Search Results

Search found 36 results on 2 pages for 'snorfus'.

Page 1/2 | 1 2  | Next Page >

  • What popular "best practices" are not always best, and why?

    - by SnOrfus
    "Best practices" are everywhere in our industry. A Google search on "coding best practices" turns up nearly 1.5 million results. The idea seems to bring comfort to many; just follow the instructions, and everything will turn out fine. When I read about a best practice - for example, I just read through several in Clean Code recently - I get nervous. Does this mean that I should always use this practice? Are there conditions attached? Are there situations where it might not be a good practice? How can I know for sure until I've learned more about the problem? Several of the practices mentioned in Clean Code did not sit right with me, but I'm honestly not sure if that's because they're potentially bad, or if that's just my personal bias talking. I do know that many prominent people in the tech industry seem to think that there are no best practices, so at least my nagging doubts place me in good company. The number of best practices I've read about are simply too numerous to list here or ask individual questions about, so I would like to phrase this as a general question: Which coding practices that are popularly labeled as "best practices" can be sub-optimal or even harmful under certain circumstances? What are those circumstances and why do they make the practice a poor one? I would prefer to hear about specific examples and experiences.

    Read the article

  • Best practices that you disagree with

    - by SnOrfus
    'Best practices' is a bit of a fuzzy term. Recently I've gone through another wave of self-improvement in my coding practices (mostly brought on by reading Clean Code) and I find that some of the things I disagree with. I'd hate to take things at face value and not think about them critically, but I wonder whether or not my thinking is wrong. So I wonder, what are some best practies or practices that you've seen that many of your peers seem to agree with that you disagree with? For the time being, I'm speaking strictly of coding practices.

    Read the article

  • What should you leave behind for your successors?

    - by SnOrfus
    Assume that you're a sole developer leaving a job. What kind of information/material, outside of the code itself, should you create and leave behind for your replacement? An obvious answer is "whatever you would want at a new job" for sure, but it's been a while since I started a new job, and I forget what the most important things that I needed were back then. I'm thinking: accounts/passwords location of equpiment What else?

    Read the article

  • What should you leave behind for your successors?

    - by SnOrfus
    Assume that you're a sole developer leaving a job. What kind of information/material, outside of the code itself, should you create and leave behind for your replacement? An obvious answer is "whatever you would want at a new job" for sure, but it's been a while since I started a new job, and I forget what the most important things that I needed were back then. I'm thinking: accounts/passwords location of equpiment What else?

    Read the article

  • Need clarification concerning Windows Azure

    - by SnOrfus
    I basically need some confirmation and clarification concerning Windows Azure with respect to a Silverlight application using RIA Services. In a normal Silverlight app that uses RIA services you have 2 projects: App App.Web ... where App is the default client-side Silverlight and app.web is the server-side code where your RIA services go. If you create a Windows Azure app and add a WCF Web Services Role, you get: App (Azure project) App.Services (WCF Services project) In App.Services, you add your RIA DomainService(s). You would then add another project to this solution that would be the client-side Silverlight that accesses the RIA Services in the App.Services project. You then can add the entity model to the App.Services or another project that is referenced by App.Services (if that division is required for unit testing etc.) and connect that entity model to either a SQLServer db or a SQLAzure instance. Is this correct? If not, what is the general 'layout' for building an application with the following tiers: UI (Silverlight 4) Services (RIA Services) Entity/Domain (EF 4) Data (SQL Server)

    Read the article

  • Is .NET WCF worth the effort?

    - by SnOrfus
    Maybe it's me, but I've never encountered nearly as many problems, annoying challenges, indirect error messages and general frustrations with any other technology as I have with WCF. What are the ACTUAL benefits? Not the MS Press Release benefits of 'a unified architecture for something something that's not going to work anyway.' And are those benefits worth the annoying frustrations? I'm normally a big MS fanboy over here, but I just can't get behind WCF.

    Read the article

  • Do most companies not know how to write software?

    - by SnOrfus
    If you're an active reader here, try to think about how many times you've heard (and even agreed) when someone here has told someone else to start looking for a new job. Personally, I've seen it a lot more than I expected: it's almost starting to sound cliche. I get that there are bound to be a number of companies that are bad at developing software or managing a software project, but it almost seems like it's getting worse and more frequent, maybe we're just hearing from them and not all of the places that have decent work atmospheres/conditions. So I ask: In your experience, and through your developer friends do you find that it is common that companies have bad development environments and if so: Why do you think it's common? What do you think could be done to fix it as a developer, as a manager, as an industry? Do you think it's improving?

    Read the article

  • Are there advantages to using a DVCS for a solo developer?

    - by SnOrfus
    Right now, I use visual svn on my server, and have ankhsvn/tortoise on my personal machine. It works fine enough, and I don't have to change, but if I can see some benefits of using a DVCS, then I might give it a go. However, if there's no point or difference using it without other people, then I won't bother. So again, I ask, are there any benefits to using a DVCS when you're the only developer?

    Read the article

  • Do immutable objects and DDD go together?

    - by SnOrfus
    Consider a system that uses DDD (as well: any system that uses an ORM). The point of any system realistically, in nearly every use case, will be to manipulate those domain objects. Otherwise there's no real effect or purpose. Modifying an immutable object will cause it to generate a new record after the object is persisted which creates massive bloat in the datasource (unless you delete previous records after modifications). I can see the benefit of using immutable objects, but in this sense, I can't ever see a useful case for using immutable objects. Is this wrong?

    Read the article

  • What are the canonical problem sets or problem domains for the different types of languages?

    - by SnOrfus
    I'm just wondering what some of the canonical problem sets are for certain types of languages? ie. Fill in the blanks: __ is the perfect language to use for solving __. The question was arrived at reading or hearing people say statements like such and such module in our codebase would be much easier to implement using a functional language. Fee free to include examples that would seem obvious to you.

    Read the article

  • Do immutable objects and DDD go together?

    - by SnOrfus
    Consider a system that uses DDD (as well: any system that uses an ORM). The point of any system realistically, in nearly every use case, will be to manipulate those domain objects. Otherwise there's no real effect or purpose. Modifying an immutable object will cause it to generate a new record after the object is persisted which creates massive bloat in the datasource (unless you delete previous records after modifications). I can see the benefit of using immutable objects, but in this sense, I can't ever see a useful case for using immutable objects. Is this wrong?

    Read the article

  • Best method to organize/manage dependencies in the VCS within a large solution

    - by SnOrfus
    A simple scenario: 2 projects are in version control The application The test(s) A significant number of checkins are made to the application daily. CI builds and runs all of the automation nightly. In order to write and/or run tests you need to have built the application (to reference/load instrumented assemblies). Now, consider the application to be massive, such that building it is prohibitive in time (an entire day to compile). The obvious side effect here, is that once you've performed a build locally, it is immediately inconsistent with latest. For instance: If I were to sync with latest, and open up one of the test projects, it would not locally build until I built the application. This is the same when syncing to another branch/build/tag. So, in order to even start working, I need to wait a day to build the application locally, so that the assemblies could be loaded - and then those assemblies wouldn't be latest. How do you organize the repository or (ideally) your development environment such that you can continually develop tests against whatever the current build is, or a given specific build, while minimizing building the application as much as possible?

    Read the article

  • How do you go about training a replacement?

    - by SnOrfus
    I recently asked about leaving a position and got a lot of great answers. One of the common threads was that being around to train the new person would be expected and could go a long way. Now considering that (I think) most people don't stay at a company for a long time after they've given notice, and it will take time for the company to interview/hire one - that leaves for a short amount of time to get someone up to speed. I've also never trained anyone before. I did a bunch of tutoring in University and College, but teaching a language/technology is far different from training someone to replace you on your job. So the question is: how do you go about training someone to replace you in a, potentially, short amount of time?

    Read the article

  • Does MS Forefront TMG cache authentication?

    - by SnOrfus
    I'm testing a client machine that makes requests to a biztalk server using a forefront machine as a web proxy. Upon first test I put in an invalid name/password into the receive port and received the correct error message (407). Then, I set the correct name/password and everything worked correctly. From there, I kept the correct information in the receive port but put an invalid name/password into the send adapter but the process completed successfully (should have failed with 407). I've ensured that both the recieve and send ports are not bypassing the proxy for local addresses. So the only thing that seems to make sense is if TMG is caching the authentication request coming from the machine I'm working on. Is this thinking correct, and if so, does anyone know how to disable it in TMG?

    Read the article

  • Windows Server 2003 DHCP not handing out IPs

    - by SnOrfus
    I'm trying to setup a home server (to tinker with) as a domain controller. I've setup the domain and I've installed DHCP and setup a scope without any exclusions (with the default range of 192.168.0.1-254). My client machine is a Windows 7 (RC) machine and it has a connection but can't get an IP address. Even if I try setting the IP to a static 192.168.0.2 and there is still no connectivity. I can ping it from the server, but pinging the server from the client just times out. The only thing between the server and the client is a 24 port switch (D-Link DES-1024D). edit Ok, it turned out that the interfaces were setup backwards in the NAT settings (the internal nic connection was set to public and the external nic connection was set to private). I changed this and all was OK.... sort-of. Problem is now: If I set a static ip on the client (where I am typing this from) all is fine. BUT; when I set it to get it from DHCP, I get a correct IP from the server (192.168.0.2) but there is no internet on the client; but I can still ping the server fine from the client (which makes sense cause I was able to get an IP from it). edit I ended up just removing the Routing and DHCP server roles and just going with ICS for the time being until I get my hands on some better learning tools.

    Read the article

  • can't configure openfire

    - by SnOrfus
    I'm trying to setup openfire on one of the servers here and I've gone through the windows installer, installed the service, started the service and I can't connect to the admin console. If I go to http://127.0.0.1:9090 (or http://127.0.0.1/index.html) all I get is a blank page. I also tried running the GUI instead of the service, and it said that it was listening on 127.0.0.1:9090 and when I navigate there or click "launch admin" I still get a blank page. What could be the problem? It's a windows server 2k3 machine with IIS running (runs a couple of other sites). edit openfire 3.6.4 I installed on my local machine without problems, so it's obviously something on the server that's causing it. There is no firewall installed on that server so I'm not sure what would be stopping it.

    Read the article

  • Windows Server 2003 DHCP not handing out IPs

    - by SnOrfus
    I'm trying to setup a home server (to tinker with) as a domain controller. I've setup the domain and I've installed DHCP and setup a scope without any exclusions (with the default range of 192.168.0.1-254). My client machine is a Windows 7 (RC) machine and it has a connection but can't get an IP address. Even if I try setting the IP to a static 192.168.0.2 and there is still no connectivity. I can ping it from the server, but pinging the server from the client just times out. The only thing between the server and the client is a 24 port switch (D-Link DES-1024D). edit Ok, it turned out that the interfaces were setup backwards in the NAT settings (the internal nic connection was set to public and the external nic connection was set to private). I changed this and all was OK.... sort-of. Problem is now: If I set a static ip on the client (where I am typing this from) all is fine. BUT; when I set it to get it from DHCP, I get a correct IP from the server (192.168.0.2) but there is no internet on the client; but I can still ping the server fine from the client (which makes sense cause I was able to get an IP from it). edit I ended up just removing the Routing and DHCP server roles and just going with ICS for the time being until I get my hands on some better learning tools.

    Read the article

  • FileSystemWatcher.WaitForChanged returns, but there is still a lock on the file

    - by SnOrfus
    I have a program that send a document to a pdf printer driver and that driver prints to a particular directory. After the print I want to attach the pdf to an e-mail (MailMessage) and send it off. Right now, I send the document to the printer (wich spawns a new process) and then call a FileSystemWatcher.WaitForChanged(WaitForChangedResult.Created) but when the object is created, it's still not done "printing" and the pdf printer still has a lock on it, throwing an error when I try to attach that file to an e-mail. I've considered a plain Thread.Sleep(2000) or whatever, but that's far less than ideal. I considered putting the attachment code in a try/catch block and looping on failure, but again, that's just bad news. I can't really think of an elegant solution.

    Read the article

  • Reputable TabletPC vendors

    - by SnOrfus
    I'm developing software for tablet pcs and so far I've used some lenovo's (x41), some toshiba's (portege m200) and some gateways (M275). Granted: the machines we've gotten have predominantly been refurbs, but they're failing 80-90% of the time. Part of the reason that they're failing is users inevitably dropping them, so I'm looking at potentially some rugged tablet pcs. The problem that I'm running into is that Current tablet pcs are high spec (much higher than I'm looking for at least) The rugged tablet manufacturer space seems to be filled with lots of small companies that I don't trust yet. I'm looking for tablet PCs (keyboard or no) that can support: XP tpc (optional win 7) single core 1.5-2ghz 1gb ram wifi optional gsm optional gps very optional vehicle docking solutions The budget I've got is tight (but slightly flexible - So are there any reputable tablet pc vendors out there that can do this.

    Read the article

  • Is there CI server software that can do all of this?

    - by SnOrfus
    I'm trying to put together a Continuous Integration server that will do the following: Work with subversion Use NUnit tests (fail build on failed tests) Use partcover (fail build on < X% coverage) Run code against FxCop (fail build on FxCop warnings, given settings) Run code against StyleCop (fail build on StyleCop warnings, given settings) Not as important: Be able to run from a sln file Be able to publish the application (ClickOnce is setup for the project already) I'm using TeamCity right now and it doesn't seem to do 3 or 5, and it doesn't have a runner for the newest NUnit. From the list of plugins that hudson has, it looks like it can do all of these except 3 (and the not as important requests). I've considered writing a plugin for hudons to use partcover, but that's adding more time to setting up a build server.

    Read the article

  • Checking to see if a generic class is inherited from an interface

    - by SnOrfus
    I've got a class that inherits from an interface. That interface defines an event that I'd like to subscribe to in the calling code. I've tried a couple of things, but they all resolve to false (where I know it's true). How can I check to see if a class implements a specific interface. Here's what I've tried (note, the object in question is a usercontrol that implements MyInterface, stored in an array of controls, only some of which implement MyInterface - it is not null): if (this.controls[index].GetType().IsSubclassOf(typeof(MyInterface))) ((MyInterface)this.controls[index]).Event += this.Handler; if (this.controls[index].GetType().IsAssignableFrom(typeof(MyInterface))) ((MyInterface)this.controls[index]).Event += this.Handler; if (this.controls[index].GetType() == typeof(MyInterface)) ((MyInterface)this.controls[index]).Event += this.Handler; All to no avail.

    Read the article

  • Nested flowlayout panel not wrapping

    - by SnOrfus
    I've got a FlowLayoutPanel with properties: Dock = Fill (in a usercontrol) FlowDirection = TopDown WrapContents = false I do it this way so that each item added to the panel gets added to the bottom. The items that I add to this panel are usercontrols which themselves have FlowLayoutPanels on them, however they have the standard behaviour (LeftToRight, WrapContents = true). The problem that I'm having is that the interior usercontrol's FlowLayoutPanel isn't resizing to fill the outer control, but when I set autosizing to true on these controls, then the panel won't wrap its contents - which is a known problem apparently. If it helps visualize what I'm trying to do, it looks like this: ______________________________ | __________________________ | Outer box = exterior flowlayout | |Text____________________| | (TopDown, NoWrap) | | # # # # # # # # # # # #| | | | # # # # | | Interior boxes = usercontrols with text and a | |________________________| | flowlayoutpanel on them | __________________________ | (LeftToRight, Wrap) | |Text____________________| | | | # # # # # # # # # # # #| | # = pictures | | # # | | | |________________________| | |____________________________|

    Read the article

  • Error CS0117: Namespace.A does not contain definition for Interface..

    - by SnOrfus
    I'm getting the error: 'Namespace.A' does not contain a definition for 'MyObjectInterface' and no extension method 'MyObjectInterface' accepting a first argument of type ... I've looked at this and this and neither seems to apply. The code looks like: public abstract class Base { public IObject MyObjectInterface { get; set; } } public class A : Base { /**/ } public class Implementation { public void Method() { Base obj = new A(); obj.MyObjectInterface = /* something */; // Error here } } IObject is defined in a separate assembly, but: IObject is in a separate assembly/namespace Base and A are in the same assembly/namespace each with correct using directives Implementation is in a third separate assembly namespace, also with correct using directives. Casting to A before trying to set MyObjectInterface doesn't work Specifically, I'm trying to set the value of MyObjectInterface to a mock object (though, I created a fake instead to no avail) I've tried everything I can think of. Please help before I lose more hair. edit I can't reproduce the error by creating a test app either, which is why I'm here and why I'm frustrated. @Reed Copsey: /* something */ is either an NUnit.DynamicMock(IMailer).MockInstance or a Fake object I created that inherits from IObject and just returns canned values. @Preet Sangha: I checked and no other assembly that is referenced has a definition for an IObject (specifically, it's called an IMailer). Thing is that intellisense picks up the Property, but when I compile, I get CS0117. I can even 'Go To Definition' in the implementation, and it takes me to where I defined it.

    Read the article

  • Is it possible to searchusing type information in visual studio

    - by SnOrfus
    It comes up from time to time and I'm wondering of it's possible to use type info when searching in visual studio, or is there a plugin that includes this? I'd like to search for the phrase "x == " or "x.ToString();" where x is of type 'Person'. The normal regex searches are strictly searching the text as opposed to the content and I figured out a long time ago that any thought I have is never the first.

    Read the article

  • Testing a method that sends e-mail without sending the mail

    - by SnOrfus
    I have a method like public abstract class Base { public void MethodUnderTest(); } public class ClassUnderTest : Base { public override MethodUnderTest() { if(condition) { IMail mail = new Mail() { /* ... */ }; IMailer mailer = new Mailer() { /* ... */ } mailer.Send(mail); } else { /* ... */ } } } I have unit tests for this method, and the mail gets sent to myself, so it's not terrible (better than no test) but I'd prefer not to send the mail. The problem I have is that I don't want test specific code in the class (ie. if (testMode) return; instead of sending the mail) I don't know lots about DI, but I considered passing a mock IMailer into MethodUnderTest except that it overrides the base class, and no other class that derives from Base needs an IMailer object (I don't want to force implementers of Base to take an unnecessary IMailer in MethodUnderTest) What else can I do? (note: IMail and IMailer are part of an external library for sending e-mail. It's written in house, so I can modify it all I like if necessary, though I can't see a need to in this situation)

    Read the article

1 2  | Next Page >