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  • SSIS Design Patterns Training in London 8-11 Sep!

    - by andyleonard
    A few seats remain for my course SQL Server Integration Services 2012 Design Patterns to be delivered in London 8-11 Sep 2014. Register today to learn more about: New features in SSIS 2012 and 2014 Advanced patterns for loading data warehouses Error handling The (new) Project Deployment Model Scripting in SSIS The (new) SSIS Catalog Designing custom SSIS tasks Executing, managing, monitoring, and administering SSIS in the enterprise Business Intelligence Markup Language (Biml) BimlScript ETL Instrumentation...(read more)

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  • Introducing SSIS Reporting Pack for SQL Server code-named Denali

    - by jamiet
    In recent blog posts I have introduced the new SSIS Catalog that is forthcoming in SQL Server Code-named Denali: What's new in SSIS in Denali Introduction to SSIS Projects in Denali Parameters in SSIS In Denali SSIS Server, Catalogs, Environments and Environment Variables in SSIS in Denali The SSIS Catalog is responsible for executing SSIS packages and also for capturing the metadata from those executions. However, at the time of writing there is no mechanism provided to view analyse and drill into that metadata and that is the reason that I am, in this blog post, introducing a suite of SSIS Catalog reports called the SSIS Reporting Pack which you can download from my SkyDrive at http://cid-550f681dad532637.office.live.com/self.aspx/Public/SSIS%20Reporting%20Pack/SSISReportingPack%20v0.1.zip. In this first release the SSIS Reporting Pack includes five reports: Catalog – A high-level summary of all activity in the Catalog Folders – A summary of activity in each Catalog Folder Folder – Project-level activity per single Folder Executions – A visualisation of all executions per Folder/Project/Package/Environment or subset thereof Execution – Information about an individual execution Here is a screenshot of the Executions report: Notice that the SSIS Reporting Pack provides a visual overview of all executions in the Catalog. Each execution is represented as a bar on the bar chart, the success or otherwise of each execution is indicated by the colour of the bar and the execution time is indicated by the bar height. I have recorded a video that gives an overview of the SSIS Reporting which I have embedded below. If you are having any trouble viewing the video go see it at http://vimeo.com/17617974 I must stress that this is a very early version of the SSIS Reporting Pack and I am expecting it to change a lot over the coming year. I am very keen to get some feedback about this, specifically: let me know if anything does not work as you expect give me your feature requests The easiest way to get hold of of me for now is within the comments section of this blog post. That’s all for now. I hope the SSIS Reporting Pack proves useful and I look forward to hearing your feedback. Lastly, that download link again: http://cid-550f681dad532637.office.live.com/self.aspx/Public/SSIS%20Reporting%20Pack/SSISReportingPack%20v0.1.zip. @jamiet

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  • SSIS packages incompatibilities between SSIS 2008 and SSIS 2008 R2

    - by Marco Russo (SQLBI)
    When you install SQL 2008 R2 workstation components you get a newer version of BIDS (BI Developer Studio, included in the workstation components) that replaces BIDS 2008 version (BIDS 2005 still live side-by-side). Everything would be good if you can use the newer version to edit any 2008 AND 2008R2 project. SSIS editor doesn't offer a way to set the "compatibility level" of the package, becuase it is almost all unchanged. However, if a package has an ADO.NET Destination Adapter, there is a difference...(read more)

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  • Parsing flat files using SSIS : SSIS Nugget

    - by jamiet
    Often when using SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) you will find there is more than one way of accomplishing a task and that the most obvious method of doing so might not be the optimal one. In the video below I demonstrate this by way of an experiment using SSIS’s Flat File Source component; I show different ways that you can pull data from a flat file into the SSIS dataflow and also how the nature of the data itself can influence your choice as to how this task should be accomplished. If you are having trouble viewing the video in your blog reader then head to http://sqlblog.com/blogs/jamie_thomson/archive/2010/03/25/parsing-flat-files-using-ssis-ssis-nugget.aspx to see it as it is hosted on my blog!  The main point I want to get across from this video is that a little bit of creative thinking when building your dataflows can sometimes be very beneficial for performance; quite often building a solution that isn’t the most obvious might actually turn out to be the best one. You’ll notice, if you have watched the video, that my editing skills weren’t quite up to snuff and I cut off the final few words however all I was saying was that if you have any feedback on this video then I would love to hear it either via email or preferably the comments section below. I hope this turns out to be useful to some of you. @Jamiet P.S. Incidentally the parsing that we do using SSIS expressions in the video would be much easier if we had a TOKENISE function in SSIS’s expression language and I have asked for the introduction of such a function on Connect at [SSIS] TOKEN(string, tokeniser_string, occurence) function. Feel free to go and vote that up if you think this feature would be useful! Share this post: email it! | bookmark it! | digg it! | reddit! | kick it! | live it!

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  • SSIS Training 15-19 Oct in Reston Virginia

    - by andyleonard
    Early bird registration is now open for Linchpin People ’s SSIS training course From Zero To SSIS scheduled for 15-19 Oct 2012 in Reston Virginia! Register today – the early bird discount ends 28 Sep 2012. Training Description From Zero to SSIS was developed by Andy Leonard to train technology professionals in the fine art of using SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) to build data integration and Extract-Transform-Load (ETL) solutions. The training is focused around labs and emphasizes a hands-on...(read more)

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  • SSIS Reporting Pack – a performance tip

    - by jamiet
    SSIS Reporting Pack is a suite of open source SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS) reports that provide additional insight into the SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) 2012 Catalog. You can read more about SSIS Reporting Pack here on my blog or had over to the home page for the project at http://ssisreportingpack.codeplex.com/. After having used SSRS Reporting Pack on a real project for a few months now I have come to realise that if you have any sizeable data volumes in [SSISDB] then the reports in SSIS Reporting Pack will suffer from chronic performance problems – I have seen the “execution” report take upwards of 30minutes to return data. To combat this I highly recommend that you create an index on the [SSISDB].[internal].[event_messages].[operation_id] & [SSISDB].[internal].[operation_messages].[operation_id] fields. Phil Brammer has experienced similar problems himself and has since made it easy for the rest of us by preparing some scripts to create the indexes that he recommends and he has shared those scripts via his blog at http://www.ssistalk.com/SSIS_2012_Missing_Indexes.zip. If you are using SSIS Reporting Pack, or even if you are simply querying [SSISDB], I highly recommend that you download Phil’s scripts and test them out on your own SSIS Catalog(s). Those indexes will not solve all problems but they will make some of your reports run quicker. I am working on some further enhancements that should further improve the performance of the reports. Watch this space. @Jamiet

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  • SSIS Catalog, Windows updates and deployment failures due to System.Core mismatch

    - by jamiet
    This is a heads-up for anyone doing development on SSIS. On my current project where we are implementing a SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) 2012 solution we recently encountered a situation where we were unable to deploy any of our projects even though we had successfully deployed in the past. Any attempt to use the deployment wizard resulted in this error dialog: The text of the error (for all you search engine crawlers out there) was: A .NET Framework error occurred during execution of user-defined routine or aggregate "create_key_information": System.IO.FileLoadException: Could not load file or assembly 'System.Core, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089' or one of its dependencies. The located assembly's manifest definition does not match the assembly reference. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131040) ---> System.IO.FileLoadException: The located assembly's manifest definition does not match the assembly reference. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131040) System.IO.FileLoadException: System.IO.FileLoadException:     at Microsoft.SqlServer.IntegrationServices.Server.Security.CryptoGraphy.CreateSymmetricKey(String algorithm)    at Microsoft.SqlServer.IntegrationServices.Server.Security.CryptoGraphy.CreateKeyInformation(SqlString algorithmName, SqlBytes& key, SqlBytes& IV) . (Microsoft SQL Server, Error: 6522) After some investigation and a bit of back and forth with some very helpful members of the SSIS product team (hey Matt, Wee Hyong) it transpired that this was due to a .Net Framework fix that had been delivered via Windows Update. I took a look at the server update history and indeed there have been some recently applied .Net Framework updates: This fix had (in the words of Matt Masson) “somehow caused a mismatch on System.Core for SQLCLR” and, as you may know, SQLCLR is used heavily within the SSIS Catalog. The fix was pretty simple – restart SQL Server. This causes the assemblies to be upgraded automatically. If you are using Data Quality Services (DQS) you may have experienced similar problems which are documented at Upgrade SQLCLR Assemblies After .NET Framework Update. I am hoping the SSIS team will follow-up with a more thorough explanation on their blog soon. You DBAs out there may be questioning why Windows Update is set to automatically apply updates on our production servers. We’re checking that out with our hosting provider right now You have been warned! @Jamiet

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  • SSIS Design Pattern: Producing a Footer Row

    - by andyleonard
    The following is an excerpt from SSIS Design Patterns (now available in the UK!) Chapter 7, Flat File Source Patterns. The only planned appearance of all five authors presenting on SSIS Design Patterns is the SSIS Design Patterns day-long pre-conference session at the PASS Summit 2012 . Register today . Let’s look at producing a footer row and adding it to the data file. For this pattern, we will leverage project and package parameters. We will also leverage the Parent-Child pattern, which will be...(read more)

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  • Learn SSIS from the Authors of SSIS Design Patterns at the PASS Summit 2012!

    - by andyleonard
    Jessica Moss ( blog | @jessicammoss ), Michelle Ufford ( blog | @sqlfool ), Tim Mitchell ( blog | @tim_mitchell ), Matt Masson ( blog | @mattmasson ), and me – we are all presenting the SSIS Design Patterns pre-conference session at the PASS Summit 2012 ! We will be covering material from, and based upon, the book. We will describe and demonstrate patterns for package execution, package logging, loading flat file and XML sources, loading the cloud, dynamic package generation, SSIS Frameworks, data...(read more)

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  • Book Review: SSIS Design Patterns

    - by andyleonard
    Samuel Vanga ( Blog | @SamuelVanga ) has posted a review of our new book SSIS Design Patterns at his blog . Several of Sam’s statements struck me, but none more than this: Within a few hours of reading SQL Server 2012 Integration Services Design Patterns , it stood out that none of the authors were trying to impress by showing what they all know in SSIS. Instead, they focused on describing solutions and patterns in a great detail (exactly why I paid for). Sam mentions he could not locate the source...(read more)

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  • A Review of From Zero To SSIS Training

    - by andyleonard
    I recently (5-9 Mar 2012) delivered my five-day SSIS training course – From Zero To SSIS! – in London. The class was delivered in collaboration with TechniTrain . I must commend Chris Webb ( blog | @Technitrain ) and Helen Lau on their leadership, professionalism, and attention to detail. They made the course a breeze for the students and the instructor! It was a pleasure and privilege to work with them. In addition to people just learning data integration, this class contained several experienced...(read more)

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  • Introducing sp_ssiscatalog (v1.0.0.0)

    - by jamiet
    Regular readers of my blog may know that over the last year I have made available a suite of SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS) reports that provide visualisations of the data in the SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) 2012 Catalog. Those reports are available at http://ssisreportingpack.codeplex.com. As I have built these reports and used them myself on a real life project a couple of things have dawned on me: As soon as your SSIS Catalog gets a significant amount of data in it the performance of the reports degrades rapidly. This is hampered by the fact that there are limitations as to the SQL statements that I can embed within a SSRS report. SSIS professionals are data guys at heart and those types of people feel more comfortable in a query environment rather than having to go through the rigmarole of standing up a reporting server (well, I know I do anyway) Hence I have decided to take a different tack with the reporting pack. Taking my lead from Adam Machanic’s sp_whoisactive and Brent Ozar’s sp_blitz I have produced sp_ssiscatalog, a stored procedure that makes it easy to get at the crucial data in the SSIS Catalog. I will spend the rest of this blog explaining exactly what sp_ssiscatalog does and how to use it but if you would rather just download the bits yourself and start to play you can download v1.0.0.0 from DB v1.0.0.0. Usage Scenarios Most Recent Execution I find that the most frequent information that one needs to get from the SSIS Catalog is information pertaining to the most recent execution. Hence if you execute sp_ssiscatalog with no parameters, that is exactly what you will get. EXEC [dbo].[sp_ssiscatalog] This will return up to 5 resultsets: EXECUTION - Summary information about the execution including status, start time & end time EVENTS - All events that occurred during the execution OnError,OnTaskFailed - All events where event_name is either OnError or OnTaskFailed OnWarning - All events where event_name is OnWarning EXECUTABLE_STATS - Duration and execution result of every executable in the execution All 5 resultsets will be displayed if there is any data satisfying that resultset. In other words, if there are no (for example) OnWarning events then the OnWarning resultset will not be displayed. The display of these 5 resultsets can be toggled respectively by these 5 optional parameters (all of which are of type BIT): @exec_execution @exec_events @exec_errors @exec_warnings @exec_executable_stats Any Execution As just explained the default behaviour is to supply data for the most recent execution. If you wish to specify which execution the data should return data for simply supply the execution_id as a parameter: EXEC [dbo].[sp_ssiscatalog] 6 All Executions sp_ssiscatalog can also return information about all executions: EXEC [dbo].[sp_ssiscatalog] @operation_type='execs' The most recent execution will appear at the top. sp_ssiscatalog provides a number of parameters that enable you to filter the resultset: @execs_folder_name @execs_project_name @execs_package_name @execs_executed_as_name @execs_status_desc Some typical usages might be: //Return all failed executions EXEC [dbo].[sp_ssiscatalog] @operation_type='execs',@execs_status_desc='failed' //Return all executions for a specified folder EXEC [dbo].[sp_ssiscatalog] @operation_type='execs',@execs_folder_name='My folder' //Return all executions of a specified package in a specified project EXEC [dbo].[sp_ssiscatalog] @operation_type='execs',@execs_project_name='My project', @execs_package_name='Pkg.dtsx' Installing sp_ssicatalog Under the covers sp_ssiscatalog actually calls many other stored procedures and functions hence creating it on your server is not simply a case of running a CREATE PROCEDURE script. I maintain the code in an SQL Server Data Tools (SSDT) database project which means that you have two ways of obtaining it. Download the source code You can download the latest (at the time of writing) source code from http://ssisreportingpack.codeplex.com/SourceControl/changeset/view/70192. Hit the download button to download all the source code in a zip file. The contents of that zip file will include an SSDT database project which you can open up in SSDT and publish just like any other SSDT database project. You can publish to a new database or any existing database, even [SSISDB] if you prefer. Download a dacpac Maintaining the code in an SSDT database project means that it can all get packaged up into a dacpac that you can then publish to your SQL Server. That dacpac is available from DB v1.0.0.0: Ordinarily a dacpac can be deployed to a SQL Server from SSMS using the Deploy Dacpac wizard however in this case there is a limitation. Due to sp_ssiscatalog referring to objects in the SSIS Catalog (which it has to do of course) the dacpac contains a SqlCmd variable to store the name of the database that underpins the SSIS Catalog; unfortunately the Deploy Dacpac wizard in SSMS has a rather gaping limitation in that it cannot deploy dacpacs containing SqlCmd variables. Hence, we can use the command-line tool, sqlpackage.exe, instead. Don’t worry if reverting to the command-line sounds a little daunting, I assure you it is not. Simply open a Visual Studio command-prompt and cd to the folder containing the downloaded dacpac: Type: "%PROGRAMFILES(x86)%\Microsoft SQL Server\110\DAC\bin\sqlpackage.exe" /action:Publish /TargetDatabaseName:SsisReportingPack /SourceFile:SSISReportingPack.dacpac /Variables:SSISDB=SSISDB /TargetServerName:(local) or the shortened form: "%PROGRAMFILES(x86)%\Microsoft SQL Server\110\DAC\bin\sqlpackage.exe" /a:Publish /tdn:SsisReportingPack /sf:SSISReportingPack.dacpac /v:SSISDB=SSISDB /tsn:(local) remembering to set your server name appropriately (here mine is set to “(local)” ). If everything works successfully you will see this: And you’re done! You’ll have a new database called [SsisReportingPack] which contains sp_ssiscatalog:   Good luck with sp_ssiscatalog. I have been using it extensively on my own projects recently and it has proved to be very useful indeed. Rest-assured however, I will be adding many new capabilities in the future. Feedback is welcome. @Jamiet

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  • SSIS Snack: Data Flow Source Adapters

    - by andyleonard
    Introduction Configuring a Source Adapter in a Data Flow Task couples (binds) the Data Flow to an external schema. This has implications for dynamic data loads. "Why Can't I...?" I'm often asked a question similar to the following: "I have 17 flat files with different schemas that I want to load to the same destination database - how many Data Flow Tasks do I need?" I reply "17 different schemas? That's easy, you need 17 Data Flow Tasks." In his book Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Integration Services...(read more)

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  • SSIS 2012 Moving and Resizing

    - by andyleonard
    Occasionally someone will email or post a comment about how all MVPs are Microsoft shills. I’m sure I enjoy those comments about as much as the Developer Teams at Microsoft. Let me start by saying that’s simply not true. In fact, it is completely off the mark – at least when it comes to the MVPs I know and with whom I interact. If anything, we are Microsoft’s harshest critics. Just last week, I sent someone at Microsoft an email with the following complaint (paraphrased): I do not like chasing down...(read more)

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  • Should we be able to deploy a single package to the SSIS Catalog?

    - by jamiet
    My buddy Sutha Thiru sent me an email recently asking about my opinion on a particular nuance of the project deployment model in SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) 2012 and I’d like to share my response as I think it warrants a wider discussion. Sutha asked: Jamie What is your take on this? http://www.mattmasson.com/index.php/2012/07/can-i-deploy-a-single-ssis-package-from-my-project-to-the-ssis-catalog/ Overnight I was talking to Matt who confirmed that they got no plans to change the deployment model. For example if we have following scenrio how do we do deploy? Sprint 1 Pkg1, 2 & 3 has been developed and deployed to UAT. Once signed off its been deployed to Live. Sprint 2 Pkg 4 & 5 been developed. During this time users raised a bug on Pkg2. We want to make the change to Pkg2 and deploy that to UAT and eventually to LIVE without releasing Pkg 4 &5. How do we do it? Matt pointed me to his blog entry which I have seen before . http://www.mattmasson.com/index.php/2012/02/thoughts-on-branching-strategies-for-ssis-projects/ Thanks Sutha My response: Personally, even though I've experienced the exact problem you just outlined, I agree with the current approach. I steadfastly believe that there should not be a way for an unscrupulous developer to slide in a new version of a package under the covers. Deploying .ispac files brings a degree of rigour to your operational processes. Yes, that means that we as SSIS developers are going to have to get better at using source control and branching properly but that is no bad thing in my opinion. Claiming to be proper "developers" is a bit of a cheap claim if we don't even do the fundamentals correctly. I would be interested in the thoughts of others who have used the project deployment model. Do you agree with my point of view? @Jamiet

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  • SSIS Reporting Pack update

    - by jamiet
    Its been a while since I last posted anything in regard to SSIS Reporting Pack, the most recent release being on 27th May 2012, so here is a short update. There is still lots of work to do on SSIS Reporting Pack; lots more features to add, lots of performance work to be done, and a few bug fixes too. I have also been (fairly) hard at work on a framework to be used in conjunction with SSIS 2012 that I refer to as the Restart Framework (currently residing at http://ssisrestartframework.codeplex.com/). There is still much work to be done on the Restart Framework (not least some useful documentation on how to use it) which is why I haven’t mentioned it publicly before now although I am actively checking in changes. One thing I am considering is amalgamating the two projects into one; this would mean I could build a suite of reports that both work against the SSIS Catalog (what you currently know as “SSIS Reporting Pack”) and also against this Restart Framework thing. No decision has been made as yet though. There have been a number of bug reports and feature suggestions for SSIS Reporting Pack added to the Issue Tracker. Thank you to everyone that has submitted something, rest assured I am not going to ignore them forever; my time is at a premium right now unfortunately due to … well … life… so working on these items isn’t near the top of my priority list. Lastly, I am actively using SSIS Reporting Pack in a production environment right now and I’m happy to report that it is proving to be very useful. One of the reports that I have put a lot of time into is execution executable duration.rdl and its proving very adept at easily identifying bottlenecks in our SSIS 2012 executions: The report allows you to browse through the hierarchy of executables in each execution and each bar represents the duration of each executable in relation to all the other executables; longer bars being a good indication of where problems might lie. The colour of the bar indicates whether it was successful or not (green=success). Hovering over a bar brings up a tooltip showing more information about that executable. Clicking on a bar allows you to compare this particular instance of the executable against other executions. Please do let me know if you are using SSIS Reporting Pack. I would like to hear any anecdotes you might have, good or bad. @Jamiet

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  • SSIS Denali as part of “Enterprise Information Management”

    - by jorg
    When watching the SQL PASS session “What’s Coming Next in SSIS?” of Steve Swartz, the Group Program Manager for the SSIS team, an interesting question came up: Why is SSIS thought of to be BI, when we use it so frequently for other sorts of data problems? The answer of Steve was that he breaks the world of data work into three parts: Process of inputs BI   Enterprise Information Management All the work you have to do when you have a lot of data to make it useful and clean and get it to the right place. This covers master data management, data quality work, data integration and lineage analysis to keep track of where the data came from. All of these are part of Enterprise Information Management. Next, Steve told Microsoft is developing SSIS as part of a large push in all of these areas in the next release of SQL. So SSIS will be, next to a BI tool, part of Enterprise Information Management in the next release of SQL Server. I'm interested in the different ways people use SSIS, I've basically used it for ETL, data migrations and processing inputs. In which ways did you use SSIS?

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  • Upgrade SSIS 2005 Packages to SSIS 2008

    There are several enhancements in SSIS 2008 such as enhanced lookup transformation, the development environment for Script Task and Script Component changing from VSA to VSTA, etc. If you intend to upgrade your SSIS 2005 packages to SSIS 2008 ... [Read Full Article]

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  • The current state of a MERGE Destination for SSIS

    - by jamiet
    Hugo Tap asked me on Twitter earlier today whether or not there existed a SSIS Dataflow Destination component that enabled one to MERGE data into a table rather than INSERT it. Its a common request so I thought it might be useful to summarise the current state of play as regards a MERGE destination for SSIS. Firstly, there is no MERGE destination component in the box; that is, when you install SSIS no MERGE Destination will be available. That being said the SSIS team have made available a MERGE destination component via Codeplex which you can get from http://sqlsrvintegrationsrv.codeplex.com/releases/view/19048. I have never used it so cannot vouch for its usefulness although judging by some of the reviews you might not want to set your expectations too high. Your mileage may vary.   In the past it has occurred to me that a built-in way to provide MERGE from the SSIS pipeline would be highly valuable. I assume that this would have to be provided by the database into which you were merging hence in March 2010 I submitted the following two requests to Connect: BULK MERGE (111 votes at the time of writing) [SSIS] BULK MERGE Destination (15 votes) If you think these would be useful feel free to vote them up and add a comment. Lastly, this one is nothing to do with SSIS but if you want to perform a minimally logged MERGE using T-SQL Sunil Agarwal has explained how at Minimal logging and MERGE statement. @Jamiet

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  • Join the Authors of SSIS Design Patterns at the PASS Summit 2012!

    - by andyleonard
    My fellow authors and I will be presenting a day-long pre-conference session titled SSIS Design Patterns at the PASS Summit 2012 in Seattle Monday 5 Nov 2012! Register to learn patterns for: Package execution Package logging Loading flat file sources Loading XML sources Loading the cloud Dynamic package generation SSIS Frameworks Data warehouse ETL Data flow performance   Presenting this session: Matt Masson Tim Mitchell Jessica Moss Michelle Ufford Andy Leonard I hope to see you in Seattle!...(read more)

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  • Presenting Loading Data Warehouse Partitions with SSIS 2012 at SQL Saturday DC!

    - by andyleonard
    Join Darryll Petrancuri and me as we present Loading Data Warehouse Partitions with SSIS 2012 Saturday 8 Dec 2012 at SQL Saturday 173 in DC ! SQL Server 2012 table partitions offer powerful Big Data solutions to the Data Warehouse ETL Developer. In this presentation, Darryll Petrancuri and Andy Leonard demonstrate one approach to loading partitioned tables and managing the partitions using SSIS 2012, and reporting partition metrics using SSRS 2012. Objectives A practical solution for loading Big...(read more)

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  • Presenting Loading Data Warehouse Partitions with SSIS 2012 at SQL Saturday DC!

    - by andyleonard
    Join Darryll Petrancuri and me as we present Loading Data Warehouse Partitions with SSIS 2012 Saturday 8 Dec 2012 at SQL Saturday 173 in DC ! SQL Server 2012 table partitions offer powerful Big Data solutions to the Data Warehouse ETL Developer. In this presentation, Darryll Petrancuri and Andy Leonard demonstrate one approach to loading partitioned tables and managing the partitions using SSIS 2012, and reporting partition metrics using SSRS 2012. Objectives A practical solution for loading Big...(read more)

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  • MicroTraining: Executing SSIS 2012 Packages 22 May 10:00 AM EDT (Free!)

    - by andyleonard
    I am pleased to announce the latest (free!) Linchpin People microtraining event will be held Tuesday 22 May 2012 at 10:00 AM EDT. The topic will be Executing SSIS 2012 Packages. In this presentation, I will be demonstrating several ways to execute SSIS 2012 packages. Register here ! Interested in learning about more microtraining from Linchpin People – before anyone else? Sign up for our newsletter ! :{>...(read more)

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  • MicroTraining: Executing SSIS 2012 Packages 22 May 10:00 AM EDT (Free!)

    - by andyleonard
    I am pleased to announce the latest (free!) Linchpin People microtraining event will be held Tuesday 22 May 2012 at 10:00 AM EDT. The topic will be Executing SSIS 2012 Packages. In this presentation, I will be demonstrating several ways to execute SSIS 2012 packages. Register here ! Interested in learning about more microtraining from Linchpin People – before anyone else? Sign up for our newsletter ! :{>...(read more)

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  • T-SQL Tuesday: Aggregations in SSIS

    - by andyleonard
    Introduction Jes Borland ( Blog | @grrl_geek ) is hosting this month's T-SQL Tuesday - started by SQLBlog's own Adam Machanic ( Blog | @AdamMachanic ) - and it is about aggregation. I thought I'd show a couple ways to do aggregation using SSIS. The Aggregate Transformation in SSIS The Aggregate transform in SSIS is fast . I built an SSIS package (AggregateScripts.dtsx) with two Data Flow Tasks (Using the Aggregate Transform and Using a Script Component). Using the Aggregate Transform looks like this:...(read more)

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