm to fit a bounding box inside a viewport (in my case a DirectX scene). I know about algorithms for centering a bounding sphere in a orthographic camera but would need the same for a bounding box and a perspective camera. I have most of the data: I have the up-vector for the camera I have the center point of the bounding box I have the look-at vector (direction and distance) from the camera point to the box center I have projected the points on a plane perpendicular to the camera and retrieved the coefficients describing how much the max/min X and Y coords are within or outside the viewing plane. Problems I have: Center of the bounding box isn't necessarily in the center of the viewport (that is, it's bounding rectangle after projection). Since the field of view "skew" the projection (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Perspective-foreshortening.svg) I cannot simply use the coefficients as a scale factor to move the camera because it will overshoot/undershoot the desired camera position How do I find the camera position so that it fills the viewport as pixel perfect as possible (exception being if the aspect ratio is far from 1.0, it only needs to fill one of the screen axis)? I've tried some other things: Using a bounding sphere and Tangent to find a scale factor to move the camera. This doesn't work well, because, it doesn't take into account the perspective projection, and secondly spheres are bad bounding volumes for my use because I have a lot of flat and long geometries. Iterating calls to the function to get a smaller and smaller error in the camera position. This has worked somewhat, but I can sometimes run into weird edge cases where the camera position overshoots too much and the error factor increases. Also, when doing this I didn't recenter the model based on the position of the bounding rectangle. I couldn't find a solid, robust way to do that reliably. Help please!

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  • how to Compute the average probe length for success and failure - Linear probe (Hash Tables)

    - by fang_dejavu
    hi everyone, I'm doing an assignment for my Data Structures class. we were asked to to study linear probing with load factors of .1, .2 , .3, ...., and .9. The formula for testing is: The average probe length using linear probing is roughly Success-- ( 1 + 1/(1-L)**2)/2 or Failure-- (1+1(1-L))/2. we are required to find the theoretical using the formula above which I did(just plug the load factor in the formula), then we have to calculate the empirical (which I not quite sure how to do). here is the rest of the requirements **For each load factor, 10,000 randomly generated positive ints between 1 and 50000 (inclusive) will be inserted into a table of the "right" size, where "right" is strictly based upon the load factor you are testing. Repeats are allowed. Be sure that your formula for randomly generated ints is correct. There is a class called Random in java.util. USE it! After a table of the right (based upon L) size is loaded with 10,000 ints, do 100 searches of newly generated random ints from the range of 1 to 50000. Compute the average probe length for each of the two formulas and indicate the denominators used in each calculationSo, for example, each test for a .5 load would have a table of size approximately 20,000 (adjusted to be prime) and similarly each test for a .9 load would have a table of approximate size 10,000/.9 (again adjusted to be prime). The program should run displaying the various load factors tested, the average probe for each search (the two denominators used to compute the averages will add to 100), and the theoretical answers using the formula above. .** how do I calculate the empirical success?

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  • how to determine if a character vector is a valid numeric or integer vector

    - by Andrew Barr
    I am trying to turn a nested list structure into a dataframe. The list looks similar to the following (it is serialized data from parsed JSON read in using the httr package). myList <- list(object1 = list(w=1, x=list(y=0.1, z="cat")), object2 = list(w=2, x=list(y=0.2, z="dog"))) unlist(myList) does a great job of recursively flattening the list, and I can then use lapply to flatten all the objects nicely. flatList <- lapply(myList, FUN= function(object) {return(as.data.frame(rbind(unlist(object))))}) And finally, I can button it up using plyr::rbind.fill myDF <- do.call(plyr::rbind.fill, flatList) str(myDF) #'data.frame': 2 obs. of 3 variables: #$ w : Factor w/ 2 levels "1","2": 1 2 #$ x.y: Factor w/ 2 levels "0.1","0.2": 1 2 #$ x.z: Factor w/ 2 levels "cat","dog": 1 2 The problem is that w and x.y are now being interpreted as character vectors, which by default get parsed as factors in the dataframe. I believe that unlist() is the culprit, but I can't figure out another way to recursively flatten the list structure. A workaround would be to post-process the dataframe, and assign data types then. What is the best way to determine if a vector is a valid numeric or integer vector?

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  • Looping through covariates in regression using R

    - by Kyle Peyton
    I'm trying to run 96 regressions and save the results as 96 different objects. To complicate things, I want the subscript on one of the covariates in the model to also change 96 times. I've almost solved the problem but I've unfortunately hit a wall. The code so far is, for(i in 1:96){ assign(paste("z.out", i,sep=""), lm(rMonExp_EGM~ TE_i+ Month2+Month3+Month4+Month5+Month6+Month7+Month8+Month9+ Month10+Month11+Month12+Yrs_minus_2004 + as.factor(LGA),data=Pokies)) } This works on the object creation side (e.g. I have z.out1 - z.out96) but I can't seem to get the subscript on the covariate to change as well. I have 96 variables called TE_1, TE_2 ... TE_96 in the dataset. As such, the subscript on TE_, the "i" needs to change to correspond to each of the objects I create. That is, z.out1 should hold the results from this model: z.out1 <- lm(rMonExp_EGM~ TE_1 + Month2+Month3+Month4+Month5+Month6+Month7+Month8+Month9+ Month10+Month11+Month12+Yrs_minus_2004 + as.factor(LGA),data=Pokies) And z.out96 should be: z.out96 <- lm(rMonExp_EGM~ TE_96+ Month2+Month3+Month4+Month5+Month6+Month7+Month8+Month9+ Month10+Month11+Month12+Yrs_minus_2004 + as.factor(LGA),data=Pokies) Hopefully this makes sense. I'm grateful for any tips/advice. cheers, kyle

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  • Ball bouncing at a certain angle and efficiency computations

    - by X Y
    I would like to make a pong game with a small twist (for now). Every time the ball bounces off one of the paddles i want it to be under a certain angle (between a min and a max). I simply can't wrap my head around how to actually do it (i have some thoughts and such but i simply cannot implement them properly - i feel i'm overcomplicating things). Here's an image with a small explanation . One other problem would be that the conditions for bouncing have to be different for every edge. For example, in the picture, on the two small horizontal edges i do not want a perfectly vertical bounce when in the middle of the edge but rather a constant angle (pi/4 maybe) in either direction depending on the collision point (before the middle of the edge, or after). All of my collisions are done with the Separating Axes Theorem (and seem to work fine). I'm looking for something efficient because i want to add a lot of things later on (maybe polygons with many edges and such). So i need to keep to a minimum the amount of checking done every frame. The collision algorithm begins testing whenever the bounding boxes of the paddle and the ball intersect. Is there something better to test for possible collisions every frame? (more efficient in the long run,with many more objects etc, not necessarily easy to code). I'm going to post the code for my game: Paddle Class public class Paddle : Microsoft.Xna.Framework.DrawableGameComponent { #region Private Members private SpriteBatch spriteBatch; private ContentManager contentManager; private bool keybEnabled; private bool isLeftPaddle; private Texture2D paddleSprite; private Vector2 paddlePosition; private float paddleSpeedY; private Vector2 paddleScale = new Vector2(1f, 1f); private const float DEFAULT_Y_SPEED = 150; private Vector2[] Normals2Edges; private Vector2[] Vertices = new Vector2[4]; private List<Vector2> lst = new List<Vector2>(); private Vector2 Edge; #endregion #region Properties public float Speed { get {return paddleSpeedY; } set { paddleSpeedY = value; } } public Vector2[] Normal2EdgesVector { get { NormalsToEdges(this.isLeftPaddle); return Normals2Edges; } } public Vector2[] VertexVector { get { return Vertices; } } public Vector2 Scale { get { return paddleScale; } set { paddleScale = value; NormalsToEdges(this.isLeftPaddle); } } public float X { get { return paddlePosition.X; } set { paddlePosition.X = value; } } public float Y { get { return paddlePosition.Y; } set { paddlePosition.Y = value; } } public float Width { get { return (Scale.X == 1f ? (float)paddleSprite.Width : paddleSprite.Width * Scale.X); } } public float Height { get { return ( Scale.Y==1f ? (float)paddleSprite.Height : paddleSprite.Height*Scale.Y ); } } public Texture2D GetSprite { get { return paddleSprite; } } public Rectangle Boundary { get { return new Rectangle((int)paddlePosition.X, (int)paddlePosition.Y, (int)this.Width, (int)this.Height); } } public bool KeyboardEnabled { get { return keybEnabled; } } #endregion private void NormalsToEdges(bool isLeftPaddle) { Normals2Edges = null; Edge = Vector2.Zero; lst.Clear(); for (int i = 0; i < Vertices.Length; i++) { Edge = Vertices[i + 1 == Vertices.Length ? 0 : i + 1] - Vertices[i]; if (Edge != Vector2.Zero) { Edge.Normalize(); //outer normal to edge !! (origin in top-left) lst.Add(new Vector2(Edge.Y, -Edge.X)); } } Normals2Edges = lst.ToArray(); } public float[] ProjectPaddle(Vector2 axis) { if (Vertices.Length == 0 || axis == Vector2.Zero) return (new float[2] { 0, 0 }); float min, max; min = Vector2.Dot(axis, Vertices[0]); max = min; for (int i = 1; i < Vertices.Length; i++) { float p = Vector2.Dot(axis, Vertices[i]); if (p < min) min = p; else if (p > max) max = p; } return (new float[2] { min, max }); } public Paddle(Game game, bool isLeftPaddle, bool enableKeyboard = true) : base(game) { contentManager = new ContentManager(game.Services); keybEnabled = enableKeyboard; this.isLeftPaddle = isLeftPaddle; } public void setPosition(Vector2 newPos) { X = newPos.X; Y = newPos.Y; } public override void Initialize() { base.Initialize(); this.Speed = DEFAULT_Y_SPEED; X = 0; Y = 0; NormalsToEdges(this.isLeftPaddle); } protected override void LoadContent() { spriteBatch = new SpriteBatch(GraphicsDevice); paddleSprite = contentManager.Load<Texture2D>(@"Content\pongBar"); } public override void Update(GameTime gameTime) { //vertices array Vertices[0] = this.paddlePosition; Vertices[1] = this.paddlePosition + new Vector2(this.Width, 0); Vertices[2] = this.paddlePosition + new Vector2(this.Width, this.Height); Vertices[3] = this.paddlePosition + new Vector2(0, this.Height); // Move paddle, but don't allow movement off the screen if (KeyboardEnabled) { float moveDistance = Speed * (float)gameTime.ElapsedGameTime.TotalSeconds; KeyboardState newKeyState = Keyboard.GetState(); if (newKeyState.IsKeyDown(Keys.Down) && Y + paddleSprite.Height + moveDistance <= Game.GraphicsDevice.Viewport.Height) { Y += moveDistance; } else if (newKeyState.IsKeyDown(Keys.Up) && Y - moveDistance >= 0) { Y -= moveDistance; } } else { if (this.Y + this.Height > this.GraphicsDevice.Viewport.Height) { this.Y = this.Game.GraphicsDevice.Viewport.Height - this.Height - 1; } } base.Update(gameTime); } public override void Draw(GameTime gameTime) { spriteBatch.Begin(SpriteSortMode.Texture,null); spriteBatch.Draw(paddleSprite, paddlePosition, null, Color.White, 0f, Vector2.Zero, Scale, SpriteEffects.None, 0); spriteBatch.End(); base.Draw(gameTime); } } Ball Class public class Ball : Microsoft.Xna.Framework.DrawableGameComponent { #region Private Members private SpriteBatch spriteBatch; private ContentManager contentManager; private const float DEFAULT_SPEED = 50; private float speedIncrement = 0; private Vector2 ballScale = new Vector2(1f, 1f); private const float INCREASE_SPEED = 50; private Texture2D ballSprite; //initial texture private Vector2 ballPosition; //position private Vector2 centerOfBall; //center coords private Vector2 ballSpeed = new Vector2(DEFAULT_SPEED, DEFAULT_SPEED); //speed #endregion #region Properties public float DEFAULTSPEED { get { return DEFAULT_SPEED; } } public Vector2 ballCenter { get { return centerOfBall; } } public Vector2 Scale { get { return ballScale; } set { ballScale = value; } } public float SpeedX { get { return ballSpeed.X; } set { ballSpeed.X = value; } } public float SpeedY { get { return ballSpeed.Y; } set { ballSpeed.Y = value; } } public float X { get { return ballPosition.X; } set { ballPosition.X = value; } } public float Y { get { return ballPosition.Y; } set { ballPosition.Y = value; } } public Texture2D GetSprite { get { return ballSprite; } } public float Width { get { return (Scale.X == 1f ? (float)ballSprite.Width : ballSprite.Width * Scale.X); } } public float Height { get { return (Scale.Y == 1f ? (float)ballSprite.Height : ballSprite.Height * Scale.Y); } } public float SpeedIncreaseIncrement { get { return speedIncrement; } set { speedIncrement = value; } } public Rectangle Boundary { get { return new Rectangle((int)ballPosition.X, (int)ballPosition.Y, (int)this.Width, (int)this.Height); } } #endregion public Ball(Game game) : base(game) { contentManager = new ContentManager(game.Services); } public void Reset() { ballSpeed.X = DEFAULT_SPEED; ballSpeed.Y = DEFAULT_SPEED; ballPosition.X = Game.GraphicsDevice.Viewport.Width / 2 - ballSprite.Width / 2; ballPosition.Y = Game.GraphicsDevice.Viewport.Height / 2 - ballSprite.Height / 2; } public void SpeedUp() { if (ballSpeed.Y < 0) ballSpeed.Y -= (INCREASE_SPEED + speedIncrement); else ballSpeed.Y += (INCREASE_SPEED + speedIncrement); if (ballSpeed.X < 0) ballSpeed.X -= (INCREASE_SPEED + speedIncrement); else ballSpeed.X += (INCREASE_SPEED + speedIncrement); } public float[] ProjectBall(Vector2 axis) { if (axis == Vector2.Zero) return (new float[2] { 0, 0 }); float min, max; min = Vector2.Dot(axis, this.ballCenter) - this.Width/2; //center - radius max = min + this.Width; //center + radius return (new float[2] { min, max }); } public void ChangeHorzDirection() { ballSpeed.X *= -1; } public void ChangeVertDirection() { ballSpeed.Y *= -1; } public override void Initialize() { base.Initialize(); ballPosition.X = Game.GraphicsDevice.Viewport.Width / 2 - ballSprite.Width / 2; ballPosition.Y = Game.GraphicsDevice.Viewport.Height / 2 - ballSprite.Height / 2; } protected override void LoadContent() { spriteBatch = new SpriteBatch(GraphicsDevice); ballSprite = contentManager.Load<Texture2D>(@"Content\ball"); } public override void Update(GameTime gameTime) { if (this.Y < 1 || this.Y > GraphicsDevice.Viewport.Height - this.Height - 1) this.ChangeVertDirection(); centerOfBall = new Vector2(ballPosition.X + this.Width / 2, ballPosition.Y + this.Height / 2); base.Update(gameTime); } public override void Draw(GameTime gameTime) { spriteBatch.Begin(); spriteBatch.Draw(ballSprite, ballPosition, null, Color.White, 0f, Vector2.Zero, Scale, SpriteEffects.None, 0); spriteBatch.End(); base.Draw(gameTime); } } Main game class public class gameStart : Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Game { GraphicsDeviceManager graphics; SpriteBatch spriteBatch; public gameStart() { graphics = new GraphicsDeviceManager(this); Content.RootDirectory = "Content"; this.Window.Title = "Pong game"; } protected override void Initialize() { ball = new Ball(this); paddleLeft = new Paddle(this,true,false); paddleRight = new Paddle(this,false,true); Components.Add(ball); Components.Add(paddleLeft); Components.Add(paddleRight); this.Window.AllowUserResizing = false; this.IsMouseVisible = true; this.IsFixedTimeStep = false; this.isColliding = false; base.Initialize(); } #region MyPrivateStuff private Ball ball; private Paddle paddleLeft, paddleRight; private int[] bit = { -1, 1 }; private Random rnd = new Random(); private int updates = 0; enum nrPaddle { None, Left, Right }; private nrPaddle PongBar = nrPaddle.None; private ArrayList Axes = new ArrayList(); private Vector2 MTV; //minimum translation vector private bool isColliding; private float overlap; //smallest distance after projections private Vector2 overlapAxis; //axis of overlap #endregion protected override void LoadContent() { spriteBatch = new SpriteBatch(GraphicsDevice); paddleLeft.setPosition(new Vector2(0, this.GraphicsDevice.Viewport.Height / 2 - paddleLeft.Height / 2)); paddleRight.setPosition(new Vector2(this.GraphicsDevice.Viewport.Width - paddleRight.Width, this.GraphicsDevice.Viewport.Height / 2 - paddleRight.Height / 2)); paddleLeft.Scale = new Vector2(1f, 2f); //scale left paddle } private bool ShapesIntersect(Paddle paddle, Ball ball) { overlap = 1000000f; //large value overlapAxis = Vector2.Zero; MTV = Vector2.Zero; foreach (Vector2 ax in Axes) { float[] pad = paddle.ProjectPaddle(ax); //pad0 = min, pad1 = max float[] circle = ball.ProjectBall(ax); //circle0 = min, circle1 = max if (pad[1] <= circle[0] || circle[1] <= pad[0]) { return false; } if (pad[1] - circle[0] < circle[1] - pad[0]) { if (Math.Abs(overlap) > Math.Abs(-pad[1] + circle[0])) { overlap = -pad[1] + circle[0]; overlapAxis = ax; } } else { if (Math.Abs(overlap) > Math.Abs(circle[1] - pad[0])) { overlap = circle[1] - pad[0]; overlapAxis = ax; } } } if (overlapAxis != Vector2.Zero) { MTV = overlapAxis * overlap; } return true; } protected override void Update(GameTime gameTime) { updates += 1; float ftime = 5 * (float)gameTime.ElapsedGameTime.TotalSeconds; if (updates == 1) { isColliding = false; int Xrnd = bit[Convert.ToInt32(rnd.Next(0, 2))]; int Yrnd = bit[Convert.ToInt32(rnd.Next(0, 2))]; ball.SpeedX = Xrnd * ball.SpeedX; ball.SpeedY = Yrnd * ball.SpeedY; ball.X += ftime * ball.SpeedX; ball.Y += ftime * ball.SpeedY; } else { updates = 100; ball.X += ftime * ball.SpeedX; ball.Y += ftime * ball.SpeedY; } //autorun :) paddleLeft.Y = ball.Y; //collision detection PongBar = nrPaddle.None; if (ball.Boundary.Intersects(paddleLeft.Boundary)) { PongBar = nrPaddle.Left; if (!isColliding) { Axes.Clear(); Axes.AddRange(paddleLeft.Normal2EdgesVector); //axis from nearest vertex to ball's center Axes.Add(FORMULAS.NormAxisFromCircle2ClosestVertex(paddleLeft.VertexVector, ball.ballCenter)); } } else if (ball.Boundary.Intersects(paddleRight.Boundary)) { PongBar = nrPaddle.Right; if (!isColliding) { Axes.Clear(); Axes.AddRange(paddleRight.Normal2EdgesVector); //axis from nearest vertex to ball's center Axes.Add(FORMULAS.NormAxisFromCircle2ClosestVertex(paddleRight.VertexVector, ball.ballCenter)); } } if (PongBar != nrPaddle.None && !isColliding) switch (PongBar) { case nrPaddle.Left: if (ShapesIntersect(paddleLeft, ball)) { isColliding = true; if (MTV != Vector2.Zero) ball.X += MTV.X; ball.Y += MTV.Y; ball.ChangeHorzDirection(); } break; case nrPaddle.Right: if (ShapesIntersect(paddleRight, ball)) { isColliding = true; if (MTV != Vector2.Zero) ball.X += MTV.X; ball.Y += MTV.Y; ball.ChangeHorzDirection(); } break; default: break; } if (!ShapesIntersect(paddleRight, ball) && !ShapesIntersect(paddleLeft, ball)) isColliding = false; ball.X += ftime * ball.SpeedX; ball.Y += ftime * ball.SpeedY; //check ball movement if (ball.X > paddleRight.X + paddleRight.Width + 2) { //IncreaseScore(Left); ball.Reset(); updates = 0; return; } else if (ball.X < paddleLeft.X - 2) { //IncreaseScore(Right); ball.Reset(); updates = 0; return; } base.Update(gameTime); } protected override void Draw(GameTime gameTime) { GraphicsDevice.Clear(Color.Aquamarine); spriteBatch.Begin(SpriteSortMode.BackToFront, BlendState.AlphaBlend); spriteBatch.End(); base.Draw(gameTime); } } And one method i've used: public static Vector2 NormAxisFromCircle2ClosestVertex(Vector2[] vertices, Vector2 circle) { Vector2 temp = Vector2.Zero; if (vertices.Length > 0) { float dist = (circle.X - vertices[0].X) * (circle.X - vertices[0].X) + (circle.Y - vertices[0].Y) * (circle.Y - vertices[0].Y); for (int i = 1; i < vertices.Length;i++) { if (dist > (circle.X - vertices[i].X) * (circle.X - vertices[i].X) + (circle.Y - vertices[i].Y) * (circle.Y - vertices[i].Y)) { temp = vertices[i]; //memorize the closest vertex dist = (circle.X - vertices[i].X) * (circle.X - vertices[i].X) + (circle.Y - vertices[i].Y) * (circle.Y - vertices[i].Y); } } temp = circle - temp; temp.Normalize(); } return temp; } Thanks in advance for any tips on the 4 issues. EDIT1: Something isn't working properly. The collision axis doesn't come out right and the interpolation also seems to have no effect. I've changed the code a bit: private bool ShapesIntersect(Paddle paddle, Ball ball) { overlap = 1000000f; //large value overlapAxis = Vector2.Zero; MTV = Vector2.Zero; foreach (Vector2 ax in Axes) { float[] pad = paddle.ProjectPaddle(ax); //pad0 = min, pad1 = max float[] circle = ball.ProjectBall(ax); //circle0 = min, circle1 = max if (pad[1] < circle[0] || circle[1] < pad[0]) { return false; } if (Math.Abs(pad[1] - circle[0]) < Math.Abs(circle[1] - pad[0])) { if (Math.Abs(overlap) > Math.Abs(-pad[1] + circle[0])) { overlap = -pad[1] + circle[0]; overlapAxis = ax * (-1); } //to get the proper axis } else { if (Math.Abs(overlap) > Math.Abs(circle[1] - pad[0])) { overlap = circle[1] - pad[0]; overlapAxis = ax; } } } if (overlapAxis != Vector2.Zero) { MTV = overlapAxis * Math.Abs(overlap); } return true; } And part of the Update method: if (ShapesIntersect(paddleRight, ball)) { isColliding = true; if (MTV != Vector2.Zero) { ball.X += MTV.X; ball.Y += MTV.Y; } //test if (overlapAxis.X == 0) //collision with horizontal edge { } else if (overlapAxis.Y == 0) //collision with vertical edge { float factor = Math.Abs(ball.ballCenter.Y - paddleRight.Y) / paddleRight.Height; if (factor > 1) factor = 1f; if (overlapAxis.X < 0) //left edge? ball.Speed = ball.DEFAULTSPEED * Vector2.Normalize(Vector2.Reflect(ball.Speed, (Vector2.Lerp(new Vector2(-1, -3), new Vector2(-1, 3), factor)))); else //right edge? ball.Speed = ball.DEFAULTSPEED * Vector2.Normalize(Vector2.Reflect(ball.Speed, (Vector2.Lerp(new Vector2(1, -3), new Vector2(1, 3), factor)))); } else //vertex collision??? { ball.Speed = -ball.Speed; } } What seems to happen is that "overlapAxis" doesn't always return the right one. So instead of (-1,0) i get the (1,0) (this happened even before i multiplied with -1 there). Sometimes there isn't even a collision registered even though the ball passes through the paddle... The interpolation also seems to have no effect as the angles barely change (or the overlapAxis is almost never (-1,0) or (1,0) but something like (0.9783473, 0.02743843)... ). What am i missing here? :(

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  • Generic socket 940 CPU fan interchangeable with HP part number 411454-001

    - by ConcernedOfTunbridgeWells
    Hi, I'm trying to find a generic CPU fan that will fit the air duct in an XW9300. Note that there are two CPU fan mounting schemes used on this machine. One with two grommets in the motherboard that the CPU fan screws into and one with a plastic collar and base plate. The form factor I'm looking for is the former (see picture below): Two HP part numbers for fans in this form factor are 411454-001 (shown below) and 416055-001. Note that the dimensions are important as the machine has an air duct that fits over the fan. Can anyone tell me the manufacturer and model of an equivalent generic part? Better yet, do you know somewhere (preferrably in the UK) that I can obtain such an item from?

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  • Workaround with paths in vista

    - by Argiropoulos Stavros
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  • Generic socket 940 CPU fan for HP XW9300 interchangeable with HP part number 411454-001

    - by ConcernedOfTunbridgeWells
    Hi, I'm trying to find a generic Socket 940 CPU fan that will fit the air duct in an XW9300. Note that two different CPU fan mounting schemes have been used on this machine. One has two grommets in the motherboard that the CPU fan screws into and the other has a plastic collar and base plate. The form factor I'm looking for is the former (see the picture below). Two HP part numbers for fans in this form factor are 411454-001 (shown below) and 416055-001. Note that the dimensions are important as the machine has an air duct that fits over the fan. Can anyone tell me the manufacturer and model of an equivalent generic part? Better yet, do you know somewhere (preferrably in the UK) from which such an item can be obtained?

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  • Why would a PCI scan fail because of components that are not even installed?

    - by Brandon
    Recently a PCI scan was run against a web server and the result was a failure. Some of the issues could be fixed, however others simply make no sense to me. The machine was a clean install, there are only two things running, the .NET 3.5 website and the dotDefender web application firewall. However there are several errors similar to: Web server vulnerability Impact: /servlet/SessionServlet: JRun or Netware WebSphere default servlet found. All default code should be removed from servers. Risk Factor: Medium/ CVSS2 Base Score: 6.4 CVE: CVE-2000-0539 I'm not sure what this is, but I can't find anything on the server that looks anything like this. Web server vulnerability Impact: /some.php?=PHPE9568F35- D428-11d2-A769-00AA001ACF42: PHP reveals potentially sensitive information via certain HTTP requests that contain specific QUERY strings. Risk Factor: Medium/ CVSS2 Base Score: 5.0 PHP is not installed. Trying to add that query string to any page does nothing because the application ignores it. And doing that phpVersion check results in a 404. Similar to this, there are dozens of errors related to JSP and Oracle that are also not installed. Web server vulnerability Impact: /admin/database/wwForum.mdb: Web Wiz Forums pre 7.5 is vulnerable to Cross-Site Scripting attacks. Default login/pass is Administrator/letmein Risk Factor: Medium/ CVSS2 Base Score: 4.0 There are several errors like this, telling me that Web Wiz Forums, Alan Ward A-Cart 2.0, IlohaMail, etc. are all vulnerable. These are not installed or referenced anywhere I can find. There are even references to pages that simply don't exist, like OpenAutoClassifieds. Can anyone point me in the right direction as to why these errors are showing up or where I might look to find these components if they are in fact installed? Note: This website and server are for a subdomain of the main website. The main website runs on a server that is running Apache/PHP, but I don't have access to that server. The report says the subdomain was the site being scanned, but is it possible for it to have scanned the main site as well?

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  • New Technical Articles on SOA, Mobile, IDM, WebLogic, Coherence

    - by OTN ArchBeat
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  • Numerous Unexpected Obstacles Ruining any Project Plans

    - by Libor
    I am working as software developer and struggling with this problem time and time again for almost thirteen years. There seems not to be any way out of the following problem. And it happens with small projects as well. For example, I plan to write an extension for Microsoft Visual Studio. I dowload learning materials, get some book on the topic and allocate time for learning and development. However, during the development, many seemingly trivial problems arise, for example: Why the script refuses to delete the file? Why Visual Studio does not register the extension? (after two days) OK, it registers it, but now it got broken. How to fix it? each of these "small" obstacles usually take 1-5 days to resolve and the project finally consumes several times more man-hours than planned. Maybe it happens only because I am working on Microsoft platform and many of their Frameworks and architectures are bit confusing and badly documented. I would like to have most problems resolved by finding answer in a book or official documentation (MSDN), but the only answer I usually find is on some weird forum or personal blog googled after desperately searching for any relevant information on the topic. Do you have the same struggles? Do you have techniques on how to prevent these problems? I was thinking of simply multiplying projected time for a given project by some factor, but this does not help. Some projects get done briskly and some take months and the guiding factor here are these small "glitches" which take programmers whole weeks to resolve. I have to admit that lots of these obstacles demoralizes me and drains me of focus and joy of work (who likes to get back to work when he have to resolve some stupid registry problem or weird framework bug instead of doing creative work?) After the project is finally done, I am feeling like dying from thousand cuts.

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  • Additional new material WebLogic Community

    - by JuergenKress
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  • Best of OTN - Week of November 4th

    - by CassandraClark-OTN
    It was another exciting week at OTN!  Lots of GREAT content to share.  If you had a favorite that you don't see listed let us know in the comment section below.  Java Community - JavaOne Sessions Online - We've posted 60 of the JavaOne sessions online, and we'll be rolling out more sessions every few weeks. This content is free, courtesy of Oracle.NetBeans 7.4 Released  - NetBeans 7.4 features HTML5 integration for Java EE and PHP development; support for Apache Cordova and JDK 8 preview features; enhancements to Maven, C/C++, and more.vJUG: Worldwide Virtual JUG Created - London Java Community leader and technical evangelist Simon Maple has created a Meetup called vJUG, with aim toward connecting Java Developers in the virtual world.Tori Wieldt, Java Community Manager Friday Funny: This is what REALLY happens when you give someone your business card ow.ly/q6aKUArchitect Community - Don't forget to register for the free Virtual Developer Day - Harnessing the Power of Oracle WebLogic and Oracle Coherence.  December 3rd, 2013 - Two great tracks, Design & Develop and Build, Deploy & Manage.   Why wait, register now!  Multi-Factor Authentication in Oracle WebLogic - Shailesh K. Mishra - Really good technical article on using multi-factor authentication to protect web applications deployed on Oracle WebLogic.Coherence*Web: Sharing an httpSessions Among Applications in Different Oracle WebLogic Clusters - Jordi VillenaUnderstanding when and how to select session attributes that must be stored in the local storage of the Oracle WebLogic instances and which should be leveraged to an Oracle Coherence distributed cache.  Bob Rhubart, Architect Community Manager Friday Funny - "Be yourself, everyone else is already taken." Oscar Wilde (October 16, 1854 - November 30, 1900) Irish writer and poet.

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