Search Results

Search found 16 results on 1 pages for 'scot'.

Page 1/1 | 1 

  • RBAC configuration on solaris10

    - by scot
    Hi , I am looking for RBAC configuration on solaris10 to achieve the below: user=jon group=jtu jon is owner of /opt/app user=ken group=jtu ken is owner of /data on Linux I have added the below line %jtu ALL= NOPASSWD: /bin/*, /usr/bin/* so that jon is able to access /data/tmp and delete files. This doesn't work on solaris10 since there is no sudo by default. How to configure RBAC in solaris10 for jon to be able to delete files in /data/tmp? Thanks

    Read the article

  • sybase ase 15.0.3 64 bit install error

    - by scot
    Hi , I have a 32bit machine installed with 64 bit suse10 linux. I then tried installing a 64bit sybase on it but the sybase installation fails the moment i launch ./setup with below error: Unhandled error...try running with is:debug system property. the install shield wizard fails to launch.. I tried replacing the JVM folder in sybase installation dump but it doesn't help. how do i use this is:debug property? has any one encountered such an error?

    Read the article

  • iPhone: Application Install Fails With "Invalid Signer" Error

    - by Scot
    The iPhone is attached to a Mac runnning the latest iTunes version and I am 100% sure that her UDID is in the provisioning file. Her iPhone has not been jailbroken and we even restored it to factory settings. I am having trouble installing our development build on this one iPhone. The error is: the application "[Application Name]" was not installed on the iPhone "iPhone" because the signer is not valid I am 100% sure that the UDID is accurately entered in the provisioning file and that they correctly copied the right provision file/build combo. This same combo has been successfully installed on over a dozen iphones. We have been able to install this on some devices with no problems. Edit: From comments to an answer: We can install it on 100 iphone with our account. We have about 40 iphones in this provisioning profile and it works on 38 of them.

    Read the article

  • save xml object so that elements are in sorted order in saved xml file

    - by scot
    Hi , I am saving a xml document object and it is saved in a xml file as shown below . <author name="tom" book="Fun-II"/> <author name="jack" book="Live-I"/> <author name="pete" book="Code-I"/> <author name="jack" book="Live-II"/> <author name="pete" book="Code-II"/> <author name="tom" book="Fun-I"/> instead i want to sort the content in document object so that when i persist the object it is saved by grouping authors then book name as below: <author name="jack" book="Live-I"/> <author name="jack" book="Live-II"/> <author name="pete" book="Code-I"/> <author name="pete" book="Code-II"/> <author name="tom" book="Fun-I"/> <author name="tom" book="Fun-II"/> I use apache xml beans..any ideas on how to achieve this? thanks.

    Read the article

  • Java Charset problem on linux

    - by scot
    Hi, problem: I have a string containing special characters which i convert to bytes and vice versa..the conversion works properly on windows but on linux the special character is not converted properly.the default charset on linux is UTF-8 as seen with Charset.defaultCharset.getdisplayName() however if i run on linux with option -Dfile.encoding=ISO-8859-1 it works properly.. how to make it work using the UTF-8 default charset and not setting the -D option in unix environment. edit: i use jdk1.6.13 edit:code snippet works with cs = "ISO-8859-1"; or cs="UTF-8"; on win but not in linux String x = "½"; System.out.println(x); byte[] ba = x.getBytes(Charset.forName(cs)); for (byte b : ba) { System.out.println(b); } String y = new String(ba, Charset.forName(cs)); System.out.println(y); ~regards daed

    Read the article

  • Can an Aspect conditionally render parts of a JSP page ?

    - by Scott The Scot
    At present the jsp pages have normal authorize tags to conditionally render links and information etc. The website is on the intranet, and we're using Spring Security 2.0.4. Ive now got a business user who wants to allow all roles to access everything for the first few weeks, then gradually add the security back in as feedback is gathered from the business. Rather than go through every page, removing the authorize tags, only to have to put them back in, is is possible to configure these through an aspect, or is there any other way to externalize this into a config file ? I've found Spring's MethodSecurityInterceptor and the meta data tags, but these wouldn't give me the externalization. I've been on google for the last hour, and am now pretty sure this can't be done, but would love to find out I haven't been asking the right questions. Advice appreciated

    Read the article

  • Any good interview Questions to ask a sybase dba.

    - by scot
    Hi, I am a java developer and i will be interviewing sybase dbas along with my boss. I know some basic stuff about sybase. Iam looking for good interview questions that i can ask for a sybase dba. they will be having a min of 4 years of experience. I am looking for them to have really good knowledge in performance and tuning related areas like how to measure database performance and suggest ways to improve database design or sybase configuration etc. Help much appreciated. BR

    Read the article

  • Is it bad to have multiple return statements?

    - by scot
    Hi, I have a code somethg like below: int method(string a ,int b , int c){ if(cond1) return -1; if(cond2 || cond3) return 3; if(cond1 && cond2) return 0; else return -999; } Does it perform badly when compared to having multiple if else and have single return?

    Read the article

  • what are the Ways to create a gui to install a java app

    - by scot
    Hi, I have a java web application . Currently the application is installed in a cli mode [on windows/linux /solaris] by running sh or cmd scripts. I would like to create a GUI for the App installation so that user can edit info in gui for the installation. Any pointers/Best practices for developing gui would be helpful. thank you

    Read the article

  • NerdDinner routing

    - by Joe
    I watched Scot hanselmann's presentation at mix '10. When he presented the tiny urls for Nerddinner he said it was a 2 part process. a) modify global.asax.cs with a new route b)some sort of isapi rewrite. When I implemented this in my asp.net mvc 2 site I only did part a. and it works. why then did he do part b?? what is the advantages of doing that???

    Read the article

  • Scrum with Team Foundation Server 2010 Done

    - by Martin Hinshelwood
    Since I have joined SSW as a Solution Architect its Chief Architect, Adam Cogan, has been mentoring me and pushing me to do better. One of the things that I have been wanting to do since the first DDD Scotland was to present a session. For DDD Scotland 2010 Adam suggested that I submit he double session on “Better project Management with Team Foundation Server 2010”. So, with some apprehension I submitted two session as Part A and Part B. Download DDD Scotland -  Scrum with Team Foundation Server 2010 How surprised was I that after the attendees had finished casting their votes that both sessions would be in the top 20 one in the top 5. I an effort to promote diversity in sessions the DDD committee try to make sure that each presenter only have one session. I would have to compress SSW’s presentation into 1 hour. Around this time SSW embarked on it continuing adventures with scrum an Microsoft started heavily investing in Scrum for its internal use. I decided to do a slightly different session, but one that would still meet the agenda and goal of the billed session to provide “Better project management with Team Foundation Server 2010”. And so Scrum with Team Foundation Server 2010 was born. At this stage I really have to thank Aaron Bjork who provided me with many of the slides and animations as I really can’t work Power Point. On the 27th of April I presented the session for the Aberdeen Partner Group and then on 8th May I presented at DDD Scotland. Figure: Some of the presenters and organisers of DDD Scotland I mentioned quite a few of SSW’s Rules to better Scrum Using TFS and I have uploaded my presentation to Skydrive.   Download DDD Scotland -  Scrum with Team Foundation Server 2010 Technorati Tags: DDD Scot,Scrum,TFS 2010,SSW

    Read the article

  • Upgrading Code from 2007 to 2010

    - by MOSSLover
    So I’ve been doing some upgrades just to see if things will work from 2007 to 2010.  So far most of the stuff I want works, but obviously there are some things that break.  Did you guys know that in 2007 you could add a webpart to the view pages for lists and libraries without losing the toolbar?  In 2010 the ribbon disappears every time you add a webpart.  So if you are using Scot Hillier’s Codeplex project to hide buttons it will not work the same way, because the ribbon is going to disappear altogether. I have also learned another reason why standalone installations are the bane of my existence.  Nine times out of ten the installation is done using Network Service as the application pool account.  You are wondering why is this bad?  Well, let’s just say the site collection administrator with local admin rights wants to attach the IIS Worker process and debug say a webpart.  Visual Studio 2010 will throw a nasty error that tells you that you are not an administrator.  You will say, but I am an administrator?  I have all the correct group permissions on the server and on SQL and in SharePoint.  Then you will go in and decide let’s add my own admin account just to see if I can attach the debugger and you will notice that works properly.  So the morale of the story is create a separate account on your development environment to run all the SharePoint Services and such.  You don’t need to go all out and create the best practices amount of accounts if it’s just your dev environment.  I would at least create one single account to run all your SharePoint process (Services, SQL, and App Pool).  Also, don’t run a standalone install unless you want to kill kittens (this is a quote from Todd Klindt).  We love kittens they are cute and awesome.  Besides you learn more if you click Complete and just skip standalone.  You will learn how to setup SQL Server 2008 and you will learn how to configure your environment.  It will help you in the long run.  So I have ranted enough for today I figure these are enough tidbits for you this time around.  The two of you who read my blog and I know some of you are friends who don’t understand SharePoint.  I might as well have just done “wahwahwahwah” in Charlie Brown adult speak.  Thanks for reading as usual.  I’ll catch you all when I complain more about the upgrade process and share more tidbits, which will inevitably become a presentation at a conference or two. Technorati Tags: Upgrade Code SharePoint 2007 to 2010,Visuaul Studio 2010,SharePoint 2010

    Read the article

  • Curing the Database-Application mismatch

    - by Phil Factor
    If an application requires access to a database, then you have to be able to deploy it so as to be version-compatible with the database, in phase. If you can deploy both together, then the application and database must normally be deployed at the same version in which they, together, passed integration and functional testing.  When a single database supports more than one application, then the problem gets more interesting. I’ll need to be more precise here. It is actually the application-interface definition of the database that needs to be in a compatible ‘version’.  Most databases that get into production have no separate application-interface; in other words they are ‘close-coupled’.  For this vast majority, the whole database is the application-interface, and applications are free to wander through the bowels of the database scot-free.  If you’ve spurned the perceived wisdom of application architects to have a defined application-interface within the database that is based on views and stored procedures, any version-mismatch will be as sensitive as a kitten.  A team that creates an application that makes direct access to base tables in a database will have to put a lot of energy into keeping Database and Application in sync, to say nothing of having to tackle issues such as security and audit. It is not the obvious route to development nirvana. I’ve been in countless tense meetings with application developers who initially bridle instinctively at the apparent restrictions of being ‘banned’ from the base tables or routines of a database.  There is no good technical reason for needing that sort of access that I’ve ever come across.  Everything that the application wants can be delivered via a set of views and procedures, and with far less pain for all concerned: This is the application-interface.  If more than zero developers are creating a database-driven application, then the project will benefit from the loose-coupling that an application interface brings. What is important here is that the database development role is separated from the application development role, even if it is the same developer performing both roles. The idea of an application-interface with a database is as old as I can remember. The big corporate or government databases generally supported several applications, and there was little option. When a new application wanted access to an existing corporate database, the developers, and myself as technical architect, would have to meet with hatchet-faced DBAs and production staff to work out an interface. Sure, they would talk up the effort involved for budgetary reasons, but it was routine work, because it decoupled the database from its supporting applications. We’d be given our own stored procedures. One of them, I still remember, had ninety-two parameters. All database access was encapsulated in one application-module. If you have a stable defined application-interface with the database (Yes, one for each application usually) you need to keep the external definitions of the components of this interface in version control, linked with the application source,  and carefully track and negotiate any changes between database developers and application developers.  Essentially, the application development team owns the interface definition, and the onus is on the Database developers to implement it and maintain it, in conformance.  Internally, the database can then make all sorts of changes and refactoring, as long as source control is maintained.  If the application interface passes all the comprehensive integration and functional tests for the particular version they were designed for, nothing is broken. Your performance-testing can ‘hang’ on the same interface, since databases are judged on the performance of the application, not an ‘internal’ database process. The database developers have responsibility for maintaining the application-interface, but not its definition,  as they refactor the database. This is easily tested on a daily basis since the tests are normally automated. In this setting, the deployment can proceed if the more stable application-interface, rather than the continuously-changing database, passes all tests for the version of the application. Normally, if all goes well, a database with a well-designed application interface can evolve gracefully without changing the external appearance of the interface, and this is confirmed by integration tests that check the interface, and which hopefully don’t need to be altered at all often.  If the application is rapidly changing its ‘domain model’  in the light of an increased understanding of the application domain, then it can change the interface definitions and the database developers need only implement the interface rather than refactor the underlying database.  The test team will also have to redo the functional and integration tests which are, of course ‘written to’ the definition.  The Database developers will find it easier if these tests are done before their re-wiring  job to implement the new interface. If, at the other extreme, an application receives no further development work but survives unchanged, the database can continue to change and develop to keep pace with the requirements of the other applications it supports, and needs only to take care that the application interface is never broken. Testing is easy since your automated scripts to test the interface do not need to change. The database developers will, of course, maintain their own source control for the database, and will be likely to maintain versions for all major releases. However, this will not need to be shared with the applications that the database servers. On the other hand, the definition of the application interfaces should be within the application source. Changes in it have to be subject to change-control procedures, as they will require a chain of tests. Once you allow, instead of an application-interface, an intimate relationship between application and database, we are in the realms of impedance mismatch, over and above the obvious security problems.  Part of this impedance problem is a difference in development practices. Whereas the application has to be regularly built and integrated, this isn’t necessarily the case with the database.  An RDBMS is inherently multi-user and self-integrating. If the developers work together on the database, then a subsequent integration of the database on a staging server doesn’t often bring nasty surprises. A separate database-integration process is only needed if the database is deliberately built in a way that mimics the application development process, but which hampers the normal database-development techniques.  This process is like demanding a official walking with a red flag in front of a motor car.  In order to closely coordinate databases with applications, entire databases have to be ‘versioned’, so that an application version can be matched with a database version to produce a working build without errors.  There is no natural process to ‘version’ databases.  Each development project will have to define a system for maintaining the version level. A curious paradox occurs in development when there is no formal application-interface. When the strains and cracks happen, the extra meetings, bureaucracy, and activity required to maintain accurate deployments looks to IT management like work. They see activity, and it looks good. Work means progress.  Management then smile on the design choices made. In IT, good design work doesn’t necessarily look good, and vice versa.

    Read the article

  • CodePlex Daily Summary for Sunday, February 28, 2010

    CodePlex Daily Summary for Sunday, February 28, 2010New ProjectsESB Toolkit Extensions: ESB Extensions is a solution containing multiple .Net Projects and artifacts: Unit Tests, Itineraries, Business Rules, Binding Files, and C# Class ...Event-Based Components Binder: The Binder automatically connects output-pins to input-pins of Event-Based Components based on message type information and naming conventions. ...Haze Anti-Virus: Haze Anti-Virus is a anti virus written in C# and has features such a realtime process watching and a Process Blacklist, and is able to download Da...latex2mathml: A .NET 2.0 library written in C# which allows the conversion of LaTeX documents to XHTML+MathML format. A stand-alone converter is included. The li...Project Lyrebird: Project lyrebird is a attempt to create a all-purpose media player. It is designed to be simple, yet powerful. Its written in C#QueryToGrid Module for DotNetNuke®: This is a module that allows you to execute and display the results of T-SQL queries in DotNetNuke using your choice of AJAX grids.Reusable Library Demo: A demonstration of reusable abstractions for enterprise application developerSharePoint 2010 Conference Samples: This project contains source code from various SharePoint 2010 conferences where Scot Hillier presented.Silverlight Photo Blogger: Silverlight Photo Blogger gives you the tools you need to capture and blog about your travels in a rich and interactive web experience. Enjoy som...SMTP Test: Several times we are faced with applications that send email, the SMTP Tester principle objective is to test various possibilities of sendingSolution Tools - tools for Visual Studio solutions and projects: Solution Tools are a collection of tools that you can use with your Visual Studio Solutions and projects.New ReleasesAgile Poker Cards for Windows Mobile: Agile Poker Cards v1.1.0.0: Agile Poker Cards v1.1.0.0 Use this application to display poker cards in a planning session on a Windows Mobile device. Release notes Added new ...BuildTools - Toolset for automated builds: BuildTools 2.0 Feb 2010 Milestone: The Feb 2010 Milestone release is a complete rewrite of the old codebase in Visual Studio 2010 RC. It features MSBuild tasks for generating build v...Composure: NHibernate-Trunk-2010-02-25-VS2010.NET4 Alpha1: Recent NHibernate-Trunk conversion for Visual Studio 2010 Beta2 against .NET 4.0. Although all of the tests pass (other than the "Ignored"), this ...Employee Scheduler: Employee Scheduler 2.4: Extract the files to a directory and run Lab Hours.exe. Add an employee. Double click an employee to modify their times. Please contact me through ...ESB Toolkit Extensions: Tellago BizTalk ESB 2.0 Toolkit Extensions: Windows Installer file that installs Library on a BizTalk ESB 2.0 system. This Install automatically configures the esb.config to use the new compo...Haze Anti-Virus: Haze Anti-Virus Binary v1.0.3: This is the Compiled version of Haze Anti-Virus, please let me know about any bugs, thanks Please Note that Database updating is currently not avai...Haze Anti-Virus: Haze Anti-Virus Source v1.0.3: This is the source for Haze Anti-VirusHOG Project: HOG Visual Studio Template: This is Visual Studio HOG Template. Created by the great tool: Solution FactoryHOG Project: Template user guide: HOW TOiTuner - The iTunes Companion: iTuner 1.1.3711: Two new features are available: the Automated Librarian and Playlist Exporter. The iTuner Automated Librarian automatically cleans the iTunes libr...johanleino.codeplex.com: SilverlightMultiLevelNavigationExample: The source code for SilverlightMultiLevelNavigationExample (VS 2010)MDownloader: MDownloader-0.15.3.56128: Fixed filefactory provider implementation after site changes.MiniTwitter: 1.09: MiniTwitter 1.09 更新内容 変更 スクロール位置がトップ以外の時は自動更新や発言時に位置を保持するように変更 タブ毎にスクロール位置が変わらないように変更 URL に ? や ! が含まれている時は短縮 URL に変換するように変更NMock3: NMock3 - Beta 4, .NET 3.5: This release includes the most current version of the NMock2 project code from Source Forge. Please start providing feedback on the tutorials. The...QueryUnit: QueryUnitPOC v. 0.0.0.7: - This version fixes problems related to the fact that in previous releases you had to specify expected values using locale-specific formats. Now e...RapidWebDev - .NET Enterprise Software Development Infrastructure: RapidWebDev 1.51: This is a hot-fix version for 1.5 which is added a new restful web service for concrete data and fixed some major bugs. The change list is as follo...Rawr: Rawr 2.3.11: - Load from Armory code cleaned up. - Tiny Abomination in a Jar's proc how now been more accurately modeled. - You should now be able to reload...Resharper Settings Manager: RSM v1.2: Changes Added Default Settings File option. The selected settings file will be loaded automatically for solutions with no settings sharing. Added...Reusable Library Demo: Reusable Library Demo v1.0.0: A demonstration of reusable abstractions for enterprise application developerRounded Corners / DIV Container: MJC RoundedDiv 3.2: This is the first public release on Codeplex.com. Versions previous to 3.2 were created before this control was made available on Codeplex.com.SharePoint 2010 Conference Samples: Samples: Download the samples from the conferencesSharePoint Outlook Connector: Version 1.2.2.8: Saving email message as list item and attachments as attachment of the list item functionality has been addedSharePoint URL Ping Tool: Url Ping Tool Solution: A solution that contain one fram fature that will add a link under Site Administration section in the Site Settings page.SMTP Test: Fist SMTP Tester: First ReleaseSolution Tools - tools for Visual Studio solutions and projects: SolutionTools binary: Initial release of the tool. Turns out, this project was just a big waste of effort - use Project Linker instead!Solution Tools - tools for Visual Studio solutions and projects: SolutionTools source - don't use this tool: Initial release of the tool. Turns out, this project was just a big waste of effort - use Project Linker instead! Anyway, here's the source code...Spark View Engine: Spark v1.1 RC1: Overview This build is a preview of v1.1. Among other changes it provides support for ASP.NET MVC 2 RC2. Spark v1.1 release will be created soon ...Sprite Sheet Packer: 2.0 Release: I'm calling this a full new release because I can. Refactored all of the build logic to sspack.exe. This allows you to run this from the command l...SPSF SharePoint Software Factory: SPSF SharePoint Software Factory 2.4.3: New features: WSPBuilder support, Simple Application now with optional multilanguage support, Extending deployment skript for large deployments Fix...TortoiseHg: Beta for TortoiseHg 1.0 (0.9.31201): Beta for TortoiseHg 1.0 (0.9.31201) Please backup your user Mercurial.ini file and then uninstall any 0.9.X release before installing Use the x86...UI Compiler .NET - JavaScript compiler/minifier built on Google Closure Compiler: UI Compiler .NET 1.5 Beta: UI Compiler .NET does not include Java. To be able to run Google Closure Compiler locally you must make sure that Java 6 is installed. If Java 6 (o...VCC: Latest build, v2.1.30227.0: Automatic drop of latest buildVisual Studio DSite: File Encryption and Decryption (Visual Basic 2008): This program will create an encrypted copy of the file specified. Also decrypt the file specified. This program contains the source code but if yo...Visual Studio DSite: Visual C++ 2008 CLR Console Application Random Int: This source code includes an example of generating a random integer between the numbers 1-100.Weather Forecast Control: MJC MyWeather 2.2: This is the first public release on Codeplex.com. Versions previous to 2.2 were created before this control was made available on Codeplex.com.Most Popular ProjectsRawrWBFS ManagerAJAX Control ToolkitMicrosoft SQL Server Product Samples: DatabaseSilverlight ToolkitWindows Presentation Foundation (WPF)Microsoft SQL Server Community & SamplesASP.NETDotNetNuke® Community EditionBlogEngine.NETMost Active ProjectsDinnerNow.netRawrBlogEngine.NETMapWindow GISSLARToolkit - Silverlight Augmented Reality ToolkitCommon Context Adapterspatterns & practices – Enterprise LibrarySharpMap - Geospatial Application Framework for the CLRNB_Store - Free DotNetNuke Ecommerce Catalog ModuleRapid Entity Framework. (ORM). CTP 2

    Read the article

  • Introducing… SharePress!

    - by Bil Simser
    For those that follow me I’ve been away from blogging and twittering for a couple of months. This is the reason. For the last few months I’ve been working with a cross-functional team putting together a new product from the people that run WordPress, the free premiere blogging platform. The result is a new product we call SharePress, a highly extensible blogging and content management platform with the usability of WordPress and the power of SharePoint combined into a single product. SharePress gives you SharePoint sites that are SEO-friendly delivered with a Web 2.0 ease of use, leveraging all of the existing abilities of SharePoint and WordPress that we know today. The Reason Back in December I was approached by the WordPress team about building a new platform that took advantage of the power of SharePoint but the ease of WordPress. I’m no stranger to WordPress and it’s 5 minute no-holds-barred install (I’ve always wanted SharePoint to do this!) and I run my personal blog on WordPress as does my better half, Princess Jenn. There’s always been a pitch by so-called Web 2.0 applications to deliver the power of SharePoint but the ease of [insert product here] over the past year or so. I checked each and every one of them out, but they fell woefully short when it came to SharePoint’s document management, versioning, and customization. They try, but it’s never been up to par in my books. On the flipside, SharePoint has always been tops in collaboration in the Enterprise but it’s painful to develop web parts, UI customization can be tricky, and there’s just no user community for something as simple as themes and designs. The Product Enter SharePress. Is it SharePoint? Is it WordPress? It’s both, and neither. Everything you like about both products are there but this is a bold new product that is positioned to bring SharePoint to the masses while maintaining the fidelity of an Enterprise 2.0 collaboration platform. SharePress delivers on all fronts including: The ability to leverage any WordPress/Joomla/Drupal/DotNetNuke themes and skins inside of SharePoint Run any WordPress/Drupal/Joomla/DotNetNuke/SharePoint plug-in/module/web part/feature works out of the box with SharePress SEO-friendly URLs and pages Permalinks for all content All the features of SharePoint Server 2010 (including InfoPath, Excel, and Access services) included in the price Small deployment footprint. You decide how much to deploy and where. Independent Database Abstraction Layer (iDal) that allows you to deploy to SQL Server 2005/2008, MySQL, and PostgreSQL Portable Rendering Engine Layer (PREL) so you host .NET or PHP on Apache or IIS (version 7 or higher). The install feature is built around WordPress and it’s famous 5-minute install (actually, it’s never taken me more than 1 minute). SharePress installs with two screens after the files are uploaded to your server (which can be done entirely using FTP): After you enter two fields of information click “Install SharePress” and you’ll be done: No mess, no fuss, no complicated dependencies, and no server access required! How simpler could this be? The Technology WordPress plug-ins and themes working with SharePoint? Of course! The answer is IronPython which has now reached a maturity level capable of doing on the fly code language conversions. SharePress is a brand new product not built on top of any previous platform but leverages all the power of each of those applications through a patent pending technique called SharePress Multi-plAtfoRm Technology (SMART). SMART will convert PHP code on the fly into Python (using SWIG as an intermediate processor) which is then compiled to MSIL and then delivered back as an ASP.NET MVC application (output is C# or VB.NET, but you can build your own SMART converter to output a different language). Sound complicated? It is, but it’s all behind the scenes and you don’t have to worry about a thing. This image illustrates the technology stack and process: So users can load up out of the box PHP themes and plug-ins from the WordPress/Joomla/Drupal community into the SMART converter and output MSIL that is used by the SharePress engine and rendered on the fly to the end user. Supported PHP versions are 4.xx and 5.xx with version 6 support to come when it’s released. Similarly you can take any .NET application, DotNetNuke Module, SharePoint Web Part or event handler and feed it into the converter to output the same. Everything is reverse compiled into MSIL so it becomes technology agnostic. No source code access is needed and the SMART converter can handle obfuscated .NET assemblies that were built with .NET 1.0, 1.1, 2.0, 3.5, and 4.0. With this technology you can also with the flip of a switch have the output create PHP pages for you. This allows you to run SharePress on Unix based systems running PHP and MySQL, allowing you to deliver your SharePoint like experience to your users with a $0 infrastructure footprint. Here’s SharePress with the default WordPress post imported then a stock SharePoint collaboration site was imported. The site was then applied with the default Kubrick theme from WordPress. The Features Deploy any of the freely available 100,000 WordPress/Joomla/Drupal themes instantly to your runtime SharePress environment and preview or activate them right from your browser. Built-in Web 2.0 jQuery Enabled End User and Administrator Web Interface. Never have to remote into a server again! Run any SharePoint Web Part or Event Handler directly without modification or access to source code in SharePress. Use any WordPress/Joomla/Drupal plug-in directly in SharePress, no local admin or access to server. Just upload and activate. Upload and Activate any SharePoint Solution Package to any site remotely. No rebuilding. Changes made to sites require no compiling or rebuilding and are published immediately. Password Protected Content. You can give passwords to individual posts, articles, pages, documents, forms, and list items. A powerful polymorphic Captcha system backs the security interface and vendors can easily tie into smart card readers, fingerprint readers, and retina scanners for authorization and identification. OpenID, Windows Live, and Windows Authentication are supported out of the box. Infinitely customizable and extensible. You can leverage plug-ins from the open source community to do practically anything, all configured and uploaded via the browser. Additionally the developer API (available soon) allows you to build extensions in .NET, PHP, and Python with little effort. Easy Importing. We have importers for Blogger, WordPress, Drupal, Joomla, DotNetNuke, and SharePoint so you can populate your site quickly and easily with full metadata modeling and creation. Banner Management. It’s easy to setup banners for your web site complete with impression numbers, special URLs, and more. Menu Manager. The Menu Manager allows you to create as many menus as you want, each one can be associated to specific audiences or roles and then be styled across multiple contexts including the same menu delivered as a fly out, rollover, drop down, and just about any navigation you can think of. Collaborative ShareBook. Our exclusive book feature allows you to setup a “book” and then authorize individuals to contribute content. Permalinks. All content in SharePress has a permanent or “perma link” associated with it so people can link to it freely without fear of broken links. Apache or IIS, Unix / Linux / BSD / Solaris / Windows / Mac OS X support. Deliver SharePress the way *you* want from the platform *you* decide. Database Independence. We know people wanted to run on any database platform so SharePress is built on top of a database abstraction layer that allows you to run on SQL Server, MySQL, PostgreSQL. Other databases can be supported by writing a supporting database script consisting of fourteen function calls. The script can be written in Perl, Python, AWK, PowerShell, Unix Shell scripts, VBA, or simple DOS batch files. The Team SharePress is the work of a lot of people in both the WordPress and SharePoint community. I worked with a lot of SharePoint MVPs to create this new product as we really wanted to deliver the most compatible and feature rich system in a product that we would be proud of. Many thanks go out to Eli Bleeker, Todd Robillard, Scot Larson, Daniel Hillier, Shane Fox, Box Peran, Amanda English, and Bill Murray for doing the heavy lifting and all of their expertise and innovative thinking to get this product out. Licensing and Pricing SharePress is still in the final stages for pricing but we’re looking at a price point somewhere between $99-$100 to make it affordable for everyone. We plan to announce final pricing sometime in the next few weeks. There are no additional charges for Enterprise versions or additional features. Everything you see is what’s available and it’s just a matter of lighting up your site with whatever feature you want to enable. The product will not be open source but source code licenses will be available to ISVs who are interested in interfacing with the API at a low level. Cost will be $25,000 USD per developer and gives you complete access to the source code to the SharePress Foundation System and the .NET 4.0 Framework source code. Conclusion We hope you enjoy the launch of SharePress as the new premium blogging and content management platform for both Intranets and the Internet. We think we’ve build the best of breed solutions here and made it easy for anyone to get started with a minimal of infrastructure but allow the scalability of SharePress to shine through in the Enterprise 2.0 world. We encourage your feedback so please leave comments as to what you’re looking for in this system as we’re always evolving it to make it a better product for everyone.

    Read the article

1