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  • SQLAuthority News – A Successful Performance Tuning Seminar at Pune – Dec 4-5, 2010

    - by pinaldave
    This is report to my third of very successful seminar event on SQL Server Performance Tuning. SQL Server Performance Tuning Seminar in Colombo was oversubscribed with total of 35 attendees. You can read the details over here SQLAuthority News – SQL Server Performance Optimizations Seminar – Grand Success – Colombo, Sri Lanka – Oct 4 – 5, 2010. SQL Server Performance Tuning Seminar in Hyderabad was oversubscribed with total of 25 attendees. You can read the details over here SQL SERVER – A Successful Performance Tuning Seminar – Hyderabad – Nov 27-28, 2010. The same Seminar was offered in Pune on December 4,-5, 2010. We had another successful seminar with lots of performance talk. This seminar was attended by 30 attendees. The best part of the seminar was that along with the our agenda, we have talked about following very interesting concepts. Deadlocks Detection and Removal Dynamic SQL and Inline Code SQL Optimizations Multiple OR conditions and performance tuning Dynamic Search Condition Building and Improvement Memory Cache and Improvement Bottleneck Detections – Memory, CPU and IO Beginning Performance Tuning on Production Parametrization Improving already Super Fast Queries Convenience vs. Performance Proper way to create Indexes Hints and Disadvantages I had great time doing the seminar and sharing my performance tricks with all. The highlight of this seminar was I have explained the attendees, how I begin doing performance tuning when I go for Performance Tuning Consultations.   Pinal Dave at SQL Performance Tuning Seminar SQL Server Performance Tuning Seminar Pinal Dave at SQL Performance Tuning Seminar Pinal Dave at SQL Performance Tuning Seminar SQL Server Performance Tuning Seminar SQL Server Performance Tuning Seminar This seminar series are 100% demo oriented and no usual PowerPoint talk. They are created from my experiences of various organizations for performance tuning. I am not planning any more seminar this year as it was great but I am booked currently for next 60 days at various performance tuning engagements. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Optimization, SQL Performance, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQL Training, SQLAuthority News, T SQL, Technology

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  • Microsoft guarantees the performance of SQL Server

    - by simonsabin
    I have recently been informed that Microsoft will be guaranteeing the performance of SQL Server. Yes thats right Microsoft will guarantee that you will get better performance out of SQL Server that any other competitor system. However on the flip side there are also saying that end users also have to guarantee the performance of SQL Server if they want to use the next release of SQL Server targeted for 2011 or 2012. It appears that a recent recruit Mark Smith from Newcastle, England will be heading a new team that will be making sure you are running SQL Server on adequate hardware and making sure you are developing your applications according to best practices. The Performance Enforcement Team (SQLPET) will be a global group headed by mark that will oversee two other groups the existing Customer Advisory Team (SQLCAT) and another new team the Design and Operation Group (SQLDOG). Mark informed me that the team was originally thought out during Yukon and was going to be an independent body that went round to customers making sure they didn’t suffer performance problems. However it was felt that they needed to wait a few releases until SQL Server was really there. The original Yukon Independent Performance Enhancement Team (YIPET) has now become the SQL Performance Enforcement Team (SQLPET). When challenged about the change from enhancement to enforcement Mark was unwilling to comment. An anonymous source suggested that "..Microsoft is sick of the bad press SQL Server gets for performance when the performance problems are normally down to people developing applications badly and using inadequate hardware..." Its true that it is very easy to install and run SQL, unlike other RDMS systems and the flip side is that its also easy to get into performance problems due to under specified hardware and bad design. Its not yet confirmed if this enforcement will apply to all SKUs or just the high end ones. I would personally welcome some level of architectural and hardware advice service that clients would be able to turn to, in order to justify getting the appropriate hardware at the start of a project and not 1 year in when its often too late.

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  • Query Tuning Mastery at PASS Summit 2012: The Video

    - by Adam Machanic
    An especially clever community member was kind enough to reverse-engineer the video stream for me, and came up with a direct link to the PASS TV video stream for my Query Tuning Mastery: The Art and Science of Manhandling Parallelism talk, delivered at the PASS Summit last Thursday. I'm not sure how long this link will work , but I'd like to share it for my readers who were unable to see it in person or live on the stream. Start here. Skip past the keynote, to the 149 minute mark. Enjoy!...(read more)

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  • Query Tuning Mastery at PASS Summit 2012: The Video

    - by Adam Machanic
    An especially clever community member was kind enough to reverse-engineer the video stream for me, and came up with a direct link to the PASS TV video stream for my Query Tuning Mastery: The Art and Science of Manhandling Parallelism talk, delivered at the PASS Summit last Thursday. I'm not sure how long this link will work , but I'd like to share it for my readers who were unable to see it in person or live on the stream. Start here. Skip past the keynote, to the 149 minute mark. Enjoy!...(read more)

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  • Query Tuning Mastery at PASS Summit 2012: The Demos

    - by Adam Machanic
    For the second year in a row, I was asked to deliver a 500-level "Query Tuning Mastery" talk in room 6E of the Washington State Convention Center, for the PASS Summit. ( Here's some information about last year's talk, on workspace memory. ) And for the second year in a row, I had to deliver said talk at 10:15 in the morning, in a room used as overflow for the keynote, following a keynote speaker that didn't stop speaking on time. Frustrating! Last Thursday, after very, very quickly setting up and...(read more)

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  • Oracle Application Server Performance Monitoring and Tuning (CPU load high)

    - by Berkay
    Oracle Application Server Performance Monitoring and Tuning (CPU load high) i have just hired by a company and my boss give me a performance issue to solve as soon as possible. I don't have any experience with the Java EE before at the server side. Let me begin what i learned about the system and still couldn't find the solution: We have an Oracle Application Server (10.1.) and Oracle Database server (9.2.), the software guys wrote a kind of big J2EE project (X project) using specifically JSF 1.2 with Ajax which is only used in this project. They actively use PL/SQL in their code. So, we started the application server (Solaris machine), everything seems OK. users start using the app starting Monday from different locations (app 200 have user accounts,i just checked and see that the connection pool is set right, the session are active only 15 minutes). After sometime (2 days) CPU utilization gets high,%60, at night it is still same nothing changed (the online user amount is nearly 1 or 2 at this time), even it starts using the CPU allocated for other applications on the same server because they freed If we don't restart the server, the utilization becomes %90 following 2 days, application is so slow that end users starts calling. The main problem is software engineers say that code is clear, and the System and DBA managers say that we have the correct configuration,the other applications seems OK why this problem happens only for X application. I start copying the DB to a test platform and upgrade it to the latest version, also did in same with the application server (Weblogic) if there is a bug or not. i only tested by myself only one user and weblogic admin panel i can track the threads and dump them. i noticed that there are some threads showing as a hogging. when i checked the manuals and control the trace i see that it directs me the line number where PL/SQL code is called from a .java file. The software eng. says that yes we have really complex PL/SQL codes but what's the relation with Application server? this is the problem of DB server, i guess they're right... I know the question has many holes, i'd like to give more in detail but i appreciate the way you guide me. Thanks in advance ... Edit: The server both in CPU and Memory enough to run more complex applications

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  • SQL SERVER – Video – Beginning Performance Tuning with SQL Server Execution Plan

    - by pinaldave
    Traveling can be most interesting or most exhausting experience. However, traveling is always the most enlightening experience one can have. While going to long journey one has to prepare a lot of things. Pack necessary travel gears, clothes and medicines. However, the most essential part of travel is the journey to the destination. There are many variations one prefer but the ultimate goal is to have a delightful experience during the journey. Here is the video available which explains how to begin with SQL Server Execution plans. Performance Tuning is a Journey Performance tuning is just like a long journey. The goal of performance tuning is efficient and least resources consuming query execution with accurate results. Just as maps are the most essential aspect of performance tuning the same way, execution plans are essentially maps for SQL Server to reach to the resultset. The goal of the execution plan is to find the most efficient path which translates the least usage of the resources (CPU, memory, IO etc). Execution Plans are like Maps When online maps were invented (e.g. Bing, Google, Mapquests etc) initially it was not possible to customize them. They were given a single route to reach to the destination. As time evolved now it is possible to give various hints to the maps, for example ‘via public transport’, ‘walking’, ‘fastest route’, ‘shortest route’, ‘avoid highway’. There are places where we manually drag the route and make it appropriate to our needs. The same situation is with SQL Server Execution Plans, if we want to tune the queries, we need to understand the execution plans and execution plans internals. We need to understand the smallest details which relate to execution plan when we our destination is optimal queries. Understanding Execution Plans The biggest challenge with maps are figuring out the optimal path. The same way the  most common challenge with execution plans is where to start from and which precise route to take. Here is a quick list of the frequently asked questions related to execution plans: Should I read the execution plans from bottoms up or top down? Is execution plans are left to right or right to left? What is the relational between actual execution plan and estimated execution plan? When I mouse over operator I see CPU and IO but not memory, why? Sometime I ran the query multiple times and I get different execution plan, why? How to cache the query execution plan and data? I created an optimal index but the query is not using it. What should I change – query, index or provide hints? What are the tools available which helps quickly to debug performance problems? Etc… Honestly the list is quite a big and humanly impossible to write everything in the words. SQL Server Performance:  Introduction to Query Tuning My friend Vinod Kumar and I have created for the same a video learning course for beginning performance tuning. We have covered plethora of the subject in the course. Here is the quick list of the same: Execution Plan Basics Essential Indexing Techniques Query Design for Performance Performance Tuning Tools Tips and Tricks Checklist: Performance Tuning We believe we have covered a lot in this four hour course and we encourage you to go over the video course if you are interested in Beginning SQL Server Performance Tuning and Query Tuning. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Optimization, SQL Performance, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology, Video Tagged: Execution Plan

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  • OBIEE 11.1.1 - (Updated) Best Practices Guide for Tuning Oracle® Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition (Whitepaper)

    - by Ahmed Awan
    Applies To: This whitepaper applies to OBIEE release 11.1.1.3, 11.1.1.5 and 11.1.1.6 Introduction: One of the most challenging aspects of performance tuning is knowing where to begin. To maximize Oracle® Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition performance, you need to monitor, analyze, and tune all the Fusion Middleware / BI components. This guide describes the tools that you can use to monitor performance and the techniques for optimizing the performance of Oracle® Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition components. Click to Download the OBIEE Infrastructure Tuning Whitepaper (Right click or option-click the link and choose "Save As..." to download this file) Disclaimer: All tuning information stated in this guide is only for orientation, every modification has to be tested and its impact should be monitored and analyzed. Before implementing any of the tuning settings, it is recommended to carry out end to end performance testing that will also include to obtain baseline performance data for the default configurations, make incremental changes to the tuning settings and then collect performance data. Otherwise it may worse the system performance.

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  • EPM Infrastructure Tuning Guide v11.1.2.2 / 11.1.2.3

    - by Ahmed Awan
    Applies To: This edition applies to only 11.1.2.2, 11.1.2.3. One of the most challenging aspects of performance tuning is knowing where to begin. To maximize Oracle EPM System performance, all components need to be monitored, analyzed, and tuned. This guide describe the techniques used to monitor performance and the techniques for optimizing the performance of EPM components. TOP TUNING RECOMMENDATIONS FOR EPM SYSTEM: Performance tuning Oracle Hyperion EPM system is a complex and iterative process. To get you started, we have created a list of recommendations to help you optimize your Oracle Hyperion EPM system performance. This chapter includes the following sections that provide a quick start for performance tuning Oracle EPM products. Note these performance tuning techniques are applicable to nearly all Oracle EPM products such as Financial PM Applications, Essbase, Reporting and Foundation services. 1. Tune Operating Systems parameters. 2. Tune Oracle WebLogic Server (WLS) parameters. 3. Tune 64bit Java Virtual Machines (JVM). 4. Tune 32bit Java Virtual Machines (JVM). 5. Tune HTTP Server parameters. 6. Tune HTTP Server Compression / Caching. 7. Tune Oracle Database Parameters. 8. Tune Reporting And Analysis Framework (RAF) Services. 9. Tune Oracle ADF parameters. Click to Download the EPM 11.1.2.3 Infrastructure Tuning Whitepaper (Right click or option-click the link and choose "Save As..." to download this pdf file)

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  • EPM 11.1.2 - EPM Infrastructure Tuning Guide v11.1.2.1

    - by Ahmed Awan
    Applies To: This edition applies to only 11.1.2, 11.1.2 (PS1). One of the most challenging aspects of performance tuning is knowing where to begin. To maximize Oracle EPM System performance, all components need to be monitored, analyzed, and tuned. This guide describe the techniques used to monitor performance and the techniques for optimizing the performance of EPM components. TOP TUNING RECOMMENDATIONS FOR EPM SYSTEM: Performance tuning Oracle Hyperion EPM system is a complex and iterative process. To get you started, we have created a list of recommendations to help you optimize your Oracle Hyperion EPM system performance. This chapter includes the following sections that provide a quick start for performance tuning Oracle EPM products. Note these performance tuning techniques are applicable to nearly all Oracle EPM products such as Financial PM Applications, Essbase, Reporting and Foundation services. 1. Tune Operating Systems parameters. 2. Tune Oracle WebLogic Server (WLS) parameters. 3. Tune 64bit Java Virtual Machines (JVM). 4. Tune 32bit Java Virtual Machines (JVM). 5. Tune HTTP Server parameters. 6. Tune HTTP Server Compression / Caching. 7. Tune Oracle Database Parameters. 8. Tune Reporting And Analysis Framework (RAF) Services. Click to Download the EPM 11.1.2.1 Infrastructure Tuning Whitepaper (Right click or option-click the link and choose "Save As..." to download this pdf file)

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  • FreeBSD performance tuning. Sysctls, loader.conf, kernel

    - by SaveTheRbtz
    I wanted to share knowledge of tuning FreeBSD via sysctl.conf/loader.conf/KENCONF. It was initially based on Igor Sysoev's (author of nginx) presentation about FreeBSD tuning up to 100,000-200,000 active connections. Tunings are for FreeBSD-CURRENT. Since 7.2 amd64 some of them are tuned well by default. Prior 7.0 some of them are boot only (set via /boot/loader.conf) or does not exist at all. sysctl.conf: # No zero mapping feature # May break wine # (There are also reports about broken samba3) #security.bsd.map_at_zero=0 # If you have really busy webserver with apache13 you may run out of processes #kern.maxproc=10000 # Same for servers with apache2 / Pound #kern.threads.max_threads_per_proc=4096 # Max. backlog size kern.ipc.somaxconn=4096 # Shared memory // 7.2+ can use shared memory > 2Gb kern.ipc.shmmax=2147483648 # Sockets kern.ipc.maxsockets=204800 # Can cause this on older kernels: # http://old.nabble.com/Significant-performance-regression-for-increased-maxsockbuf-on-8.0-RELEASE-tt26745981.html#a26745981 ) kern.ipc.maxsockbuf=10485760 # Mbuf 2k clusters (on amd64 7.2+ 25600 is default) # For such high value vm.kmem_size must be increased to 3G kern.ipc.nmbclusters=262144 # Jumbo pagesize(_SC_PAGESIZE) clusters # Used as general packet storage for jumbo frames # can be monitored via `netstat -m` #kern.ipc.nmbjumbop=262144 # Jumbo 9k/16k clusters # If you are using them #kern.ipc.nmbjumbo9=65536 #kern.ipc.nmbjumbo16=32768 # For lower latency you can decrease scheduler's maximum time slice # default: stathz/10 (~ 13) #kern.sched.slice=1 # Increase max command-line length showed in `ps` (e.g for Tomcat/Java) # Default is PAGE_SIZE / 16 or 256 on x86 # This avoids commands to be presented as [executable] in `ps` # For more info see: http://www.freebsd.org/cgi/query-pr.cgi?pr=120749 kern.ps_arg_cache_limit=4096 # Every socket is a file, so increase them kern.maxfiles=204800 kern.maxfilesperproc=200000 kern.maxvnodes=200000 # On some systems HPET is almost 2 times faster than default ACPI-fast # Useful on systems with lots of clock_gettime / gettimeofday calls # See http://old.nabble.com/ACPI-fast-default-timecounter,-but-HPET-83--faster-td23248172.html # After revision 222222 HPET became default: http://svnweb.freebsd.org/base?view=revision&revision=222222 kern.timecounter.hardware=HPET # Small receive space, only usable on http-server, on file server this # should be increased to 65535 or even more #net.inet.tcp.recvspace=8192 # This is useful on Fat-Long-Pipes #net.inet.tcp.recvbuf_max=10485760 #net.inet.tcp.recvbuf_inc=65535 # Small send space is useful for http servers that serve small files # Autotuned since 7.x net.inet.tcp.sendspace=16384 # This is useful on Fat-Long-Pipes #net.inet.tcp.sendbuf_max=10485760 #net.inet.tcp.sendbuf_inc=65535 # Turn off receive autotuning # You can play with it. #net.inet.tcp.recvbuf_auto=0 #net.inet.tcp.sendbuf_auto=0 # This should be enabled if you going to use big spaces (>64k) # Also timestamp field is useful when using syncookies net.inet.tcp.rfc1323=1 # Turn this off on high-speed, lossless connections (LAN 1Gbit+) # If you set it there is no need in TCP_NODELAY sockopt (see man tcp) net.inet.tcp.delayed_ack=0 # This feature is useful if you are serving data over modems, Gigabit Ethernet, # or even high speed WAN links (or any other link with a high bandwidth delay product), # especially if you are also using window scaling or have configured a large send window. # Automatically disables on small RTT ( http://www.freebsd.org/cgi/cvsweb.cgi/src/sys/netinet/tcp_subr.c?#rev1.237 ) # This sysctl was removed in 10-CURRENT: # See: http://www.mail-archive.com/[email protected]/msg06178.html #net.inet.tcp.inflight.enable=0 # TCP slowstart algorithm tunings # We assuming we have very fast clients #net.inet.tcp.slowstart_flightsize=100 #net.inet.tcp.local_slowstart_flightsize=100 # Disable randomizing of ports to avoid false RST # Before usage check SA here www.bsdcan.org/2006/papers/ImprovingTCPIP.pdf # (it's also says that port randomization auto-disables at some conn.rates, but I didn't checked it thou) #net.inet.ip.portrange.randomized=0 # Increase portrange # For outgoing connections only. Good for seed-boxes and ftp servers. net.inet.ip.portrange.first=1024 net.inet.ip.portrange.last=65535 # # stops route cache degregation during a high-bandwidth flood # http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en/books/handbook/securing-freebsd.html #net.inet.ip.rtexpire=2 net.inet.ip.rtminexpire=2 net.inet.ip.rtmaxcache=1024 # Security net.inet.ip.redirect=0 net.inet.ip.sourceroute=0 net.inet.ip.accept_sourceroute=0 net.inet.icmp.maskrepl=0 net.inet.icmp.log_redirect=0 net.inet.icmp.drop_redirect=1 net.inet.tcp.drop_synfin=1 # # There is also good example of sysctl.conf with comments: # http://www.thern.org/projects/sysctl.conf # # icmp may NOT rst, helpful for those pesky spoofed # icmp/udp floods that end up taking up your outgoing # bandwidth/ifqueue due to all that outgoing RST traffic. # #net.inet.tcp.icmp_may_rst=0 # Security net.inet.udp.blackhole=1 net.inet.tcp.blackhole=2 # IPv6 Security # For more info see http://www.fosslc.org/drupal/content/security-implications-ipv6 # Disable Node info replies # To see this vulnerability in action run `ping6 -a sglAac ::1` or `ping6 -w ::1` on unprotected node net.inet6.icmp6.nodeinfo=0 # Turn on IPv6 privacy extensions # For more info see proposal http://unix.derkeiler.com/Mailing-Lists/FreeBSD/net/2008-06/msg00103.html net.inet6.ip6.use_tempaddr=1 net.inet6.ip6.prefer_tempaddr=1 # Disable ICMP redirect net.inet6.icmp6.rediraccept=0 # Disable acceptation of RA and auto linklocal generation if you don't use them #net.inet6.ip6.accept_rtadv=0 #net.inet6.ip6.auto_linklocal=0 # Increases default TTL, sometimes useful # Default is 64 net.inet.ip.ttl=128 # Lessen max segment life to conserve resources # ACK waiting time in miliseconds # (default: 30000. RFC from 1979 recommends 120000) net.inet.tcp.msl=5000 # Max bumber of timewait sockets net.inet.tcp.maxtcptw=200000 # Don't use tw on local connections # As of 15 Apr 2009. Igor Sysoev says that nolocaltimewait has some buggy realization. # So disable it or now till get fixed #net.inet.tcp.nolocaltimewait=1 # FIN_WAIT_2 state fast recycle net.inet.tcp.fast_finwait2_recycle=1 # Time before tcp keepalive probe is sent # default is 2 hours (7200000) #net.inet.tcp.keepidle=60000 # Should be increased until net.inet.ip.intr_queue_drops is zero net.inet.ip.intr_queue_maxlen=4096 # Interrupt handling via multiple CPU, but with context switch. # You can play with it. Default is 1; #net.isr.direct=0 # This is for routers only #net.inet.ip.forwarding=1 #net.inet.ip.fastforwarding=1 # This speed ups dummynet when channel isn't saturated net.inet.ip.dummynet.io_fast=1 # Increase dummynet(4) hash #net.inet.ip.dummynet.hash_size=2048 #net.inet.ip.dummynet.max_chain_len # Should be increased when you have A LOT of files on server # (Increase until vfs.ufs.dirhash_mem becomes lower) vfs.ufs.dirhash_maxmem=67108864 # Note from commit http://svn.freebsd.org/base/[email protected] : # For systems with RAID volumes and/or virtualization envirnments, where # read performance is very important, increasing this sysctl tunable to 32 # or even more will demonstratively yield additional performance benefits. vfs.read_max=32 # Explicit Congestion Notification (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Explicit_Congestion_Notification) net.inet.tcp.ecn.enable=1 # Flowtable - flow caching mechanism # Useful for routers #net.inet.flowtable.enable=1 #net.inet.flowtable.nmbflows=65535 # Extreme polling tuning #kern.polling.burst_max=1000 #kern.polling.each_burst=1000 #kern.polling.reg_frac=100 #kern.polling.user_frac=1 #kern.polling.idle_poll=0 # IPFW dynamic rules and timeouts tuning # Increase dyn_buckets till net.inet.ip.fw.curr_dyn_buckets is lower net.inet.ip.fw.dyn_buckets=65536 net.inet.ip.fw.dyn_max=65536 net.inet.ip.fw.dyn_ack_lifetime=120 net.inet.ip.fw.dyn_syn_lifetime=10 net.inet.ip.fw.dyn_fin_lifetime=2 net.inet.ip.fw.dyn_short_lifetime=10 # Make packets pass firewall only once when using dummynet # i.e. packets going thru pipe are passing out from firewall with accept #net.inet.ip.fw.one_pass=1 # shm_use_phys Wires all shared pages, making them unswappable # Use this to lessen Virtual Memory Manager's work when using Shared Mem. # Useful for databases #kern.ipc.shm_use_phys=1 # ZFS # Enable prefetch. Useful for sequential load type i.e fileserver. # FreeBSD sets vfs.zfs.prefetch_disable to 1 on any i386 systems and # on any amd64 systems with less than 4GB of avaiable memory # For additional info check this nabble thread http://old.nabble.com/Samba-read-speed-performance-tuning-td27964534.html #vfs.zfs.prefetch_disable=0 # On highload servers you may notice following message in dmesg: # "Approaching the limit on PV entries, consider increasing either the # vm.pmap.shpgperproc or the vm.pmap.pv_entry_max tunable" vm.pmap.shpgperproc=2048 loader.conf: # Accept filters for data, http and DNS requests # Useful when your software uses select() instead of kevent/kqueue or when you under DDoS # DNS accf available on 8.0+ accf_data_load="YES" accf_http_load="YES" accf_dns_load="YES" # Async IO system calls aio_load="YES" # Linux specific devices in /dev # As for 8.1 it only /dev/full #lindev_load="YES" # Adds NCQ support in FreeBSD # WARNING! all ad[0-9]+ devices will be renamed to ada[0-9]+ # 8.0+ only #ahci_load="YES" #siis_load="YES" # FreeBSD 8.2+ # New Congestion Control for FreeBSD # http://caia.swin.edu.au/urp/newtcp/tools/cc_chd-readme-0.1.txt # http://www.ietf.org/proceedings/78/slides/iccrg-5.pdf # Initial merge commit message http://www.mail-archive.com/[email protected]/msg31410.html #cc_chd_load="YES" # Increase kernel memory size to 3G. # # Use ONLY if you have KVA_PAGES in kernel configuration, and you have more than 3G RAM # Otherwise panic will happen on next reboot! # # It's required for high buffer sizes: kern.ipc.nmbjumbop, kern.ipc.nmbclusters, etc # Useful on highload stateful firewalls, proxies or ZFS fileservers # (FreeBSD 7.2+ amd64 users: Check that current value is lower!) #vm.kmem_size="3G" # If your server has lots of swap (>4Gb) you should increase following value # according to http://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-hackers/2009-October/029616.html # Otherwise you'll be getting errors # "kernel: swap zone exhausted, increase kern.maxswzone" # kern.maxswzone="256M" # Older versions of FreeBSD can't tune maxfiles on the fly #kern.maxfiles="200000" # Useful for databases # Sets maximum data size to 1G # (FreeBSD 7.2+ amd64 users: Check that current value is lower!) #kern.maxdsiz="1G" # Maximum buffer size(vfs.maxbufspace) # You can check current one via vfs.bufspace # Should be lowered/upped depending on server's load-type # Usually decreased to preserve kmem # (default is 10% of mem) #kern.maxbcache="512M" # Sendfile buffers # For i386 only #kern.ipc.nsfbufs=10240 # FreeBSD 9+ # HPET "legacy route" support. It should allow HPET to work per-CPU # See http://www.mail-archive.com/[email protected]/msg03603.html #hint.atrtc.0.clock=0 #hint.attimer.0.clock=0 #hint.hpet.0.legacy_route=1 # syncache Hash table tuning net.inet.tcp.syncache.hashsize=1024 net.inet.tcp.syncache.bucketlimit=512 net.inet.tcp.syncache.cachelimit=65536 # Increased hostcache # Later host cache can be viewed via net.inet.tcp.hostcache.list hidden sysctl # Very useful for it's RTT RTTVAR # Must be power of two net.inet.tcp.hostcache.hashsize=65536 # hashsize * bucketlimit (which is 30 by default) # It allocates 255Mb (1966080*136) of RAM net.inet.tcp.hostcache.cachelimit=1966080 # TCP control-block Hash table tuning net.inet.tcp.tcbhashsize=4096 # Disable ipfw deny all # Should be uncommented when there is a chance that # kernel and ipfw binary may be out-of sync on next reboot #net.inet.ip.fw.default_to_accept=1 # # SIFTR (Statistical Information For TCP Research) is a kernel module that # logs a range of statistics on active TCP connections to a log file. # See prerelease notes http://groups.google.com/group/mailing.freebsd.current/browse_thread/thread/b4c18be6cdce76e4 # and man 4 sitfr #siftr_load="YES" # Enable superpages, for 7.2+ only # Also read http://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-hackers/2009-November/030094.html vm.pmap.pg_ps_enabled=1 # Usefull if you are using Intel-Gigabit NIC #hw.em.rxd=4096 #hw.em.txd=4096 #hw.em.rx_process_limit="-1" # Also if you have ALOT interrupts on NIC - play with following parameters # NOTE: You should set them for every NIC #dev.em.0.rx_int_delay: 250 #dev.em.0.tx_int_delay: 250 #dev.em.0.rx_abs_int_delay: 250 #dev.em.0.tx_abs_int_delay: 250 # There is also multithreaded version of em/igb drivers can be found here: # http://people.yandex-team.ru/~wawa/ # # for additional em monitoring and statistics use # sysctl dev.em.0.stats=1 ; dmesg # sysctl dev.em.0.debug=1 ; dmesg # Also after r209242 (-CURRENT) there is a separate sysctl for each stat variable; # Same tunings for igb #hw.igb.rxd=4096 #hw.igb.txd=4096 #hw.igb.rx_process_limit=100 # Some useful netisr tunables. See sysctl net.isr #net.isr.maxthreads=4 #net.isr.defaultqlimit=4096 #net.isr.maxqlimit: 10240 # Bind netisr threads to CPUs #net.isr.bindthreads=1 # # FreeBSD 9.x+ # Increase interface send queue length # See commit message http://svn.freebsd.org/viewvc/base?view=revision&revision=207554 #net.link.ifqmaxlen=1024 # Nicer boot logo =) loader_logo="beastie" And finally here is KERNCONF: # Just some of them, see also # cat /sys/{i386,amd64,}/conf/NOTES # This one useful only on i386 #options KVA_PAGES=512 # You can play with HZ in environments with high interrupt rate (default is 1000) # 100 is for my notebook to prolong it's battery life #options HZ=100 # Polling is goot on network loads with high packet rates and low-end NICs # NB! Do not enable it if you want more than one netisr thread #options DEVICE_POLLING # Eliminate datacopy on socket read-write # To take advantage with zero copy sockets you should have an MTU >= 4k # This req. is only for receiving data. # Read more in man zero_copy_sockets # Also this epic thread on kernel trap: # http://kerneltrap.org/node/6506 # Here Linus says that "anybody that does it that way (FreeBSD) is totally incompetent" #options ZERO_COPY_SOCKETS # Support TCP sign. Used for IPSec options TCP_SIGNATURE # There was stackoverflow found in KAME IPSec stack: # See http://secunia.com/advisories/43995/ # For quick workaround you can use `ipfw add deny proto ipcomp` options IPSEC # This ones can be loaded as modules. They described in loader.conf section #options ACCEPT_FILTER_DATA #options ACCEPT_FILTER_HTTP # Adding ipfw, also can be loaded as modules options IPFIREWALL # On 8.1+ you can disable verbose to see blocked packets on ipfw0 interface. # Also there is no point in compiling verbose into the kernel, because # now there is net.inet.ip.fw.verbose tunable. #options IPFIREWALL_VERBOSE #options IPFIREWALL_VERBOSE_LIMIT=10 options IPFIREWALL_FORWARD # Adding kernel NAT options IPFIREWALL_NAT options LIBALIAS # Traffic shaping options DUMMYNET # Divert, i.e. for userspace NAT options IPDIVERT # This is for OpenBSD's pf firewall device pf device pflog # pf's QoS - ALTQ options ALTQ options ALTQ_CBQ # Class Bases Queuing (CBQ) options ALTQ_RED # Random Early Detection (RED) options ALTQ_RIO # RED In/Out options ALTQ_HFSC # Hierarchical Packet Scheduler (HFSC) options ALTQ_PRIQ # Priority Queuing (PRIQ) options ALTQ_NOPCC # Required for SMP build # Pretty console # Manual can be found here http://forums.freebsd.org/showthread.php?t=6134 #options VESA #options SC_PIXEL_MODE # Disable reboot on Ctrl Alt Del #options SC_DISABLE_REBOOT # Change normal|kernel messages color options SC_NORM_ATTR=(FG_GREEN|BG_BLACK) options SC_KERNEL_CONS_ATTR=(FG_YELLOW|BG_BLACK) # More scroll space options SC_HISTORY_SIZE=8192 # Adding hardware crypto device device crypto device cryptodev # Useful network interfaces device vlan device tap #Virtual Ethernet driver device gre #IP over IP tunneling device if_bridge #Bridge interface device pfsync #synchronization interface for PF device carp #Common Address Redundancy Protocol device enc #IPsec interface device lagg #Link aggregation interface device stf #IPv4-IPv6 port # Also for my notebook, but may be used with Opteron device amdtemp # Same for Intel processors device coretemp # man 4 cpuctl device cpuctl # CPU control pseudo-device # Support for ECMP. More than one route for destination # Works even with default route so one can use it as LB for two ISP # For now code is unstable and panics (panic: rtfree 2) on route deletions. #options RADIX_MPATH # Multicast routing #options MROUTING #options PIM # Debug & DTrace options KDB # Kernel debugger related code options KDB_TRACE # Print a stack trace for a panic options KDTRACE_FRAME # amd64-only(?) options KDTRACE_HOOKS # all architectures - enable general DTrace hooks #options DDB #options DDB_CTF # all architectures - kernel ELF linker loads CTF data # Adaptive spining in lockmgr (8.x+) # See http://www.mail-archive.com/[email protected]/msg10782.html options ADAPTIVE_LOCKMGRS # UTF-8 in console (8.x+) #options TEKEN_UTF8 # FreeBSD 8.1+ # Deadlock resolver thread # For additional information see http://www.mail-archive.com/[email protected]/msg18124.html # (FYI: "resolution" is panic so use with caution) #options DEADLKRES # Increase maximum size of Raw I/O and sendfile(2) readahead #options MAXPHYS=(1024*1024) #options MAXBSIZE=(1024*1024) # For scheduler debug enable following option. # Debug will be available via `kern.sched.stats` sysctl # For more information see http://svnweb.freebsd.org/base/head/sys/conf/NOTES?view=markup #options SCHED_STATS If you are tuning network for maximum performance you may wish to play with ifconfig options like: # You can list all capabilities via `ifconfig -m` ifconfig [-]rxcsum [-]txcsum [-]tso [-]lro mtu In case you've enabled DDB in kernel config, you should edit your /etc/ddb.conf and add something like this to enable automatic reboot (and textdump as bonus): script kdb.enter.panic=textdump set; capture on; show pcpu; bt; ps; alltrace; capture off; call doadump; reset script kdb.enter.default=textdump set; capture on; bt; ps; capture off; call doadump; reset And do not forget to add ddb_enable="YES" to /etc/rc.conf Since FreeBSD 9 you can select to enable/disable flowcontrol on your NIC: # See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethernet_flow_control and # http://www.mail-archive.com/[email protected]/msg07927.html for additional info ifconfig bge0 media auto mediaopt flowcontrol PS. Also most of FreeBSD's limits can be monitored by # vmstat -z and # limits PPS. variety of network counters can be monitored via # netstat -s In FreeBSD-9 netstat's -Q option appeared, try following command to display netisr stats # netstat -Q PPPS. also see # man 7 tuning PPPPS. I wanted to thank FreeBSD community, especially author of nginx - Igor Sysoev, [email protected] and [email protected] mailing lists for providing useful information about FreeBSD tuning. FreeBSD WIP * Whats cooking for FreeBSD 7? * Whats cooking for FreeBSD 8? * Whats cooking for FreeBSD 9? So here is the question: What tunings are you using on yours FreeBSD servers? You can also post your /etc/sysctl.conf, /boot/loader.conf, kernel options, etc with description of its' meaning (do not copy-paste from sysctl -d). Don't forget to specify server type (web, smb, gateway, etc) Let's share experience!

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  • DB2 insert performance - How to measure

    - by svrist
    [From stackoverflow] Im trying to find a way to speedup my inserts to a DB2 9.7.1 (ubuntu linux) Im watching vmstat and trying to gather some statistics via the db2 get snapshot commands but im not able to figure out which numbers im looking for to be able to see where the trouble is. I've read lits of stuff like http://www.eggheadcafe.com/software/aspnet/35692526/question-multiple-row-in.aspx, and http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/data/library/tips/dm-0403wilkins/ and tricks like ALTER TABLE lalala APPEND ON works somewhat (the difference between a dd if=/dev/zero and insert is still a factor 10) but I would like to be able to find the counters or other performance indicators that actually show why it makes sense to use those tricks. For example: What is the metric called that shows me that it is buffer pages allocation (FSCR stuff) that is the problem Where do I see that the insert time is hampered by clustered indexes? I find db2top very useful but im still searching for more direct view of "this is your bottleneck" methods

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  • WebLogic Server Performance and Tuning: Part I - Tuning JVM

    - by Gokhan Gungor
    Each WebLogic Server instance runs in its own dedicated Java Virtual Machine (JVM) which is their runtime environment. Every Admin Server in any domain executes within a JVM. The same also applies for Managed Servers. WebLogic Server can be used for a wide variety of applications and services which uses the same runtime environment and resources. Oracle WebLogic ships with 2 different JVM, HotSpot and JRocket but you can choose which JVM you want to use. JVM is designed to optimize itself however it also provides some startup options to make small changes. There are default values for its memory and garbage collection. In real world, you will not want to stick with the default values provided by the JVM rather want to customize these values based on your applications which can produce large gains in performance by making small changes with the JVM parameters. We can tell the garbage collector how to delete garbage and we can also tell JVM how much space to allocate for each generation (of java Objects) or for heap. Remember during the garbage collection no other process is executed within the JVM or runtime, which is called STOP THE WORLD which can affect the overall throughput. Each JVM has its own memory segment called Heap Memory which is the storage for java Objects. These objects can be grouped based on their age like young generation (recently created objects) or old generation (surviving objects that have lived to some extent), etc. A java object is considered garbage when it can no longer be reached from anywhere in the running program. Each generation has its own memory segment within the heap. When this segment gets full, garbage collector deletes all the objects that are marked as garbage to create space. When the old generation space gets full, the JVM performs a major collection to remove the unused objects and reclaim their space. A major garbage collect takes a significant amount of time and can affect system performance. When we create a managed server either on the same machine or on remote machine it gets its initial startup parameters from $DOMAIN_HOME/bin/setDomainEnv.sh/cmd file. By default two parameters are set:     Xms: The initial heapsize     Xmx: The max heapsize Try to set equal initial and max heapsize. The startup time can be a little longer but for long running applications it will provide a better performance. When we set -Xms512m -Xmx1024m, the physical heap size will be 512m. This means that there are pages of memory (in the state of the 512m) that the JVM does not explicitly control. It will be controlled by OS which could be reserve for the other tasks. In this case, it is an advantage if the JVM claims the entire memory at once and try not to spend time to extend when more memory is needed. Also you can use -XX:MaxPermSize (Maximum size of the permanent generation) option for Sun JVM. You should adjust the size accordingly if your application dynamically load and unload a lot of classes in order to optimize the performance. You can set the JVM options/heap size from the following places:     Through the Admin console, in the Server start tab     In the startManagedWeblogic script for the managed servers     $DOMAIN_HOME/bin/startManagedWebLogic.sh/cmd     JAVA_OPTIONS="-Xms1024m -Xmx1024m" ${JAVA_OPTIONS}     In the setDomainEnv script for the managed servers and admin server (domain wide)     USER_MEM_ARGS="-Xms1024m -Xmx1024m" When there is free memory available in the heap but it is too fragmented and not contiguously located to store the object or when there is actually insufficient memory we can get java.lang.OutOfMemoryError. We should create Thread Dump and analyze if that is possible in case of such error. The second option we can use to produce higher throughput is to garbage collection. We can roughly divide GC algorithms into 2 categories: parallel and concurrent. Parallel GC stops the execution of all the application and performs the full GC, this generally provides better throughput but also high latency using all the CPU resources during GC. Concurrent GC on the other hand, produces low latency but also low throughput since it performs GC while application executes. The JRockit JVM provides some useful command-line parameters that to control of its GC scheme like -XgcPrio command-line parameter which takes the following options; XgcPrio:pausetime (To minimize latency, parallel GC) XgcPrio:throughput (To minimize throughput, concurrent GC ) XgcPrio:deterministic (To guarantee maximum pause time, for real time systems) Sun JVM has similar parameters (like  -XX:UseParallelGC or -XX:+UseConcMarkSweepGC) to control its GC scheme. We can add -verbosegc -XX:+PrintGCDetails to monitor indications of a problem with garbage collection. Try configuring JVM’s of all managed servers to execute in -server mode to ensure that it is optimized for a server-side production environment.

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  • How I use PowerShell to collect Performance Counter data

    - by AaronBertrand
    In a current project, I need to collect performance counters from a set of virtual machines that are performing different tasks and running a variety of workloads. In a similar project last year, I used LogMan to collect performance data. This time I decided to try PowerShell because, well, all the kids are doing it, I felt a little passé, and a lot of the other tasks in this project (such as building out VMs and running workloads) were already being accomplished via PowerShell. And after all, I...(read more)

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  • How I use PowerShell to collect Performance Counter data

    - by AaronBertrand
    In a current project, I need to collect performance counters from a set of virtual machines that are performing different tasks and running a variety of workloads. In a similar project last year, I used LogMan to collect performance data. This time I decided to try PowerShell because, well, all the kids are doing it, I felt a little passé, and a lot of the other tasks in this project (such as building out VMs and running workloads) were already being accomplished via PowerShell. And after all, I...(read more)

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  • SQL SERVER – Example of Performance Tuning for Advanced Users with DB Optimizer

    - by Pinal Dave
    Performance tuning is such a subject that everyone wants to master it. In beginning everybody is at a novice level and spend lots of time learning how to master the art of performance tuning. However, as we progress further the tuning of the system keeps on getting very difficult. I have understood in my early career there should be no need of ego in the technology field. There are always better solutions and better ideas out there and we should not resist them. Instead of resisting the change and new wave I personally adopt it. Here is a similar example, as I personally progress to the master level of performance tuning, I face that it is getting harder to come up with optimal solutions. In such scenarios I rely on various tools to teach me how I can do things better. Once I learn about tools, I am often able to come up with better solutions when I face the similar situation next time. A few days ago I had received a query where the user wanted to tune it further to get the maximum out of the performance. I have re-written the similar query with the help of AdventureWorks sample database. SELECT * FROM HumanResources.Employee e INNER JOIN HumanResources.EmployeeDepartmentHistory edh ON e.BusinessEntityID = edh.BusinessEntityID INNER JOIN HumanResources.Shift s ON edh.ShiftID = s.ShiftID; User had similar query to above query was used in very critical report and wanted to get best out of the query. When I looked at the query – here were my initial thoughts Use only column in the select statements as much as you want in the application Let us look at the query pattern and data workload and find out the optimal index for it Before I give further solutions I was told by the user that they need all the columns from all the tables and creating index was not allowed in their system. He can only re-write queries or use hints to further tune this query. Now I was in the constraint box – I believe * was not a great idea but if they wanted all the columns, I believe we can’t do much besides using *. Additionally, if I cannot create a further index, I must come up with some creative way to write this query. I personally do not like to use hints in my application but there are cases when hints work out magically and gives optimal solutions. Finally, I decided to use Embarcadero’s DB Optimizer. It is a fantastic tool and very helpful when it is about performance tuning. I have previously explained how it works over here. First open DBOptimizer and open Tuning Job from File >> New >> Tuning Job. Once you open DBOptimizer Tuning Job follow the various steps indicates in the following diagram. Essentially we will take our original script and will paste that into Step 1: New SQL Text and right after that we will enable Step 2 for Generating Various cases, Step 3 for Detailed Analysis and Step 4 for Executing each generated case. Finally we will click on Analysis in Step 5 which will generate the report detailed analysis in the result pan. The detailed pan looks like. It generates various cases of T-SQL based on the original query. It applies various hints and available hints to the query and generate various execution plans of the query and displays them in the resultant. You can clearly notice that original query had a cost of 0.0841 and logical reads about 607 pages. Whereas various options which are just following it has different execution cost as well logical read. There are few cases where we have higher logical read and there are few cases where as we have very low logical read. If we pay attention the very next row to original query have Merge_Join_Query in description and have lowest execution cost value of 0.044 and have lowest Logical Reads of 29. This row contains the query which is the most optimal re-write of the original query. Let us double click over it. Here is the query: SELECT * FROM HumanResources.Employee e INNER JOIN HumanResources.EmployeeDepartmentHistory edh ON e.BusinessEntityID = edh.BusinessEntityID INNER JOIN HumanResources.Shift s ON edh.ShiftID = s.ShiftID OPTION (MERGE JOIN) If you notice above query have additional hint of Merge Join. With the help of this Merge Join query hint this query is now performing much better than before. The entire process takes less than 60 seconds. Please note that it the join hint Merge Join was optimal for this query but it is not necessary that the same hint will be helpful in all the queries. Additionally, if the workload or data pattern changes the query hint of merge join may be no more optimal join. In that case, we will have to redo the entire exercise once again. This is the reason I do not like to use hints in my queries and I discourage all of my users to use the same. However, if you look at this example, this is a great case where hints are optimizing the performance of the query. It is humanly not possible to test out various query hints and index options with the query to figure out which is the most optimal solution. Sometimes, we need to depend on the efficiency tools like DB Optimizer to guide us the way and select the best option from the suggestion provided. Let me know what you think of this article as well your experience with DB Optimizer. Please leave a comment. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Joins, SQL Optimization, SQL Performance, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • Tuning Red Gate: #4 of Some

    - by Grant Fritchey
    First time connecting to these servers directly (keys to the kingdom, bwa-ha-ha-ha. oh, excuse me), so I'm going to take a look at the server properties, just to see if there are any issues there. Max memory is set, cool, first possible silly mistake clear. In fact, these look to be nicely set up. Oh, I'd like to see the ANSI Standards set by default, but it's not a big deal. The default location for database data is the F:\ drive, where I saw all the activity last time. Cool, the people maintaining the servers in our company listen, parallelism threshold is set to 35 and optimize for ad hoc is enabled. No shocks, no surprises. The basic setup is appropriate. On to the problem database. Nothing wrong in the properties. The database is in SIMPLE recovery, but I think it's a reporting system, so no worries there. Again, I'd prefer to see the ANSI settings for connections, but that's the worst thing I can see. Time to look at the queries, tables, indexes and statistics because all the information I've collected over the last several days suggests that we're not looking at a systemic problem (except possibly not enough memory), but at the traditional tuning issues. I just want to note that, I started looking at the system, not the queries. So should you when tuning your environment. I know, from the data collected through SQL Monitor, what my top poor performing queries are, and the most frequently called, etc. I'm starting with the most frequently called. I'm going to get the execution plan for this thing out of the cache (although, with the cache dumping constantly, I might not get it). And it's not there. Called 1.3 million times over the last 3 days, but it's not in cache. Wow. OK. I'll see what's in cache for this database: SELECT  deqs.creation_time,         deqs.execution_count,         deqs.max_logical_reads,         deqs.max_elapsed_time,         deqs.total_logical_reads,         deqs.total_elapsed_time,         deqp.query_plan,         SUBSTRING(dest.text, (deqs.statement_start_offset / 2) + 1,                   (deqs.statement_end_offset - deqs.statement_start_offset) / 2                   + 1) AS QueryStatement FROM    sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS deqs         CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(deqs.sql_handle) AS dest         CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_query_plan(deqs.plan_handle) AS deqp WHERE   dest.dbid = DB_ID('Warehouse') AND deqs.statement_end_offset > 0 AND deqs.statement_start_offset > 0 ORDER BY deqs.max_logical_reads DESC ; And looking at the most expensive operation, we have our first bad boy: Multiple table scans against very large sets of data and a sort operation. a sort operation? It's an insert. Oh, I see, the table is a heap, so it's doing an insert, then sorting the data and then inserting into the primary key. First question, why isn't this a clustered index? Let's look at some more of the queries. The next one is deceiving. Here's the query plan: You're thinking to yourself, what's the big deal? Well, what if I told you that this thing had 8036318 reads? I know, you're looking at skinny little pipes. Know why? Table variable. Estimated number of rows = 1. Actual number of rows. well, I'm betting several more than one considering it's read 8 MILLION pages off the disk in a single execution. We have a serious and real tuning candidate. Oh, and I missed this, it's loading the table variable from a user defined function. Let me check, let me check. YES! A multi-statement table valued user defined function. And another tuning opportunity. This one's a beauty, seriously. Did I also mention that they're doing a hash against all the columns in the physical table. I'm sure that won't lead to scans of a 500,000 row table, no, not at all. OK. I lied. Of course it is. At least it's on the top part of the Loop which means the scan is only executed once. I just did a cursory check on the next several poor performers. all calling the UDF. I think I found a big tuning opportunity. At this point, I'm typing up internal emails for the company. Someone just had their baby called ugly. In addition to a series of suggested changes that we need to implement, I'm also apologizing for being such an unkind monster as to question whether that third eye & those flippers belong on such an otherwise lovely child.

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  • EPM 11.1.1 - EPM Infrastructure Tuning Guide v11.1.1.3

    - by Ahmed Awan
    This edition applies to EPM 9.3.1, 11.1.1.1, 11.1.1.2 & 11.1.1.3 only. INTRODUCTION:One of the most challenging aspects of performance tuning is knowing where to begin. To maximize Oracle EPM System performance, all components need to be monitored, analyzed, and tuned. This guide describe the techniques used to monitor performance and the techniques for optimizing the performance of EPM components. Click to Download the EPM 11.1.1.3 Infrastructure Tuning Whitepaper (Right click or option-click the link and choose "Save As..." to download this file)

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  • Tuning Red Gate: #5 of Multiple

    - by Grant Fritchey
    In the Tuning Red Gate series I've shown you how to look at a current load on the system and how to drill down to look at historical analysis of the system. I've also shown how you can see the top queries and other information from the current status of the system. I have one more thing I can show you before we need to start fixing things and showing how that affects the data collected, historical moments in time. For example, back in Post #3 I was looking at some spikes in some of the monitored resources that were taking place a couple of weeks back in time. Once I identify a moment in time that I'm interested in, I can go back to the first page of Monitor, Global Overview, and click on the icon: From this you can select the date and time you're interested in. For example, I saw some serious CPU queues last week: This then rolls back the time for all the information that's available to the Global Overview and the drill down to the server and the SQL Server instance there. This then allows me to look at the Top Queries running at this point, sort them by CPU and identify what was potentially the query that was causing the problem right when I saw the CPU queuing This ability to correlate a moment in time with the information available to you in the Analysis window makes for an excellent tool to investigate your systems going backwards in time. It really makes a huge difference in your knowledge. It's not enough to know that something happened at a particular time. You need to know what it was that was occurring. Remember, the key to tuning your systems is having enough knowledge about them. I'll post more on Tuning Red Gate as soon as I can get some queries rewritten. I'm working on that.

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  • How do i return integers from a string ?

    - by kannan.ambadi
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Suppose you are passing a string(for e.g.: “My name has 1 K, 2 A and 3 N”)  which may contain integers, letters or special characters. I want to retrieve only numbers from the input string. We can implement it in many ways such as splitting the string into an array or by using TryParse method. I would like to share another idea, that’s by using Regular expressions. All you have to do is, create an instance of Regular Expression with a specified pattern for integer. Regular expression class defines a method called Split, which splits the specified input string based on the pattern provided during object initialization.     We can write the code as given below:   public static int[] SplitIdSeqenceValues(object combinedArgs)         {             var _argsSeperator = new Regex(@"\D+", RegexOptions.Compiled);               string[] splitedIntegers = _argsSeperator.Split(combinedArgs.ToString());               var args = new int[splitedIntegers.Length];               for (int i = 0; i < splitedIntegers.Length; i++)                 args[i] = MakeSafe.ToSafeInt32(splitedIntegers[i]);                           return args;         }    It would be better, if we set to RegexOptions.Compiled so that the regular expression will have performance boost by faster compilation.   Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Happy Programming  :))   

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  • 3 Day Level 400 SQL Tuning Workshop 15 March in London, early bird and referral offer

    - by sqlworkshops
    I want to inform you that we have organized the "3 Day Level 400 Microsoft SQL Server 2008 and SQL Server 2005 Performance Monitoring & Tuning Hands-on Workshop" in London, United Kingdom during March 15-17, 2011.This is a truly level 400 hands-on workshop and you can find the Agenda, Prerequisite, Goal of the Workshop and Registration information at www.sqlworkshops.com/ruk. Charges are GBP 1800 (VAT excl.). Early bird discount of GBP 125 until 18 February. We are also introducing a new referral plan. If you refer someone who participates in the workshop you will receive an Amazon gift voucher for GBP 125.Feedback from one of the participants who attended our November London workshop:Andrew, Senior SQL Server DBA from UBS, UK, www.ubs.com, November 26, 2010:Rating: In a scale of 1 to 5 please rate each item below (1=Poor & 5=Excellent) Overall I was satisfied with the workshop 5 Instructor maintained the focus of the course 5 Mix of theory and practice was appropriate 5 Instructor answered the questions asked 5 The training facility met the requirement 5 How confident are you with SQL Server 2008 performance tuning 5 Additional comments from Andrew: The course was expertly delivered and backed up with practical examples. At the end of the course I felt my knowledge of SQL Server had been greatly enhanced and was eager to share with my colleagues. I felt there was one prerequisite missing from the course description, an open mind since the course changed some of my core product beliefs. For Additional workshop feedbacks refer to: www.sqlworkshops.com/feedbacks.I will be delivering the Level 300-400 1 Day Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Performance Monitoring and Tuning Seminar at Istanbul and Ankara, Turkey during March. This event is organized by Microsoft Turkey, let me know if you are in Turkey and would like to attend.During September 2010 I delivered this Level 300-400 1 Day Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Performance Monitoring and Tuning Seminar in Zurich, Switzerland organized by Microsoft Switzerland and the feedback was 4.85 out of 5, there were about 100 participants. During November 2010 when I delivered seminar in Lisbon, Portugal organized by Microsoft Portugal, the feedback was 8.30 out of 9, there were 130 participants.Our Mission: Empower customers to fully realize the Performance potential of Microsoft SQL Server without increasing the total cost of ownership (TCO) and achieve high customer satisfaction in every consulting engagement and workshop delivery.Our Business Plan: Provide useful content in webcasts, articles and seminars to get visibility for consulting engagements and workshop delivery opportunity. Help us by forwarding this email to your SQL Server friends and colleagues.Looking forwardR Meyyappan & Team @ www.SQLWorkshops.comLinkedIn: http://at.linkedin.com/in/rmeyyappan

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  • Free Online Performance Tuning Event

    - by Andrew Kelly
      On June 9th 2010 I will be showing several sessions related to performance tuning for SQL Server and they are the best kind because they are free :).  So mark your calendars. Here is the event info and URL: June 29, 2010 - 10:00 am - 3:00 pm Eastern SQL Server is the platform for business. In this day-long free virtual event, well-known SQL Server performance expert Andrew Kelly will provide you with the tools and knowledge you need to stay on top of three key areas related to peak performance...(read more)

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  • VM Tuning to enhance performance

    - by Tiffany Walker
    vm.bdflush = 100 1200 128 512 15 5000 500 1884 2 vm.dirty_ratio = 20 vm.min_free_kbytes = 300000 That means that the MOST dirty data that can be in RAM is 20% and that there will always be 300MB RAM that linux CANNOT use to cache files right? What I am trying to do is ensure that there is always room left for service to spawn and use RAM. I have 8GB of ram and hosting websites with PHP so I want to have more free RAM on stand by instead of seeing myself on 50MB of RAM free.

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  • Need help tuning Mysql and linux server

    - by Newtonx
    We have multi-user application (like MailChimp,Constant Contact) . Each of our customers has it's own contact's list (from 5 to 100.000 contacts). Everything is stored in one BIG database (currently 25G). Since we released our product we have the following data history. 5 years of data history : - users/customers (200+) - contacts (40 million records) - campaigns - campaign_deliveries (73.843.764 records) - campaign_queue ( 8 millions currently ) As we get more users and table records increase our system/web app is getting slower and slower . Some queries takes too long to execute . SCHEMA Table contacts --------------------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+ | Field | Type | Null | Key | Default | Extra | +---------------------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+ | contact_id | int(10) unsigned | NO | PRI | NULL | auto_increment | | client_id | int(10) unsigned | YES | | NULL | | | name | varchar(60) | YES | | NULL | | | mail | varchar(60) | YES | MUL | NULL | | | verified | int(1) | YES | | 0 | | | owner | int(10) unsigned | NO | MUL | 0 | | | date_created | date | YES | MUL | NULL | | | geolocation | varchar(100) | YES | | NULL | | | ip | varchar(20) | YES | MUL | NULL | | +---------------------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+ Table campaign_deliveries +---------------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+ | Field | Type | Null | Key | Default | Extra | +---------------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+ | id | int(11) | NO | PRI | NULL | auto_increment | | newsletter_id | int(10) unsigned | NO | MUL | 0 | | | contact_id | int(10) unsigned | NO | MUL | 0 | | | sent_date | date | YES | MUL | NULL | | | sent_time | time | YES | MUL | NULL | | | smtp_server | varchar(20) | YES | | NULL | | | owner | int(5) | YES | MUL | NULL | | | ip | varchar(20) | YES | MUL | NULL | | +---------------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+ Table campaign_queue +---------------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+ | Field | Type | Null | Key | Default | Extra | +---------------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+ | queue_id | int(10) unsigned | NO | PRI | NULL | auto_increment | | newsletter_id | int(10) unsigned | NO | MUL | 0 | | | owner | int(10) unsigned | NO | MUL | 0 | | | date_to_send | date | YES | | NULL | | | contact_id | int(11) | NO | MUL | NULL | | | date_created | date | YES | | NULL | | +---------------+------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+ Slow queries LOG -------------------------------------------- Query_time: 350 Lock_time: 1 Rows_sent: 1 Rows_examined: 971004 SELECT COUNT(*) as total FROM contacts WHERE (contacts.owner = 70 AND contacts.verified = 1); Query_time: 235 Lock_time: 1 Rows_sent: 1 Rows_examined: 4455209 SELECT COUNT(*) as total FROM contacts WHERE (contacts.owner = 2); How can we optimize it ? Queries should take no more than 30 secs to execute? Can we optimize it and keep all data in one BIG database or should we change app's structure and set one single database to each user ? Thanks

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  • Small performance test on a web service

    - by vtortola
    Hi, I'm trying to develop a small application that test how many requests per second can my service support but I think I'm doing something wrong. The service is in an early development stage, but I'd like to have this test handy in order to check in time to time I'm not doing something that decrease the performance. The problem is that I cannot get the web server or the database server go to the 100% of CPU. I'm using three different computers, in one is the web server (WinSrv Standard 2008 x64 IIS7), in other the database (Win 2K - SQL Server 2005) and the last is my computer (Win7 x64 ultimate), where I'll run the test. The computers are connected through a 100 ethernet switch. The request POST is 9 bytes and the response will be 842 bytes. The test launches several threads, and each thread has a "while" loop, in each loop it creates a WebRequest object, performs a call, increment a common counter and waits between 1 and 5 millisencods, then it do it again: static Int32 counter = 0; static void Main(string[] args) { ServicePointManager.DefaultConnectionLimit = 250; Console.WriteLine("Ready. Press any key..."); Console.ReadKey(); Console.WriteLine("Running..."); String localhost = "localhost"; String linuxmono = "192.168.1.74"; String server= "192.168.1.5:8080"; DateTime start = DateTime.Now; Random r = new Random(DateTime.Now.Millisecond); for (int i = 0; i < 50; i++) { new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(Test)).Start(server); Thread.Sleep(r.Next(1, 3)); } Thread.Sleep(2000); while (true) { Console.WriteLine("Request per second :" + counter/DateTime.Now.Subtract(start).TotalSeconds ); Thread.Sleep(3000); } } public static void Test(Object ip) { Guid guid = Guid.NewGuid(); Random r = new Random(DateTime.Now.Millisecond); while (true) { String test = "<lalala/>"; WebRequest req = WebRequest.Create("http://" + (String)ip + "/WebApp/"+guid.ToString()+"/Data/Tables=whatever"); req.Method = "POST"; req.ContentType = "application/xml"; req.Credentials = new NetworkCredential("aaa", "aaa","domain"); Byte[] array = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(test); req.ContentLength = array.Length; using (Stream reqStream = req.GetRequestStream()) { reqStream.Write(array, 0, array.Length); reqStream.Close(); } using (Stream responseStream = req.GetResponse().GetResponseStream()) { String response = new StreamReader(responseStream).ReadToEnd(); if (response.Length != 842) Console.Write(" EEEE "); } Interlocked.Increment(ref counter); Thread.Sleep(r.Next(1,5)); } } If I run the test neither of the computers do an excesive CPU usage. Let's say I get a X requests per second, if I run the console application two times at the same moment, I get X/2 request per second in each one... but still the web server is on 30% of CPU, the database server on 25%... I've tried to remove the thread.sleep in the loop, but it doesn't make a big difference. I'd like to put the machines to the maximun, to check how may requests per second they can provide. I guessed that I could do it in this way... but apparently I'm missing something here... What is the problem? Kind regards.

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